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 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00067
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00067
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


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6ateete ?iotm 74e 6amftc'4 ,


U/F Alumni


WHY THIS MESSAGE:
-~~ ir-c LUroi rr,r if
F .:r-d 3. 1 -, .3 Sra hr :. 3ri

C.3ii. fr,.n, hnNc ,..,ID


l~.Loan Funij Tl,., d..


t.). :iF-.I Fr, r~ L.- J. r.r.: r V.-,


- Everywhere!


* Your University needs $90,000. That sum is required
to provide funds on a matching basis so students at your
University can take advantage of the National Defense
Loan Fund established by the U. S. Government. For each
dollar from the University the NDLF will allocate nine
to provide a revolving fund of almost a million dollars to
help struggling students complete their education.

* The U/F student body has pledged its help to raise
some $20,000 of the sum needed. Students are looking to
you alumni for the remaining $70,000. A gift from each
of you will reach the goal-and every dollar thus donated
is tax deductible.

* There is no better season than this to help your Uni-
versity-and there's no better reason for helping your
University than to make sure that some fine, up-and-
coming youngster gets the loan he needs in time to help
him over the rough financial spots on the road to a college
degree. And who knows-maybe the boy your dollars aid
today will be serving your business later with the skill
and knowledge you helped make it possible to acquire.

* Remember your own college days. If you had a rocky
financial path to walk-give so others may find the going
easier. And if things went smooth and fine for you-give
so that others can avoid some of the frustrations and
heartbreaks you didn't know existed.



MAKE A NEW YEAR'S PLEDGE
Write a check today to:
University of Florida Endowment Corp.
And send it promptly to:
University Alumni Association; P. 0. Box 3535
University Station, Gainesville, Fla.


WELCOME THIS OPPORTUNITY TO HELP















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JANUARY, 1960


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Florida Architect

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



Io 74i Iaee ---


Letters . . . . . .
Tile Contractors' Design Award . . . .
Regional Committee Chairmen . . . .
Study of The Theory of Architecture . . .
By Walter Raymond, University of Florida
Success in The Sixties . . . . . .
By John Stetson, FAA President
FAA Merit Award 1959 Convention . . .
The Chapter Presidents Speak:


Florida North . .
Daytona Beach . .
Palm Beach . .
Jacksonville . .
Florida North West .
Florida South . .
Florida Central . .
Mid-Florida . .
Florida North Central
Broward County .


News and Notes .
Advertiser's Index .
United Effort Can Reach The Goal .
Editorial By Roger W. Sherman

F.A.A. OFFICERS 1960
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Verner Johnson, First Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Second V.-Pres., Room 208, Security Bldg., Gainesville
Robert B. Murphy, Third Vice-President, 1210 Edgewater Drive, Orlando
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Treasurer, Suite 209, 233 E. Bay Street, Jacksonville

DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Jack W. Zimmer; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Ernest J. Stidolpjh; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: W. Stewart Morrison; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, H. Samuel
Kruse, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: A. Robert Broadfoot, A. Eugene
Cellar, Taylor Hardwick; MID-FLORIDA: Charles L. Hendrick, Robert B.
Murphy; PALM BEACH: Kenneth Jacobson, George J. Votaw.

Verna M. Sherman, Administrative Secretary, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami

COVER
Last fall first year students at the College of Architecture and Fine Arts, U/F,
undertook, as one of their sketch problems, the design of a cover for The
Florida Archiect. Many of the designs were so good that a number have been
selected for use during 1960. This is the first of this new cover series. It was
developed by Gene Redding and involves use of reverse-plate typography and
two colors in addition to black.


. . 4
. 6




. 13

. 14


. . By James T. Lendrum .
. . By David A. Leete . .
. . By Donald R. Edge . .
. . By W. Stanly Gordon .
. . By Bernard W. Hartman.
. . By C. Robert Abele .
. . By A. Wynn Howell .
. . By James E. Windham, III
. . By Lawrence B. Evans .
. . By William F. Bigoney, Jr.


. 19
. 20
. 20
. 21
. 21
. 22
. 23
. 24
. 27
. 28
. 30


. . 31
. . 32




The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
Editor-Publisher


VOLUME 10

NUMBER 1 1960

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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Trinity White Portland Cement makes
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JANUARY, 1960

























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Letters


As the U/F Moves Ahead
EDITOR, FA:
I have just seen the December issue
of The Florida Architect and want to
express to you and the members of
your organization my deep apprecia-
tion for the page given to the "Dollar
for Scholars" drive at the University
of Florida. We feel that it was most
generous of you to provide this public
notice for your association, and we
are most grateful for this and other
support that you have given the Uni-
versity of Florida in the past.
The fine response of individuals
and groups like yours is a source of
great encouragement as the Unviersity
moves ahead in its program.
J. WAYNE REITZ, President
University of Florida
Note: Read-and respond to-the
same message on the inside front cover
of this issue.

Re Needs in Gainesville . .
EDITOR, FA:
Just wanted to drop you this short
note to offer you sincerest congratu-
lations for your fine article that ap-
pears in the December issue of The
Florida Architect. I sincerely trust
that this open letter to Florida's next
Governor will in large measure have
a lot to do with getting things in mo-
tion for their needs at Gainesville.
I want to say thanks too for send-
ing me the material on the FAA Con-
vention together with a list of those
in attendance there. Your thoughtful-
ness is most appreciated.
GEORGE W. JONES, JR.
Florida Solite Corporation

House Problem Again . .
EDITOR, FA:
Though a visitor to Florida for
many years. I have just recently be-
come a permanent resident. I am now
living in an apartment, but wish
shortly to move into a home of my
own. Toward that end I have been in-
vestigating the housing situation in
and around Dade County-and even
farther into the midstate east coast,
and the central area around Sebring
and Lake Placid.
I find that it is almost impossible
to consider anything but what is pop-
ularly called a "project" house for the


money that I can afford to pay. This
is in the neighborhood of $18,000 to
$20,000. Architects to whom I have
talked take no apparent interest in
houses of this price class. And the
project builders offer nothing but
standardized models-which may sat-
isfy the needs and tastes of average
buyers, but do not sufficiently meet
the desires of my wife and myself.
What can be done about this situa-
tion? Does not the architectural pro-
fession have any interest in the possi-
bility of improving the design and
livability of the small house? Are spec-
ulative or development builders so cal-
lous that they will entertain no other
ideas than those which have been
"standard" throughout the country
for the past thirty years? Is it not pos-
sible for an individual like myself to
obtain a custom-designed small house
without having to pay premiums for
both the architectural design and the
construction of it?
It seems to me that this is a prob-
lem which the architects of Florida
should be most interested in solving.
I do not believe I am too great an
exception to the rule. I am sure that
many house-hunters are like me -
looking for something which is geared
to a special set of requirements and
tastes, but unable to pay for the extra
services which apparently are neces-
sary to obtain them.
Couldn't your architectural associa-
tion develop some sort of a small
house service organization to provide
adequate professional aid to persons
like myself?
HORACE B. ANDREWS
Note: You outline a problem of the
architectural profession for which
there is, at present, no overall answer.
Many fine architects are interested
in doing small houses on an individual
basis and have produced outstanding
results. Others have been working
with development, or merchant,
builders; and this latter activity is in-
creasing in scope throughout the
state. But it must be admitted that
so far the FAA has not developed any
organized program to make competent
architectural services available on an
overall basis for people who, like your-
self, have a high standard of taste
linked to a modest pocketbook.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






6For omar Speeiccatioe ies . .


NWMA Door Guarantee Revised for'60


All doors produced by members of the National Woodwork
Manufacturers Association, Inc. are guaranteed by the manu-
facturer for one year from date of shipment by the manufacturer
to be of good material and workmanship, free from defects which
render them unserviceable or unfit for the use for which they
were manufactured. Natural variations in the color or texture
of the woor are not to be considered as defects.
Doors must be accorded reasonable treatment by the
purchaser. Doors muest be stored or hung in dry buildings
and never in damp, moist or freshly plastered areas. Doors
must not be subjected to abnormal heat, dryness or hu-
midity. The utility or structural strength of the door must
not be impaired in the fitting of the door, the application
of hardware, or cutting and altering the door for lights,
louvres, panels and any other special details. When solid
core and hollow core flush doors are cut for lights or lou-
vers, the portion between the cut out area and the edge
of the door shall not be less than 5 inches wide at any
point; and the cut out area shall not exceed 40% of the
area of the face of the door; and in addition the cut out
area of a hollow core door shall not exceed half the height
of the door and shall be suitably prepared. Immediately
after fitting, the entire door including top and bottom
edges must receive two coats of paint, varnish or sealer
to prevent undue absorption of moisture. The manufac-
turer will not assume responsibility for doors which become
defective because of failure to follow these recommenda-
tions or for hazards of shipment or storage after the doors
leave the control of the manufacturer.
Doors must be inspected upon arrivel for visible defects
and all claims or complaints based thereon must be filed
immediately and before the doors are hung and before
the first coat of painter's finish is applied.
The manufacturer agrees to repair or replace in the
white, unfitted, and without charge, any door found to be
defective within the meaning of this guarantee.
Doors must not be repaired or replaced without first
obtaining the consent of the manufacturer.
A warp or twist of not to exceed 14 inch shall not be
considered a defect.

