Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00066
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: December 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00066
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text
the


florida architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFARCHITECTS



o S Y
4t
is











IN





















A
Aj,




i
,II










Is Your Chapter Using



This Helpful P/R Tool?





If you're an AIA member or associate interested
in helping the public to learn about what archi-
tects are and how they work, you'll be interested
in the answer to that question. This informative
booklet was prepared by a Special FAA Committee
for your individual use through distribution by
your AIA Chapter. Ask your Chapter officers
about it . .


Architectural

Service...




?7 I- ---

S.m pf.faiuf -na the .m u dj ach
rrt bu -1U ereL. Aeltiietal -Sv a
th* irr.i Ir tnrdn.-.gi .aur imi as U susurl rc h
rI t. .md =ff'mma hmOomi Wofms.
lu Ib m . 4P l ad i el.J in bv o
Ze.. re
& in.,'p ~ -- *Hn -ic r*i iu
ha.-r*^


all
mjf ecfl
,,6


60 db.ail
ktob n4 ha


Ws ae ai
pmk,+-ok*


kris .a rt ...'u.t se. ty.pa p6 MIoldial t
.: md mo. pm hd R-do
La.1f. ED tO acrosm of mmadri1 & a M er
-u~ d"----uraI ac o
rvC6~r


iet
.01 5
Stt
* Bo'


The Cost

of rvice...

m,^* I
^sD s% Rk .
jT 4i Off,
! tw


nucaab kIr h I ad p naidlh io ight *a s
Experience, f-.- o .b &.i~m, a
ancmp.h hm lb Wtha h wq o armam l q'"
Traiining, i.' '

Versatility... h. . m p b~. ri. 53
rm aaim anc l-- b

d Flow C hoose

J An Architect

&a4oibml mod ama lrr MA .li mmicd, M. da
0. ara -- ak da L ..r Lp d ense dF_ .ms
l t ..... " '4 d vn ... k


I---






w 7__~ _1


Y 7,T


*<*' *.;' *
'-- '.

; W



;-.


L1
feci~ :-^- "


1 5 P;


Preference for lutschler "design
original" kitchens is not confined to
builders and owners of individual
dwellings. For apartments, too, they are
the obvious choice. All homemakers
are quick to recognize the value of
Mutschler's many exclusive features, the
superb cabinetwork in both natural-
grain finishes and decorator colors
.. .and the Mutschler planning services
that fit the kitchen to personal operational
patterns. Consulting services of
Mutschler kitchen specialists are available
without cost to architects and
builders. For complete
information, mail coupon.


(5
1 '
:. .
r4-,.-


MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
Subsidiary of Mutschler Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
2959 N.E. 12th Terrace, Oakland Park, Fla. Phone: Logan 4-8554
Please furnish me with information about your services
for builders and architects.


name


address

city, state


DECEMBER 1959


." .







74


Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


not 7i s4ae ---


Little Succeeds Gamble as AIA District Director . .

Consultant Will Survey FAA's Insurance Needs . .

Revelation, Reason and Action . . . .
Convention Keynote Address by Samuel T. Hurst, AIA

Post-Convention Report . . ... . .
By John Stetson,.AIA

New FAA Officers for 1960 . . . . .

Committee Named to Select New FAA Eecutive Director

Between The Business Sessions . . . . .

Five Awards Named from Exhibit of Architects' Work .

FAA Honor Award 1959 Convention . . .

1959 Convention Resolutions . . . . .

FAA Standards of Good Practice . . . .
News and Notes ..............

Advertisers' Index . . . . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
H. Samuel Kruse, Immediate Past President, C of C Bldg., Miami

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.
DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage,
Wahl J. Snyder, hr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene
Cellar; MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM
BEACH: Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.


.4

.6

.9
4

611



11



..13
13

14

17

20

21
. . . 21
. . 27


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Associatipn of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S..Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 12 95
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT































East Carolina College Dormitory, Greenville, N. C.
ERIC G. FLANNAGAN AND SONS, Henderson, N. C., Architects & Engineers
W. H. GARDNER, JR., & ASSOCS., Durham, N. C., Consulting Engineers
O. L. SHACKELFORD, INC., Kinston, N. C., General Contractors


BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE

The new dormitory at East Carolina College
is a good example of the latest trends in school
and college building. The trim, five story dorm
is cleanly modern, yet manages to preserve a
solid feeling of tradition in keeping with its sur-
roundings.
In construction, the latest techniques were
used. The building features a structural frame-
work of lightweight reinforced concrete. To
keep dead load at an absolute minimum, the
architect specified lightweight structural con-
crete for grade beams, columns, and all slabs
above ground floor. Solite was the aggregate
approved for this concrete.



Wherever you find imaginative and
effective new construction techniques
at work you are apt to find Solite.


There were two good reasons for this choice.
First, Solite is 1/3 lighter than ordinary con-
crete. Yet it is equally as strong and durable.
By choosing Solite, the architect was able to
reduce dead load-with its resulting savings in
space and cost-with no sacrifice of safety or
permanence.
Solite-both for lightweight structural con-
crete and masonry units-is featured increas-
ingly in outstanding building projects. Its many
inherent advantages and complete compatabil-
ity with all building materials and techniques
make it the natural choice.






LIGHTWEIGHT MASONRY UNITS
AND STRUCTURAL CONCRETE


WHATEVER YOU BUILD-The professional advice of an architect or engineer can save
you time and money-and provide the integrity of design that means lasting satisfaction.


"DECEMBER 1959






Little Succeeds Gamble

As AIA District Director


ROBERT M. LITTLE, Florida South
Chapter, was elected AIA Director for
the Florida District at the Jackson-
ville Convention of the FAA last
month. He will succeed CLINTON
GAMBLE, Broward County Chapter,
who was appointed by the AIA Board
to fill the unexpired term of the late
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA. He was
elected for a three-year term and will
assume his formal duties as an AIA
Director immediately following the
AIA Convention in April.
Though not a native-born Flor-
idian, the new District Director has
been an active resident of the State
for almost 30 years and has been in
independent practice in Miami since
1933. He was born in Uniontown,
Pa., and received his architectural
training at the Beaux Arts and T-
Square Club in Philadelphia and in
the office of JOHN T. WINDRIM. For
seven years prior to opening his own
office he was associated with the firm
of ROBERT A. TAYLOR in Miami
Beach.
His AIA membership dates from
1942; and almost from that time he
has been active in both Chapter and
state association affairs. He has
served on many committees of both
organizations, was elected president of
the Florida South Chapter for 1947
and of the FAA for 1950.
Little's nomination occurred as
something of a surprise development
at the Convention. It had been gen-
erally assumed that CLINTON GAMBLE
would accept a nomination for a full
three-year term. He had been named
by the Nominating Committee; but
immediately thereafter he asked that
his name be omitted from the Com-
mittee's list. Pressed for reasons be-
hind his decision, the District Di-
rector authorized this statement:
"Some of the reasons controlling
my unwillingness to serve a new term
as the Florida District Director are
purely personal. Beyond these, how-
ever, are two which I think are
equally important.
"One is that I have no ambitions
for any AIA national office. Logically,
a three-year director from Florida
could well become a candidate for


ROBERT M. LITTLE, AIA


G. CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA


some position of higher responsibility
at the national level. I believe our
AIA director should serve with the
willingness to accept the opportunity
for national office when it occurs.
"Another is my sincere wish to de-
vote more of my energies and avail-
able time to what can be called 'grass
roots' matters. Much needs to be
done at our own local state level to
improve the standing and perform-
ance of our profession. And specifically
there exists a fascinating opportunity
to improve existing conditions at the
University of Florida and so to bring
the educational background for archi-
tecture in closer alignment with the
problems and possibilities of profes-
sional practice."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































. . And the bugs are dry-wod termites which
feed, unseen, on finish and structural lumber
alike. They're dangerous and to guard against
their costly ravages, specify WOODLIFING by
dipping or flooding for all woodwork in any
building... WOODLIFE's ingredients are poison
to wood-eating insects. They penetrate the sur-
face of wood, coat the cells and thus provide a
lasting immunity from attack and infestation.
Also, WOODLIFE is non-staining and actually
improves the paintability of the wood surface it
invisibly protects ...


9UAzIFV
PFAU=


S 7Te Ortai
contain WATER REPELLENT
onlTaning PRESERVATIVE
PENTAchlorophenol

Ingredients in Woodlife also protect wood from
moisture-damage-swelling, warping, surface-
checking. Woodlife's "anti-wicking" action pre-
vents moisture seepage; and its water-repellant
solution penetrates the surface to coat wood
cells with an invisible, lasting protection.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 1th TERRACE, MIAMI - -FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto Call Palmetto 2-1011


DECEMBER 1959


- IIm


. .... . ....