INTERPRETATION OF WARP OR TWIST
"A warp or twist of not to exceed 14 inch shall not
be considered a defect." This refers to any distortion in the
door itself and not its relationship to the frame or jamb


in which it is hung. Therefore, a warp or twist exceeding
4 inch shall be considered a defect only:

1. When warp is determined by applying a straight
edge to the concave face of the door, or

2. When twist is determined by placing the face of
the door against a true plane subject. A simple
device to determine and measure "twist" may be
made by placing two cross-members on a post, one
about orr height and the other slightly above the
floor. The cross-members must be perfectly straight,
and true and plumbed into perfect alignment.

The guarantee against warp or twist does not apply to the
following:
a. 1/4" or thicker doors that are wider than 3'6" or higher
than 8'0".
b. 11/8" and 138" thick doors that are wider than 3'0" or
higher than 7'0".
c. Doors with face veneers of different species.
d. Doors that are improperly hung or do not swing freely.




IMPORTANT NOTE:

The NWMA Standard Door Guarantee applies only to
Ponderosa Pine and Hardwood Veneered Doors manu-
factured by members of the National Woodwork
Manufacturers Association. It has, however, become
accepted as a minimum standard by the construction
industry . Door guarantees of some manufacturers
substantially exceed the NWMA Standard Guarantee.
For example, that covering IPIK Solid Core DOORS
exceeds this Standard as to both time and size limi-
tations . The Guarantee on IPIK DOORS extends
for a two-year period and covers all sizes up to four
by ten feet in a one and three-quarters inch thickness,
but otherwise embodies all the contigent provisions of
the NWMA Standard Door Guarantee printed here . .
This NWMA document was revised in October, 1958,
and is reproduced here as convenient and ready
reference for architects and specification writers.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.

71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI - FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto . Call Palmetto 2-1011


JANUARY, 1960


















































G GEORGE C.

GRIFFIN O.
4201 St. Augustine Road
P.O. Box 5151, Jacksonville, Florida









Beuy0.. asig au


Tile Contractors' Design Award ...


The Tile Contractors' Association
of America will hold its convention
in Jacksonville May 8 through 13,
1960, and has scheduled May 11 as
"Architects' Day." As part of a spc-
cial afternoon program an award of
$1,000 and a suitable plaque will be
presented to an architect whose tile
design has been judged best.
Competition for this prize winning
design is open to all members and as-
sociates of the FAA and their employ-
ees. Entries must be sent to: Tile
Contractors' Association of America,
Design Competition, 764 May Street,
Jacksonville 4; and all must be post-
marked not later than midnight, April
15, 1960. Submissions will be
screened by a jury of three Jackson-
ville architects for final judgment by
a jury of two architects and Kenneth


D. Earle, president of the TCAA.
Designs maybe either proposed or
installed, but must be for installation
by a tile contractor. A tile design for
application by precast stone fabricat-
ors, for example, would not be accept-
able. Otherwise the winning design
will be selected on the basis of the
most imaginative and practical use of
all types of ceramic or glass tile.
Entries must be submitted on one
or more illustration boards, 18 by 24
inches. Each should include: an ex-
planatory plan at suitable scale; sec-
tion and details sufficient to explain
application and installation; suitably
scaled elevations; a rendered presenta-
tion or photograph; and specification
descriptive of materials, sizes, colors,
etc., and method of installation.
(Continued on Page 31)


Regional Committee Chairmen 1960


AIA/AGC
JOHN STETSON, P. 0. Box 2174,
Palm Beach, Florida.
AIA PRODUCERS COUNCIL
VERNER JOHNSON, 250 N. E. 18th
Street, Miami, Florida.
AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
WAHL J. SNYDER, JR., FAIA, 1177
N. E. 79th Street, Miami, Florida.
BUILDING CODES
WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR., 2520
East Las Olas Boulevard, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.
CHAPTER AFFAIRS
TAYLOR HARDWICK, 764 May
Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
DISASTER CONTROL
ERNEST T. BOWEN, II, 2910
Grand Central Avenue, Tampa.

EDUCATION
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, Room
208, Security Bldg., 1105 W. Uni-
versity Avenue, Gainesville, Fla.
FEES AND CONTRACTS
IRVIN KORACH, 1630 Lenox Ave-
nue, Miami Beach, Florida.
HOSPITALS AND HEALTH
WALTER SCHULTZ, Box 4817,
Jacksonville 1, Florida.


INDEX TO ARCHITECTURAL
INFORMATION
JAMES T. LENDRUM, Department
of Architecture, University of Flo-
rida, Gainesville, Florida.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
EDWIN T. REEDER, 1114 Dupont
Plaza Center, Miami, Florida.
OFFICE PRACTICE
ROBERT H. LEVISON, 425 South
Garden Avenue, Clearwater, Fla.
PRESERVATION
HISTORIC BUILDINGS
BELFORD W. SHOUMATE, 222
Plaza Circle, Palm Beach, Florida.
THE PROFESSION
H. SAMUEL KRUSE, 811 Chamber
of Commerce Bldg., Miami, Fla.
PROFESSIONAL INSURANCE
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Suite 8,
Professional Center, Winter Park.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
EDWARD G. GRAFTON, 2575 South
Bayshore Drive, Miami.
RESEARCH
TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA, 229
S. W. 42nd Street, Gainesville.
SCHOOLS AND
EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES
C. ELLIS DUNCAN, P. 0. Box 695,
Vero Beach, Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






* *.<. ~ 4-, 0M:b


General Telephone Company building, Durham, N. C.
PRUDEN & SCOTT, A.I.A., Durham, N. C., Architects;
W. H. GARDNER & ASSOCIATES, Durham, N. C., Structural Engineers;
F. N. THOMPSON, INC., Raleigh, N. C., General Contractors.


AT HOME...
General Telephone Company's new office build-
ing near Durham, N. C., is a sleek, modern struc-
ture containing 46,000 square feet of floor space.
It occupies a five acre site and features a split-
level design (generally two stories). That makes
it seem perfectly at home on its sloping lot. An
excellent example of modern building ingenuity,
the building has a frame of steel and reinforced
Solite lightweight structural concrete. All sus-
pended floor and roof systems are also con-
structed of Solite lightweight concrete, formed
with removable steel pans.
In this case, Solite-1/3 lighter than ordinary


Wherever you find imaginative and
effective new construction techniques
at work you are apt to find Solite.
It is a natural choice for building.


concrete-was selected for its ability to provide
maximum spans with minimum depth of section.
Solite's fire resistance was also an important
consideration, providing a fire rated floor and
roof system at a low competitive cost. Fire re-
sistant, self insulative Solite lightweight mas-
onry units were also used in the building.
Solite-for lightweight structural concrete
and lightweight masonry units-is widely used
in such outstanding projects. Its many inherent
advantages and full compatability with all
building techniques and materials make it a
natural choice for good building.





LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS
AND STRUCTURAL CONCRETE


WHATEVER YOU BUILD-The professional advice of an architect or engineer can save
you time and money-and provide the integrity of design that means lasting satisfaction.


JANUARY, 1960







bON


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Study of The Theory of Architecture...