0;70 ew ate ?Veoteaew





























7,,


CHECK IST


for service!

Reinforcing Steel
Structural Steel
Complete Engineering &
S Fabricating Facilities
Bar Joists
Aluminum & Steel Sash
Steel Doors & Frames
Miscellaneous Iron &
Aluminum
Ornamental Iron
Steel Roof Deck
Steeltex
Highway Products
Corruform
Sonotubes
Metal Culverts
SPolyethylene Plastic Film


FLORIDA STEEL
CORPO RATION



TAMPA 8-0451
ORLANDO GArden 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


Consultant Will Survey


FAA'S Insurance Needs


At the pre-convention meeting of
the Board, November 11, CLIFFORD
F. GOULD, C.L.U., of Coral Gables,
was unanimously appointed as a pro-
fessional insurance consultant for the
FAA. His activity as an advisor on
insurance matters does not involve
payment of any salary or fee from the
FAA's general funds; but the Board
voted that the sum of $500 be allo-
cated to defray Mr. Gould's out-of-
pocket expenses incident to his work
on behalf of FAA members.
The FAA's new insurance consult-
ant's first activity will be to obtain
facts relative to insurance situations
and needs now current among the
membership. This will be done
through a survey-questionnaire to be
mailed soon to each corporate and
associate member. Various types of
coverages will then be recommended as
may be required from facts uncovered
by the questionnaire. Insurance speci-
fications will be drawn up by the con-
sultant; and on the basis of these he
will then obtain bids from companies
best able to serve the various phases
of an overall insurance program.
The survey-questionnaire will not
obligate the FAA nor its members. It
will be used solely as the factual basis
for specific insurance recommenda-
tions. Members are urged to complete
the questionnaire as fully as possible
and to return it promptly after receiv-
ing it.
Mr. Gould was presented to the
FAA Board by CLINTON GAMBLE,
AIA District Director. He is a mem-
ber of the insurance firm of Gould
and Gould, a Chartered Life Under-
writer -generally equivalent to a
Fellowship in the AIA and for the
past several years has specialized in
the field of professional insurance con-
sultation. He is currently a consult-
ant to several national and state asso-
ciations which, like the FAA, have
recognized the desirability of utilizing
the experience of an unbiased expert
to coordinate their insurance require-
ments. His success in this field has
been based partly on his technique of
preparing insurance specifications for
group need based on survey informa;


CLIFFORD
CLIFFORD


R. GOULD, C.L.U.


tion. Partly also it has resulted from
the fact that through an association,
coverages can be obtained to meet
specifications at lower rates but with
better service.
Mr. Gould's appointment is for a
two-year period. It will then be sub-
ject to review at a pre-convention
meeting of the FAA Board.



Changes ...
The office of the Secretary of the
State Board of Architecture, MOR-
TON T. IRONMONGER, has a new ad-
dress. It was recently moved from
1261 East Las Olas Boulevard, to 235
S. E. 13th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale.
The Board's post office address is P.
O. Box 2447, Ft. Lauderdale.
FRANCIS E. TELESCA, Florida South
Chapter, formerly chief architect
with the firm of Rader and Associ-
ates, has announced the opening of
his own office at 7299 S. W. 79th
Court, Miami 43.
The Gainesville partnership of
CAMPBELL, O'KELLEY and MAY has
been dissolved. ARTHUR LEE CAMP-
BELL has announced the opening of
his own office at Room 208, Secur-
ity Building, 1105 W. University
Avenue, Gainesville. His former ad-
dress was 115 South Main Street,
Gainesville.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Not just "Doodling around"...

REALLY GOING PLACES!


THE HOUSTON CORPORATION


If you have a problem which you think natural
gas may be able to solve, please call us...
we'll be glad to help. New and different uses
for this versatile fuel are being discovered every
day right here in Florida! Let us tell you
about them.
DECEMBER 1959


ST. PETERSBURG MIAMI JACKSONVILLE
ORLANDO LAKELAND DAYTONA BEACH EUSTIS




PRACTICAL INFORMATION ON TILE FOR ARCHITECTS


4-




There are so many reasons for the superiority of Tiffany Tile

. not just claims but down-to-earth practical advantages.

The Tiffany organization is headed by a Master Tile Setter,

truly a tile craftsman who is thoroughly

familiar with every phase of the designing,

manufacturing and installation of ceramic tile.



MORE PRACTICAL DIMENSIONS

Tiffany wall tile measures 4%"x 4%3"-V8" larger than Tiffany's more practical dimensions cut installation
most. A small difference but mighty important to you. time, reduce costs . but most important, result in a
5% to 7% greater coverage. Fits standard bathtubs more uniform and attractive tile surface.
without time-consuming cuts. Eleven courses gives a
Available in rectangular design or Mecca . a Tiffany
wainscot height of 54/2" . again without cutting. Sill exclusive. Tested and approved by independent testing lab-
tile is available in the 5/8"x 6" size to fit standard sills, oratories. Your inquiry cordially invited.


* Architect-Robert Wielage, A.I.A.
of Wielage & Eaton, Architects
Tampa, Florida


"Americas finest ceramic tile"
"America's finest ceramic tile"


TIFFANY TILE CORPORATION 500 N. WEST SHORE DRIVE PORT TAMPA, FLORIDA
8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


n


16







Symapsium o wreavtiity... 7 K4 eynote 4dewe ...


Revelation,



Reason



and Action



By SAMUEL T. HURST; AIA,
Dean, School of Architecture and The Arts,
Alabama Polytechnic Institute


No word or word concept today en-
joys more use and abuse than the word
creativity. With its many derivatives,
it is waved about every cause like a
banner of virtue, of action and of
progress. Who can be against it? Who
is not creative? Who in his own mind
does not march under that banner
toward a better world-be it in archi-
tecture, education, business or indus-
try?
The housewife, even, is now being
freed of drudgery in the modem
kitchen by the modern miracles of
kitchen mechanics-freed to engage
in "more creative activity." And the
Merchants of Madison Avenue allow
the "creative man" to do his own
thinking-though inevitably he
chooses Viceroy!
Why is it that we constantly pro-
claim what really is a natural, essen-
tial quality and force in our lives? Is
that force so suppressed and our sense
of inadequacy so great that we pro-
claim creativity as a substitute for
practicing it? Are we like the husband
who, rising on Monday morning, in-
sists to his wife,
"I love you, I love you, I love you,
I love you, I love you! Now, damn it,
don't ask me again for another week!"
In our architecture, is it that pro-
fessional schizophrenia has made us
lose contact with the direct emotional
experience which is the artist's expres-
sion in order to cope with the de-
DECEMBER 1959


mands of technology and of business?
Are we trying to be all things to all
men-as well as some things to a few
women-and in the process suffering
diffusion of identity and responsibility
beyond reason and beyond our ability
to perform?
I leave the answers to these ques-
tions in the capable hands of others.
It seems to me sufficient here to un-
dertake some clarification of terms,
some statement of what creativity and
the creative process is and what corner
of the wide creative field the architect
has in which to work. From such an
analysis and the personal statements
of artists, scientists, philosophers and
theologians recognized in our time, we
might gain understanding, gain insight
which will increase the productivity
of our already developed intelligence
and may serve to increase our loyalty
to its demands.
This, I think, is the reason we come
here to examine this most elusive
of architectural qualifications. In the
complex professional role we under-
*The reference is to a group of symbolic
cartoons which Samuel Ehrlich, New York
artist, created for the Architectural Record
in connection with a series of articles, de-
veloped by Emerson Coble, Record editor,
on the many-faceted functions of the ar-
chitect in today's social complex. Some
of these cartoons were reproduced,
through the generous cooperation of Ar-
chitectural Record, as part of the decor-
ative setting for the exhibit of architects'
and students' work at the FAA Conven-
tion.


take, we require a reminder that un-
less the architect be creator, he is not
architect. To that essential beginning
he may then add all the roles so skil-
fully depicted by Mr. Ehrlich's car-
toons which hang in the next room.*
Today I want to speak of the archi-
tect in both the individual and in the
corporate sense-as the office, the or-
ganization, the team which produces
a whole job. It is clear that the quality
we term creativity is not common to
us all in any constant degree. All of
us can, however, recognize that qual-
ity and if we care enough insure its
preeminence in our corporate work.
The alternate is to recognize a class
structure within the profession- an
aristocracy of creative architects, an
aristocracy which, to a marked extent,
already exists. In a broader sense, each
man must nurture creativity in the
search for his own personal signifi-
cance, for individuality, for an affirm-
ation of his life's purpose-or what
the psychologists call an affirmative re-
lation to his work and to his time.
This necessity is powerfully presented
in the view of one psychologist, Louis
Way, in a book entitled "Man's Quest
for Significance".
The great volume of work today by
the group or the corporate architect
relies not only on the protection and
the utilization of individual creativity
(Continued on Page 10)






Revelation, Reason and Action ...