The study of architecture requires
the systematic organization and the
orderly presentation of the facts and
principles which define the nature
of architecture. The theory of archi-
tecture is the discipline which pro-
vides for this organization and presen-
tation. As an all-encompassing study,
the theory of architecture should serve
as an integrating medium through
which all aspects of architecture may
be brought together at any level of
the student's development. Since all
architectural activity implies the use
of theory-as the systematic organiza-
tion of facts and principles-without
it we are prey to the latest dogma,
the current cliche, and are unable to
distinguish between fad and true ar-
chitecture. This is truly chaos and
confusion.
We test, therefore, the student's
understanding of theory at each level
of design. Frequently, theory has been
presented as an informal accompani-
ment of design. But this must be con-
sidered as too casual in approach, for
the subject as a whole then becomes
dependent upon the limited oppor-
tunity presented by individual design
problems. There must be a more care-
fully devised presentation of archi-
tectural theory rather than to permit
this to take place informally as an
accompaniment to design criticism.
Our approach has been, therefore, to
provide areas of instruction in theory
running parallel with the development
of the student in design. The first
course in theory logically deals with
the elements of architectural design.
At a time when the student is faced
with a need for finding architectural
expression of simple problems, the
course is directed to extending an
understanding of the character of dif-
ferent kinds of space-abstract and
concrete-and the various means of
defining space with geometrical ele-
ments. He is made aware of how the
definition of space will vary with re-
gard to the individual or groups; with
the desire to attain a certain scale or
proportion; with use and need; with
furnishings and equipment; and fin-
ally, with individual or group psy-
chological reactions.
He is then introduced to the man-
JANUARY, 1960


By WALTER RAYMOND
Professor of Architecture,
U/F College of Architecture and Fine Arts


On December 4 an all-day Seminar was conducted by the
Faculty of the U/F College of Architecture and Fine Arts. To it
had been invited all FAA officers and directors and all presidents
of all Florida AIA Chapters. Attendance of FAA members was
disappointingly small. Only fifteen heard various faculty members
present the instructional policies and programs of the College.
But those attending were impressed with the basic approach
to the educational problem, with the sound analysis offered as
a background to curricula, with the competence and dedication of
College personnel and with the evidence of high-quality results
which are being obtained .. . . This article is one of several
presentations made by faculty members. Others will follow. ...


ner in which these elements arc
brought together into a physical com-
position which will not only provide
an esthetic expression of form, but
will also place some emphasis on the
special character required for the
building as demanded by its purpose
and use. Though these basic consider-
ations have primary application to the
building element, they are necessarily
extended in scope to include, not only
the immediate surrounding areas, but
this scope is gradually broadened to
reach the utmost limits of its poten-
tial implication.
With this background the student
is equipped to undertake a study of
building types so that he can bring
to bear a better understanding on the
variety of problems he is called upon
to face in architectural design. As al-
ways, we try to introduce a new study
and approach into an area in which
the student has his own greatest per-
sonal experience. So the introduction
of building types begins with residen-
tial buildings. Starting with the single
family house, the scope is increased
to include row housing, garden apart-
ments, city apartment houses, finally
including hotels, dormitories, and in-
stitutional homes.
The basic approach to all these
types is first through an understand-
ing of time and place-the urgency
to appreciate the needs generated by
the conditions of present time and of
specific location. The type-study is
then discussed in order to bring into


focus the manner by which particular
physical, psychological, cultural and
social needs develop individual pro-
grams and condition the design ap-
proach. With this background estab-
lished, we can enter into fruitful dis-
cussion of the particulars: site rela-
tionships, room relationships, group
relationships, the effect of climate, the
influence of materials, the structural
and constructional considerations.
Progressing from the individual
homes to group housing and others,
additional influences are noted
which bear on the program, such as
land utilization, transportation and
traffic, the relationship of the hous-
ing unit to the immediate surround-
ing area and to the community as a
whole. We wish him to become aware
that housing is not merely an isolated
speculative venture, but an integral
part of community life with a specific
function to perform and a specific
relationship to maintain.
Having undertaken a survey of
residential building from the simp-
lest housing unit to the complex
structures indicated, we feel the stu-
dent is ready to examine the full
range of building types which will
familiarize him with the wide variety
of architectural effort. In this course,
the third of the series, the specific
building types which come under dis-
cusion are buildings for commerce and
industry; religious buildings; buildings
for health, for transportation, for
(Continued on Page 10)







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Theory of Architecture ...
(Continued from Page 9)
recreation; governmental buildings;
and, monumental buildings.
In these discussions, a wide range
of general principles and factors are
brought to his attention. Examina-
tion is made of planning elements
in the analysis of building require-
ments, whether for single buildings or
large scale group planning of build-
ings by a study of the functional, the
structural, the esthetic, and the in-
tegrated approach; by a study of ma-
terials and their effect on architectural
design; of structural systems and their
effect on design of one story and
multi-story buildings; of building types
in relation to land use problems and
locations. Finally, realizing the in-
creasing importance to the student in
his development of his ability for self-
criticism, critical evaluation of the ex-
amples under consideration form an
important element in this area of
study.
Having set before the student the
elements of architectural design and
posed the problems of the various
building types, it is important now to
place before him the problem of es-
thetics in a systematic manner. He
must become acquainted with the
principles of beauty, style, and taste.
The constantly changing ideas of
beauty are first discussed on a chrono-
logical basis in order to show the grad-
ual development leading up to modern
concepts, emphasizing those based on
universally accepted principles ob-
tained by intellectual processes. At-
tention is then directed to the change
affected by modern sensualism which
depends upon psychological reactions,
but which poses the difficulty of pre-
senting these reactions within an or-
derly statement of principles. In dis-
cussing style we try to show how it
is created when the individual imparts
a unique quality of architectural ex-
presion to a building, and how this
individual style can become an his-
toric style when the similarities of
individuals can be grouped together
to exhibit this unique quality in a
recognizable fashion.
Finally attention is centered on
taste as an interpretation of beauty
according to the intellectual and cul-
tural criteria of the time. And empha-
sis is placed on developing an under-
standing of the difference between


taste and fashion. Whereas taste is a
valid interpretation, fashion repre-
sents a deteriorating influence on ar-
chitectural development with its
constant repetition of imitated forms
without constructive thought-which
eventually must seek to revitalize it-
self by the addition of something
novel and which finally results in
forms of decoration without purpose,
in increased license and in inevitable
reaction.
The courses in the theory of archi-
tecture to this point have dealt with
the elements and principles of func-
tion, of structure, and of esthetics.
We are interested, however, in one
other phase of theory, which is to
acquaint the student with his heritage
of architectural thought-that history
of ideas which rest on the philosophi-
cal conception of the nature of archi-
tecture. So with the mature student,
in the final course in theory, we sur-
vey the literature of architectural
theory.
We consider this literature to be
that body of material which has been
preserved to us through the ages of
our Western civilization and which
forms our heritage of the continuing
contemplative thought concerned
with creative efforts in the arts and
architecture. Our examination starts
with the Hellenic age, for ideas not
recorded are lost forever; and it was
the Greeks who first created and per-
fected the art of literature. This ex-
amination is carried out in chronologi-
cal fashion to the time of Le Corbu-
sier and the Bauhaus. These writings
can be examined with the calm reflec-
tion granted to us by the passage of
time. The contemporary scene is too
chaotic, the writings too polemic, if
not wholly propagandistic, to provide
food for truly contemplative thought.
We believe that the examination pro-
vided will furnish to the student a
competent base from which he can
pose the questions which must be
posed before he can arrive at funda-
mental truths.
These courses in the theory of ar-
chitecture are of particular import-
ance to us, because in theory, in the
history of architecture, and in the
study of community planning, we have
the greatest opportunity to provide for
the cultural development of the stu-
dent, so vitally important to him, so
that he may assume his proper place
in our professional confraternity.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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JANUARY, 1960




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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







74e ?WA P ardent LdooS to 1960...


Success in The Sixties

By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


The Florida Association of Archi-
tects enters a new decade dedicated
to public service, service to the pro-
fession and service to the Institute.
These, noteworthy as prerequisites to
fellowship in the American Institute
of Architects, should be a guide to the
individual member and to the Associa-
tion as a whole. Public service, while
representing service to others, actu-
ally is bread cast upon the waters-
returning itself tenfold. Let us look
at 1960 through these three service
portals in respect to the activities to
be assumed by you as a working mem-
ber and the Association as a working
organization.