(Continued from Page 9)
within the group, but as well upon
a high order of group creativity. A use-
ful story in this regard is told by WAL-
TER GROPIUS concerning a meeting
held down in Mexico when he and
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT were sitting on
the same panel and discussing their
personal philosophies. Gropius had a
great deal to say about collaboration
and the group and team effort. Wright
took his position on the panel and
said,
"Now, Walter, don't you think you
rather overdo this business of collab-
oration and team work? If you wanted
to make a baby, you wouldn't go next
door and call in your neighbor."
Gropius reflected for a moment.
Then he said,
"Well, I might-if she were a
woman!"
I think that doing a good building
is, in fact, not unlike making a baby.
It takes two to conceive-a sensitive
architect and a willing client. It takes
a long time to deliver; the pain of
labor is great; and it always costs more
than you expect.
Creativity, we know, is the quality
of conception, of new conception, of
invention, of productivity, of forming
fnd bringing into existence. It is an
active quality of liberation, or aggres-
siveness. Creativity is affirmative, not
negative; constructive, not destructive.
By its nature it adds to the existing
established order; and while it may
challenge, overthrow or supersede the
existing order, it cannot erase it.
Let us now try to see the creative
process in its three components or
stages. Recognizing the wide variabil-
ity of personal experience, I want to
suggest that these three components
are revelation, reason and action. The
creative act as revelation emanates
from our subconscious mind and our
pure senses. It is directed then, tested,
modified, challenged and judged
worth while, or not, by our conscious
reason. Then, by action it is executed
and put to use.
I like the theologian's term "revela-
tion", for I think it suggests the
searching and the yearning which pre-
cede creation and the spontaneity and
release which accompany it. Swiss the-
ologian EMIL BRUNNER contends that
much of modern man's predicament


stems from the fact that he- always
subordinates revelation to reason in
theological matters. Observing the cur-
rent state of our world affairs, might
we not concur with Brunner and look
for a more creative approach to pol-
itics, to peace and prosperity?
In this broad sense creativity is fun-
damental to man's evolutionary proc-
ess and indeed is a function necessary
for his survival. What I have called
revelation-this process of ideation, of
giving form to our ideas-is, I think,
the result of the inter-action between
knowledge and experience stored in
our subconscious mind and the gnaw-
ing problems we live with and feed
into that subconscious.
WILLIAM PERIERA, speaking at the
New Orleans Convention, spoke of de-
sign as "the lonely act of creation-
not problem-solving." I like that
phrase, but would say that creativity
itself is problem-solving on the very
highest plane. It is problems which
make creativity and creative design
urgent. The compulsion for creativity
is the insufficiency of the existing
known order and form of things. It
is now predicted by some that the full
store of man's knowledge will double
in the next ten years. What a staggcr-
ing and really frightening challenge to
creativity!
From an excellent book on "The
Creative Process" by BREWSTER GHI-
SELIN we may draw the personal testi-
mony of some 30 or 40 recognized
creators from all fields. The consensus
of their statements as condensed by
Ghiselin establishes some fundamen-
tals of creativity. I want to quote a
few of them for you here:
One .. ."The creative order is not
an elaboration of the established, but
a movement beyond the established-
or at least the reorganization of it."
Two..."Vital change goes on de-
spite all opposition and indifference."
Three.. ."Even when an artist has
found his way, the opposition between
the new and old persists, for the un-
realized continues to draw him. The
restlessness of the inventor is unend-
ing. He has an inordinate appetite for
discovery and the ability to satisfy it."
Four.. ."The faithful formalist has
no chance of creating anything. What
is needed is control and direction." ,


Five..."New life comes from out-
side our world. Production by purely
conscious calculation seems never to
occur."
Six..."WILL belongs to the con-
scious life only. It is effective in ob-
taining objects in yiew, but it cannot
enable us to move in directions that
have not yet been discovered."
Seven .. ."By no means all the crea-
tive process is primarily a spontaneous
development. Two important stages in
it are predominantly conscious and
critical; and in these WILL properly
functions. It is of use in that prelim-
inary labor, or sometimes less burden-
some preparation without which there
can be no significant creativity, and
in the work of verification, correction
and revision that ordinarily follows
and completes or refines its product.
D. H. Lawrence is reported to have
written 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' three
times."
This has been very much a clinical
approach to this subject. In the next
few days you will discuss what you
have already faced-some of the real-
ities of the architect's work. Can archi-
tecture be really both art and busi-
ness? Is creativity economical? I think
it is in the long-term sense of the
architect's survival. In the immediate
sense, perhaps not-in point of view
of time consumed or risks involved.
Certainly it is not easy, for every new
design idea requires the revision of
others and the adaptation of the
standards and systems by which we
already work.
There is on my faculty one very
respected design teacher who came to
us from a very respected design office.
In that office he had the reputation
for doing buildings which always won
awards, but never made any money.
And yet I know that that office is as
busy as any office in our area and that
they continue to win awards and that
they draw the best students out of our
school.
What are the enemies of creativity?
They are many. Vocational education
in the name of architecture is one.
The conventions of a formalized so-
ciety, the indifference of a large seg-
ment of the profession, the inability
of the client to discriminate in many
cases and the general prosperity of our
time are others. Compulsion toward
(Continued on Page 19)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






76m 074 Ved 4 76C 7,44 Pted4eseu ...


Post Convention Report


By JOHN STETSON, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


The 45th Annual Convention of
the Florida Association of Architects
will probably set an all time record for
length of business sessions. I judge all
who attended will have returned home
convinced that much was accom-
plished. This report is being written
with a twofold purpose to consoli-
date in semi-report form the happen-
ings of the convention for the mem-
bership as a whole, and to advise
those members not fortunate enough
to attend of the actions of the Asso-
ciation in meetings assembled.

F.A.A. Office Space
The convention ratified the action
of the Board of Directors in voting to
maintain the offices of the Associa-
tion at their present quarters in the
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami, until
the lease now held by the Florida
Squth Chapter, A.T.A. expires (Febru-
ary 28, 1963) or until we move our
headquarters to another city.

Executive Director
A committee composed of VERNER
JOHNSON, chairman, FRANCIS R. WAL-
TON, ROY M. POOLEY, ARTHUR LEE
CAMPBELL and JOHN STETSON was
elected by the combined Old and New
Boards to interview applicants for the
position of F.A.A. Executive Director
and to report to a meeting of the
Board of Directors to be held at
Gaincsville, December 5th. In the
interim, the Convention voted to ex-
tend the employment of VERNA M.
SHERMAN to continue current admin-
istrative duties under existing proced-
ures. This will permit the operation
of the F.A.A. office with no interrup-
tion.

Magazine Editor
ROGER W. SHERMAN, in submitting
his resignation as Executive Director
asked permission to submit a proposal
to the Board relative to his operating
DECEMBER 1959


and serving as Editor for The Florida
Architect. This proposal was submit-
ted to the Board and to the Conven-
tion. A committee composed of your
President as temporary chairman,
WAHL J. SNYDER, FAIA, ROY M.
POOLEY, ROBERT H. LEVISON and
FRANCIS R, WALTON was elected to
negotiate a contract with ROGER W.
SHERMAN and to report to the Board
meeting on December 5th. A meet-
ing of the committee was held imme-
diately following the close of the con7
vention and negotiations were begun
with Roger on Monday, November
16. On November 17, ROBERT H.
LEVISON was appointed by your Presi-
dent to serve as permanent chairman
of this committee. It is sincerely
hoped that successful negotiations
are forthcoming to permit the con-


tinuance of the present high standard
of publication with no interruption.
Group Insurance
The Convention voted approval to
employ Clifford F. Gould, C.L.U., as
an insurance consultant to set up a
master plan for the Association, offer-
ing all the advantages of group insur-
ance to all members.

Legal Counsel
The Board voted, and the Conven-
tion concurred, that we retain our
present attorney, BENMONT M.
TENCH, JR., on the present job basis
until after a new Executive Director
is employed. The Board seems divided
as to whether a retainer or a job basis
is the best method of employing legal
counsel.
(Continued on Page 12)


FAA Chooses New Officers for 1960


Here are some of the 1960 officers of the FAA as the cameraman caught them
at the Convention's closing session, Saturday morning, November 14. Left to
right they are, Francis R. Walton, Daytona Beach Chapter, re-elected as FAA
Secretary; John Stetson, Palm Beach Chapter, re-elected as President for 1960;
Robert M. Little, Florida South Chapter, chosen as the Florida District's AIA
Director, and Roy M. Pooley, Jr., Jacksonville Chapter, next year's Treasurer of
the FAA. Also elected (but missing from the photo) was Robert B. Murphy, Mid-
Florida Chapter, as the FAA's Third Vice-President from the Central Area.





Post Convention Report...
(Continued from Page 11)

Charter and By-Laws
The changing over of the State
Association to a District of the A.I.A.
required certain Charter and By-Laws
revisions. In addition it appeared that
other minor changes and clarifications
were in order. This required a careful
analyzation and was time-consuming,
but accomplished much to simplify
the problems of the Board and of
legal counsel. One 'important point
concerns membership. Associates are
members of the Florida Association of
Architects and must pay dues. If a
man objects to this (classification or
dues) it is suggested that the Chapter
change its By-Laws to include a clas-
sification of membership to cover this
type of individual, eliminating the
confusion that would exist if the
F.A.A. By-Laws are not followed.

Future Conventions
The F.A.A. Convention in 1960
will be held probably at Hollywood,
with the Broward Chapter as hosts.
Already they have indicated that the
theme "Designing For Our Climate"
is being considered. This is an excel-
lent choice and should prove an in-
teresting topic for many discussion
perods. In 1961 'the Palm Beach
Chapter will be hosts to the Conven-
tion. Don't forget the A.I.A. Con-
vention in April at San Francisco.
Also, in 1963 the A.I.A. Convention
will be held at Miami Beach. No
doubt we'll be busy.


A five-man committee was named
at the FAA Board's post-convention
meeting for the purpose of selecting
a new executive director for the FAA
and conducting service contract nego-
tiations with him for subsequent rati-
fication by the Board.
Services of such a committee were
made evident during the November 11
meeting of the Board when the FAA's
present Executive Director stated he
would not be a candidate for reap-
pointment after expiration of his serv-
ice agreement which terminates De-
cember 31, 1959. Previously he had


Program for 1960
A poll of the Board indicated that
the following projects are worthy of
our consideration:
1. Better liaison between the
F.A.A. and Chapters.
2. Wider participation by the
membership in writing articles
for The Florida Architect and
other publications.
3. Closer alliance of the F.A.A.
Board and the Florida State
Board of Architecture.
4. New building for the Univer-
sity of Florida, School of Archi-
tecture.
5. Expansion of our Public Rela-
tions program.
6. Continuance of seminars (like
the Office Practice Workshop
of this past summer).
7. Setup of an annual meeting of
Chapter Presidents, to be held
in conjunction with the annual
convention.
8. Long-range legislative goal.
9. A program for the edification
of City and other government-
al officials of the value of
architects serving on boards
pertaining to building, zoning,
planning, etc.
10. Organization of an "Architect
in Training" program.
11. Continued close association
with the School of Architecture
at Gainesville to offer assistance
to both faculty and students.
12. Set up of a long range program
to study our obtaining a head-
quarters building.


communicated his decision to relin-
quish the Executive Director's post in
a letter to President John Stetson. The
letter was in the form of a resignation;
but since it specified an effective date
as the termination of the service agree-
ment in force, the FAA Board was
under no necessity of either accepting
or rejecting it.
Chief among reasons for his resig-
nation was the Director's opinion that
duties with which he was charged had
become too great to be discharged
competently by a single individual-
yet the service agreement tendered to ,


Your President desires to instigate
something else under the heading of
new business. I have asked (and hope
he will serve) Bob Levison to be chair-
man of a "Committee on Commit-
tees." This would greatly reduce the
correspondence flooding the presi-
dent's office and would permit the
Board at each meeting to receive a re-
port, from only one person, of the
entire committee structure and op-
eration, greatly reducing this time-
absorbing factor.
By re-electing your president for a
second term, you have indicated a cer-
tain willingness to proceed further
with the type of program instigated
in 1959. It will never be possible for
an administration to satisfy every
member. All a president can do is
champion the program aimed at do-
ing the most for the largest percent-
age of the membership. Certainly the
work accomplished in 1959 indicates
that never have so many members
taken such an active part in the work
of the Florida Association of Archi-
tects. We've still a lot to do, and
everyone's assistance is needed. Con-
trary to all that was once said about
the profession, I have found the vast
majority of its members willing and
able to assist in any worthy program,
but at the same time remain vigilant
against outside interference, absorp-
tion by others, or for one minute re-
linquishing control of any functions
of the Association. Your Board's one
desire, I've found, is to work for the
interests of the Association and its in-
dividual members. They need your
support and suggestions.

him for next year indicated an in-
crease, rather than a decrease, in both
activities and responsibilities.
"During the past two years, particu-
larly, the FAA has expanded rapidly,"
he said. "As a result, duties specified
in the service agreement executed two
years ago have become increasingly
complex. It is now evident that the
FAA needs to re-analyze its adminis-
trative needs and re-orient its working
organization to care for them more
adequately than is possible under the
present setup."
For the past four years-the last
two as Executive Director-the FAA's
administrative officer has been charged
with a many-sided responsibility. This
has included: One, administering the
operation of the FAA office and per-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Committee Named to Select

New FAA Executive Director





sonnel; two, acting as liaison between
the FAA and various governmental
and legislative agencies and represent-
ing FAA interests on a resident basis
at sessions of the State Legislature;
three, acting as the FAA's liaison with
various Chapters of the Association;
four, general development and operat-
ing supervision of FAA annual con-
ventions. In addition, he has acted as
editor-publisher of the FAA's Official
Journal and has been charged with
conducting this activity in such a
manner as to provide the FAA's gen-
eral operating fund with a source of
additional income.
In submitting his resignation, the
Executive Director indicated a willing-
ness to continue an association with
the FAA as editor-publisher of The
Florida Architect under a mutually
satisfactory working agreement. At
press time, no conclusion had been
reached relative to the publishing pro-
posal requested by the FAA Board.
A Board Committee composed of
ROBERT H. LEVISON, chairman, JOHN
STETSON, FRANCIS R. WALTON, ROY
M. POOLEY, JR., and WAHL J. SNY-
DER, FAIA, was studying the matter,
with a special Board meeting on De-
cember 5 slated as the target date
for a final decision.



FiVe Awards Named from
Exhibit of Architects' Work

From among some 50 submissions
of architects' work which comprised
the outstanding Architectural Exhibit
of the FAA's 45th Annual Conven-
tion, a five-man jury selected the fol-
lowing for awards: Honor Awards St.
Paul's Lutheran Church, Sarasota,
VICTOR A. LUNDY, architect; and Bath
House for Hugh Matheson, South Mi-
ami, PANCOAST, FERENDINO, SKEELS
AND BURNHAM, architects. Merit
Awards: Civic Building for St. Peters-
burg Beach, WILLIAM B. HARVARD,
architect, with B. E. JOLLY and ALLAN
RUDOLPH as associates; and Showroom
for Galloway's Furniture Store, Sara-
sota, VICTOR A. LUNDY, architect.
In addition, the jury selected for a
Merit Award from submissions of stu-
dent work three abstract compositions
by WILLIAM F. WEDEMYER, III.
Due to shortness of time before a
publication deadline for December,
most of the awards will not be pub-
lished until the January issue of The
DECEMBER 1959


Between the Business Sessions .. .


Snapped at the Thursday
dinner meeting above
were Edwin T. Reeder,
Kenneth Jacobson, Her-
bert C. Millkey, FAIA,
Mrs. C. Ellis Duncan,
Harold A. Obst, C. Ellis
Duncan and Mrs. Jacob-
son ... Convention ladies
enjoyed the architectural
exhibit as much as any-
one, especially this group
which included Mrs. Rich-
ard Y. Pearson, Jr., Mrs.
Robert E. Boardman, Mrs.
Norman E. Washer and
Mrs. W. Mayberry Lee.


Congressman Charles E. Bennet held an informal post-panel conference on
Saturday morning. Pictured here are, left to right, Congressman Bennett,
Joseph M. Shifalo, Herbert R. Savage, Frederick W. Kessler, Kenneth Jacobson,
Walter A. Taylor, FAIA, Roy M. Pooley, Jr., and (back to camera) Frederick
Sherman, Real Estate Editor of the Miami Herald.


Florida Architect. The award-winning
bathhouse appears on pages 14 and
15 of this issue.
The overall quality and scope of
this year's architectural exhibit made
selection of award winners unusually
difficult, according to ROBERT C,


BROWARD, host chapter chairman of
the convention exhibit. The jury in-
cluded PAUL H. HEFFERNAN, FAIA,
chairman, Dean HENRY KAMPHOEF-
NER, FAIA, HERBERT H. SWINBURNE,
AIA, DOUGLAS HASKELL, AIA, and
GARRET EKBO.



















FAA Honor Award -- 1959 Convention ..