Public Service
As members, your active participa-
tion on municipal boards, worthy
charity drives, committees for civic
improvements, youth and old age or-
ganizations, professional guidance
clinics working with schools and adult
groups, and active church affiliation
can tremendously raise your standing
in the esteem of the community and
add to the reputation of the profes-
sion. Additionally, the personal satis-
faction gained through such service is
most worthy of consideration.
The Association during 1960 should
seek ways and means of cooperating
with other organizations, schools and


political subdivisions in programs
aimed at the artistic improvement of
the individual, community and state
as a whole. We must realize and be
conscious of the general lack of ap-
preciation of the arts too often found
in the average community. Finding
and setting a cultural goal for our
State could make Florida unique in
the future as an area of refinement
in a growing chaotic morass of artis-
tic depreciation.

Service to the Profession
Our greatest service to the profes-
sion is in raising our personal stand-
ards to the highest possible peak.
Sometimes it seems we suffer from a
mountainous inferiority complex
which, though self-inflicted, threatens
to destroy the very thing we hold
most dear in our business world. In
almost every land but ours the archi-
tect is the number one professional
(Continued on Page 19)


1960 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters


BROWARD COUNTY:
President- William F Eigone\ Jr
Vice President Robert E Hansen
Secretary Victor A Larson
Treasurer ... James M HartleN


DAYTONA BEACH
President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer_ _. _ -
FLORIDA CENTRA
President_- -_
\ ice President_
Secrerar
Treasurer-
FLORIDA NORTH:
President
Vice Presider-t _
Secrerar _
Treasurer .
FLORIDA NORTH
President t
Vce President.
Secretary\ -Treasurer


Da~id A Leete
Edwin M Snead
Ralph F Spicer
Ernest H Nor:


__ A W,,nn Howell
_ -Mark G Hampton
Herbert L Walker
_-Jack S McCandless

James T Lendrum
M',rl J Hanes
Thomas Larric:.
__ Gordon S Johnson
CENTRAL:
La%.rence B E\ans
Prentiss Huddleston
_ -.Chester Lee Craft


FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
President Bernard W. Hartman Jr
Vice President ___ .__Sam M Marshall
Secre tar. Ellis W Bullock Jr
Treasurer ...__ _ Ror' L Ricks
FLORIDA SOUTH:
President_ C Roberr Abele
Vice President _. John Grimshaw
Secretary, _. _ _. Ogden K Ho-ustoin, Jr
Treasurer Howard M Dunn
JACKSONVILLE:
President _ __ W Stan Gordon
V\'ice President __l\an H Sm',th
Secrerar\ .. .. Albert L Smith
Treasurer .__ Cecil B Burns
MID-FLORIDA:
President ___ James E Windharn III
\'ice President Fred G O%%les, Jr.
Secretary. __ John T Hart
Treasurer George A Tuttle Jr
PALM BEACH:
President _.. .. Donald R. Edge
Vice President Harold A Obst
Secretary, . C Ellis Duncan
Treasurer . Reed B Fuller


JANUARY, 1960







FAA Merit Award



MUNICIPAL BUILDING, The
ically, th
St. Petersburg Beach expandii
administ
Chambe
WILLIAM B. HARVARD, AIA, room.
Solu;
Architect, an entry
BLANCHARD E. JOLLY, AIA, two and
Associate, The oth
ALLAN RUDOLPH, municip
has beer
Project Architect ,,,- -


-- 1959 Convention



building was planned to satisfy, efficiently and econom-
te need for governmental facilities of a relatively small, but
ig municipality. These include office spaces for municipal
ration, a police department, an area for use by the local
r of Commerce, and a combined meeting hall and court

tion to the problem embodies two elements, separated by
nce walkway. The northwest wing is the smaller of the
houses the police department and Chamber of Commerce.
er includes the meeting room, governmental offices and
al departments arranged around a common lobby. Provision
1 made for expansion of these facilities toward the south-
n necessary.


'F [- -
I i ii
I I

L,--- r -I
.[I I

;iT----_ ...
I I I
,L I I
-.L L .

00000


- ~ '~r
'C.,---


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



































. I1#


All photos by William G. Amick


Above, detail of the entrance walk sep-
arating the two elements shown in the
general view of the building on the op-
posite page. In the background is Boga
Ceiga Bay. The building is set some 25
feet from the bay and faces it toward
the northeast. Left, view of administrative
areas from the lobby. Offices are ranged
on the right, the combined meeting hall
and court room on the left.


JANUARY, 1960


ASK




















rfl[


4
*
I.


-1.
I-

S'T

'fl* tiff


11 tT-w


City manager's office and conference area occupies the southeast corner of the building and is easily
accessible to all other administrative and municipal department areas. All exterior glass walls are pro-
tected by diamond-shaped lattice of concrete blocks, a detail of which is shown on the opposite page,
top. Illustrated also on the opposite page is the dias end of the combination meeting and court room.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















































































JANUARY, 1960










mJIallHeJ


FOR:


STRENGTH


PERMANENCE


. FIRE RESISTANCE


.. ECONOMY


I


q SPEED OF ERECTION

. FLEXIBILITY


N AVAILABILITY


WAR~DS


Photograph courtlri of Florida
Prestressed Concrete Co.. Inc.


The iri.,i ,iiFki :rir. ie&' \ ,:,'ti ,_,)iiery
\\aid t,-,.re in St. Pi:.tirsbLirg iS
another impressive example of the
use of prestressed concrete units.


We salute these Florida manufac-
turers! As pioneers in the develop-
ment of prestressed concrete, their
progressiveness and vision have
resulted in the creation of a new,
superior structural unit that is in
ever increasing demand.


Si'StiS .. "'"'**-*,, tE;; t; tt..s;
01"'-'S ^ /.'> .:f* -^ ^


BAMMAN PRECAST CONCRETE CORPORATION, Hollywood
BRANNEN, INC., Sarasota
CAPITOL CONCRETE CORPORATION, Jacksonville
DURA-STRESS, INC., Leesburg
DUVAL ENGINEERING & CONTRACTING CO., Jacksonville
WELL ENGINEERING AND CONTRACTING CO., Lakeland
FINFROCK INDUSTRIES, INC., Orlando
FLORIDA LITH-I-BAR, INC., Miami
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC., Tampa
JUNO PRESTRESSORS, INC., West Palm Beach
LEWIS MANUFACTURING CO., INC., Miami
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC., Miami
PERMA-STRESS, INC., Holly Hill
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC., Lakeland
SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC., Pensacola
WEST COAST SHELL CORPORATION, Sarasota
R. H. WRIGHT, INC., Ft. Lauderdale


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA


* TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Success in The Sixties . .
(Continued from Page 13)

man. A recent survey conducted in
one of our largest cities by a widely
circulated national weekly indicated
our profession to be considered num-
ber one in its responsibility to the
public. The man on the street
thought this to be true. Why don't
you?
Fee cutting, inadequate design and
planning, poor working drawings,
lack of knowledge of methods and
materials hurt you individually, yes;
but they also hurt the entire profes-
sion and each one of its members.
We are cursed with too rapid growth,
too few really well organized archi-
tectural firms, too many one-man
offices, and as yet unstable statewide
economy. It is only natural for the
newly-registered architect to desire a
break-away from a firm where he is
employed as a draftsman and seek an
immediate opening of his own office.
It is natural because it happens to
be a local condition. Too often it
results in a lower net income to a




Florida


North


By JAMES T. LENDRUM
President


We in the Florida North Chap-
ter of the AIA expect the year 1960
to be a good one. It is very easy
to key our year's operation to the
FAA program for 1960, as outlined
by President John Stetson in the
December, 1959 Florida Architect.
In fact, a number of the twelve ob-
jectives outlined by the President
seemed directly related to our own
Chapter and the activities of its indi-
vidual members.
The composition of the member-
ship of our Chapter differs greatly
from other small chapters. Almost
two-thirds of our members are em-
ployed by the State of Florida. Five,
including two of the state employees,
live out of our district. Only nine
JANUARY, 1960


man than that he would have re-
ceived had he affiliated himself with
a larger firm. This disservice to the
profession and to the individual tends
to snowball. Hence our lower drafting
room salaries, lower fees and too
often lower standards of practice than
other areas.
Let us encourage the formation
of more complete firms, dedicated to
the best possible service to our clients
-and by so doing render a real serv-
ice to the profession and the client.
We should not forget that our every
motion reflects on the esteem with
which we are held by the public
(our clients).

Service to the Institute
Now that we are a District (or
Region if you prefer) of the American
Institute of Architects, we owe a duty
to this august body. The rules and
regulations, plans and programs which
have been set for us, all bear a pur-
pose. As no one of the fifty states
can stand alone politically, neither
can we as a state organization divorce
ourselves from our parent organiza-


practicing architects are members of
the chapter, five of these are in
Gainesville and of these, one teaches
part time.
Such a distribution of membership
with its resulting specialized interest
in some fields, the lack of interest in
others and the financial limitations
because of salaries could easily bring
a feeling of isolation and result in
lack of interest in the state or national


tion. The Institute is looking at Flo-
rida because of our many achieve-
ments in the past. If we are to con-
tinue to climb in the estimation of
the membership, then our service
must not decline in intent or volume,
but must increase. We have appointed
many of you as District Committee
Chairmen, thereby automatically ele-
vating you to National Committee
membership. Through you we can
best serve the Institute-don't let us
down.
Let us start the Sixties determined
to make ARCHITECTURE Florida's
number one profession. Your Associa-
tion officers cannot do this alone, but
need the help of every one of you
as individuals. Become interested in
the work of your chapter if you
haven't before. As for all of you "old,
reliable workhorses," we're counting
on you again. We expect great things
from ROGER SHERMAN in his new
capacity as Editor-Publisher of The
Florida Architect. When we obtain a
new executive director we will expect
a great deal from him too. In the
meantime, VERNA SHERMAN will be
carrying the burden of the office work.


program. Fortunately, this is not the
case this year.
Since many of us are directly re-
lated to the University, the three
points on the President's program
relating to the Department of Archi-
tecture are singularly welcome. The
desire to continue a close association
with the Department of Architecture,
to both faculty and students, and
the desire to assist in obtaining a new
building for the College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts, are in reality
programs helping us directly.
It has been well accepted that an
architect's education is divided into
three distinct parts. First is the five-
year academic program which at Com-
mencement leads to a Bachelors de-
gree. The second portion of an archi-
tect's education is the period of can-
didacy or period of transition. This
is the architect-in-training program.
We have encouraged this as a Chap-
ter; and we welcome the addition of
this project as part of the FAA pro-
gram for 1960. This architect-in-
training program is a vital one during
a period in which the theories learned
in school are often seen in practice
(Continued on Page 20)






Florida North . .
(Continued from Page 19)
for the first time. Only by sympathet-
ic understanding on the part of the
practicing architect can this be made
an effective part of the young archi-
tect's continuing education.
The third portion of an architect's
education begins at the time he be-
comes a registered architect and
should continue throughout his en-
tire active professional life. Here
again, we find it very easy to throw
our wholehearted support and enthu-
siasm behind the FAA project for
continuing seminars.
With half or more of the total
"planks in the platform" of the FAA
reflecting actual special projects of our
own Chapter, it is simple to predict
that the year will find Florida North
Chapter taking a stronger and more
vigorous part in the state association's
activities, and throwing all abilities,
enthusiasm and resources at our dis-
posal behind the state program.


Daytona


Beach


By DAVID A. LEETE
President



Headlining the activities of the
Daytona Beach Chapter for the year
1960 will be the work of the Com-
mittee on Urban Renewal and City
Planning in suggesting renewal of our
downtown areas and further coopera-
tion with the city planning board on
our new city plan and zoning ordi-
nance.
We have started and will expand
our Architect in Training program and
hold seminars at the monthly meet-
ings.
Having a large number of Univer-
sity of Florida graduates in our Chap-


ter, the FAA can rest assured of our
interest and cooperation in getting
the new building for the University of
Florida School of Architecture.
We welcome the July Board meet-
ing and wish to inform all members
and guests that there will be plenty
of entertainment as well as work while
you are with us.


Palm Beach



By DONALD R. EDGE
President




In order to gain that measure of
public identification needed by pro-
fessional organizations to make them-
selves felt within and without, we
hope to promote "AIA" as a symbol
both of ability and of duty. Essen-
tially, the accomplishing of this will
be the gross aim of our program for
the year.
1960 might well be the kickoff year
for the Palm Beach Chapter. We have
gone through a period of disinterest
and through a period of spring train-
ing and build-up. This past year Ken
Jacobson has put the word "organiza-
tion" back into the Chapter vocabu-
lary and we hope to continue in that
direction.
This year the Public Relations
Committee will be charged with the
formation of a C h a p t e r speakers'


bureau, and with the preparation of
an architectural exhibit. Two big jobs
these-both of which originated in
the past.
Through our architect-founded and
mightily expanded Joint Cooperative
Committee we'll continue mutual
effort with others of similar interest
to work toward better communities
in our area, and better conditions
within the building family. At the
same time we'll urge more direct
architectural participation on civic
boards and committees. We do this


mutually by offering such services to
the communities and by encouraging
architects to accept the additional
load.
Except through the medium of this
magazine, our membership has been
ill informed of the value of the Flor-
ida Association in our working lives.
An overnight awakening would be an
achievement indeed. A more logical
aim would be the stimulation of in-
terest in the FAA by relating the
statewide approach to local issues.
This we will attempt.
Dwindling interest in the Chapter
by both our senior members and our
junior members is a major problem
with us. Loss of attendance is the
direct result. We hope that by tack-
ling a stimulating program and even
controversial problems that we can
rekindle the fire in the one group
and build it under the other.
In the end the only way the Chap-
ter, the FAA, the AIA, can accom-
plish their goals is through contribu-
tion of their members' abilities
and by repaying this contribution of
individual effort with results that are
attainable only through group effort.
The aiming of this contribution and
the showing of its results shall be the
avowed goal of this administration.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Jacksonville


By W. STANLY GORDON
President




The Jacksonville Chapter looks for-
ward to a year filled with opportuni-
ties to serve both our community and
profession. 1959 has been an active
and fruitful year. It was necessary
that much of our efforts, particularly
those of our past President, be direc-
ted towards planning of the FAA
Convention. The many hours devoted
to this task were not without reward.
We are more aware of the opportuni-
ties, problems, and procedures of our
State association. With Roy Pooley
serving as Treasurer and as a member
of the FAA Executive Committee,
we should not experience the "com-
munications" difficulties which have
precipitated misunderstanding in re-
cent years. Freed of the responsibility
of serving as hosts to the convention,
we can now turn our major efforts
toward serving our community and
profession locally.
The architectural profession does
not receive the recognition warranted
here in Jacksonville. Service to the
community, combined w it h good
public relations, can in time correct
this situation. Creating goodwill and
respect for our profession must be our
primary goal in the next few years.
We should assume a position of
leadership in securing Metropolitan
Planning and a County Building
Code. We should support all com-
munity cultural projects such as the
Festival of the Arts. Whenever our
experience and background qualify us,
we must speak out on civic issues and
make certain that our members serve
on all appropriate civic committees.
We can publicize our profession and
our membership by showing our
recently acquired film, "Designing a
Better Tomorrow," to all high schools
and other interested groups. We
should strive to make our exhibit of
members' work at the Art Museum
the outstanding show of the year.
Our new Executive Committee is
pledged to efficient meetings. We are
JANUARY, 1960


Alp


looking for ways to strengthen our
standing committees and insure their
action. We will expect a planned pro-
gram of activities for the year from
each committee. The quality of our
Chapter meetings have improved
immeasurably in recent years, but we
are not satisfied. We can increase
attendance by offering more attrac-
tive programs. We have neglected our






Florida


Northwest


By BERNARD W. HARTMAN
President


Here in Northwest Florida, prob-
ablb the most important job for the
Chapter (and for all architects) is
that of public relations. Too many
of the people in this area are inade-
quately or inaccurately informed as to
the true nature, cost and value of the
architectural services. The usual mis-
conceptions concerning architects are
entirely too prevalent; generally, our
services are thought of as a "luxury"
and our professional advice often is
placed on a par with (or beneath)
that of many persons who are much


Associate members and must find
ways of bringing them more actively
into Chapter affairs. We have tended
to forget the advantage of meeting
our professional associates on a social
basis.
For several years we have worked
towards the development of a Sched-
ule of Minimum Recommended Fees.
This project is one we should cer-
tainly complete within the year. Our
Ethical Practices Committee, with
the Chapter Vice-President as Chair-
man, should become one of our most
active committees. We have come to
realize that selective membership is
the most practical way to make AIA
standards work. The Executive Com-
mittee will continue its practice of
interviewing each prospective cor-
porate and associate member. These
interviews are appreciated by the
prospective members, and they help
to insure active participation by new
members. As in other areas of the
State, we are plagued with illegal
practice of architecture. One of our
goals shall be to cooperate more fully
with the State Board of Architecture
in curbing these practices.
The combined efforts of all our
members will insure a year of service
and growth for our Chapter.


less well qualified than we. A by-prod-
uct of such misguided thinking is the
popular belief that the "cheapest"
services are almost always the best
"bargain" and will "save" the client
the most money. Unfortunately,
(Continued on Page 22)

































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A Problem


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now .