Bath House for Hugh Matheson, Jr.,
South Miami, Florida
Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels & Burnham,
Architects



... ii o. I4 ,.
7 'I
Ft -


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









































This design-which may well
have established a record as
the smallest honor-award-
winner-was developed with
rough-dressed p r e s s u r e-
treated pine structural mem-
bers and cemesto-board pan-
els. The structure is actually
hung from a middle spine
composed of a series of
double 2 by 4s bolted to silll
members at the center foun-
dations and to the ridge
member above. Stability is
achieved by strap-anchoring
exterior 4 by 4 posts. Fram-
ing members and panels have
been left in their natural
color and finish-except for
the panel at the entrance
which has been painted
white. When landscaping has
been completed, the little
building will sit in the mid-
dle of a white-graveled ter-
race.


DECEMBER 1959











2180 N. W. 24th Avenue :>Miami, Florida


MANUFACTURERS OF FINE QUALITY CAST


BRONZE ALUMINUM TABLETS
FOR INDUSTRY, MUNICIPALITIES, BANKS,
CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS,
PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS & PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

Our Bronze Tablets, many of which adorn the
most famous public buildings in our Nation, are
the finest examples of the Master Metalcraftman's
art. Like fine jewelry, all our tablets are hand-
chased to sharpen and clearly define every detail.

Honor Rolls Door Plates
Memorials Individual Letters for
building facades
Bas Reliefs Engraved Plastic or
Donor Tablets Metal Plates
S* Building Directories
Presentation Plaques
Specially designed
Markers Telechron Clocks
up to 8 ft. in
Signs Diameter


DISRY S


The Consulting staff of National Bronze Co.
offers to the Architect, Engineer or Contractor,
without obligation, the benefit of over 40 years of
experience in the manufacture of bronze tablets.
We will help you develop your ideas by furnishing
full size sketches without obligation and
will quote prices
promptly on any de- Phone
sign submitted. I ,, ,


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







1959 Convention Resolutions...


The report of the Committee on
Resolutions was presented at the Con-
vention's Saturday luncheon meeting
as the last order of Convention busi-
ness. ANTHONY L. PULLARA, as chair-
man, presented six resolutions which
had been considered by his committee,
which included JAMES L. DEEN and
JACK MOORE.
The following, concerning building
codes, was recommended for adoption
by the Convention and reference to
the FAA Board for action. Conven-
tion action was affirmative on the
recommendation.

Building Code for
Unincorporated Areas
WHEREAS; The present lack of con-
trol for the construction of buildings
outside incorporated areas allows the
construction of buildings which are
many times dangerous to the health,
safety and welfare of the general pub-
lic; and,
WHEREAS; It is recognized by many
authorities and professions that some
measure of control is necessary,
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED
BY THIS CONVENTION? That the policy
of the Florida Association of Archi-
tects now is to proceed with all due
dispatch with steps necessary, as seems
best, to secure adoption of a building
code which will protect the unincor-
porated areas of the State.
A policy resolution was presented
by the Committee without recom-
mendation. However, its adoption by
the Convention was moved and sec-
onded from the floor and unani-
mously voted. It, too, will be referred
to the Board for subsequent action
relative to implementation of its va-
rious phases.

FAA's Long-term Aims
WHEREAS; The Florida Association
of Architects has not stated its long-
range goals to fulfill the purpose
stated in its Charter and to give direc-
tion to current activities or contin-
uing programs, or for the establish-
ment of sound fiscal and operational
policies; and,
WHEREAS; The statement of its
long-range goals will conserve the
DECEMBER 1959


money, time and efforts expended in
current activities by pointing the di-
rection that current and future activ-
ities shall take to have accumulative
and long-term meanings; and,
WHEREAS; The officers and the
Board of the Florida Association of
Architects must have the expression
of the Association's long-range aims
if its programs shall have continuity
year after year and shall reflect the
desires of the membership at large;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That the following goals are
the Florida Association of Architects'
long-term aims:
1 ... The FAA shall develop a pub-
lic understanding of sound community
growth and the value of competent
architectural service in that growth;
2 ... The FAA shall be the center
for coordinating and rallying the activ-
ities of the various elements of Flor-
ida's building industry toward improv-
ing professional and trade practices;
3 ... The FAA shall be the agency
through which architects will continue
their education and improve their
services for the mutual benefit of
architects and the public; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That
the Board and Officers of the Florida
Association of Architects so direct the
programs and activities and establish
policies so that the main effort of the
Association is channeled for the pur-
pose of attaining the long-term aims
of the Association.
The following four resolutions were
reported to the Convention with rec-
ommendation to approve and their
adoption moved by the Resolution
Committee Chairman:

Appreciation to
Product Exhibitors
WHEREAS; The exhibition of the
various building products at the An-
nual Convention is of very great inter-
est and educational value to those
attending the Convention; and,
WHEREAS; Such exhibits not only
give the architects the opportunity to
keep up to date with the latest build-
ing products, but also afford us the
opportunity to personally meet those
who handle and distribute these prod-
ucts; and,


WHEREAS; The exhibits at this 45th
Annual Convention of the Florida As-
sociation of Architectstrre outstanding,

both from a design viewpoint as well
as the educational value;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That this Convention express
its appreciation to the exhibitors par-
ticipating in this Convention for the
fine part they have played in making
it a success.

Appreciation to Jacksonville
Council of The Arts
WHEREAS; The Jacksonville Coun-
cil of The Arts has contributed much
to the success and entertainment of
the 45th Annual Convention of the
Florida Association of Architects; and,
WHEREAS; They have given so gen-
erously of their time and talents in
making this Convention a success;
and,
WHEREAS; The Florida Association
of Architects is desirous of creating
and maintaining better understanding
between all the professions encom-
passing the fine arts;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That this Convention ex-
presses its wholehearted appreciation
to the Jacksonville Council of The
Arts for the high level of entertain-
ment which they have contributed to
this Convention.

A Bow To The Ladies
WHEREAS; The wives and sweet-
hearts have added beauty, compan-
ionship, gaiety and good counsel to
the various deliberations of this, the
45th Annual Convention of the Flor-
ida Association of Architects; and,
WHEREAS; These wives and sweet-
hearts have contributed helpfully to
the overall success of every phase of
this Convention; and,
WHEREAS; These helpmates of all
Florida Association of Architects mem-
bers have, from behind the scenes,
provided inspiration and active help,
not only to the executive elements of
this Convention, but also to its gen-
eral character;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That this Convention recog-
(Continued on Page 27)



















MR. HALE DID...

"It is so economical

to operate."


Mr. Hale says, "I decided to put
in central oil heating for my home
owners because it is the most een- ::

ly distributed heat you can use. It ":
helps to sell the house also, beca use
it is so economical to operate."



Mr. Architect: Your c clients I -.

and prospective clients are

learning about the superior ,
dependability and economy of H. E. Hale, President of Hale & Hale, Inc., Daytona Beach builders,
inspects an oil heating unit being installed in one of his new homes.
oil home heating through ads

like this. Your recommenda-

tion of oil heating systems will

find ready acceptance.
Remember-Florida homes do need heat!
Even South Florida homes require an over-
.LOIIDage of 42 days, of dependable home heat-
OO HOME HATIN NSTUE ing each year when temperatures drop
into the 50's or lower. "u.s.w.,.......


18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Revelation; Reason and Action ...


(Continued from Page 10)
concerted creative thought and action
is greatest in times of crisis. Where
our desire is sufficient, I think none
of these enemies is invincible.
Many writers have beautifully de-
scribed the surrender to creativity and
the restlessness of the inventive mind.
In summation here I'd like to bring
you just three. First, from THOMAS
MANN introducing his story of Joseph:
"For do I not know the feeling? To
me, too, has unrest been ordained;
have not I, too, been endowed with
a heart which knoweth no repose?
The story-teller's star-is it not the
moon, lord of the road, the wanderer
who moves in his stations one after
another freeing himself from each?
For the story-teller makes many a sta-
tion, roving and relating, but pauses
only tent-wise awaiting further direc-
tions; and soon feels his heart beating
high partly with desire, partly, too,
from fear and anguish of the flesh,
but in any case as a sign that he must
take the road toward fresh adventures
which are to be painstakingly lived


through, down to their remotest de-
tails according to the restless spirit's
will."
Then, from Victor Hugo I think
this particular passage speaks to archi-
tects again and again:
"Every man has within him his own
Patmos. He is free to go, or not to go,
out upon that frightful promontory
of thought from which one perceives
the shadow. If he goes not, he remains
in the common life, with the common
conscience, with the common virtue,
with the common faith or with the
common doubt; and it is well. For in-
ward peace it is evidently the best. If
he goes out upon those heights, he is
taken captive. The profound waves of
the marvelous have appeared to him.
No one views with impunity that
ocean. Henceforth he will be the
thinker dilated, enlarged, but floating;
that is to say, the dreamer. He will
partake of the poet and the prophet.
Henceforth a certain portion of him
belongs to the shadow. An element of


the boundless enters into his life, into
his conscience, into his virtue, into his
philosophy."
And, finally, from ADLAI STEVEN-
SON in answer to the question, "What
is a Liberal"-an answer we might
paraphrase for the creative architect:
"First, he believes in the existence
of the future as well as the past-and
believes that it can be made a good
future. If he is my age, he may often
thiik of the past; and he may think
of it with affection and nostalgia. But
he rejects the idea that it was better
than what we face now. In answer to
the conservative's question, 'Whither
are we drifting?' the liberal says, 'We
cannot drift; we must go.' Although
he respects the past, he has no desire
to tinker with the clock or to turn it
back. He does not try to force it ahead.
But he does wind the clock!
And so I ask this today: do we care
enough to wind the clock; to move
with time toward fresh adventures; to
venture on to Hugo's "frightful prom-
ontory" and there be taken captive?
I believe and I hope that we do.