Florida Northwest ...
(Continued from Page 21)
these views are, in many cases, held
by educated and/or influential people.
It is my earnest desire to promote
a Chapter-sponsored public relations
program and to encourage each indi-
vidual architect to take a more active
interest in civic affairs and public
speaking. Locally, we need to strive
constantly to provide more expert,
complete and responsible services and
to discourage partial and inadequate
work even though it is performed for
partial fees. Every step we take should
be calculated to elevate the status of
the architect in the community. A
prime effort of our Chapter program
will be directed toward improving our
newspaper relations and coverage. A
principal feature of my plan is to ob-
tain from the Octagon a series of
appropriate articles, to re-write them
as necessary to add to local reader in-
terest, and to induce the newspapers
to run them as a public information
service, telling the story of the archi-
tect and his value to the community.



Florida


South



By C. ROBERT ABELE
President



The close of 1959 has brought
forth many written words extolling
the accomplishments and failures of
the past decade. We, in the Florida
South Chapter, are more interested
in the plans for the next decade.
These next ten years should see the
Florida District become one of the
strongest forces in the American In-
stitute of Architects. The Florida
South Chapter proposes to be a leader
in this maturation.
During the "Fifties" the chapter
grew from 130 to 222 corporate mem-
bers. Our monthly meetings have 90
to 100 members in attendance. The
annual "Craftsmen's Award" dinner
was attended by over 350 members


and guests. Due to such active par-
ticipation, we have seen our members
appointed to practically every civic
board and committee in Dade
County. We intend to extend this
sphere of influence to every phase of
community endeavor.
In addition to our work within the
Institute, we plan to de ve 1op a
stronger bond between all members
of the construction industry. The
membership stands ready and capable
to assume this leadership.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I hope that this coming year will
see even closer cooperation between
our group and the A.G.C. We now
are starting the research necessary to
prepare for a "joint frontal attack" in
an effort to convince city and county
commissioners of the value of and
need for more strict enforcement
of the Adopted Building Code and
related ordinances in the interest of
the public health and safety.
Other features of my program in-
clude research into architectural of-
fice costs per man-hour and profes-
sional fees. I hope that we will be
able to come up with a minimum fee
schedule this year.
Probably every incoming President
has a hatful of big ideas and schemes,
and I'm no exception. But my term
will be a grand success if only one
goal is achieved that goal is to see
each member of our Chapter taking a
more active, dedicated interest in our
affairs and doing everything in his
power to advance the status of the
architect to his rightful place as the
"master builder" and a leader in his
community.


... how to get needed

heat economically


az3~i






The chapter has just completed one
year with an executive secretary, Mrs.
Norman Skeels, and we all owe her
our he art fel t thanks. We also
acquired, during the past year, a legal
advisor and public relations counselor.
The three attend our executive com-
mittee meetings and chapter meet-
ings. They have already been of
invaluable assistance, and we look
forward to our first full year under
this guidance.
Our 1960 program also includes-
1. Cooperation with Metropolitan-
Dade County Government, par-
ticularly the Planning Commis-
sion.
2. Assisting the University of Flor-
ida in every way possible to obtain
a building for the School of Archi-
tecture at Gainesville.
3. Development of our public rela-
tions throughout the State.
4. Continuing our program of bring-
ing new and qualified men into
the organization.
In addition to the above, we plan
full cooperation with the Florida
Association of Architects, and the
other chapters throughout the State.


Florida


Central


By A. WYNN HOWELL
President



It has been said that one strong
man is a force and two strong men
an army. Think what a powerful army
there might be in the 164 members
of the Florida Central Chapter! This
great potential army is made up of
two Fellows, 93 Corporates, 45 Asso-
ciates and 24 J u nio r Associates.
Strength herein is certainly not in
numbers, but in the individual
strength of each working together
with the whole army.
Our Chapter covers a very large and
diversified area of our great and
rapidly growing State. Such an area
needs and demands a diversity of
talent and participation on the part


of those very persons whose training
and aspiration and courage fit them to
stimulate and mold the hopes and
aspirations of those who make up our
villages, towns and cities. Not every
local problem is necessarily peculiar
to the entire Chapter area; but there
are many common problems, oppor-
tunities and challenges. In all of our
(Continued on Page 24)


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JANUARY, 1960






Florida Central...
(Continued on Page 23)
communities the architects must be,
to best fulfill their responsibilities as
professionals, men of vision, integrity
and enquiry. Opportunities for seeing
tasks at hand are everywhere.
Once the tasks are seen, a real and
vital integrity is required for any service
to be honorable and worth the time
expended. Then, as we progressively
fulfill our tasks, we must look ahead
to seek and to learn what our greatest
and noblest hopes and aspirations may
be. If we can lead, rather than be led,
then can the total culture be raised
to greater heights. To serve and to
create for today alone is not enough.
The goal is not even in sight; but we
must enquire-and honestly enquir-
ing, we may find.
In our Chapter there is a wide
diversity of talent and skill. May we
therefore devote ourselves to the task
of timeless creation rather than resort
to fashion, plagiarism and trash. There
is, after all, a distinction between
permanent and good work and that
which is purely fashionable.


Many young men in our offices
often ask why they should become
members of the Chapter-what good
does the Institute do; what can I get
out of it; why pay dues when we
don't get anywhere? These men,
whether they be Associates or Junior
Associates, need and expect some sup-
port; they want to be challenged even
as they challenge us. Let us remem-
ber for ourselves and show to those
about us that it is not so much what
we can get as what we can give. It
may well be worth many reminders
to ourselves that before we can do,
we must be. If we really can be
deserving of the appelation of pro-
fessional, we may well have answered
some of the younger man's questions.
To myself and to the other 163
members of the Florida Central Chap-
ter, I call attention to the words of
the late Edward Bok's Grandmother,
"Make you the world a better place
because you have lived in it." The
question for everyone will then not be
what can I get this year from my
membership, but what can I contri-
bute? For before we get, we must
give; before can do, we must be!


Mid-Florida



By JAMES E. WINDHAM, III
President



The architectural profession in the
Central Florida area is beset by
many problems which are undoubt-
edly universal to the profession, but
of which we seem to have more than
our share-such as low public esteem,
draftsmen's and designers' offices,
stock plan business, fee cutters, "seal
salesmen", lack of cooperation of
municipalities in regard to state law
enforcement, and above all a some-
what general atmosphere of apathy on
the part of many-but not all-of
the members of the profession to take
any concrete steps toward correcting
the situation. Granted a few strides
have been taken in the right direc-
tion, a few injunctions obtained, etc.
But in general these have been over-


ORCHID ISLE BUILDERS, Contractor

THE RICHARD PLUMER COMPANY, Decorator


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


























shadowed by ever increasing adversity
and resistance.
We are, of course, in the midst of
a period of tremendous expansion and
most of the offices are reasonably busy
although not nearly as busy as they
could, or should, be. Under these con-
ditions it is unfortunately a human
characteristic to take things as they
come, ignore the problems and let
the future take care of itself. Now,


however, I feel is just the time for us
to really pitch in and work as a unit
to overcome some of these problems
so that when things do slow down
again we will be in a much more
favorable position, particularly in re-
gard to public relations.
We are somewhat further ham-
pered in achieving this goal in that we
have relatively few members in our
Chapter; and as in any organization
only a small part of these are willing
to really work toward such an intan-
gible goal as "raising the standards
and standing of the profession as a
whole." In view of this, it is my inten-
tion as president of our Chapter to
concentrate and guide the efforts of
these few during the year along the
lines I feel the most progress can be
made and the most good done for our
profession.
Specifically, I intend to attempt to
concentrate this effort under the work
of the Public Relations, Office Prac-
tices, Chapter Affairs and Relations
w i t h t h e Construction Industries
Committees of the Chapter, and to
set up specific and attainable goals for
each of these committees so that they


will have something concrete to work
with. Another area in which we hope
to make progress is Chapter-F.A.A
-State Board-National Organiza-
tion intercommunication and coordi-
nation of effort-particularly in the
field of establishing policies which can
be interpreted without ambiguity or
reservation and handled on a chapter
level in regard to ethical practices and
other related matters.
Above all, I hope that we will be
able to achieve a unity of purpose
among the members of our chapter
so that the thinking and actions of
the individual members of the Chap-
ter will become more in terms of
what is good for "us" instead of
"me". This, of course, can only be
accomplished through the coordinated
efforts of all of the members; and re-
sults will show each member that in
the long run what is best for the
profession as a whole is also best for
the individual.
I do not, of course, expect to
achieve all of this in one short year,
but I do hope to be able to set the
machinery in motion toward achieving
this goal.