(Fifth of a series)
Painting of treated lumber is not feasible because the
surface of treated lumber is coated with oil or chemicals
that resist paint.





CELCURED Lumber is easily paintable when dry. Actually CELCURE
serves as an excellent base or primer for paint. It retards chipping and
cracking, and will not "bleed" through as will other preservatives.


For further information on CELCURE Treated Lumber, write to the
plant nearest, you.

Treating Plants in:
TAMPA WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE GRACEVILLE
ORLANDO BOYD BUNNELL




AMERICAN C 1I1 e WOOD PRESERVING CORP.

1074 EAST EIGHTH STREET JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


DECEMBER 1959





TABULATION OF BIDS


JOB. NO.

DATE


JOB


General Contractor

Base Bid

Time

Renv. past mas/sy

Excv. soil per cy

Mass Cone per cy

Forms per sf

Plast bond per sy

2 coat plast per sy

3 in. tile part/sf

3 coat paint plast/sy
deduct
Alternate No. I add
deduct
Alternate No. 2 add
deduct
Alternate No. 3 add



Heating and Plumbing Contr.

Base Bid
deduct
Alternate No. 1P add
deduct
Alternate No. 2P add



Electrical Wiring Contr.

Base Bid

Linoleum Contract

Base Bid

Library Equipment
Contractors

Base Bid
deduct
Alternate No. 1 add
deduct
Alternate No. 2 add

20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


AuFUK=J


FAAGOOD PRACTICE I


Office and Job Forms...


AUVK


JOB







News & Notes


Students to Compete on
FAA Stationery Design
A design sketch problem has been
scheduled for students in the U/F
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
relating to the design of stationery
and membership cards for the FAA's
administrative office. Dean TURPIN C.
BANNISTER has authorized the sketch
competition and has invited students
of the Advertising Design curriculum
as well as those in the Architectural
Department to compete. The FAA's
office will make two prizes available;
$25 for the design placed first for the
stationery-letterheads and envelopes
-and $15 for that placed first for the
membership cards.
The sketch problem has been sched-
uled for December 4; and judgment
will be rendered December 5. It is
hoped that winning designs can be
shown in The Florida Architect for
January. Assistant Professor WILLIAM
STEWART is in charge of the design
competition; and all entrants will be


briefed on the scope and possibilities
of the sketch problem-including
suggestions regarding typography-by
RoY CRAVEN, in charge of the adver-
tising design curriculum.


Subcontractor Conference
On Retained Percentage
The matter of retained percentage
-long a financial thorn in the opera-
ting side of general contractors-was
the subject of a day-long discussion
November 5 between architects, sub-
contractors and surety bond experts
at the AIA headquarters in Washing-
ton. Called by the AIA, the meeting
included representatives of 12 na-
t i o n a subcontractor organizations,
building product companies, the Pro-
ducers' Council, the Association of
Casualty and Surety Companies, The
Surety Association of America and the
National Association of Credit Man-
agement. The AIA was represented by
six national officers and directors as
well as chairmen of national AIA


Committees concerned with construc-
tion industry problems.
Purpose of the meeting was to
acquaint AIA personnel with subcon-
tractors' views on tfie retained per-
centage problem. This problem is
recognized as a serious one by virtually
every segment of the construction in-
dustry. And a series of conferences
with various groups within the in-
dustry has been held during the past
few years with little concrete results
in the way of an overall policy to
show for them. According to AIA
Executive Director Edmund R. Pur-
ves, FAIA, this most recent meeting
"has undoubtedly made an impact
on the AIA leadership." Purves said
that as a result of the discussion the
AIA Board "will most likely" again
consider the Institute's policy on the
matter of retained percentages.
Economists have figured that the
withholding of an unnecessarily high
proportion of contract payments re-
sults in effectively freezing many
(Continued on Page 22)


"J Write or Phone N
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc.
for brochure, samples, or
further information.
DECEMBER 1959


At lost! Here's a pre-finished
plywood paneling wi f h a
written lifetime guarantee
against fading, against de-
lamination, against any
structural defect! Plywall's
12 handsome finishes ar e
highly scuff-resistant
S w r c. stain-resistant! Available in
4x7, 4x8, and 4x10 V-
S groove panels. Also, 4x8
4 iW' plain. Let us give you the
.1 j complete Poly-Clad story!











DISTRIBUTED BY:
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc., 924 Sligh Blvd., GA 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc., 2860 22nd Ave., No., Phone 5-7627
Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc., 1607 S. W. 1st Ave., JA 3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc., 1043 Haines St. Expressway, EL 6-8542





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 21)
millions of dollars annually. In
addition, it tends to raise the cost of
construction since it often makes
necessary additional financing, on an
expensive, short-term basis, on the
part of contractors who cannot obtain
payments for work done and materials
furnished until the building has been
certified as completed.
Almost a year and a half ago-in
June, 1958-the Specialty Contractors
Association, at a meeting in Chicago,
adopted the resolution that, "Re-
tained percentages of work completed
on all construction work shall be 10
percent of all work completed up to
50 percent of the total contract price
on either subcontractor or general
work-the retainer fees not to exceed
5 percent of the total contract when
work completed exceeds 50 percent
of the total contract."
Indications are that this resolution
reflects the thinking of a large pro-
portion of the construction industry-
on both the general and the subcon-
tract levels.


THIS YEAR IT WAS NECKTIES . The custom of identifying Host Chapter
committeemen started at the 1957 Convention in Clearwater by the red coats
of the "Clearwater Hunt Club" was continued in Jacksonville this year. Each
member of the Jacksonville Convention Committee sported a new necktie in
the colors chosen for the styling of the Convention literature and program.
Here are some of them--and their badge of office. Left to right, C. Stanley
Gordon, Wayne P. Meyers, Lamar Drake, Robert E. Boardman, Taylor Hardwick,
Walter B. Schultz, John R. Graveley and Roy M. Pooley, Jr.


AIA Board Calls for
Wider Civic Redesign
The AIA Board has called upon
architects in every section of the na-
tion to "take the lead in improving
our cities by advancing a coordinated


approach to planning for community
building and re-building."
In a statement issued immediately
after its Portland, Oregon, meeting,
the AIA Board summed up the neces-
sity for professional action. In part,
(Continued on Page 24)


FEATHEROCK VENEER..



*Lightweight-seven pounds
to the square foot . .


Beautiful new colors and
textures Silver Gray and
Charcoal . . Easy to shape
and apply perfect lasting
bond . . Durable with-
stands weather and freezing
.... Chemically neutral ....

eFEATHEROCK-in veneer
or natural shapes- is a nat-
ural lava stone quarried in
California, available locally.


S0 0 0 0 ...


Distributed in Florida by:
Kissam Builders Supply, Orlando . . Steward-Mellon Co., Jacksonville . .
Steward-Mellon Co., Tampa . . Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., Hialeah . .
Doby Brick & Supply, Boca Raton . .


And in Georgia by:
F. Graham Williams Co., Atlanta

featherock, INC. 6331 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES 28, CALIFORNIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







For a Better Job,
Specify CRADLE DRAIN
Because...
1. C.D. is the first major
improvement in sub-surface
drainfields.
2. C.D. has ten years of
proven satisfactory usage.
3. C.D. costs no more than
conventional drainfields.
4. C.D. insures a longevity
of operation.
5. C.D. guarantees less chance
of clogging.
6. C.D. is highly root-resistant.
7. C.D. eliminates rank growth
and lawn streaks.