SBU SS,.INTERIORS


RICHARD PLUMER

BUSINESS INTERIORS.INC.


155 Northeast Fortieth Street, Miami, Florida


JANUARY, 1960














































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Florida North Central


By LAWRENCE B. EVANS
President

As I look forward to 1960 and my
job as President of the North Central
Chapter, I am compelled to again ask
myself a question which all architects
have surely asked at least once in
their careers. Why AIA? What is it?
What does it accomplish? What are
its goals? Why should I be a part
of it?
I think now is the time for this
Chapter to answer these questions in-
dividually and collectively and reap-
praise its position in the profession
and the State Organization.
To quote from a brochure pub-
lished by the Octagon: "The objects
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects shall be to organize and unite in
fellowship the Architects of the Unit-
ed States for the purpose of promot-
ing the esthetic, scientific, and prac-
tical efficiency of the profession; to
advance the science and art of plan-


~!
N.


/
0'


ning and building by advancing the
standards of architectural education,
training, and practice; to coordinate
the building industry and the profes-
sion of Architecture to insure the
advancement of the living standards
of our people through their improved
environment; and to make the pro-


fession of ever-increasing service to
society."
Answers to the first four questions
are self evident in the above quota-
tion; but the answer to the fifth,
"Why should I be a part of it?" lies
with each individual member.
Each of us are confronted almost
daily with public apathy to good de-
sign, general ignorance as to the func-
tions of the Architect, illegal practice
and indifferent workmanship by the
building trades. I am confident that
we can meet and solve these prob-
lems, but only if each individual
member of this Chapter is willing to
assume the responsibility inherent in
being a member of the American In-
stitute of Architects.
During 1959 we had fairly good
attendance at our monthly meetings.
But during 1960 we shall strive to
increase our membership and reach
a 100% attendance at all meetings.
This would be an excellent start to-
ward our goals, but the enthusiasm
and energy required for any program
of activity must be generated by you,
the individual member, if we are to
achieve anything for the good of the
profession.


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JANUARY, 1960


















D)


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Depend on Members of

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HEATING & PIPING
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Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
Airko Air Conditioning Company
Cawthon, Dudley M., Inc.
Central Roof & Supply Co.
Conditioned Air Corporation
Domestic Refrigeration
Giffen Industries, Inc.
Hamilton, Sam L., Inc.
Hill York Corporation
McDonald Air Conditioning
Miami Air Conditioning
Mliami Super Cold, Inc.
Poole & Kent Coupany
Srdeo Corporation
Zack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
SUPPLIERS
A & B Pipe & Gen. Sheet Metal
Steel Co. & Roofing
Air Filters Co. Condods Corporation
Airtemp Div. Graves Refrigeration
Chrser Corporation Joe Middleton and Co.
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Brophy, Ceorge ,
Clark Equipmient Co. Thermo Air
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Broward


County

By WILLIAM F. BIGONEY, JR.
President

We plan a three-fold program for
the year:
.. hosting the convention;
. improving the quality of our
architectural services;
... closing the gap between
architect and community.
The convention will engage our
continuing effort through the year.
Our major activities will be planned
around its theme, which is THE PAR-
TICULAR ARCHITECTURE OF OUR CLI-
MATE. We will attempt to create
interest in all chapters with articles
relating to this subject throughout
the year. We will try to get members
in other chapters to present papers
in The Florida Architect on various
facets of this theme-control of light,
temperature, and air.
We intend to attempt to coordinate
advertisers and exhibitors at the con-
vention in this effort that is, to
give some relation between their prod-
ucts and the theme. As needs of con-
trolling climate are discovered through
the presentation of the papers, we
would also like to stimulate adver-
tisers to do research on their own
products.
The second endeavor, to improve
the quality of members' services, will
be an educational program for the
architects themselves, through lectures
and discussions, in areas where archi-




U/F Joins Tile Council's
Scholastic Aid Program
The College of Architecture and
Fine Arts of the U/F is one of eight
architectural schools which this year
are participating in the Tile Council
of America's scholastic aid program.
Under terms of the scholastic aid pro-
gram, each of the eight schools will
receive from the Tile Council a sum
of $2,500 yearly for three years. Of
this yearly contribution, the school
will either grant or lend $1500 to stu-


tects' services are not up to standard.
This is particularly felt in the elec-
trical and other mechanical areas in
residential and small work, where the
architect seldom employs the services
of other professionals. On the jobs
where an architect uses the services of
electrical and mechanical engineers,
also, he should have a better under-
standing of their practical problems
of design, in order to coordinate them
properly with the overall architectural
approach. We plan to begin these lec-
tures with electrical design and hope
to extend them to the other fields
after an expressions of needs is re-
ceived from chapter members.
Closing the gap between the achi-
tect and the community we hope to
achieve by stimulating in the architect
awareness of his responsibility to the
community for instance, in city
planning, zoning, and building codes.
The architect must aggressively offer
his training towards solving any com-
munity problem that relates to the
field of architecture.




dents selected by the faculty. It will
use of $1,000 balance to help defray
expenses of improving instruction in
materials of construction.
The Tile Council program is ad-
ministered jointly by the American
Institute of Architects and the Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Schools of Archi-
tecture. Since it was started, in 1956,
the Tile Council has assisted 27
schools of architecture. According to
LEWIS PHILLIPS, chairman of the
Council's architectural committee, the
program will eventually include 61.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















THE FERNALDS SAY...

"Oil heating a 'must'...
economical, too."

Mr. Fernald says, "Central
oil heating is a 'must' in our
home. It is economical, too.
It's great to relax in control-
led warmth instead of huddl-
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Are you still trying to get by
with costly, makeshift "spot"
heating in your home? It's so
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Safest and most dependable,
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See your oil heating dealer for home
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' Lo..mo HOME -A. HEATING S r,, .
JANUARY, 1960


~,. *


Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Fernald live at 4100
14th Avenue, West Bradenton. Here young
Gary Fernald and his mother enjoy the com-
fort of their attractive oil-heated home.


MR. ARCHITECT:
Folks all over Florida sing the praises
of oil home heating in newspaper ads
like this one. You won't find any re-
sistance when you recommend safe,
economical, efficient, dependable oil
heating in the homes you design! If
you need any information on central
automatically controlled oil heating
systems we will be glad to provide it.
Write or visit us at Buildorama, DuPont
Plaza Center, Miami.







































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News & Note


Board Names Time
for 1960 Meetings
At its December 5th meeting at
Gainesville the FAA Board selected
the following dates and locations for
its 1960 regular meetings: January
23-Fort Lauderdale area; March 26
-Tallahassee area; July 23-Daytona
Beach area; September 24-Tampa-
Clearwater area. No specific head-
quarters were named by the Board,
the thought being that these would
be worked out in detail by the AIA
Chapters which, presumably, will be
acting as local hosts during the Board's
visit to each area.
This schedule means the Board
will meet at least five times during
1960. A meeting immediately pre-
ceding the FAA's annual convention
is required by FAA By-Laws. This will
be held November 9, 1960, at the
Hollywood Beach Hotel which has
been officially named as the site for
the 1960 convention.
In another important action, the
Board voted an appropriation of
$2,000 for defraying expenses of an
informational P/R effort to help pro-
mote development of a new building
for the College of Architecture and
Fine Arts. Material will be prepared
under the direction of EDWARD G.
GRAFTON as FAA Public Relations
Committee chairman who will work
with CLINTON GAMBLE as chairman
of the FAA's special committee on
the new building.

New FAA Stationery
After the New Year, the FAA will
sport new stationery-and each FAA
member will carry a membership card
-designed by a student of the U/F
College of Architecture and Fine Arts.
A sketch problem for both letterhead
and membership card was held De-
cember 4; and results were judged by
the entire FAA Board of Directors
acting as a competition jury Saturday
noon, December 5. Selections were
made by the numerical voting system;
and the first prize went to KENNETH
STANTON, the second to DAVID
SHousE. Stanton's designs are now
being processed for FAA use.
The student competition involved
a first prize award of 25 and a second
award of $15.