FLORIDA DEALERS
L. C. Boggs Industries
Hollywood, Florida
Cochran Concrete Company
Sarasota, Florida
Dawson Company
Riviera Beach, Florida
F. A. Johnson, Inc.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Lake Alfred Concrete Products
Lake Alfred, Florida
Naranja Rock Company
Naranja, Florida
North Dade Septic Tank Co., Inc.
S North Miami Beach, Florida
Palm Beach Septic Tank Co.
West Palm Beach, Florida
Pence Sitton Septic Tank Co.
'Melbourne, Florida
Sanitary Engineering Co., Inc.
Ormond Beach, Florida
Geo. W. Shepard & Sons, Inc.
Naples, Florida


CRADLE DRAIN...


Now Used Exclusively by


HOWARD JOHNSONS in Florida

"In comparison to other types of drainfields, we do not hesitate to say
that it is every bit as good as any we have found available today, and we
particularly like the cradle drainfield because a new installation can
be made very quickly and, even where large quantities of affluent have
to be disposed of, it does not take a great deal of area as'compared with
some other makes. It is very adaptable to a relay job without a long
drawn out messy job."


1. Cradle Drain has been
approved by the Florida
State Board of health on a
basis of a 1 to 4 ratio ... a
75% reduction in the length
of the ordinary drainfield.


2. Cradle Drain is the only
drainfield in use today
where the distributor is
both above the reservoir
and above the 12-inch rock-
bed absorption area.


3. Cradle Drain has a peak-
load storage reservoir above
the absorption area hold-
ing the air-equivalent of
21/2 gallons of water.


4. Cradle Drain has been tested
by the Wingerter Laborator-
ies, Inc. of Miami, Florida ...
and Report 44094 states con-
clusively that Cradle Drain
will withstand a destructive
force of 12,000 pounds.


CRADLE DRAIN CORPORATION
DUPONT PLAZA CENTER SUITE 707
MIAMI 32, FLORIDA
FRanklin 3-3371


DECEMBER 1959











Depend on Members of

AIR-CONDITIONING
REFRIGERATION
HEATING & PIPING
ASSOCIATION, INC.
1390 N.W. 43rd ST.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
SAirko Air Conditioning Company
SCawthon, Dudley M., Inc.
C central Roof & Supply Co.
SConditioned Air Corporation
Domestic Refrigeration
SCiffen Industries. Inc.
Hamilton, Sam L., Inc.
Hill York Corporation
SMcDonald Air Conditioning
SMiami Air Conditioning
Miami Super Cold. Inc.
Poole & Kent Company
SZack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
SUPPLIERS
* A & B Pipt & Gondas Corporation
Steel Co. Graves Refrigeration
SAir Filers Co. McMurray, H. L.Co.
Brophy, George Middleton, J. L., Co.
Clark Equipment Co. O'Brian Associates
Dean, A.C., Co. Southern Metal Prod.
SFlorida Elec. Motor Swigert Air
a Gen. Sheet Metal Cond. Engrs.
& Roofing Trane Company


rJ


DESCO VITRO-GLAZE is a
vitreous-hard, glazed wall
finish that's attractive, sani-
tary, washable, colorful,
waterproof and economical.
It is available in many non-
fading, permanent colors
and is an ideal material for
use on walls of schools, hos-
pitals, churches and all pub-
lic and commercial buildings.

STEWARD-MELLON CO.,
Of Jacksonville
945 Liberty Street, Jacksonville
Phone: ELgin 3-6231


News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 22)
the statement said:
"Our first priority in this coming
decade must be to make our com-
munities more liveable, efficient and
beautiful. By 1975 our total popula-
tion will increase to around 225 mil-
lion people, 70 percent of which will
live in cities and suburbs. Unless the
habitation for this vast population ex-
pansion is properly designed and built,
our cities and suburbs will continue
to generate slums and traffic conges-
tion."
The AIA Board called for a more
continuous and effective attention to
solving urban problems than has yet
been given.
"The decay of our cities is overtak-
ing our limited on-again, off-again re-
newal efforts. Our national pride, the
continuation of our high standard of
living and our leadership of the free
world demand sound and continuing
redevelopment programs based on
proper planning and design.
"We must stop the pollution of
land, water and air. We need greater
emphasis on beauty in our environ-
ment. Effective means must be found
to control city and highway blight,
billboards, overhead wires and other
disruptive outdoor advertising."
The statement urged architects
throughout the nation to follow the
example of those groups which have
already given leadership in re-design-
ing their communities. The cities of
Detroit, Kansas City, Nashville, Mem-
phis, Indianapolis and Toledo were
cited as examples of what coordinated
architectural activities in re-design and
in rallying the.support of the public
could accomplish toward the progres-
sive improvement of communities.

Craftsmen Of the Year
Honored In Miami
Over 350 members of the Florida
South Chapter, A.I.A., and their
guests converged on Dupont Plaza
Hotel last month (November 10) to
celebrate the fifth annual Craftsmen's
Awards Banquet. EDWARD G. GRAF-
TON, president, said the event prob-
ably marked one of Miami's largest
meetings of the year to be sponsored
by the construction industry.
In the spotlight were eleven crafts-
men of the Greater Miami area who
were singled out by the Awards Com-


mittee for their outstanding skill, in-
terest and exacting precision. Commit-
tee Chairman, ALFRED BROWNING
PARKER, F.A.I.A., announced that se-
lections were made following personal
inspection tours of the work sites nom-
inated, and after many interviews with
nominees' employerAand fellow work-
ers.


Hellmuth Thomas, tile setter, receives
his second annual craftsman award
from Florida South Chapter President
Edward G. Grafton, right. In the back-
ground are two other award winners,
Frank Henson, lighting fixtures, and
Peter Dunan, masonry designer. The
Chapter's excellence award went to
eleven of Miami area's top craftsmen.

One of the 1959 winners is HELL-
MUTH THOMAS who received a similar
award from Florida South Chapter in
1954 for his fine work as a tile setter.
Other winners are WILLIAM
STRAIGHT and RAYMOND SMITH, De-
sign Associates in the American In-
stitute of Decorators, and craftsmen
in ceramic tiles; FRANK HENSON,
lighting fixtures; HERMAN BROCK-
DORFF, sculptor; PETER DUNAN, ma-
sonry designer; MICHAEL Ross, cab-
inet maker; LEVI E. JACOBS, pipe fit-
ter; ROBERT P. RINGEMANN, plumber;
VILJO LAAKSONEN, carpenter; and
ANGELO GAVAGNI, a mason.
Sharing the spotlight for Florida
South Chapter was GEORGE NAKA-
SHIMA, architect, famous furniture de-
signer, and National A.I.A. Gold
Medal award winner in 1952.

Data on Surety Bonds
Construction bonds are today rec-
ognized as an essential part of modern
construction procedures. But they arc,
in the words of JOHN NOBLE RICH-
ARDS, FAIA, president of the AIA,
(Continued from Page 26)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


in7










































MEDALLION HOME AWARDS

BRING PRESTIGE TO ARCHITECTS


This Medallion certifies that a home meets modern requirements
for electrical living. It guarantees that the home is designed to
provide many work-saving and comfort features. It's a "most-
wanted" home that turns clients into delighted homeowners. It
reflects the architect's professional pride in up-grading residential
standards for modern living... Better Living, Electrically.

a MEDALLION HOME must meet these
basic requirements:
* ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHEN-LAUNDRY that includes at least 4 major elec-
trical appliances... water heater, cooking range, clothes dryer, dishwasher,
or other "Reddy-servants."
* FULL HOUSEPOWER (100-200 amp service) with large enough wire and
ample circuits, outlets and switches for maximum convenience and efficiency
...now and in the future.
* LIGHT-FOR-LIVING properly planned for every part of the house and
outdoors, for decorative beauty and utility.

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.


The Medallion Home campaign
is backed by multi-million dollar
promotions in newspapers and
magazines, on TV and radio. Call
our office for full details and spec-
ifications to qualify your homes for
Medallion Awards.


DECEMBER 1959


Pr,~






In Cooperatives...

Economical Heating Is a MUST


* Safety, room-by-room control, cleanliness and
p o s i t i v e, through-the-room circulation are
equally important . ELECTREND provides all
these essentials in one efficient, compact unit.


ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
4550 37th Street No. St. Petersburg
Phone: HEmlock 6-8420


MOORE VENT
. MOORE VENT


1 Keep Walls Dry
2 Make Walls Cooler
3 Save Owners Money
Placed 4' on centers at top and bot-
tom of walls, aluminum Moore Vents
provide gentle air circulation to relieve
water-vapor pressure, prevent inter-
nal condensation . An effective,
inexpensive means of assuring free-
dom from moisture troubles. Write
for sample and full technical data .


S / s "Stop Wall
// Condensation"
P. O. BOX 1406, WEST PALM BEACH
Phone TEmple 3-1976


GLAZED


CEMENT


. A vitreous wall

surfacing, supplied

and applied through-

out Florida by . .