New Office Address
for The Florida Architect
As of January 1, 1960, the FAA's
Official Journal, The Florida Arch-
itect, will have a new address to
which all correspondence should be
sent. It will be 7225 S. W. 82nd
Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone
number of the new office will be
MOhawk 5-5032. Mail will, of course,
be forwarded from the old address;
but the new address should be used
from now on for all communications
relative to editorial material, advertis-
ing and circulation matters, the latter
including changes of addresses of those
receiving the publication.
The magazine's new publishing
headquarters was established as a
result of the FAA's action relating to
its continued publication taken at the
FAA Board meeting held at Gaines-
ville, December 5, 1959. At that time
it was unanimously voted that all pub-
lishing operations would be conducted
by the FAA's former Executive Di-
rector, ROGER WV. SHERMAN, AIA, as
an activity separate from that of the
FAA's administrative office. As editor-
publisher, Sherman will work with
an FAA Publication Committee,
chairmanned by CLINTON GAMBLE,
Fort Lauderdale, and including RoY
M. POOLEY, JR., Jacksonville, ROBERT
H. LEVISON, Clearwater, HUGH J.
LEITCH, Pensacola, and WILLIAM A.
STEWART, Gainesville.
The FAA's administrative office
will continue operations at 414F Du-
pont Plaza Center, Miami 32. Cur-
rently, office affairs will be in charge
of the FAA's Administrative Secretary.
The office phone number is FRank-
lin 1-8253.


CORRECTION
On page 20 of the De-
cember, 1959, issue of
The Florida Architect,
the address and phone
number of the Braden-
ton Stone Co. were in-
correct. We are glad to
print the correct ones
here: P. 0. Box 256;
Phone 4-1044. We are
sorry indeed for any in-
convenience this error
may have caused.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


k_7_ -






Tile Design Award ...
(Continued from Page 6)

This design-award program of the
TCAA was initiated to encourage
wider and more imaginative employ-
ment of tile in architectural design.
The award is given annually to an
architect resident in the state selected
as the site of the TCAA's annual con-
vention. This year's program is being
developed jointly by an award com-
mittee of the TCAA and a commit-
tee from the FAA which includes
Robert E. Boardman, W. Mayberry
Lee and Taylor Hardwick, all of the
Jacksonville Chapter. This committee
will also act as the jury screening all
competition entries. The final jury
will include architects Boardman and
Lee in addition to the president of
the TCAA.
As now planned, the presentation
program will include a special feature
for architects during the afternoon of
May 11 culminating in a cocktail
party from 4:00 to 5:00 to which,
presumably, architects are invited.
The TCAA convention headquarters
will be in Jacksonville's Robert Meyer
Hotel.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Air-conditioning, Refrigeration,
Heating & Piping Asso. . 28
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Corp. . 27
Better Fuel Council
of Dade County 11
Buildorama . . 12
A. R. Cogswell . . 30
Dunan Brick Yards . 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co . 22
Featherock, Inc. . . 23
Florida Home Heating Institute 29
Florida Portland Cement Co. 1 8
Florida Power & Light Co. . 26
Florida Steel Corp. . . 4
Florida Tile Industries . I
General Portland Cement Co. 3
George C. Griffin Co. . 31
Lupton Curtain Walls . 10
Benjamin Moore & Company 30
Richard Plumer 24 and 25
Prescolite . . . 28
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 5
Solite . . . . 7
Tiffany Tile Corp. . . 8
F Graham Williams . . 31

JANUARY, 1960


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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United Effort Can Reach The Goal


In just sixteen months the 1961 Florida State Legis-
lature will convene in Tallahassee. During its sixty-day
session, Appropriations Committees of both legislative
houses will list all expenditures planned for the ensuing
biennium. Legislators will vote on this listing; and when
the 1961 Appropriations Bill has been passed, the State
of Florida will have a rigid budget for disbursing its
income until a new Appropriations Bill is fashioned and
passed in 1963.
So the hour is late. To members of Florida's construc-
tion industry it is later than most think. Right now
projects are being planned for inclusion in the 1961
appropriations schedule. If funds for the vitally needed
building for the U/F College of Architecture and Fine
Arts are to be included, action toward that end must be
started now. And efforts toward that end must be vig-
orous, all-inclusive and unremitting until Florida's new
Governor finally signs the Appropriations Bill into law.
The urgent necessity for this building has been clearly
evident for many, many years. But fulfillment of the need
has been repeatedly passed over. This must not happen
again. Legislators must be made to realize the vital urgency
involved. They must be made to realize the alternative
if they fail to act upon this urgency. And it is up to
every element of the construction industry to see that this
is accomplished and that adequate, not merely mini-
mum, funds are appropriated for use at the earliest pos-
sible time.
Here are some of the facts legislators should know:
1 ... Since 1949 ten years the College has been
housed in temporary wooden shacks scattered about the
campus -shacks which are now in a disgraceful state
of disrepair, and deterioration.
2 ... The College of Architecture and Fine Arts ranks
high among major centers of education in the art and
science of construction. Yet it is the only major unit
of the University of Florida which has been subjected to
a complete and callous neglect of its instructional facil-
ities.
3 . Because of its shamefully inadequate quarters,
the College is in real danger of losing approval by the Na-
tional Architectural Accrediting Board. If this should hap-
pen -and it may well take place in 1961 if the near-
future does not forecast betterment of existing conditions
-educational standards and opportunities in Florida
would suffer a disgraceful and embarrassing setback.
4 .. Appropriation was made by the 1957 Legislature;
but no construction funds were released during the bien-


nium. In 1959 the appropriation was rejected even though
the needed buildings had been accorded a top priority by
the University. However, some planning funds have since
been allocated by the Board of Control. Plans are now
nearing completion.
5 ... The building has been visioned as caring for
the educational needs of every segment of Florida's con-
struction industry. Not only the architectural profession
will be served; but instructional departments will also
include facilities for the interior design and landscape
architecture professions as well as those for the technical
training of students slated for the fields of general con-
tracting and home building. Thus, every phase of our
State's huge and growing industry has a stake in the
early development of this project.
Because this is all true, every individual who earns
his living and sees his future in Florida's building has
a direct concern with the realization of this project.
Combined, the various elements of construction in our
State bulk up to a grouping and a dollar-volume that
are now as great as any other segment of Florida's econ-
omy not excepting tourism or agriculture.
So, from every important viewpoint educationally,
regionally, economically and even politically Florida's
legislators have good reason to close ranks and insist that
Appropriations Committees include, in 1961 Bills, non-
revokable recommendations for funds covering a construc-
tion industries building for the U/F campus.
The only question relative to such recommendations
is the overall amount of the appropriation now required.
This should be set at a minimum of $2,500,000. This
is a million more than was sought from the 1955 and
1957 Legislatures. The former sum of $1.5-million had
been determined on a basis that visioned a progressive
building program. Since then building costs have risen.
So have instructional needs of the College. Present studies
indicate that the former sum requested would provide
a net usable area of only 56,000 sq. ft. and would force
continued use of three existing temporary buildings. The
larger sum would care for the increased cost factor; and
it would also provide about 91,000 sq. ft. of net usable
area now needed to avoid continued use of the temporary
shacks now housing college activities.
This is the goal. Helping to reach it is the duty and
the high privilege of every member of Florida's construc-
tion industry be he architect, contractor, home builder,
material supplier, equipment manufacturer, financier or
building owner. ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




ROBCO -


BRICK


DUNAN






















The first Con\ention of the new decade -
which some are already\ calling "The Sizzling
Sixties" will be at Hollywood in No\ember.
The Broward Count\ Chapter will be the host;
and members are already at work developing
the theme "Architecture for Our Climate" into
a program which promises to be both provoca-
tive and unusual. It's not too earl\ to plan
for the 1960 FAA Con,,ention right now.
There's a good chance you'lll be ini ted to par-
ticipate as well as to attend


Headquarters for the 1960
Convention will be the Holly-
wood Beach Hotel-long rated
as offering some of the best
convention facilities on the
entire east coast. In addition
to plenty of space for meet-
ings and exhibits, all sorts of
opportunities exist for fun.


46th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION

NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 1960 HOLLYWOOD BEACH HOTEL HOLLYWOOD




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