BEN THOMSON, INC.
530 Putnam Road
West Palm Beach
JUstice 5-1122


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A.R.COGSWELL
"SINCE 1921"

AW

THE BEST

in

Architects' Supplies



Complete Reproduction
Service



433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


r


News & Notes
(Continued from Page 24)

"... not well understood, particularly
by the less experienced practitioners
and by clients, prospective clients and
the construafivtbjndustry. .. To pro-
vide authoritative information regard-
ing such bonds, The Surety Associa-
tion of America-which comprises
some 80 bonding organizations-has
prepared a 44-page booklet entitled
"Bonds of Suretyship".
The little volume has been enthu-
siastically endorsed by the AIA-and,
in fact, has been prepared in close
association with the Institute staff. In
part, it constitutes a reprint from cer-
tain portions of the "Handbook of
Architectural Practice"; but other por-
tions offer clear definitions of various
types of surety bonds. In addition, the
booklet contains typical examples of
various types of the most commonly
utilized bonds.
Extra copies of the booklet, for use
by architects with clients or prospec-
tive clients, may be obtained by writ-
ing to the Surety Association of Amer-
ica, 60 John Street, New York 38,N.Y.






Resolutions ...
(Continued from Page 17)
nize and pay tribute to the distaff
side of the membership; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That
special notice and appreciation of this
Convention is expressed to the ladies
of the Auxiliary of the Host Chapter.

In Memoriam
WHEREAS; God, in His infinite
wisdom, has taken from this earth
Jack Moscowitz and others; and,
WHEREAS; These men had of their
time and resources given much to the
profession; and,
WHEREAS; We mourn their loss as
personal friends as well as fellow prac-
titioners;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: That the Florida Association
of Architects does mourn the loss of
these members and miss them from
among its ranks; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That a
copy of this resolution be sent to the
surviving members of the families and
spread upon the minutes of the Asso-
ciation.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX

A-C, R, H & P Assn., Inc.. 24
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Corp. . . 19
A. R. Cogswell . . . 26
Cradle Drain Corporation . 23
Electrend Distributing Company 26
Featherock, Inc.... . . 22
Florida Home Heating Institute 18
Florida Power and Light Company 25
Florida Power Corporation . .28
Florida Steel Corporation .. 6
George C. Griffin Co . 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 21
Houston Corporation . .. 7
Moore Vents. . . 26
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida . 1
National Bronze Company . 16
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc.. . 5
Souhtern Lightweight
Aggregate Corp.. . 3
Steward-Mellon Co.
of Jacksonville ... . ..24
Ben Thomson, Inc.. . 26
Tiffany Tile Corp. . . 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27


DECEMBER 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


F


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1084
LONG DISTANCE 470


ATLANTA

GA.


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154






Electricity




does all better!









LIGHTING
There's no substitute in commercial and
industrial operations for modern electric light-
ing for illumination, advertising, decorating,
or display. Electric lighting SELLS, INCREASES
PRODUCTION!


COOKING
For cleanliness, safety, convenience and
economy in commercial cooking, electric
equipment has no equal, whether for the small
lunch room, the luxury restaurant, the in-
plant snack bar or company cafeteria. Electric
cooking is FAST AND EFFICIENT!

MORE INFORMATION?
YEAR-ROUND For further information from our
COMFORT CONDITION I NG staff of experienced commercial rep-
COMFORT CONDITIONING resentatives or industrial engineers,
Nothing pulls in customers for the business write, wire or phone your nearest
firm, or improves plant working conditions, Florida Power Corporation office, or
like cool, comfortable air conditioning during A. H. HINES, JR., director of area de-
the hot sweltering months of summer, and velopment, or R. C. ROBERTS, director
comfortable safe electric heat during the win- of commercial development, Florida
ter. Electric year-round comfort conditioning Power Corporation, St. Petersburg, Fla.
means MORE CUSTOMERS, INCREASED Tel. 5-2151.
OUTPUT!




FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
I IVE BETTER
]FORD POVR'1e Ea* \ ] ^rmc^


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Another Open Letter...


To Florida's Next Governor


MY DEAR GOVERNOR:
In a former communication I ventured to call your attention to the need for a
policy and program to halt the growth of unregulated, shoddy building which is
threatening our cities with blight. I also suggested you concern yourself with legislative
measures for improving construction practices as one means for meeting the need
outlined.
May I now point out another measure which can have a far-reaching effect in
achieving the goals which I am sure we both seek. I refer to the pressing necessity
for a new building at the University of Florida to house the educational plant for
Florida's construction industry.
As you must surely be aware, construction is now a giant among industries in our
State. It is the background for the tremendous industrial expansion which we are
now enjoying. It is providing the means for the growth of our tourist industry. It
furnishes the tools and know-how for the progressive development of our towns and
cities; and thanks to the skill and experience and initiative of those who comprise
this industry architects, contractors, engineering specialists and suppliers of materials
and products- Florida has grown and consolidated her growth at an almost phe-
nomenal rate.
But educationally, construction is the step-child of progress in our State.
At the University of Florida is the nation's fourth largest College of Architecture
and Fine Arts. It offers instruction not only in the arts of building design, but as
well in the techniques of building construction. Thus it is organized to serve every
facet of the building industry. But it is operating under a handicap of so grave a
nature that maintenance of its educational standards constitutes an almost-major
miracle.
This College, Governor, is housed in a series of shamefully inadequate, wooden
shacks. These were originally built to provide temporary emergency space during
World War II. They now constitute a campus slum. They are in poor repair, ill-
ventilated, poorly lighted. Some are completely without toilet facilities or even water.
They are not only unsanitary, but actually unsafe.
They are in fact, so desparatcly inadequate and crowded, that the National
Architectural Accrediting Board must shortly be forced to withdraw its approval from
the University as providing an accredited College for the study of architecture.
For more than ten years constant efforts have been made to obtain an appropri-
ation from the Legislature to provide adequate housing for one of the most important
educational activities at Gainesville. Prior to 1957 no appropriation was made. Then
a minimum sum was listed in the Appropriations Bill but subsequently withdrawn.
In 1959--in spite of a high priority--this needed construction was again passed
over. In the meantime, the make-do and do-without policy under which the College
has been forced to operate has witnessed further deterioration in the grossly inefficient
structures.
It is logical to assume that the College can hardly continue to operate much
longer under present conditions. Thus the 1961 Legislature becomes a critical dead-
line. If action to provide housing for the College is not forthcoming then, national
accreditation will undoubtedly be withdrawn. The able staff- which has kept educa-
tional standards high in spite of deplorable instructional conditions- will become
too discouraged to fight longer and members will yield to better opportunities else-
where. If this happens, Florida will have lost an educational center of first importance
to the progress and effectiveness of one of her major industrial activities.
To prevent this, Governor, firm and positive leadership toward decisive action
is needed. I earnestly urge you to furnish it in full and effective measure.
Cordially,
RdGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
The Florida Association of Architects






e~au ? 5.m 76e eae*44..,


U/F Alumni


WHY THIS MESSAGE:
Because the University of
Florida is a State-operated
and financed institution, it
cannot budget nor borrow
funds needed to provide the
one-to-nine matching sum
necessary to assure an allo-
cation from the Natlonal De-
fense Loan Fund Thus do-
nations must be relied upon
to ra.se the $90,000 needed
to establish a basis for the
total revolving fund required
for student aid during the
next four years Hence this
appeal for alumni help


- Everywhere!


* Your University needs $90,000. That sum is required
to provide funds on a matching basis so students at your
University can take advantage of the National Defense
Loan Fund established by the U. S. Government. For each
dollar from the University the NDLF will allocate nine
to provide a revolving fund of almost a million dollars to
help struggling students complete their education.

* The U/F student body has pledged its help to raise
some $20,000 of the sum needed. Students are looking to
you alumni for the remaining $70,000. A gift from each
of you will reach the goal-and every dollar thus donated
is tax deductible.

* There is no better season than this to help your Uni-
versity-and there's no better reason for helping your
University than to make sure that some fine, up-and-
coming youngster gets the loan he needs in time to help
him over the rough financial spots on the road to a college
degree. And who knows-maybe the boy your dollars aid
today will be serving your business later with the skill
and knowledge you helped make it possible to acquire.

* Remember your own college days. If you had a rocky
financial path to walk-give so others may find the going
easier. And if things went smooth and fine for you-give
so that others can avoid some of the frustrations and
heartbreaks you didn't know existed.


MAKE AN XMAS OR NEW YEAR'S PLEDGE
Write a check today to:
University of Florida Endowment Corp.
And send it promptly to:
University Alumni Association; P. 0. Box 3535
University Station, Gainesville, Fla.


WELCOME THIS OPPORTUNITY TO HELP,
/ ,5




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs