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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00065
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00065
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


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ida architect
THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OFARCHITECTS OFTHIE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFARCHITECTS


45tnl annuaL
convention sue


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1W lARKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHAN I CAL CONTRACTORS

HONORS

R. J. SCHNEIDER A.I.A.
Architect on the Hotchkiss-Mank
Town Park Estates Homes


F


R. J. Schneider has made an important contribution
to the housing needs of the flourishing Dade County
population increase through his inspired creations
for homes for such prominent builders as Adler
Construction, Francine Homes and R & R Construc-
tion Co. Tracing back a distinguished career in
architecture for 16 years, Mr. Schneider numbers
among his industrial projects the recently completed
Southern Bell Building in Hialeah. Markowitz Bros.,
Inc. was pleased to have handled the entire plumb-
ing and heating on Mr. Schneider's 700 home Town
Park Estate development.


AW RKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS
5600 N.E 4TH AVENUE. MIAMI 37 FLORIDA

* PLUMBING HEATING AIR CONDITIONING POWER PLANTS
* PROCESS PIPING SEWAGE AND WATER TREATMENT PLANTS


-4


THE BIG
ONES CALL
FOR THE B I .


NW















FLORIDA


TILE


. . offers architects a Florida-made ceramic

tile of the highest quality in a wide range of

popular colors. Sample available upon request

from the distributors' showrooms listed below.


S Q O OE .AUTY Q
DURABII"- |O


I K] iPl


DISTRIBUTORS


Atlanta Tile Contractors' Supply
Columbia, S. C. Renfrow Dist. Company, Inc.
Ft. Lauderdale- Miami Tile Dist.
Ft. Myers -Gulf Tile Dist.
Jacksonville- Miami Tile Dist.
Melbourne East Coast Tile and Terrazzo Supply
Miami -Miami Tile Dist.
Sarasota Palm Tile Dist.
St. Petersburg- Tile Dist., Inc.
West Palm Beach Sikes Tile Dist.
Winter Park -South East Tile Dist., Inc.


NOVEMBER, 1959


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


la 74i Isse-


Letters . . . . . . . . 4
Four Criticisms and a Commentary . . . . . . . 17
By H. Samuel Kruse, AIA
Long Live The King! . . . . . . 19
By Lester Pancoast
1959 AIA Residential Awards . . . . . . . . 21-25
1 Merit Award Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA, Architect
2 Merit Award David Tudeen, Architect
Air Conditioning for Florida's Schools? . . . . . . 27
The President's Annual Report . . . . . . . . 31
By John Stetson, AIA
Works of Art Purchased as Convention Attendance Awards . . . 34
AIA's Home Award Program Goes National Next Year . . . 35
Program 45th Annual FAA Convention . . . . . 37-42
Reduction of Exit Requirements Proposed for Southern Code . . . 45
State Board Revises Rule 7 . . . . . . . . . 49
Report of the Nominating Committee . . . . . . . 51
Regional Judiciary Committee To Be Elected At Conference . . . 53
How To Write A Committee Report . . . . . . . 53
FAA Standards of Good Practice . . . . . . . 55-57
Office and Job Forms
News and Notes . . . . . ... 59
Designing with Light 64
By Stanley. McCandless
5th Annual Roll Call 76-77
Advertisers' Index . . . . . . . 79


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
H. Samuel Kruse, Immediate Past President, C of C Bldg., Miami

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.
DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Leete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage,
Wahl J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene
Cellar; MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM
BEACH: Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.

THE COVER
Members and others who have received information relative to the FAA's
45th Annual Convention this month will recognize the design on the cover
as an adaptation from that used on the Convention Committee's letterheads
and printed material. The general format and the characteristic sunburst were
developed cooperatively by members of the Jacksonville Chapter.


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 11 1959
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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doors.


Thern'm..i re.,rii.:rced pla rjc kr'ri
I and mah,.car., rail and rile: I
permar, rnrl, t..:. ended r.:. hghl, .,arer-
rec:iranr .:..r' ct equarit .ell. produ.:
3 ra n I rh e r..:3 ll, iq n r re .rir 'r.. p r.:.du- ,c r
r.Ch ar.d r-t.n. d ., th.:..tr col-.r .-.f 1. l, B
impact atlrh c.:.i.:r Cell '
TRA NSLUCENT ,cr elimn. re: alare
and atturd; pr .a.:,
ESIST' NT ir ..eatherr, mpaacr
abrasion chemical:
LOW /.\AINTENI NCE ,l.in: f:.t I"
mil, i ,nure again-r er,..: r. r. l 3rd r.r:. id.
lony lie. H ih a.:r.,l.c ar.d ultra l.:,-le
ab::rber ccnrtenr Scrarche; aln.,: - I
..i.ble No .:G:rr..:.ri G .d L. .alue
STABILITY ,: exc-ll, r.r be-:raue -.t
recril r.ar core .'hich re .i:.zt ex ,an-
.:,ri, arnd *:.nrracticrn and permit: pla:t-
ric ,k.n ber..eern c.-re mnenber: to take
up rno ement
FAIL AND STILE of rrmah.ogar,, tur.-
gqcde trratred and ur>thanr: c,)ared
The are prOjecred 'a be\o-'d i4l n:
It, allo dres.,r. arid in trallla ,r ..i t t
,urt




Same .:cn:truct..:.r. at d r.:3r: except
no rail and rile. Exter.-r .:.r intcn:,r
Ncn .n production oon.r -0 X 6. -
and 7 d and panel.-
---btrh I '- arnd X X cell .:ze
Cu:rton. .:e" c:l.:.r c ll :pecal le- '
ra,.1 klihtl: :. pern eg. crate r.
-.pecial order -





C- a-r.t. r t' ----








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unloading .... nothing-but
nothing, is as versatile as
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Whether you specify the
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with but four or five sta-
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est electroncially controlled
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fifty or more stations, you'll
be serving your client best
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backed by 43 years of con-
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alone.
May we be of service to
you anywhere in Florida?


ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR

& SUPPLY COMPANY
501 N. W. 54th St., Miami


Letters


$1000 Architect's Award
Proposed for Tile Design
Recently received by JOHN STETSON,
FAA President, was a letter from
THOMAS A. GRAMLING, of Minneapo-
lis, a Director of the Tile Contractors'
Association of America, Inc. It con-
cerns the recently adopted decision of
the Association to devote a day of each
year's national convention as "archi-
tects' day" and to award the sum
of $1000 and a suitable plaque to an
architect or designer of outstanding
work in the field of tile.
Mr. Gramling's letter provides full
information on this unique and inter-
esting program. It is reproduced here
at the suggestion of the FAA president.
Dear MR. STETSON:
Our Board of Directors recently
passed a resolution to honor an archi-
tect or designer for his outstanding
work in the field of tile. This annual
award will be made to an individual
in the state in which we are holding
our national convention. Inasmuch as
our 1960 Convention is being held
in Jacksonville from May 8th through
the 13th, we earnestly seek your
cooperation so that this first award
will be successful.
Two years ago we inaugurated an
architects' day at the Convention; and
last year in Chicago the largest display
of American made tile was exhibited.
We had in attendance nearly 200
architects from Chicago and the sur-
rounding area; the Chicago Chapter
put on a panel discussion and the
entire afternoon proved to be most
enlightening for both architects and
tile contractors. We, therefore, would
like to make the presentation of this
award in conjunction with our archi-
tects' day program.
The resolution passed by our Board
of Directors, gives an expense paid
trip for one day to our Annual Con-
vention, also a monetary remuneration
of $1000 and a plaque suitable to the
occasion. The thoughts and inten-
tions of our Committee are that the
following ideas guide us in the selec-
tion of a candidate.
The award, as I mentioned above,
to be made to an architect or designer
for his or her outstanding work in the
field of tile. If a specific installation


is the basis of this award, this installa-
tion must have been installed by a
member of the Tile Contractors' As-
sociation, Inc. We also feel that the
jury of selection should embody a
panel of architects as well as members
of our Association. Undoubtedly the
best way of obtaining candidates for
this award would be for your organiza-
tion to request that architects and
designers submit their qualifications
for consideration and also members
of our Association residing in Florida
should have the opportunity of sub-
mitting candidates.
I understand your State Association
is holding your Annual Convention
next month. I hope that you will take
this matter up with your Board of
Directors and that we may receive a
favorable reply. I have asked MR. M.
V. COSTELLO of the Steward-Mellon
Company of Jacksonville, who is a
member of our Awards Committee, to
contact you regarding the proposed
award.
Thanking you for your considera-
tion, I am
Very truly yours,
THOMAS A. GRAMLING

Good Suggestion for
FAA P/R Program
EDITOR, FA:
Through an architect friend I have
had occasion to see several recent
issues of The Florida Architect. As
one having a close past contact with
publishing, I congratulate you on the
magazine's overall appearance and
general makeup. Editorially it appears
to do a rather complete job of keeping
its readers abreast of developments in
the professional field. So it undoubt-
edly provides good values for its
advertisers also.
Though merely a layman, I have
been interested in reading some of the
articles. I found them informative and
enjoyable; and because of this I ven-
ture to offer a suggestion for future
issues.
Would it not be profitable for the
profession to include more examples
of the work architects are doing
throughout the State? I believe many
non-architects like myself would find
this interesting and in many cases
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


































Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company's new General Office
Building in Jacksonville, Fla.
KEMP, BUNCH & JACKSON, A.I.A., Jacksonville, Fla., Architects;
JOHN L. McCOLLOUGH, Jacksonville, Fla., Engineer;
DANIEL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY OF FLORIDA, Jacksonville, Contractors.

BUILDING THAT SPEAKS...


Atlantic Coast Line Railroad's new general office
building speaks, industrially, of imagination,
foresight, and faith in the future of a progres-
sive area.
Architecturally, it speaks of creative scope
and a skilled use of the latest materials and
techniques.
In this important project, Solite lightweight
structural concrete played a number of im-
portant roles. Selected for its light weight and
durability, it was used over cellular steel decks,
for structural concrete decks, and to form cants,
saddles and crickets on roof decks. The result:
a saving on cost with no sacrifice in quality -
Wherever you find imaginative and
effective new construction techniques
at work you are apt to find Solite.
It is a natural choice for building.


through reducing dead weight in the structure
of the building, reducing load on the foundation
system, and reducing the number of piles
required.
Again, Solite was used in the building's pre-
cast concrete exterior spandrel panels. These
sandwich panels were centered with 1" glass
fiber insulation, faced with integrally cast glass
mosaic tile and fastened to the building by bolts
and clips. Thus, they actually served as a com-
plete prefabricated exterior wall, requiring no
further materials or work. The result: a con-
siderable saving in dead weight and erection
time as compared with conventional construc-
tion methods.



A sjyl~c'


FOR BETTER BUILDING-The professional service of an architect or engineer can
save you time and money... assure the integrity of design for lasting satisfaction.


PANTeS:

NOVEMBER, N.. GRE9 CV5PRNSFA








"STEEL'


when


you


want


it!"
REINFORCING BARS
SIRUCTULJAL STEEL
COMPLETE ENGINEERING
AND
FABRICAIING FACILITIEc


- I --- *


TAMPA 8-0451 V
ORLANDO GArden 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


Letters


(Continued from Page 4)
helpful if some way could be found
to get the magazine into their hands.
On the architects' part it would be a
good way to get closer to the public
as potential clients.
RALPH W. SANDERSON,
Miami

Report on Project R-17
EDITOR, FA:
I am forwarding herewith a copy
of my report to the ACSA on the
R-17 project, giving information on
the Grindstone Lake, Wisconsin,
Summer Seminar, which I hope may
be of interest to you.
If you will examine the enclosures,
you will note that a number of chap-
ters and societies throughout the coun-
try have made donations of money
for scholarships in support of this pro-
gram aimed at improving architectural
education.
If your organization was one of
those listed, I hope you will wish to
make a similar or increased contri-
bution towards helping to assure the
continuance of this very worth while
project. We are planning to hold the
fourth annual seminar in the Adiron-
dacks in June, 1960. This year, the
committee is hopeful that there will
be sufficient funds available to enable
at least one from each school to
attend-and also to provide for the
attendance of several more outstand-
ing young men who indicate an inter-
est in entering the architectural teach-
ing profession.
Full expenses, including travel, sub-
sistence and tuition will vary, accord-
ing to distance, from $250 for those
coming from Syracuse, Troy or Mon-
treal, to $480 for those coming from
the West Coast schools. For teachers,
it has been our practice to grant one-
half expense scholarships on the as-
sumption that the school or the
individual can supply the balance. For
prospective teachers, the stipend ordi-
narily should be greater than one-half.
HAROLD BUSH-BROWN,
Chairman, Joint ACSA-
AIA Committee.

NOTE: The R-17 project has set up,
for three past years, two-week summer
seminars for teachers and prospective
teachers of architecture. It is an activ-
ity of the Joint Committee of the


Institute and the Association of Col-
legiate Schools of Architecture. This
year, for the first time, the FAA, as
one of 16 organiaztions, participated
in the program to the extent of $360.
As a result, Assistant Professor Will-
iam A Stewart, U/F College of Arch-
itecture and Fine Arts, attended the
Grindstone Lake Seminar. Attendance
at the seminar totaled 63 participants
47 schools; and 14 speakers.


Future Governors
Take Notice!
EDITOR, FA:
I have truly appreciated receipt of
your publication; and this courtesy
will be returned through the deeper
understanding of the architects' prob-
lems in contradistinction to those of
the professional planner.
Your "Open Letter to Florida's
Next Governor" in the October issue
is splendid. I am sure you are familiar
with the unsuccessful campaign of the
Florida Planning and Zoning Associ-
ation for years in obtaining general
state enabling legislation to aid in
more properly guiding our tremendous
growth. Locally, we have enjoyed
rapport with the architectural com-
munity and know we can call upon
them and receive public service aid.
JOHN B. HARVEY,
Planning Director,
City of St. Petersburg.
EDITOR, FA:
I would like to congratulate you
on an exceptionally fine letter which
you wrote on the back page of the
latest issue of The Florida Architect
entitled "An Open Letter to Florida's
Next Governor."
I thought it was a very well-written
letter saying what most architects in
the State would like to say. I, per-
sonally, would like to see more such
letters written in The Florida Archi-
tect between now and time of elec-
tion. I believe they would have a def-
inite effect on those men running for
governor and other leaders in the
State.
Keep up the good work!
A. ROBERT BROADFOOT, AIA,
Jacksonville Chapter
EDITOR, FA:
For some time I have wished to
write to tell you how much I appre-
ciate the very fine magazine you are
(Continued on Page 10)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











EXCLUSIVELY ... IN TILE BY TIFFANY

SAn entirely new concept in tile design, Mecca is a
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The unique pattern . reminiscent of the
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Use with square tile. Create dramatic color
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Like all tile by Tiffany, Mecca is a true glazed
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1 1

L I

NOVEMBER, 1959


7'


- inquiry
ially invited


tif any
TILE CORPORATION
500 N. West Shore Drive
Port Tampa, Florida


'*'/ ..
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77


U rLJJLIL1 Lit LaE'~~~ I I ~ ~ E~ U~IUEUEEU~I


7~iI-~


NEW! MODULAR

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AW- ~ AFW lioWAW WW


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I-'


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5 *

-er S -


* n 6. *
6 *
*m 6 6 0-




*n l S


S


Mail for Trendline catalog to
Florida Builders, Inc. Trendline Division
Department FA-7 P. 0. Box 11769
St. Petersburg 33, Florida


The new Trendline
catalog contains a
complete description
of Modular Kitchens
and all Trendline
construction
components.


Specify TRENDLINE a division of . FL O ,ID.A. BUTJILDERS
h


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


D~.






























First Methodist Church. Coral Gables. Dean Parmalee. AIA, architect.


74e ngw /dVtlai6 i M-O-I-S-T-U-R-E


. the major cause of exposure-damage to wood


Even indoors, absorption of moisture by untreat-
ed wood can cause swelling, warping, surface-
checking and end-splitting each the start of
progressive deterioration . To guard against
such moisture-damage, specify that all woodwork
in any building be WOODLIFED, preferably by dip-
ping or flooding . WOODLIFE'S "anti-wicking"
action prevents moisture seepage; and by pene-
trating the surface with an invisible, water-
repellent solution, WOODLIFE coats wood cells and
makes protection last and last and last.


Ingredients in Woodlife also protect wood from
decay, fungus, stain and attack by wood-eating
insects. They act as a poison to render wood
immune from attack by the micro-organisms
and insects which feed on untreated wood.


ROW
t ffnnw
SCERTUIM
QUALT
PRODUCT


- mm.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI --- FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto ..... Call Palmetto 2-1011


NOVEMBER, 1959


""y^-;A







A Problem


In Churches


. . how to get

heat economically


* SOLUTION

1. Specify room-by-
room control of heat -
safe and clean due to
electricity. ELEC -
TREND provides this...

2. Specify efficiency
of heating to give
positive through-room
circulation. ELEC-
TREND provides this...

3. Specify space-sav-
ing and economy
through in-wall, and
two-way heat distribu-
tion. ELECTREND pro-
vides this . .


ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING
COMPANY
Comfort Convenience Economy
4550 37th Street No. St. Petersburg
Phone: HEmlock 6-8420


Letters
(Continued from Page 6)


editing for the Florida Association of
Architects. Now that I have read "An
Open Letter to Florida's Next Gover-
nor" in the October issue of The
Florida Architect, I am writing to
thank you and congratulate you.
I have not read a more timely or
objective article in any magazine. You
have at the same time pointed out a
great need, a hope and an aspiration
for the development of our great State
that would, if accomplished only in
part, be of inestimable benefit to mil-
lions of people. Whoever the next
governor may be we do not yet know;
but I hope that he may, together with
all of us, accept the challenge pre-
sented.
A. WYNN HOWELL, AIA,
President-Elect.
Florida Central Chapter

With Appreciation . .
EDITOR, FA:
Thank you so much for your letter
advising me that I will receive The
Florida Architect each month. I ap-
preciate your courtesy in sending me
this publication and am sure I shall
find it interesting and informative.
SPESSARD HOLLAND,
United States Senator.

EDITOR, FA:
Many thanks for sending me The
Florida Architect. I greatly appreciate
a chance to see this fine publication
which so well represents your pro-
fession. I certainly appreciate a chance
to read this fine publication.
EUGENE LYONS,
City Manager,
City of Vero Beach.

EDITOR, FA:
Thank you for your thoughtfulness
in sending me The Florida Architect,
the official voice of architecture in
the State of Florida.
Architecture is a very important
profession in Florida and has devel-
oped a new concept in living spe-
cifically suited to our climate.
As a municipal official, I like to
keep abreast of architectural trends
because of the many public works
scheduled in our capital improvement
program.
Thanks again for your courtesy.
O'IS W. SHIVER,
Commissioner,
City of Miami.


EDITOR, FA:
Thank you very much for the sub-
scription to The Florida Architect. I
have received one copy and have not
only enjoyed it myself, but my two
boys who are in the ninth grade and
very much interested in architecture,
have also obtained pleasure from it.
It was good of you to place my name
on the mailing list.
JOE HALL,
Superintendent,
The Board of Public
Instruction, Dade County.
EDITOR, FA:
Thank you for your letter concern-
ing my receiving The Florida Arch-
itect every month from now on. You
may be interested to know I have
already received my first copy; and
I think that it is wonderful literature
to inform the public and keep fellow
architects abreast of what is happen-
ing in architectural practice in Florida.
I certainly appreciate it and know I
will receive much enjoyment from it.
NORWOOD W. HOPE,
Commissioner,
City of Gainesville.
EDITOR, FA:
I appreciate the courtesy which has
been extended to me of receiving The
Florida Architect each month. I am
sure that this publication will be of
distinct value to myself and the Zon-
ing and Planning Board of Clearwater
in the work which we are attempting
to accomplish.
I feel that an Association such as
yours is of tremendous value in the
assistance which you are giving to
the improvement of Forida commun-
ities.
ARTHUR M. KRUSE,
Chairman,
Zoning and Planning Board,
City of Clearwater.
EDITOR, FA:
Thank you very much for your
letter in which you state I will be
receiving a copy of The Florida Arch-
itect each month. I consider this an
excellent publication, inasmuch as the
information contained is of high qual-
ity and the subjects covered are fre-
quently indigenous to my work.
I shall look forward to receiving
The Florida Architect each month.
KENNETH THOMPSON,
City Manager,
City of Sarasota.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


7







Window Walls


by Griffco...


This is the Jacobs Building latest addition
to Jacksonville's smart new skyline. Architects
were Ketchum and Sharp, Burns & Germaine,
Associated; and their unique checker-board
facade design has been worked out by Griffco
in a series of aluminum sash staggered at alter-
nate floors and separated by panels of yellow
porcelain enamel. Spandrel panels are faced with
white porcelain . This Griffco window wall is
just a block from Convention headquarters -
and you can see its detail in our display booths
43 and 44 . .


SGEORGE C. 4201 St. Augustine Road
R IFFIN .0. Jacksonville, Florida


RIFFCO
QUALITY PRODUCTS
OF ALUMINUM


PERFORMANCE . .
* This Griffco facade is faced
outside with porcelain enameled
steel, inside with painted steel
- with foamglass core forming
a 1 %/4-inch sandwich. Vertical
and horizontal shadow mullions
of heavy aluminum are anchor-
ed to channels attached to floor
slabs permitting two-way ad-
justment for perfect alignment.
All 33,000 square feet of these
Griffco window walls were fab-
ricated, delivered and installed
within 150 calendar working
days from the date of the
contract.


NOVEMBER, 1959





SEE US IN BOOTH 29 FLORIDA ARCHITECTS' CONVENTION JACKSONVILLE, NOV. 11 14


face it, HOMER,


nflobile has replaced



Horse and buggy

JUST AS STRONGHOLD AND SCREW-TITE THREADED NAILS
ARE FAST REPLACING OLD-FASHIONED SMOOTH SHANK NAILS
THE OLD GRAY MARE that tugged on the whiffletree has gone
the way of the dodo. The automobile is here to stay. And so are
STRONGHOLD and SCREW-TITE Threaded Nails.
These "new fangled" nails are no longer a novelty. They've
)L met the test of a quarter of a century of use. Architects specify
them. Leading builders, contractors, fabricators use them by
the millions of pounds a year.
They make house frames up to 5.7 times as strong
-keep wood floors and underlayment smooth, tight,
squeak-free virtually eliminate "popping" nail
heads that mar beautiful gyspumboard drywall -
hold shingles secure in winds up to three times hurri-
cane force. They make new cost-saving methods
practical permit you to use shorter nails, slimmer
nails, fewer nails; save time, labor, material; cut
maintenance costs; give freedom from customer
complaints. No wonder they've revolutionized con-
struction methods!


SActual samples
of nearly 50
different types
1 Lof STRONGHOLD,
SCREW-TITE and
other special
n ails are shown
Son this display
S board. Sent free
S s to dealers, dis-
tributors, archi-
tects, teachers.


Always ask for "Stronghold"
Sor "Screw-Tite" Nails by
\ name. Do not accept
Substitutes. Write us
1 for samples, literature,
Technical data.


' .....-1Y j
'T T



pr-r ~ -


-I'0111


Copyright I. N. & P. Co.. 1959. Trade Marks Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. Litho in U.S.A.
There is only one STRONGHOLD Line-the Original. Made only by
INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Pioneer Developers and Largest Manufacturers of Threaded Nails
. BRIDGEWATER, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A.
Distributed in Florida by


Independent Florida Nail Corp., Norman M. Lewis, P. 0. Box 10553, St. Petersburg 33
Warehouse: 22nd and Durham Sts., Tampa 11
Timber Products Co., Inc., 1834 Atlanta Ave., Orlando
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~T~FC2


I Il


et THI
r 11 0'-
St iiro.ndihold
zioe









CREST Thin-bed Mortars

Permit Greater Use of Ceramic Tile


. -. .









CREST TILE-SET comes pre-mixed. Just add No special preparation of back-up needed.
WATER. Mixer shown is designed especially Here TILE-SET is floated on dry portland
for this purpose. TILE-SET is also easily cement brown coat. Special notched trowel
hand-mixed, gives proper thin-bed mortar thickness.





... More Economical and Permanent

than Any Other Method of Setting Tile!


By specifying CREST TILE-SET, more and more architects
are giving their clients the beauty, permanence and easy
maintenance of ceramic tile-and at a cost competitive with
less satisfactory materials. CREST is the original thin-bed
portland cement mortar. It offers the permanence of
portland cement with over twice the bonding strength
of old- style "mud." Costly lathing . waterproofing . tile
soaking and mortarbox mixing are eliminated. Realize
reductions of up to 65% in wall weight.
Check its advantages. Specify CREST TILE-SET on your next
job. Fully backed by Kaiser's Quality Control Guarantee.
Also specify CREST ACIDITE acid-resistant grout, and
CREST CONDUCTITE, a thin-bed conductive mortar for
setting conductive ceramic tile.


Write for the new Crest AIA brochure


4
S 4-
*


KAISER
MANUFACTURING, INC.
General Offices S. Plant- 2000 Harrinrton. Houston. Toeys
Ol(I ce a3nd Plarni: Lo. An,ele- .li ,rn.- arenu-e.usE and
Othte. : Cr...:ago. Fhilad.lprn.3, DaEiia: Kan:a C.- r.lo


Here full sheets of back-mounted ceramics
are hung in place. TILE-SET holds sheets
without slippage. Allows ample open time
for adjusting.


P


U
II
I I
N


d*






The finishing touch-CREST SUPREME DRY
TILE GROUT is forced into tile joints where
it bonds to sides of tile and to TILE-SET
mortar bed.





.,,







With CREST TILE-SET the completed job is
finished in record time at considerable sav-
ings. And the client receives the perform-
ance, beauty and durability only ceramic
tile offers.


HOTEL ROBERT MEYER, JACKSONVILLE, AIR FORCE ACADEMY, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. SOUTHLAND CENTER, DALLAS, TEXAS
FLORIDA. William B. Tabler, A.I.A. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Architects & Engineers. WeltonBecket, F.A.I.A. andAssociates.
Daniel Const. Co., Inc., of Fla., General Selectile, Inc., Tile Contractor Architects & Engineers. J. W. Bateson
Contractor. Steward-Mellon Co. of Co., Inc., General Contractor. Atlanta
Jacksonville, Tile Contractor Tile & Marble Co., Tile Contractor


NOVEMBER, 1959


I .






WHEN AMERICA BUILDS FOR ECONOMY... IT BUILDS WITH CONCRETE

... ...... . . . . .




















Sears, Roebuck & Company's Tampa store . .
......... . . ........ ...,

















Sears, Roebuck & Company's Tampa store...


concrete folded plate roof achieves
large, unobstructed floor area


One of the basic requirements here was to achieve
unobstructed floor space with economy. Architects
Weed, Russell, Johnson & Associates found the an-
swer by using a concrete shell in the form of a folded
plate. This construction made it possible to span the
entire floor area with only one interior row of columns
. . and suspend the second floor from the roof. The
result: 163,715 square feet of fully flexible floor space,
so important to any retail selling operation.
Folded plate design is, in itself, unique and interest-
ing. And only concrete can give the added boldness of
the wide, cantilevered overhang.
It's one more example of the way new uses of con- Isometric view showing
create are bringing big economies and added vitality FOR STRUCTURES ... 125-fain col on c spacing ola
to both conventional and modern architecture. MODE N is supported by 3-inch
both conventional and modern architecture. MOplates welded together to
S form a hanger. Hangers are
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION concrete spaced25feet c onc.
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT































































VISION PANELS in Weldwood Fire Doors come in five sizes (up to 30" x 36") for Class "C" openings, and in two sizes (up to 100 sq. inches) for
Class "B" openings. Paneling shown is new Algoma-made fire-resistant Weldwood prefinished walnut V-Plank, which also carries the Underwriters' label.

Why settle for just one? Weldwood Fire Doors

with vision panels offer beauty and fire protection


It need not be "either/or." You can
provide both the beauty of wood and
Underwriters' Laboratories rated fire
protection when you specify Weldwood
Fire Doors such as the handsome walnut-
faced door shown here. Available in a
wide range of superbly beautiful wood
faces to match most Weldwood fire-
resistant wood paneling, the Weldwood
Fire Door cuts maintenance costs and
NOVEMBER, 1959


eliminates periodic refinishing.
Listed by Underwriters' Laboratories,
Inc., for Class "C," Weldwood Fire
Doors protect against flame. Weldwood
Fire Doors with Class "B" ratings also
protect against dangerous heat trans-
mission-maximum 2500F at the end of
30 minutes by test. Reason: the incom-
bustible all-mineral Weldrok- core.
Guaranteed against warping or manu-


facturing defects for the life of the
installation, any defective door will be
replaced without charge, including all
labor costs of hanging and refinishing.
Write for free new catalog, "Weldwood
Architectural Doors-#1882."
ALGOMA-MADE
WELDWOOD DOORS
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORPORATION
Dept. FA 11-59,55 W.44th St.,NewYork 36N.Y.
15






Shaapigep tde tewm Syliee o fa euuacsnMe . .


MASONRY MATERIALS

for Design Versatility

for Enduring Beauty

for Structural Stability


Trhe Du.al Counr, Co'rr H:1.,.? Re,,nolds Smith & H.II-
Architect s, The GC .rg, .i '.r.-, I'.I.. j.:r;


Whe '

New


VDesigon fo po
nes et Beaaty


* Fine buildings deserve fine materials and throughout
the world masonry materials have been recognized as most
worthy since building began. The rich old traditions of
architecture were developed in masonry. Today architects
are forging new traditions to serve the expanding and
changing needs of our contemporary life . In that we,
too, play a part by furnishing the time-tested masonry
units to turn dreams into realities . .


.BRICK & TILE CO.

4 fP. 0. Box 6308 589 Nixon Street

Jacksonville 5, Fla. Phone EV 7-2561


:. c.r : L. te Ir. ',,,' r.:. r I = 'F r, t-:,, r.= rr. -, j r ,3,:k :,r.,
r,: ..r.:,:r T h,: l: r l n r, .:.r, c E ..I. l. r:


Io/a reette
,,and PermanCenuce...

rI -


THE FLORIDA ARCHIT


THIS WAS OUR PART...
In the COURT HOUSE
we furnished:
Face Brick . Glazed Tile
. Glazed Brick . In-
terior Stairtreads . Flooring
Tile . Granite
In the PRUDENTIAL BUILDING
we furnished:
Limestone . Face Brick
. Patio Brick . Con-
crete Block . Common
Brick . Hollow Tile . .
Glazed Tile . Granite


Va61

1/


sonrty,

Utiityl












Four Criticisms...




And A Commentary





By H. SAMUEL KRUSE, AIA
Immediate Past President,
Florida Association of Architects


The immediate past president of
the Florida Association of Architects
possesses an unique privilege. As a
member of the Board of Directors he
does not represent a Chapter's interest
nor shoulder executive responsibility
of office. He alone in the FAA can
view the scene of activities at close
range and with unbiased eyes.
Exploiting this unique privilege for
the benefit of the FAA membership
as well as the Board and Officers can
become the immediate past president's
most valuable contribution to the
Association. And it is for this reason
that this paper was prepared.
There are four criticisms that can
be leveled at our activities this year;
and, although these same criticisms
have been made year after year, I shall
state them again because they are
valid and need correction. They are:
1 .. The Board and Officers of the
Association are too much concerned
with administrative procedure and
organization rather than with the far
more difficult and important matters
of policy and direction.
2 ... Board members and Officers
do not thoroughly acquaint themselves
with past and current procedures and
policies when they take office. Too
little is known of past mistakes and
successes; and as a result past mistakes
are repeated and matters previously
studied, digested and adopted or dis-
carded are re-hashed.
3 ... Excepting for the general aims
stated in the Charter, the FAA has
not set for itself specific goals with a
program of action for achieving them.
NOVEMBER, 1959


We are a widely divergent group,
running in different directions, some
not even leaving the same starting
line.
4 ... Committees, generally, are not
assigned specific tasks or studies; and
when given tasks, frequently do not
perform. Committees are expected to
achieve in a month or a year when not
to achieve might be the committee's
best recommendation, and to study
two years and longer the wisest proce-
dure.
Now that the criticisms have been
stated, let the membership be assured,
the year from the last Convention to
this was not without progress. Com-
munications between Directors, Offi-
cers and Chapters have improved
enormously. The cohesiveness so ne-
cessary to effect statewide measures is
improved. Administrative procedures
of Officers and staff are on a sound
operating basis; and we have made
positive starts in educating ourselves
and informing the public. Our publi-
cation, The Florida Architect, is grow-
ing in interest and effectiveness as a
public relations tool and professional
journal. The Officer, Board and Com-
mittee reports will bear this out in
detail.
But where is the FAA headed? At
the 8 August, 1959, Board meeting in
Palm Beach the first major policy
measure was passed by the Board. In
that measure the Board stated that the
policy of the FAA shall be to expand
its activities in all fields of activities
to the maximum permitted by our
growing capacities. This gives direc-


tion to our FAA undertakings. We
now know that if the means are
available, we will expand our scholar-
ship funds, our seminar program, the
circulation of our publication. We
will not stay put or retrench. We will
expand; that's our policy.
But where arc we headed? What arc
our long-range goals which give direc-
tion to our Officers, Directors and
Committees from one year to the next
- and the next after that? How long
will we exhaust our efforts and re-
sources in scattered, unrelated activi-
tics with each new administration?
These are questions that must be re-
solved or the policy adopted in Palm
Beach will result in a wild spending
spree of effort and money with little
lasting benefit to our Association or
our profession.
Last year there were proposed six
broad objectives for the Association in
line with the avowed aims written in
our Charter and four fields of
activity in which our efforts would go
in long measure toward attaining the
six goals. Briefly stated these six ob-
jectives were:
1 . The FAA shall be the author-
itative voice of the profession and be
recognized as a proponent of sound
public policy in every section of
Florida.
2 ... The FAA shall be the leader-
ship in movements to develop our
communities.
3 ... The FAA shall develop a pub-
lic understanding of sound community
(Continued on Page 78)


U& a 0 arv ReA, d r ---






... great names for architects


This is Pompeiian an aristocrat of modern flooring. It's
resilient, thick, quiet with the rich, colorful beauty of
marble to give architects full freedom of color and design . .
This floor, in variegated gray, black and soft green, is one of
fourteen fabulous floor designs displayed in Miami's Buildo-
rama . See them then write us for full data . .


* WHOLESALE


Robbins
FLOOR PRODUCTS, INC.
See Our Booths 5 6
DISTRIBUTORS


Tampa... Jacksonville le- "WE COVER THE STATE" Miami . Orlando
18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FLAMINGO






'N~e444e jtam a eio...


Long Live The King!



By LESTER PANCOAST
Florida South Chapter


Leadership is difficult in a profes-
sion like architecture which produces
a product that not everyone can really
see. FAA President JOHN STETSON
proved this in a recent "Message from
the President" in The Florida Archi-
tect. He trotted out the old fraud-
revealant, the Emperor and His New
Clothes. His cast:
The King . Invisible Cloth . .
Master Tailors . Small Lad . .
Fools who Submit to Contemporary
Architecture . Contemporary
Architecture by Architects . .
Today's Contemporary Architect
. John Q. Buyer and Mr. and
Mrs. Home Buyer.
The innuendo deserves a close sniff.
The Small Lad, remember, is the only
clear-headed, intelligent, honest char-
acter on the scene. Here follows my
paraphrasing of "Are We Spinning
Invisible Cloth?"
Architects are in three groups: one,
Those who just want to make a living,
but practice creative deceit; two, More
than able professional men who are
not contemporary architects; three,
Younger men (like students) who are
blind to all but "completely con-
temporary" (whatever that may be);
these dastards are ahead of their time,
like all other failures have been.
A (truly) brilliant design idol-X
-has fallen on his face in spite of
approval by magazines, designers and
students. He didn't sell because Mrs.
Buyer wouldn't buy.
What sells is success. Success is
selling, making money. Therefore, the
best judge of successful architecture
is the buying public. (Other successes
in this country include billboards,
American automobiles, rose decals,
cheap novels, bubble gum-anything
which really sells.) Educators and edi-
tors waste their time praising "mech-
anistic functional form" because it
doesn't really sell.
NOVEMBER, 1959


The architect has lost out to the
merchant-builders, pre-fabs and plan
books because he has been doing arch-
itecture too advanced to sell. Be
smart! Follow the Paris clothing de-
signer: Get attention with a radical
design-but go conservative if you
want to sell. Otherwise, you have to
be a real salesman, sucker!
Are you making the mistake of
designing for other architects? Design
for the masses or go out of business.
Don't be ahead of your time; the
masses can't keep up. Don't disturb
them. And don't expect anything
from your clients who have lived in
buildings different from what you feel
they need-they simply can't change.
For the last ten years commercial
design has been austere. Don't make
simple designs; because you can't con-
trol the decorator, landscape or power
company anyway. And what is all this
business about glass walls and grilles?
Better get rid of these current devices,
or the Russians-and the buying pub-
lic-will blow us all to hell!
Students-bone up on your ogee
and cove moldings so you will know
how to house conventional furniture.
After all, there is twenty times more
of that than contemporary-and you
must house the stuff! Mother won't
give it up; and vou can't risk dis-
turbing Mother!
It's an insurmountable task to edu-
cate everyone to our way of thinking.
So change. Think like everyone else.
Let's not design for each other, but
for poor old Mother-to make more
money, which means success. Cover
up the King with ogee and cove mold-
ings or he will murder you tailors!
*
I hope that President Stetson
wanted to say "Bad, Bad" to insensi-
tive architects who carry inadequate
clients too far. But he has indicated
(Continued on Page 75)


yes...Four..




Robbins
There's a Robbins floor
product to meet every
specification for economy,
resiliency, durability,
high-fashion or bed-rock
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Curon-


* *


The decorative wall and
ceiling surface that ab-
sorbs all sounds like a
sponge and insulates as
well to cut heating and
air-conditioning costs ..
Colors and textures to
meet almost any interior
design condition . .


DOWNS......
For durability, for re-
siliencey, for beauty, for
long-lived economy -
there's no substitute for
the deep-piled, tightly-
woven values of Downs
pure wool wiltons "so
wonderful underfoot . ."

TILE-TEX...
Asphalt and vinyl-as-
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and famed, too, for choice
of over 100 colors to meld
beauty with utility . .



FLAMINGO*

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TRAVERTINE ....



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* Ready for your design specification is one of
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stones a true travertine, densely textured,
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* Colors, controlled by nature, range from
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


,.:,








1959 AIA Residential Design Awards...


1 Merit Award, Custom-Built Category

ALFRED BROWNING PARKER, FAIA,
Architect


This Florida home was designed by
the architect for his mother. This is
not a house for family life. It is a
home for a woman whose family re-
sponsibilities are behind her, a place
to live alone. She didn't want to be
burdened with housekeeping. She
wanted a house in which she could
entertain and one which her grand-
children could visit and enjoy.
All of the materials were selected
for their durability and qualities of
low maintenance. At the same time,
the weathering features add a patina
that makes them warm and attractive
to live with.


The construction is not large, the
main building being a square 20'x20'
and the smaller guest house having
walls 16'x16'. It is a house that is
small enough so that she may be alone
in it without feeling the need for
other people to fill its unoccupied
space. It is a house that she can share
with a friend living in the separate
guest house. They can enjoy each
other's presence and companionship
with a mutual regard for each other's
independence and privacy.
This is a house conceived with
sheltered openness to live an outdoor
life for the greater part of the year.
However, both of the tinv buildings


NOVEMBER, 1959


close up into a snug retreat for chilly
winter days or a cool, shadowy, air-
conditioned haven when Florida's
summer heat becomes too extreme.
There is a central compressor located
in the storage room which serves two
heat exchangers in each of the two
buildings. The distribution of both
warm air and cool air is from a cen-
tral high location for each main liv-
ing space. Complete heating or cool-
ing is achieved in a matter of a few
minutes with complete absence of
sound or drafts. As much as possible
was built into the structure of the
home, including lighting fixtures,
cabinets, beds, shelving, and so forth.
21







- r~Qt. <'7,'


Photographs on this and the opposite page
suggest how exterior and interior living areas
have been integrated to produce a compact,
yet free and open unit. Tiling of the two
terraces carries indoors on the floors; and
when the wood-louvered doors are opened,
the sweep of open and sheltered paying pro-
duces an illusion of a much greater area than
actually exists-and also heightens the sense
of orderly integration.


MIN I41r &V


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































































Photos ( by Ezra Stoller


NOVEMBER, 1959








































2 Merit Award,

Custom-Built Category

DAVID VERNON TUDEEN,
Architect

The owners of this house in St. Petersburg refer to
it as "A teahouse in the pines" and "An apartment with
privacy". The architect calls it "a tree house", largely
because all living quarters are on the second floor level
to take more advantage of breezes and as a protection
against ground water. All designations are apt. The design
objective was simplicity, comfort in every phase, a casual
elegance in appointments, and space development to take
fullest advantage of location and climate. Construction
is pressure-treated wood throughout. Living areas are com-
pletely screened; and the open plan is provided with even
more freedom by a series of pivoting, flush-panel doors
that open from both living and bedrooms to porch decks.
Formerly the owners lived in a multi-level, poured concrete
house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The architect
has provided them with as complete as possible a contrast
and all concerned are pleased.


S 6 12


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












































~-L ~ -.


*asi '.-aiBp






5 ;""". ^ 4

-4-.A.


NOVEMBER, 1959
































Wood says welcome. An interior view of Carlisle-
Porter's new showroom and service building. ,
Construction features Rilco laminated wood hip
beams, 5i/" x 26' x 39'-1" to 52'-8" long, plus
columns, purlins, fasciae and Rilco Western Red .
Cedar deck.


"A landmark in this area," says H. H. Carlisle of his firm's recently constructed Rilco
building in Clearwater, Fla. Architect: John Randall McDonald, AIA, Indian Rocks Beach, Fla.



SERVICE SERCE "The Showplace
COURT
CUT SERVICE
BAYS of Clearwater"


"And the most dramatic business building
on the West Coast of Florida," adds H. H.
Carlisle, of Carlisle-Porter, progressive Con-
tinental, Lincoln and Mercury dealer in
Clearwater, Fla.
"We are more than pleased," he continues,
"with the Rilco laminated wood construc-
tion. It has greater beauty than we could
visualize . the utility is tops . and as
a setting for our fine cars it permits us to
show them off to the very best advantage.
We have visitors every day who express
amazement at the beauty and utility of this
building."
Strong words, but typical of those from the
many satisfied owners of buildings con-
structed with Rilco laminated wood.
Laminated wood arches gracefully span large
areas, often eliminate supporting columns
and posts. Initial low cost and labor saving
maintenance of wood assures satisfaction for
budget minded buyers. Fashioned from
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bonded by glues stronger than the wood
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P. 0. Drawer 978, Leesburg, Fla.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Air Conditioning for Florida's Schools ?




At the Junior High School Facilities Conference, some 300 educators,
architects and equipment specialists discussed the Junior High School
in all its phases -- with cool interiors the hottest subject on the agenda.


What participants and visitors de-
scribed as one of the most constructive
of recent planning conferences was
held in Jacksonville September 24, 25
and 26. The Conference on Junior
High School Facilities was co-spon-
sored by the FAA, the School Facili-
ties Council and the State Depart-
ment of Education. Purpose was to
analyze the varied problems of the
junior high school and ". . to provide
an opportunity for architects, educa-
tors, equipment and materials pro-
ducers and interested lay groups to
define the particular specific problems
that must be solved, to discuss the
alternative means for their solution
and to develop a framework of guide
lines and criteria that may be used in
solving these major problems and give
direction to the resolution of the
major issues involved."
Though some of the speakers gave
free rein to imagination in discussing
the ultimate future of the junior high
school plant, the conference was gen-
erally organized as a hard-work ses-
sion. And it was a session in which the
audience-participation idea was de-
veloped to the greatest practicable
degree. Study committees were select-
ed from the almost 300 architects,
educators and technicians who had
registered. Working with assigned
chairmen and in line with the subject
matter of scheduled panel discussions,
these committees developed, within
the two days given them which
included many hours of night work
for most groups a whole series of
significant recommendations covering
virtually every phase of the junior high
school facilities problem. As now
planned these recommendations will
shortly be issued as an informational
guide by the State Department of
Education.
Among the many highlights of the
conference was a report by DR. G. B.
NOVEMBER, 1959


WVADZECK, Superintendent of Schools,
San Angelo, Texas. In sketching the
place of the junior high school in the
nation's overall educational program,
Dr. Wadzeck said, in part:
"If we would only recognize that
our predecessors in the field of educa-
tion have done an excellent job in
providing an outstanding educational
system for this nation, we could then
look to our task of continued develop-
ment to meet the needs of the child
in this changing world. The accumula-
tion of knowledge and technical de-
velopment has been so rapid in the
last 40 to 50 years that we are now
confronted with completely different
and more complex demands on the
educational system. We need to be
leaning all our efforts toward meeting
the new needs and stop trying to de-
fend something that does not need
to be defended.
"Many of the suggestions made for
improvement are based on the theory
of acceleration in years. In other
words, let the children finish our pro-
gram faster. Yet the same writers who
offer these suggestions are saying that
we lack quality in the finished prod-
uct. Consequently, before we think
of acceleration, we must be very sure
that we have sufficient quality to turn
out the type of student needed in
today's world.
"For many years we have defined
equality of opportunity as being the
same program for every child. In
examining this philosophy, we are
finding that equal does not necessarily
mean the same. As all children differ
in their general ability and special
gifts of ability, we need a program
that will meet the needs of all children
in proportion to their abilities.
"The junior high school is peculiar
to the American system of education.
It was originally created to be a transi-
tion school for the between-age child.


It has actually failed to develop and
do the job intended, but rather seems
to strike one of two patterns. It is
either a glorified elementary school or
a miniature high school.
"We need to develop a completely
new personality for this school so that
it can realistically do its job. Here are
a few major points.
"One, we must recognize that the
building is only a tool to implement
the educational process. The program
should always dictate the building
construction and should never be con-
fined and limited by the buildings in
their design and structure.
"Two, the curriculum for the junior
high school is going through many
changes in an effort to provide transi-
tion, balance, identification and accel-
eration of the student. The program
itself will demand more special rooms
to implement the full program.
"Three, the organization and ad-
ministration of the junior high school
are also indicating changes. A need
for different length periods for differ-
ent subjects is demanding that build-
ings be designed to allow free move-
ment of students without disturbing
classes which are in session. There is
also a change being indicated that
would provide for large, average, small
groups and some individual study
areas. This has brought about many
articles with titles such as 'Our New
Out-of-Date School Buildings'. This is
calling for non-weight-bearing parti-
tions and walls with complete flexibil-
ity for a change as the program
changes.
"Four, we have always seen social
conflict between 7th and 9th grade
students. We see a similar type con-
flict between sophomores and upper
classmen in high school and college;
however, it is not considered as serious
as the 7th grade problem. We are now
(Continued on Page 28)








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School Conference . .
(Continued from Page 27)
doing some research on parallel age
grouping in the junior high. By this
we mean isolating or separating the
7th grade from the 8th and 9th for
a large part of the day. At the present
time, all indications are that this
would be a dramatic improvement in
junior high organization.
"Five, research in industry has
proven efficiency is increased with
total air conditioning. By total air
conditioning, we mean a system that
holds the proper balance on humidity,
purifies the air for dust particles,
pollen and manufacturing particles
that are in the air, and holds the
temperature, cold or hot, at an even,
efficient reading. New approaches to
construction have shown that totally
air conditioned buildings can be built
for the same money as more tradi-
tional buildings. A sealed building
with filtered air shows sufficient sav-
ing on janitorial labor alone to offset
the increased utilities cost."
As one specific illustration of his
fifth point, Dr. Wadzeck commented
on the San Angelo Central High
School, the award-winning plant for
which the firm of CAUDILL, ROWLETT
& SCOTT, of Houston, Texas, were
architects. Set on a gently-contoured
plot of 30 acres, the 11 buildings of
this school provide a college campus
atmosphere. Other noteworthy facts
are the unusual degree to which glare
reducing glass has been employed -
even in interior corridors to create
an impression of complete openness;
and the total air conditioning with
which all building units are equipped.
The school can accommodate an en-
rollment of 2500 students, contains
209,864 square feet and was built for
a construction cost of $12.41 per
square foot, of a pupil cost of $1,042.
Total cost, including land, site devel-
opment, furniture and equipment and
professional fees, amounted to $16.88
or a per-pupil cost of $1,417.
In commenting on the San Angelo
facilities Dr. Wadzeck said that the
campus-type school shows more favor-
ably on a per-pupil cost basis than on
a square foot basis, since much more
site development work is required. But
he indicated that mere cost compar-
ison was not an adequate measure of
relative plant values. The San Angelo
plant, he said, was designed to oper-


ate, if required, 24 hours a day, 12
months a year. It was designed with-
out bearing partitions or bearing walls,
thus is easily susceptible to space re-
arrangement as may be required by
future changes in the educational
program.
He noted particularly the influence
of air conditioning in the often dis-
regarded item of maintenance cost.
Equipment operation at San Angelo
will cost about $10,000 more per year
than in non-air conditioned buildings
of comparable size. But experience
since the school was opened, Septem-
ber, 1958, has shown a saving in the
cost of janitorial service alone of
$27,000 or enough to pay not only
the increased yearly operating cost but
also the initial cost of the equipment
within a comparatively few years.
Architects attending the conference
were thus provided with some sound
argument for recommending the use
of air conditioning in future Florida
schools. It is no secret that the State
Department of Education and a num-
ber of county school boards are now
taking a long and careful look at the
various advantages which air condi-
tioning offers. Now under considera-
tion is a program whereby a practical
test of its effectiveness can be made
here. It includes a proposal to build
an air-conditioned school in Gaines-
ville where its operation in every detail
could be checked out by the various
technical and educational factors of
the University of Florida.
FAA architects took an active part
in the Junior High School Facilities
Conference. Several served as commit-
tee and panel members, including
JOHN STETSON, ERNEST T. H. BOWEN,
II, C. ELLIS DUNCAN, GEORGE M.
MEGGINSON, RICHARD LEMON, ED-
WARD G. GRAFTON, RICHARD B.
ROGERS, CURTIS E. HALEY, KENDALL
P. STARRATT, JAMES E. GARLAND,
GEORGE J. VOTAW, NORMAN P.
CROSS, CARL H. ATKINSON, H. LESLIE
WALKER, J. S. WILLSON, JR., GEORGE
F. GEORGE.
This is the second educational facili-
ties conference with which the FAA
has acted as co-sponsor with the State
Department of Education. That
earlier in the year was concerned with
Junior College facilities. ROGER W.
SHERMAN, FAA Executive Director,
served as a member of the advisory
and planning committee of each
conference.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


V-40. ene.
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The President's



Annual Report



By JOHN STETSON, AIA,
President
Florida Association of Architects


There is no reason, to my way of
thinking, for a President's Annual Re-
port to be a well-doctored list of per-
sonal achievements, accompanied by
flag waving and horn tooting. An or-
ganization can analyze its working
year and categorically determine if it
progressed or retrogressed. No one or
no group ever stands still. No indi-
vidual is an organization, and no or-
ganization survives which permits an
individual to "take over." Success is
achieved by the interest and mutual
achievements of all the membership,
even if most of the burden is carried
by a selected few.
The Florida Association of Archi-
tects during 1959 reached puberty.
We have spent a good number of
years aborning, growing, over-organ-
izing, battling internally, as does any
family; and finally we face the neces-
sity of proving ourselves to the pub-
lic and to other professional organiza-
tions with which we come in contact.
We have problems some of our
own manufacture and some over
which we had no creative supervision.
Economically we are sound, but we
still don't get the most from our
budget dollar. We fear expenditures
very necessary to progress, but contin-
ue to spend money (out of habit) far
in excess of values received.
Some members seem to expect the
impossible from the organization,
others have no interest at all. A real-
istic analyzation proves only that the
NOVEMBER, 1959


personal and economic interests of
the individual still are the most im-
portant to him. Pure unselfishness
doesn't exist. So long as there are
groups of people there will be per-
sonal ambitions pulling the masses
along by their shoelaces, but irritating
the very devil out of many. People
artistic by nature are the most diffi-
cult to organize. Individualism con-
tinually breaks surface, no matter how
deep the flood of organizational prop-
aganda.
Enough of looking back; let's look
ahead. What do we want? Are we
satisfied with what the profession
holds? Then let's disband and stop
all this shouting, waving of arms and
false starts. Would we like to see ar-
chitecture become the number one
profession, as it is in Europe and
South America? No doubt we would.
With no small amount of public as-
sistance we have almost prevented this
happening in our life time. Our task
is too great to accomplish in any one
year. Attacking a forest barehanded
produces little firewood. Let's aim for
the ultimate goal, carefully developing
leadership that will assure success. We
will some years seemingly achieve
little (some trees need a lot of chop-
ping), but other years we'll chop out
quite a hole. So what is the course?
All patients need either external or
internal treatment, some both. We
fall in the latter category. Our plan-
nine should thus be so divided.


External. ..
Public relations are still our weak-
est point. Too many people still pro-
nounce it "archeeteck." Too many
newspapers still ignore the Architect
in press releases. Even with a state
law governing the practice of Archi-
tecture, too many political subdivi-
sions ignore us, or even flout the sit-
uation by favoring plans submitted
by the unlicensed. Too many engin-
eers are being hired to do jobs that
are definitely out of their realm. Why
are these listed under public rela-
tions, and what are the suggested
cures?
For many years the profession
nursed the wounds of depression
years, was unorganized politically and
lived on a high plateau of professional
ethics clouding the ugly fact that eat-
ing beats starving. With few excep-
tions, Architects never came down
from their lofty pinnacles long enough
to talk to the common man. Suddenly
the common man is the powerful
man, politically and economically. He
serves the community on the school
board, city and county commissions,
on state boards, and is a leader in in-
dustry. He still needs to be shown. It
is our first duty to ourselves and the
profession to do the showing.
We must have public speakers,
better press relationships (particularly
on small town papers), gain member-
(Continued on Page 32)







The President's Annual Report . .


(Continued
ship on every public committee and
in all service and civic organizations.
We should have annual awards to po-
litical subdivisions and to the press
for their efforts to improve and en-
courage good design and public safety
through the recognition of the li-
censed Architect. We should give
credit to the towns, cities and count-
ies that have enabling acts permitting
the inclusion of local laws paralleling
the State Statutes governing archi-
tecture. We must, once and for all,
convince everyone that there is a dis-
tinct difference in the fields of archi-
tecture and engineering.
Each has its place in our economy
and each required a specialized train-
ing to produce. We studied design of
buildings; the engineer design of
roads, bridges, dams and heavy struct-
ures. We had no courses that included
pneumatic caissons; flow rate through
weirs, aqueducts or well drilling.
They had no courses on proportion,
texture and color in design; history of
architecture, delineation, composition,
etc. But and perhaps herein lies the
problem-we both studied reinforced
concrete and structural steel design of
buildings, trusses, mechanical instal-
lations, air conditioning and proper-
ties of materials; and surprisingly
often in just about the same amount
of study time and knowledge of the
subject. We all tend to forget a sub-
ject through non-use.
At the present time the wording of
the laws governing the practice of
engineering in our state permits an
engineer "to design a building." No
more clear definition is included, and
apparently none intended. The laws
governing the practice of architecture
clearly permit an architect to do the
engineering required within the build-
ing he designs, and certainly simple
engineering connected thereto, but
outside the building. Only the good
Lord can, in some instances, dif-
ferentiate between what should be
the work of the Architect and that of
the engineer. Once and forever, our
two professions must put a stop to
the present mess. This can be accom-
plished only by a rewrite of present
State laws apparently, and by the
adoption and recognition of an Archi-
tect-Engineer agreement clearly de-
fining the work to be accomplished
32


from Page 3)
by each profession. But-every single
practicing professional must recognize
and abide by this for any measure of
success. Impossible no; improb-
able yes. Maybe we should just de-
clare "open season," and let the chips
fall where they may.

Internal . .
For years the majority of the time
spent in executive committee and
board meetings of the F.A.A. was de-
voted to organization of the Associa-
tion. No doubt much was necessary
and some even beneficial. However, it
seems that it is time to stop talking
and get to work. We have unsolved
internal problems as well as external.
There is no doubt that we have
gained considerable respect from the
people of the State in the last ten
years, but we have only started. So
let's do a little house cleaning and
put the shelves in order.
There is that appropriation for the
School of Architecture at the Univer-
sity of Florida. The convicts of our
prison farm system are better housed
than arc the students who will some
day become the leaders of the State's
largest industry, and I do mean indus-
try. Confusing "tourist clipping" with
manufacturing has too long been a
weakness of ours. Pharmacists, cattle
breeders, budding politicians, account-
ants, corn growers, our friends the
engineers, and even the budding real
estate brokers study in new or cer-
tainly well constructed buildings, of
a vintage this side of the "Carpet-Bag
Era." But what must the leaders of
the construction industry, Florida's
largest tax paying production group,
use for facilities? Take a look. Better
than that, get a firm grip on your lo-
cal legislator and show him the School
of Architecture at the University of
Florida, the most decrepit collection
of fugitives from the wood pile. Also
important, we should start now to
correct this injustice, no matter what
it takes.
For some time there have been con-
flicting rumors concerning dissatisfac-
tion with the location of, and opera-
tion of, the Executive Director's of-
fice. Don't whisper, speak up. Let us
have some recommendations from
Chapters, or, if you disagree with your
Chapter, from individuals. We set up


the office to solidify and make easier
the tasks of the Association. We don't
expect perfection, but since the ma-
jority's wishes are paramount, then
let's at least satisfy as many as pos-
sible. Do you want a more central lo-
cation? Do you want to see the mem-
ber organizations of the Joint Cooper-
ative Council join together in erect-
ing a permanent construction industry
headquarters in a central Florida city,
each having his own building with all
facilities required for meetings, etc.,
in a jointly owned and operated meet-
ing hall? It is possible to accomplish
this in the near future, and if pro-
moted correctly, at a very low cost to
all.
WVe have officers, more than
enough to do the work required. But,
we haven't properly designated au-
thority and duties. A suggestion has
been made that one vice president be
put in charge of publications, an ex-
cellent idea. We will soon vote on a
president-elect. It is expected that he
will take charge of all committees.
How about another vice president tak-
ing over the Joint Cooperative Coun-
cil work, and the third being respons-
ible for legislative and legal matters?
No president can accomplish all these
things any longer and maintain even
the smallest practice. The correspond-
ence alone connected with the presi-
dent's office has grown to mountain-
ous proportions. We did intend that
the Executive Secretary (as originally
constituted) would relieve the officers
of this task. But, unless we shift the
Executive Secretary to the home town
of the president each year, or keep
the secretary in a fixed spot, always
electing a president from the same
Chapter, it won't work exactly as
planned.
Prorating responsibilities is a must.
Dumping the entire problem of func-
tioning on the Executive Director is
only releasing control, admitting dis-
interest, and inviting disaster. The
Executive Director works for you, not
you for him. He exists for the good of
the organization, not the organization
for his benefit. If anyone thinks dif-
ferently, take another, much closer
look. We waste a lot of motion "tilt-
ing with windmills," or just shadow
boxing. Sometimes it appears that we
think all our hazards and enemies lie
within. Maybe we do need an organ-
izational chart, but like taking a trip,
let's determine where we're going and
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






get the motor running first before we
pull out the map. Then give instruc-
tions to the driver if you want a par-
ticular designation. Left to his own,
he will take you just exactly where
he wants to go.
Any successful organization has an
attorney and an accountant on a re-
tainer basis. We scream that the pub-
lic only hires an architect when it is
absolutely necessary. So what do we
do? We try to "pick an attorney's
brains" at some hourly consultant
rate. Necessity requires more use of
his services than originally planned,
and for partial service we pay as much
or more than we originally did when
we obtained a real service. For years
we blindly ignored the proper use of
accountants and the proper filing of
an income tax return. Now we've got
trouble in this department. The chor-
us of, "I told you so's" ring loud in
our ears. Again we ignored advice.
Let's quit being authorities on sub-
jects out of our sphere and hire the
proper professionals. We'll save a lot
of bucks and many headaches.
Now as to budget. Let's take a real-
istic look at this annual puzzler. Year-
ly we increase the costs of our Exec-
utive Director's office. The officers
each year get a little more "gun shy"
of duties, correspondence, and travel.
I wonder why? Do you, the member-
ship, realize what it costs to repre-
sent your Association? Secretarial ser-
vices, postage, long distance telephone
calls, transportation and living costs
away from home, and time. That lat-
ter item represents dollars; dollars lost
from income. So what is the natural
form of relief: "Let the Executive Di-
rector do it, that's what he is paid to
do." So the Executive Director hies
off to the other end of the State to
do a job one of the membership
should do, and can do at a large dol-
lar saving. If some item of correspond-
ence is handed to the Executive Di-
rector's office for processing and an-
swer, it slows down normal procedure
and too often costs more than neces-
sary.
It would seem entirely normal to
set up a sliding scale of budgeted ex-
penses for our officers. They receive
no pay for their time away from their
office; the least that could be done is
to reimburse them for expenses. Our
organizational setup provides a pat-
tern of vice president and other offic-
ers well scattered, and usually near
NOVEMBER, 1959


the locale of important conferences
and functions. Any officer worth his
salt and wise enough to serve should
stand ready and willing to represent
us. How can any man, uninformed
and undoctrinated serve an organiza-
tion as an officer? He can only earn by
doing, and we need to develop leader-
ship. Our future is bleak indeed if
we expect to elect only figureheads,
turning over all duties and functions
to a paid employee. If you want effi-
ciency coupled with economy, some
changes are more than necessary.
For years we've spent thousands on
legislative expense. Some years we've
felt it money well invested; others not
so. Have we received proportionally
the protection for which we've paid?
Is there any other means of accom-
plishing the same thing? In so many
ways the entire design and construc-
tion industry is tied together in the
protection of the overall industry and
of each member group, where legis-
lative action is concerned. If our ef-
forts were combined, we could obtain
a better representation at a fraction of
present costs. As it now stands, no
one man can ever give us perfect pro-
tection; there are too many facets. It
is too much to expect our Executive
Director to carry on two jobs; that
of editing a magazine and represent-
ing us at legislative sessions simul-


taneously. By joining with other de-
sign and construction organizations
we can obtain readily available pro-
fessional legislative representation
right in Tallahassee, dividing the ex-
pense, and for far less than the costs
now borne by individual organiza-
tions. Our legislative committee could
then concentrate on specifics, and
start a "ground roots program" aimed
at selling the profession to legislators
before they go to Tallahassee. This
would definitely beat the "heavy
club" method of too little too late.
Finally, we are now a Region of the
American Institute of Architects and
we enjoy the position of being almost
a model State organization. Now let's
do something on a national scale. The
F.A.A. should annually nominate and
follow through on elevating at least
two members to Fellowship in the
A.I.A. We have the material, but
seemingly petty jealousy too often
rears its ugly head. We have an ex-
cellent opportunity to elect a vice
president of the A.I.A. in the near
future. This takes planning, and
there is no time like the present.
You, the individual member,
through your Chapter activities, con-
vention and Board of Director meet-
ings of the F.A.A., and finally your
selection of officers, can steer the fu-
ture of our organization.


Board Adopts New Rules for Convention Business

This year for the first time in FAA history, the FAA Board of Directors
has prepared a summary report of its activities. This has been mailed to
all FAA members; and it will serve as the agenda of business to be taken
up at the Convention. Only last minute matters that arise between the
preparation of this report and the Convention will appear on a separate
agenda.
At its August 8 meeting the Board approved a new procedure for
handling convention business, patterned closely on procedures now in
force at Institute Conventions. In a preface to the Board's report,
Secretary Francis R. Walton outlined the Convention Rules for resolutions
and new business as follows:
"1 . All resolutions or discussions concerning matters contained
in the Board's Report shall be in order and may be placed before the
Convention only if the relevant section has been read and is still under
consideration. Resolutions concerned with matter contained in the Board's
Report shall not be considered by the Committee on Resolutions.
"2 . All resolutions offered by the Board will be printed in the
Board's Report and action taken thereon at the time the relevant sections
are placed before the Convention. Amendments to these resolutions or
supplemental resolutions and statements concerning the section under
consideration shall be in order only while the relevant section is before
the Convention."
"3 . All resolutions concerning matters not contained in the
Board's Report, and all matters of new business, shall be presented to
the Committee on Resolutions before a time set by the Board and
reported to the Convention."







Works of Art Purchased As



Convention Attendance Awards


Five years ago the FAA initiated
the tradition of Convention attend-
ance awards which this year, at
New Orleans, was also adopted as a
convention procedure by the Institute.
This year, special emphasis has been
placed on the attendance awards pro-
gram. And as a result, five people who
will attend the Convention in Jack-
sonville will each become the for-
tunate owners of an art object pro-
duced by a Florida artist.
Pictured on this and the opposite
page are the works selected by a jury
from a collection of thirty submitted
by Florida artists throughout the state.
The collection was assembled through
the courtesy and by the staff of the
Cummer Museum Foundation of
Jacksonville as "The Florida Associa-
tion of Architects Special Art Ex-
hibit." The exhibit formed part of
Jacksonville's Festival of the Arts held


in the Prudential Building October
10 and 11.
Judgment of the collection to se-
lect awards for the FAA Convention
was held October 9, the jury being
ROBERT L. PARSONS, Director of the
Cummer Museum Foundation, TAY-
LOR HARDWICK, AIA, President of the
Jacksonville Chapter, and ROBERT E.
BOARDMAN, AIA. The Festival of the
Arts exhibit contained about 20 works
of art, was designated as "Architects'
Special Exhibit" and was accompa-
nied by the following explanation:
"To further the understanding, ap-
preciation and patronage of the visual
arts, the Jacksonville Chapter of the
Florida Association of Architects.
sponsored this invitational exhibition
of work by outstanding Florida art-
ists.
"Five jury-selected works will be
purchased by the Florida Association


of Architects to be given as attend-
ance prizes at their Annual Conven-
tion being held in Jacksonville No-
vember 12, 13 and 14."
At the Convention, drawings will
be made for the awards. There will be
three awards for Corporate members,
one each for Associate Members and
Student Associates. Corporate awards
are: First, oil painting by MUN QUAN;
Second, wood carving by RALPH
HURST; Third, watercolor by HILTON
LEECH. Associate Member award is an
original ceramic pottery by CHARLES
BROWN. A polychrome wood-block
painting by ANN TVILLIAMS was se-
lected for the Student Associate
award.
All five art works will be purchased
- the total purchase sum being
$1,050 and the Chapter will pack
and ship any of the awards which
cannot be transported by its winner.


-- -__: .- -



Above, 1st Award Purchase for Corporate Members $475.
City Scene, an oil painting, 42V2 by 36V2-inches, by Mun Quan
of Jacksonville. Right, the Student Associate award 5th Award
Purchase, $50. It is a polychrome wood block painting
measuring 31 /4 by 231/2 inches by Ann Williams of Jacksonville.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Left, Coco-bolo wood carving
by Ralph Hurst, FSU faculty,
Tallahassee. It is 25-inches high
and was the 2nd Award Pur-
chase, $275, for Corporates.
Above, the 4th Award Purchase,
$150, for Associates, ceramic
pottery by 201/2-inches high by
Charles Brown of Mandarin.


Above, the 3rd Award Purchase
for Corporates a watercolor,
entitled "Upthrust", which mea-
sures 401/2 by 3034-inches. The
artist was Hilton Leech of Sarasota.
NOVEMBER, 1959


AIA's Home Awards

Program Goes

National Next Year

Success of the AIA's Homes for
Better Living Awards Program has
been such that in 1960 the program
will be broadened to include all 50
states. The four previous programs -
all sponsored by the Institute in
cooperation with House 6 Home and
Life magazines have been regional
in character. But they have elicited
more than 1000 entries and have
generated such favorable recognition
to award-winning architects that ex-
pansion of the program to national
scope is called for.
Awards for the 1960 program will
be in two major categories as in the
past, but will include three classifica-
tions in each. In the private residence
category classifications are according
to size: one, under 1600 square feet
of living space; two, between 1600 and
2800 square feet of living space; and,
three, over 2800 square feet of living
space. In effect this places no restric-
tions at all on the submission of
houses designed for individual owners.
The second category houses de-
signed for a merchant builder for sale
- includes classifications according
to price. These are: one, under $15,-
000; two, from $15,000 to $25,000;
and, three, over $25,000. Here again,
award possibilities cover the whole
range of merchant builder operation.
The Homes For Better Living
Awards Program is in no sense a com-
petition in the field of residential
design. Sponsors have recognized the
fact that comparasion of designs in-
volving wide ranges of climate, site
conditions and budget is basically
impractical. For this reason each entry
will be judged on its individual merit.
As many First Awards, Awards of
Merit and Honorable Mentions will
be made as submissions seem to
justify.
Entries may be submitted by an
architect, an owner or a builder. But
all must have been designed by a
registered architect and completed
since January 1, 1957. Deadline for
submission of entry slips is January
15, 1960. Material submitted for judg-
ing must be postmarked before mid-
night, February 12, 1960. Entry slips
are available from the Institute or
from House 6 Home magazine.








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spec sheets available to you!




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for manufacturers Buildorama offers
a highly effective medium
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to architects, builders, decorators and
the general public of two continents!

for further information,
call Products Information Center ."
BUILDORAMA
FRanklin 7-1461


Be sure to visit us in Suite No. 1601
at the Hotel Robert Meyer
during the FAA Convention,
November 12 14!


H
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BUILDORAMA
Architects International Bureau of Building Products
West Wing, Dupont Plaza Center
"where Biscayne Boulevard meets Biscayne Bay"
Miami 32, Florida


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


(1-1 f A









th Annual Convention

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS





THE KEYNOTE IS CREATIVITY-THE PROGRAM, PERFORMANCE.


As hosts to the 45th Annual FAA
Convention and producers of the
Convention's theme and program,
the Jacksonville Chapter has turned
the topical spotlight on the Archi-
tect's chief excuse for being Cre-
ativity. The very name of the 1959
Convention-"Architects' Omnibus"
- connotes the real substance of the
program. This is A Symposium of Cre-
ativity, and the measure of the archi-
tect's creative functions and responsi-
bilities in three major fields of social
existence have furnished both the
background and substance for the
three seminars about which the Con-
vention program has been fashioned.
Though the motivating core of this
Convention is professional introspec-
tion, the program itself has been
planned to provide a bridge between
what the architect is and what he con-
ceivably can or even should be-


come. In the early planning stages
of this 1959 Convention program the
Jacksonville Chapter asked these two
questions: Is the Architect really the
leader of the creative activities in his
community? And if not, why not?
Every phase of this Convention has
been integrated to provide overall an-
swers to these questions. And to this
end, some of the design profession's
most searching minds have been gath-
ered to take part in it.
This is to be a Convention of part-
icipation. Seminars have been planned
as discussion groups; and those who
attend them are invited to contribute
to whatever extent the argument of
panelists may move them. At least,
this should provoke individual think-
ing. At best, it might generate a state-
wide professional resurgance of major
significance.


Through the courtesy of
Architectural Record, this
sketch suggests one of the
questions to be considered at
this Convention: Is the archi-
tect being confined by the
box of his environment or,
being boxed, is he about to
burst the barriers for less
cramped quarters or even the
open country of new
opportunities?


TAYLOR HARDWICK, AIA WALTER B. SHULTZ, AIA
President, Jacksonville Chapter, AIA. Ch., Chapter Convention Committee


NOVEMBER, 1959 37








ARCHITECTS' OMNIBUS...


JOHN FISHER
A Rhodes Scholar, a working
journalist and an officer of a
major publishing firm, the
editor of "Harper's Magazine"
enjoys a professional perspective
not privileged to many. As the
main speaker at the Conven-
tion's Friday Banquet, he will
survey the architectural scene-
and from his wide general
experience will suggest a num-
ber of points for individual and
collective improvement.


SAMUEL T. HURST, AIA
As both a practicing architect
and educator, he clearly recog-
nizes the architect's many-sided
role in contemporary life. As
the convention's keynote speak-
er, he has the ability shown
at the New Orleans AIA Con-
vention of pinpointing the
faults and spotlighting the
opportunities of the profession
to which he belongs and for
which he is a staunch advocate
and vocal conscience.


The "Omnibus" is largely an ex-
pression to denote a wide and varied
scope of interest and substance. To a
large degree this will be a "soul-search-
ing" Convention for the FAA. It will
propose questions; it will present op-
portunity for discussion of those ques-
tions; and it will hopefully suggest, at
least in general terms, some answers
to those questions which the architect
dedicated to the advancement of his
profession can accept.
As a "Symposium of Creativity" the
1959 Convention Seminar Programs
will offer cold comfort to those who
count professional success in the bald
terms of money-in-the-bank. But for
those whose goal is creative accom-
plishment, the strengthening of cre-
ative resources and a discovery of the
true values that lie in professional
service, this 1959 FAA Convention
can well prove a rare and valuable,
as well as a memorable, experience.


1-The Architect as A Creative Designer...

What is the scope of the architect's creative opportunity? What are the future problems he
will be called upon to solve? How must he adjust his philosophy, gear his activities, chan-
nel his energies and ambitions to take fullest advantage of their solutions . ?


GARRETT ECKBO
As a creative designer himself,
he has done outstanding work
in the field of landscape archi-
tecture; and is the author of
two books on that subject. He
was 1958 chairman of the
Aspen, Colo., design conference
and has been active in the
educational field as a faculty
member and visiting critic at
several university schools of
architecture and fine arts.


JAMES T. LENDRUM, AIA
Presently the director of the
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts, U/F, his background for
this Convention assignment is
impressive. He has been author
of several books on architecture,
directing head of the Illinois
Small Homes Council, active in
architectural research, a govern-
ment consultant to Federal
agencies and president of the
Central Illinois Chapter, AIA.


HERBERT H. SWINBURNE, AIA
An increasingly influential
member of the Institute and an
ardent advocate of architectural
research as one means for ex-
panding the profession's scope
and ability in design. A recipient
of many architectural awards,
he is a thoughtful exponent of
creative activity and has been
a vocal champion of creativity
as a speaker before many local
and national audiences.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









THREE IMPORTANT SEMINARS


2-The Architect as A Creative Teacher...

What is the professional man's responsibilities to his community? Particularly, to what extent
can, or should, the architect act as the exponent of cultural progress . ?


PAUL M. HEFFERNAN, FAIA
A Paris Prize winner, a partner
in an active architectural firm,
and a teacher of architecture for
the past twenty years, he is also
an author and lecturer who has
distinguished himself in the
field of creative inspiration.
Recipient of many scholarship
and design awards, he has a
special ability to bridge the gap
between the architect as a
practitioner and as a teacher.


ROY C. CRAVEN, JR.
Though presently an assistant
professor of art of the U/F, his
background of photography,
commercial and fine art has
provided a special ability to
discuss the role of the architect
as a creative teacher in the
community. His position as an
award-winning artist suggests an
approach to his subject on a
level of objective accomplish-
ment significant in concept.


G. FREDRICK HOLSCHUH
A sculptor distinguished for his
work in galleries and museums
throughout the country, he
studied at the Bauhas, holds
several fine arts degrees, is
president of Associated Florida
Sculptors, a Board member of
the Florida Fine Arts Council.
As a teacher of art at FSU, he
appreciates the important role
of the architect as a preceptor
of community taste and design.


3-The Architect as A Creative Citizen


S..


Can the professional man become a real and driving force in his community? What can the
architect individually and collectively offer to the advancement of his area of interest
and activity? Objectives and ways for reaching them lie behind these questions . .


WILLIAM PACHNER
Widely recognized for his sig-
nificant work in the fine arts,
he has established his reputation
as a creative citizen since com-
ing from Czechoslovakia in
1939 with a background of
Vienna study. In 1951 he
assumed the art directorship of
the Florida Gulf Coast Art
Center, now heads his own
school at Clearwater. He knows
the need for creativity.
NOVEMBER, 1959


As a member of Congress from
Florida's second District, he has
a brilliant background of public
and community service, in Flor-
ida and nationally. As a ten-
year public servant, as a practic-
ing lawyer and as a citizen who
has received many awards for
service to his community, he is
well able to comment on the
role architects must play in their
respective communities.


An architectural journalist and
publishing executive, he has, for
more than twenty years, been
a keen observer of the archi-
tect's position as a creative
citizen. Realizing the import-
ance of this role, he has been
instrumental in clarifying its
recognition on the part of the
profession and in stimulating its
increasingly wide acceptance by
the community.


004WsI-





















CONVENTION HOSTS


Jacksonville Chapter, AIA-Taylor
Hardwick, President; W. Stanley
Gordon, Vice president; Fred W.
Bucky, Jr., Secretary; John R.
Graveley, Treasurer.
CONVENTION COMMITTEE
Walter B. Schultz
Chairman
Harry E. Burns, Jr.
RegistratIon
John R. Graveley
Treasurer
Wayne P. Meyers, Cecil B. Burns
Hospitality
Robert C. Broward
Arcnaeclural Exhibits
Norman P. Freedman
Enterranment
H. Lamar Drake
Products Exhibits
Robert E. Boardman
Awards
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Publicity
Mrs. Ivan H. Smith
Ladies' Program




arcHi





omn


IBUS


Program -

THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATE
ROBERT MEYE


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11
8:00 A. M. Installation starts on product ex-
hibit booths.
12:00 Noon Various Committee Meetings as
may be desirable.
Meeting of Joint Cooperative Council -
John Stetson, presiding.
3:00 P.M. -Meeting of FAA Board of Direc-
tors, John Stetson, presiding. Members
having matters to be brought before the
Board invited to attend at 7:30 P.M.
1 :00 P. M. Registration opens for Chapter
Members, Guests, Students and Exhibitor
Personnel. Mezzanine Floor.
Identifying badges will be required for ad-
mission to all FAA business sessions and
other scheduled Convention affairs.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12
8:00 A.M. Breakfast for Committees or
Group Conferences Chairmen of Com-
mittees to arrange.
9:00 A. M. Registration continues.
Opening of Products Exhibit.
Officiating at opening ceremony will be
John Stetson, Pres., FAA: Taylor Hardwick,
Pres., Jacksonville Chapter, and Hon. Hay-
don Burns, Mayor of Jacksonville.
Architectural Exhibit opens.
10:00 A. M. First business session, John Stet-
son, Pres., FAA, presiding. Report of FAA
Officers and Executive Director. Report of
Nominating Committee.
11:30 A. M. -Architects' Omnibus Session -
Introduction by Taylor Hardwick, Pres., Host
Chapter. Address by Samuel T. Hurst, Dean,
School of Architecture and The Arts, Ala-
bama Polytechnic Institute.
12:15 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit.
1 :00 P. M. Luncheon, Welcome to Convention
and introduction of guests by John Stetson,
Pres., FAA. Program by Council of the Arts.
2:30 P. M. -Architects' Omnibus Session -
The Architect as a Creative Designer, Ver-
ner Johnson, FAA Vice Pres., presiding.
Moderator Douglas Haskell, Editor, "Ar-
chitectural Forum".
Panel Garret Eckbo Landscape.
James Lendrum Planning & the Building
Herbert H. Swinburne Buildings and
the City.






2_n


[5th Annual


Convention


OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
OTEL JACKSONVILLE NOVEMBER 12, 13, 14, 1959


5:00
6:30

7:30


P. M. Visit Products Exhibit.
P. M. -Cocktail Party Windsor South
Ballroom.
P. M. Dinner, Windsor North Ballroom,
program by Council of the Arts Presenta-
tion of Building Product Exhibit Awards.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13
8:00 A.M. -Committee and other breakfasts.
9:00 A. M. Registration continues.
Visit Products Exhibit.
9:00 A. M. Second Business Session, John
Stetson, Pres., FAA. presiding. Completion
old business; introduction of new business.
10:30 A. M. -Architects' Omnibus Session -
Student Symposium Arthur Lee Camp-
bell, FAA V. Pres., presiding This pro-
gram to be developed and conducted by the
Student Chapter. Walter A. Taylor,
F.A.I.A. will participate in program.
12:00 A.M. -Visit Products Exhibit.
12:45 P.M.- Luncheon, Council of the Arts
Activity.
2:15 P.M. -Architects' Omnibus Session -
The Architect as a Creative Teacher.
H. Samuel Kruse, Past Pres. FAA presiding.
Moderator Russell Hicken Director,
Jacksonville Art Museum.
Panel Henry Kamphoefner Dean
School of Design, N. C. State College.
Paul Heffernan Director, School of Ar-
chitecture, Ga. Tech.
Dr. Fredrick Holschuh Dept. of Art,
Fla. State University.
Roy Craven Dept. of Art, Univ. of Fla.
5:00 P. M. Registration Closes.
Election polls at Registration Desk close.
Visit Products Exhibit..
6:30 P.M. -Cocktail Party.
7:30 P. M. The Convention Banquet John
Stetson, Pres., FAA presiding.
Dress Optional.
Presentation of Awards:
For Products Exhibit attendance
For the Architects Exhibit
For the Students Exhibit
Remarks from John Noble Richards, F.A. I.A.,
Pres., AIA.
Election Results.
Address by John Fischer, Editor, "Harper's
Magazine".
Dancing.


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SATURDAY, NOVEMER 14
8:00 A. M. Students and Associates Break-
fast, sponsored by Student Chapter.
9:00 A.M. -Visit Products Exhibit (closes at
noon).
9:30 A. M. -Architects Omnibus Session -
The Architect as a Creative Citizen Rob-
ert H. Levison, FAA V. Pres., presiding.
Moderator Herbert C. Millkey, F.A.I.A.
Past Regional Director.
Panel William Pachner, Artist.
Charles E. Bennett, U. S. Congressman
Emerson Goble, Editor, "Architectural
Record".
10:45 A. M. Final Business Session Continu-
ation of new business.
1 :00 P. M. Luncheon, Taylor Hardwick, Pres.
Host Chapter presiding. Summary remarks
by G. Clinton Gamble, A.I.A. District
Director.
45th Annual FAA Convention adjourns.

CONVENTION NOTES
All FAA members may take part in any Convention
discussion, but only AIA Corporate members may vote on
matters proposed for Convention action. Corporate members
must be registered for the Convention prior to voting on all
Convention business requiring formal action as covered in
current FAA By-Laws.
Ladies of the Convention are cordially invited to attend
all business and panel sessions of the Convention if they so
desire. Full information on the Ladies' Program planned for
the Convention period may be obtained at the Registration
Desk on the Mezzanine Floor.
Eligibility for Products Exhibit attendance awards must be
established by obtaining, in person, stamps on the Products
Exhibit Card covering all exhibit booths. Awards will be made
in three classifications: Corporate, Associate and Student. Prizes
in each classification have been selected by a jury from an
exhibit of contemporary art invited from Florida artists.
Specially designed plaques will be awarded to participants
in the Products Exhibit. One will be given for general excellence
of display; the other for the exhibit judged to be most generally
informative.
Those desiring to arrange for sight-seeing tours, golf or
tennis privileges at local country clubs, or boat trips can do so
through cooperation of the Jacksonville Chapter's Convention
Committee. Contact for this purpose should be made with
Norman C. Freedman, chairman, Entertainment Committee; or
with Cecil Burns, chairman, Hospitality Committee.
Check-out time for all Conventioneers will be 5:00 P.M.
during the three-day Convention period.
The Florida State Board of Architecture will hold its 1959
Fall Meeting beginning Monday, November 9, through Wednes-
day, November 11. Location of the meeting will be posted on
the bulletin board; members wishing to visit the Board or attend
any portion of its meeting should apply either to Franklin S.
Bunch, Board President.


...:. ..;" ; ,. -.. : : .... .,.:- :. ..... -.m. : -' i.. .







The 1959 Building Products Exhibit...


COCK TAILS A
ARCHITECTURAL
EXHIbIT5


Li I. I" I" I. S l 148
42 41 44 41

38 II 6 51 34 81 5 1 SI 2,9 2.8
IF IB 19 20 21 ?7 21 24 25 26 27


This exhibit is an education in itself almost a college course in a capsule. Exhibitors have
geared their displays to the educational theme of the Convention Design. Visit all the
booths. Talk with the people in charge; and bring yourself up-to-date on the tremendously
important part that good products play in the sound development of good architectural design.


1...American-Olean Tile
Company
2...Briggs Manufacturing
Company
3...Schlage Lock Company
4...Rilco Laminated Products,
Inc.
5...Flamingo Wholesale
Distributors, Inc.
6...Flamingo Wholesale
Distributors, Inc.
7...Rohm and Haas Company
8...Rohm and Haas Company
9...Thomas A. Marshall &
Associates
10...Thomas A. Marshall &
Associates
11...Concrete Products, Inc.
12...Bradley Washfountain
Company
13...General Electric Textolite
14...Hillyard Sales Company
15...Tnemec Company, Inc.
16...Henderson Clay Products,
Inc.


17...All State Pipe Supply
Company, Inc.
18...Aichel Steel & Supply
Company
19...Aichel Steel & Supply
Company
20...P. 0. Moore, Inc.
21...Herman Miller Furniture
Company
22...Ware Laboratories, Inc.
23...Florida Solite Corporation
24...Florida Solite Corporation
25...Harris Standard Paint
Company
26...Builders Products Company
27...Arcadia Metal Products
28...United States Plywood
Corporation
29...Independent Nail & Packing
Company
30...Florida Power & Light
Company
31...Florida Power & Light
Company


32...Benjamin Moore & Company
33...Groff Designs &
Manufacturing Co.
34...Owens-Corning Fiberglas
Corporation
35...Kaiser Manufacturing, Inc.
36...Pittsburgh Plate Glass
Company
37...Bird & Son, Inc.
38...Electrend Distributing
Company of Florida
39....Acousti Engineering
Company of Florida
40...Protection Products Mfg.
Company
41...Boiardi Tile Mfg. Company
42...Nutone, Incorporated
43...George C. Griffin Company
44...George C. Griffin Company
45... Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass
Company
46...The Mosaic Tile Company
47...Formica Corporation
48...The Mabie-Bell Company
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ARC ITECTS
DINING ROOM


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"I *TRADE MARK


1iHl-t-7LLt5A


3-DIMENSIONAL ALUMINUM GRILLES FOR RAILINGS AND DECORATIVE SCREENS
REFER TO 1959 SWEETS FILE 6e/Blu OR SEND FOR CATALOG M-59
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH, 460 MELWOOD STREET, PITTSBURGH 13, PA.


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... ..<*(* ,;-* ^


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Subsidiary of Mutschler Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Phone: Logan 4-8554
Please send complete information on your kitchens and
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name


address

city, state


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Reduction of Exit Requirements



Proposed for Southern Code


For some time past architects con-
cerned with the design of assembly
occupancy buildings have disagreed
with the reduction of exit capacity
requirements set forth in the Southern
Standard Building Code for assembly
spaces above or below ground level.
But most have done little or nothing
to prove the error in the Southern
Standard Building Code requirements
or press for its revision. In most cases
exit allowances have been worked out
individually with local code authorities
on the basis of recommendations from
such bodies as the National Board of
Fire Underwriters.
Recently FRANCIS R. WALTON,
1959 Secretary of the FAA and a
practicing architect in Daytona Beach,
undertook a careful research of exit
capacity requirements. Based on this
he worked out a series of recommenda-
tions and these, backed with docu-
mented and graphic illustrations, were
forwarded to offices of the Southern
Building Code Congress in Birming-
ham, Alabama. As a result, according
to M. L. CLEMENT, Executive Direc-
tor of the Congress, the 1960-61 edi-
tion of the Southern Standard Build-
ing Code will probably contain a sub-
stantial revision to the Means of
Egress section of the current edition.
Walton's recommendations to the
Congress were, one, that computation
of exit width (for assembly occupan-
cies above or below the ground floor)
by direct square foot method should
be abandoned; and, two, that exit
width should be determined by first
determining the number of occupants
involved and then fixing the exit
width in terms of occupants per exit
unit. The Code official has given as-
surance that these recommendations
will be given thorough review and
careful study in arriving at final re-
vision of the Codes Means of Egress
section.
As now in force, this section calls
for reduction of capacity on a
square foot calculation of occupancy
basis of nearly 100 per cent. The
Southern Standard Building Code,
NOVEMBER, 1959


(Sec. 512, Par. 512.8) says this rela-
tive to exits:
"Locate exits as remotely from one
another as practicable.
"Number of exitways: E-1, Large
Assembly, 3 exits minimum; four for
over 1000 occupants; E-2, Small As-


main entrance

6000 square feet



1201


SMALL ASSEMBLY
AT STREET LEVEL


VF unit width 22"


@ 15 square feet per person
6000 = 400 persons
3-
400 6 2/3 units or7 req
6F_
66+12 rates 3 1/2 units
3 1/2 = 6'-6" exit
two meets req.


6000 square feet

main entrance
man nce exit 6'6"



120'


SMALL ASSEMBLY
ABOVE STREET LEVEL and as per NATIONAL BUILDING CODE recommended by THE NATIONAL
BOARD OF FIRE UNDERWRITERS
prepared by Francis R Walton A. I.A. Architect for inclusion in study on calculation of exit
requirements in Southern Standard Building Code 1959 Daytona Beach ,Florida


This is a graphic comparison of exit capacity requirements. The two lower
diagrams indicate the wide variation in above-street exit requirements between
the Southern Standard Building Code and the recommendations of the National
Board of Fire Underwriters.


sembly, 2 exits minimum.
"Aggregate clear width of exits: On
ground or street level floor where fixed
seats are not provided, not less than
16" of width for each 1500 square feet
of gross floor area served; where place
(Continued on Page 46)

exit 2'-8"

@ 16" per 1500 sq. ft.
6000 =4 units of 16"

4 x 16 = 2 doors 2'-8"


exit 2'-8 -


I
and as per SOUTHERN STANDARD BUILDING CODE
PARAGRAPH 512.8


@22" per 450 sq. ft.
6000 13 1/3 units
13 1/3 x22"= 4 doors 5'-6"
I door 2'-9"


exit 6'-6'" ""






Exits ...
(Continued from Page 45)
of assembly without fixed seats is
located in a story above street level,
not less than 22" of width for each
450 square feet of gross floor area
served."
Computations by Walton indicate
that the clear width requirement for
exits on the ground floor is .01667"
per square foot; and that for exits in
areas other than on the ground floor
is .04888" per square foot. The differ-
ence figures out to a reduction of
capacity of almost 100 percent.
In contrast with this the National
Building Code (1957 edition), recom-
mended by the National Board of Fire
Underwriters, and the Building Exits
Code (15th Edition, 1958) recom-
mended by the National Fire Protec-
tion Association, International, both
require only a 25 percent reduction of
exit capacity for assembly areas above
or below a ground floor. These require-
ments have been determined as a
result of research undertaken by the
National Bureau of Standards and


reported in 1935. Subsequently a com-
mittee of the National Fire Protection
Association functioning under the pro-
cedure of the American Standards
Association developed the Building
Exits Code.
It is Walton's opinion that most
local code authorities would accept
the 25 percent exit capacity reduction.
He suggests that provisions of the
Building Exits Code be consulted in
detail when considering review of any
specific exits problem or code revi-
sions.


AIA Sets November 23
Deadline for Entry of
Honor Award Submissions

There's not much time left for
filing entry forms and fees with the
AIA for the 1960 Honor Awards
Program. The deadline is barely three
weeks away November 23 and
a fee of $10 for each exhibit to be
submitted must accompany the form.
January 15 is the deadline for receipt
of submissions in brochure form.


Judgement will take place at the
Octagon in Washington, January 20
to 22. Winners will be notified Feb-
ruary 5.
Folders containing an entry form
were mailed by the Institute to all
corporate members. Though the Pro-
gram is open to buildings of all
classifications, those submitted must
have been completed after January 1,
1955. Entries are also limited to build-
ings designed by registered architects
practicing professionally in the United
States. However, the buildings sub-
mitted may have been erected in the
United States or abroad.
This is the AIA's twelfth Annual
Program of National Honor Awards.
As in the past, all entries receiving
awards will be displayed at the AIA
Convention- to be held this year at
San Francisco, April 18 to 23 and
will form the basis for subsequent
public showings nationally.
Don't forget that first important
deadline! To quote from the brochure,
"The entry slip and fee must be
received by The Institute prior to
November 23, 1959."


46 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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State Board Revises Rule 7...



In the Circular of Information issued by the Florida State Board of
Architecture, Rule 7 concerns "Approved Style of Names for Practice
of Architecture". As this rule appeared in the Circular issued April 28,
1958, certain portions appeared to be subject to various interpreta-
tions, resulting in confusion. For the past year and one half the Board
has been studying revisions to Rule 7. The revised text printed here.
was approved by the Board and adopted officially as of August I, 1959.


(This replaces and supersedes Rule 7
as printed in Circular of Information
dated April 28, 1958.)

1. Statutes:
The Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture, having the official duty to
regulate the practice of architecture,
as a basis for this rule and regulation,
directs attention to the following
Florida Statutes:

"Otherwise, any person who shall
be engaged in the planning or design
for the erection, enlargement or alter-
ation of buildings for others or furn-
ishing architectural supervision of the
construction thereof shall be deemed
to be practicing architecture and be
required to secure a certificate and all
renewals thereof required by the laws
of this state as a condition precedent
to his so doing." (Section 467.09)
". .. no certificate (of registration)
shall be issued either with or without
an examination to any corporation,
partnership, firm or association to
practice architecture in this state, but
all certificates shall be to individual
persons." (Section 467.08)
"In the case of a copartnership of
architects, each member must hold a
certificate to practice." (Section
467.10)
"Any person applying to the licens-
ing official of any county, city, town,
or village for an occupational license
to practice architecture shall at the
time of such application exhibit to
such licensing official satisfactory evi-
dence under the seal of the Florida
State board of architecture and the
hand of its secretary that such appli-
cant possesses a registration certifi-
cate and any required annual renewal
thereof and no such occupational
license shall be granted until such
NOVEMBER, 1959


evidence shall be presented, any pro-
vision of any special act or general act
notwithstanding." (Section 467.13).
"It shall be a misdemeanor . for
any person to practice architecture in
this state (except as exempted in
Section 467.09) or to use the title
'architect' or to use or display any
title, sign, word, card, advertisement,
or other device or method to indicate
that such person practices or offers to
practice architecture or is an architect,
without being registered as an archi-
tect and having a certificate of regis-
tration then in force . ." (Section
467.17).
In this rule, where the context will
permit:
(A) The singular includes the plu-
ral and vice versa.
(B) The word "Architect" means
an architect registered in Florida
holding a current annual renewal
certificate.
(C) The words "Professional En-
gineer" mean a professional engi-
neer registered in Florida holding
a current annual renewal certifi-
cate.

2. Partnerships:
No certificate of registration to
practice architecture can be or will be
issued to a partnership. A contract for
architectural services must be made
in the name of an Architect, as an
individual, and signed by such person
personally. Subject to this requirement
a partnership name may be used if
such name consists of:
(A) The name of two or more
Architects; or
(B) The name of one or more
Architects and one or more Pro-
fessional Engineers;
(C) A partnership name must in-
clude the name of at least one


Architect but shall not include the
name of any person who is neither
Architect nor Professional Engineer.

3. "Associate", "Associates",
and "Associated":
(A) The use of these or similar
words in the name of a firm implies
a partnership; consequently, regu-
lations for partnerships apply.
Associates whose names do not ap-
pear in the firm name must be
either an Architect or a Profes-
sional Engineer; and when such
associates' names are used on let-
terheads, cards, printed matter or
otherwise, the professional status
of each must be specifically indi-
cated.
(B) When these or similar words
are used to show two or more sepa-
rate and independent firms have
combined to furnish architectural
services for a particular project,
each firm shall be subject to these
regulations.
(C) No individual or firm whose
members do not conform hereto
shall act as the principal architect
nor be termed 'Associate", "Asso-
ciates", or "Associated".

4. Corporations:
A corporation cannot legally prac-
tice or offer to practice architecture in
its corporate name or otherwise; and
this is true even though the name of
an architect is a part of the corporate
name.

5. Consultants:
When the name of an Architect is
plainly and predominantly set forth
as the Architect for a project, and
such Architect employs a consultant
for any type of services, the name of
(Continued on Page 50)








The Committee Nominated These Men...


For: Secretary


Treasurer


FRANCIS R. WALTON ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
Daytona Beach Chapter Jacksonville Chapter


Rule 7 Revised . .
(Continued from Page 49)
the consultant may be shown pro-
viding:
(A) The title and the name of
the consultant are subordinated to
the name and title of the principal
Architect.
(B) The type of service and the
address of the consultant's prin-
cipal office are clearly set forth.

6. Names of Retired or Deceased
Architects:
If an Architect is deceased or he is
not actively engaged in the practice
of architecture, his name shall not be
used in any way to indicate he is
practicing architecture.

7. Approved Usage:
The following usage is approved
under the circumstances indicated and
subject to compliance with the fore-
going provisions of this Rule.
(A) Approved if all members
named are Architects:
DOE, ROE & BROWN, ARCHI-
TECTS
or
ARCHITECTURAL OFFICES OF
DOE, ROE & BROWN
(B) Approved if all named are
names of partners who are Archi-
tects or Professional Engineers, at
least one being an Architect and
this being made clear:
DOE, ROE, BROWN & BLACK,
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS
Joe Doe, A.I.A.


3rd V-President


JOSEPH M. SHIFALO
Mid-Florida Chapter


Richard Roe, A.I.A.
George Brown, A.S.M.E.
Frank Black, A.I.A.
Others who perform services for
the firm may be listed thus:
James Blue, Office Manager
Ralph Smith, Chief Drafts-
man
Tom M. Snow, Accountant
(C) Approved examples of "Ass-
ciate", "Associates", "Associated":
(See Paragraph 3 above.)
(1) JOHN DOE & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
John Doe, A.I.A.
Richard Roe, A.I.A.
John Black, R.A.
(or Architect)
JOHN DOE & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS
John Doe, A.I.A.
Richard Roe, A.I.A.
John Black, A.S.M.E.
(3) JOHN DOE, ARCHITECT
RICHARD ROE, ASSOCIATE
ARCHITECT
(4) JOHN DOE AND ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECT:
associated with
BROWN AND BLACK, ARCHI-
TECT AND ENGINEER
(D) Approved usage where Con-
sultants are used:
(See Paragraph 5 above.)
(1) DOE, ROE & BROWN,
ARCHITECTS
WILLIAM SNOW,
CONSULTING ARCHITECT
Registered in
State of registration if other
than Florida


Also nominated by the
Committee was CLINTON
GAMBLE, for the new FAA
office of Director At Large
proposed in By-Law changes
to be voted upon the
assumption being that the
Director of the Florida Dis-
trict, AIA, will also serve
as an FAA Director at Large.
.. Since the Committee's
announcement, however, Mr.
Gamble has indicated he will
not become a candidate for
re-election as District Direc-
tor. Thus the Committee will
offer a new nomination at
the Convention.


(2) DOE, ROE & BROWN,
ARCHITECTS
ABC CORPORATION,
CONSULTANTS
Bank Equipment
Atlanta, Georgia
(E) Approved use of names of re-
tired or deceased Architects.
JOHN DOE, ARCHITECT
Successor to Doe & Brown

8. Disapproved Usage:
(A) Disapproved unless Black is
a registered architect:
BLACK AND ASSOCIATES, ARCHI-
TECTS AND ENGINEERS
(B) As this usage is misleading,
it is no longer acceptable.
DOE & ROE
John Doe, Architect
(C) Disapproved unless Black is
an Architect:
JOHN DOE, ARCHITECT
FRANK BLACK, ASSOCIATE
(D) The use of any corporate
name in offering to practice or in
practicing architecture is illegal.
The following usage is disapproved;
whether by a corporation or others:
JONES, BROWN & CO.,
ARCHITECTS
THE JONES-FRANK
ARCHITECTURAL Co.
FRANK L. JONES, INC.
ARCHITECTS
UNIVERSAL DESIGNERS,
INC., ARCHITECTS
BLACK, INC. DESIGNERS
ARTEX ASSOCIATES
THE JOHN DOE ASSOCIATES
ARCHITECTS COLLABORATIVE


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Report of The Nominating Committee...


For President-Elect


The FAA Nominating Committee,
as announced by President Stetson at
the October 9 Executive Committee
meeting, included: KENNETH JACOB-
SON, Palm Beach Chapter, Chairman;
W. STEWART MORRISON, Florida
Northwest Chapter; WAHL J. SNYDER,
FAIA, Florida South Chapter; L.
ALEX HATTON, Mid-Florida Chapter;
SIDNEY R. WILKINSON, Florida Cen-
tral Chapter; and LESTER N. MAY,
Florida North Chapter.
The Committee named the follow-
ing as candidates for FAA officers:
For President: JOHN STETSON, Palm
Beach Chapter.
For President-Elect: ROBERT H.
LEVISON, Florida Central Chapter.
For 3rd Vice President: JOSEPH M.
SHIFALO, Mid-Florida Chapter.
For Secretary: FRANCIS R. WVALTON,
Daytona Beach Chapter.
For Treasurer: ROY M. POOLEY, JR.,
Jacksonville Chapter.


For President


JOHN STETSON
Palm Beach Chapter


Of those nominated, Stetson and
Walton now hold the offices for
which they were nominated. The
office of President-Elect is a new one
proposed in the By-Law changes on


which the Convention will vote.
According to FAA By-Laws, nom-
inations for all officers may also be
made by Corporate members from the
Convention floor.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Regional Judiciary Committee

To Be Elected At Convention


One of the responsibilities which
the ten member-Chapters of the FAA
must discharge during the November
Convention is that of electing a three-
man Judiciary Committee to act for
the newly-formed Florida District. It
will be the duty of the FAA Nominat-
ing Committee to offer the names of
candidates for this important regional
committee; and presumably this will
be done sufficiently prior to the
Convention's opening to be included
in the Committee's formal report at
the first Convention business session,
Thursday morning, November 12.
Candidates' names will be included on
the ballot for election of FAA officers.
Actually, four individuals must be
elected to the Florida District Judici-
ary Committee. Institute By-Laws call
for a committee composed of "three
corporate members and one alternate,
the members normally serving on
staggered three-year terms, and the
alternate a one-year term." Institute
By-Laws further specify that members
shall be elected "by the Regional


Council in the Region concerned,";
but in Florida, as a newly-formed AIA
District, no such Council exists. It is
the opinion of Florida's AIA Director,
therefore, that election of the Judici-
ary Committee by Chapter represen-
tatives at the FAA Convention will
be in order.
In some quarters there appears to
exist an impression that the Florida
District, AIA, does not now have
access to a judiciary body to which
charges could be referred by Chapters.
This is not the case. By action of the
AIA Board the Judiciary Committee
of the South Atlantic District as
formerly constituted has been author-
ized to act for the Florida District
until January 1, 1960, when the Flor-
ida Committee will assume its duties.
The Florida member of the South
Atlantic District Judiciary Committee
is THOMAS LARRICK, of the Florida
North Chapter. He was elected to
that post by the South Atlantic
Regional Council during the AIA
Directorship of the late SANFORD V.


How To Write A Committee Report


The most important committee
report is useless unless it tells, simply
and exactly, what the committee has
done and what action it wishes taken
by the person or body reading or
hearing it.
That statement, by CLINTON GAM-
BLE, Florida District Director, was
made recently against the background
of his service on many FAA commit-
tees and as a chairman and member
of several AIA national and Board
committees.
"Reports can be valuable" he said,
"but only if they are in a form that
can actually be put to use. NED
PURVES has made up a form for
national committee chairmen to
follow. This makes it easy for AIA
Board members quickly to learn what
the committee has done and quickly
to act on its recommendations."
Here is the form he recommends
for use of committees in the Florida
Region:
1 . Title of Committee.


2 . Meeting dates, time, place.
3 . Those present.
4 . The report itself one
short paragraph on each subject con-
sidered and acted upon and the action
taken on each.
5 . Recommendations. Include
the statement "The
Committee (unanimously if the case)
passed the following resolutions which
it presents, requesting approval."
Then list each resolution as a separate
recommendation. Each should be
worded carefully to be as concise and
brief as possible.
6 . Sign the report with,
"Respectfully submitted, Chairman,
of Committee."
"With this kind of a report," says
the District Director, "A Board can
simply vote yes or no on the reconm-
mendations. Or it can rewrite them
if necessary. This may seem obvious.
But from experience I know how few
committeemen seem to realize its
importance."


COIN, FAIA, but is scheduled to
relinquish his committee membership
at the end of this year.
The whole matter of Institute dis-
cipline for unprofessional conduct of
AIA members also appears to be
clouded relative to a number of points.
First, there exists some misunderstand-
ing as to the differences between
unprofessional conduct and illegal
practices thus it is not always
clear to those wishing to press charges
against an individual whether these
charges should be laid before the
State Board of Architecture or the
Regional Judiciary Committee.
In reality the distinction is both
clear and simple. Unprofessional con-
duct involves transgression of one or
more of the Mandatory Rules the
Institute's Code of Ethics. Illegal
practice has nothing to do with pro-
fessional ethics. It refers only to the
provisions of the Florida Statutes,
Chapter 467, which regulate the
practice of architecture. Charges of
illegal practice can be brought against
any architect who violates the pro-
visions of this law and against any
other individual who practices, or
attempts to practice, architecture as
defined in the law without first having
been duly registered by the State
Board to do so.
One other point should be clarified
relative to preferring charges of un-
professional conduct against an archi-
tect. The Institute By-Laws recognize,
and make clear, the fact that dis-
ciplinary action by the Board can
be taken only against a corporate
member of the Institute. This is so
because, at present, only corporate
are recognized as members of the
Institute. Though the Institute may,
at some future time, set up other
member classifications, currently "as-
sociates" are merely members of AIA
Chapters, not of the Institute.
Against this background of Institute
By-Laws and organization, it seems
clear that charges of unprofessional
conduct against a Chapter associate
member could not be brought before
a Regional Judiciary Committee for
investigation and subsequent disciplin-
ary action by the AIA Board. The
Chapter could act on its own initiative
by terminating the associate's Chapter
membership. But beyond that no dis-
ciplinary procedures against associates
have yet been adopted or announced
by the Institute's Board.


NOVEMBER, 1959









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stone, refinforcing steel is insu-
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safety, less chance of fire dam-
age to structural elements . .
When you design with Hollo-
stone you design for economy,
structural safety and low operat-
ing costs . .


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


7
11A
ii`r





Office and Job Forms ...


- TADARS.0


CHECK LIST


JOB NO.


JOB

ADDRESS


DIV ITEM DWGS. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Under Bldg. to top
E
X Drains (Storm)
C
A Sewers
V
A Pipe Lines (Water, Oil)
T
i Tree and Root Removal
0
N Walks and Drives

Footings

F Under slabs
I
L Soil Poisoning
L
Grading

W Driveway
A
L Sidewalks
K
S Retaining Walls
& Curbs

D Fence and Enclosures
R
I Walls
V
E Plant Bins
Terraces and Patios

Walks
C
0 Retaining Walls
N
C Slab suspended
R
E Floors Concrete
T
E Floors Conc. Joists
Beams
NOVEMBER, 1959 55




STANDARDS OF

FAAGOOD PRACTICE


SCHEDULE OF COSTS

The following form is given as a guide for the Contractor's use in preparing the unit schedule of contract costs and payment
requests required under Article 24 of the General Conditions, and Section 2-7 of the Supplementary General Conditions. The
last two columns are to be used in making monthly requests for payments:


Project Name and Location


Contractor's Name


BREAKDOWN OF CONTRACT COSTS CONTRACT VALUE EARNED TO DATE
Total Quantity Total
Item Unit Quantity Material Labor or Percent Earned
General:
Bond Premium L. Sum
Insurance L. Sum
Temporary Bldgs. L. Sum
Other

Concrete Work:
Concrete Cu. Yd.
Reinforcing Steel Ton
Forms Sq. Ft.
Cement Finish Sq. Ft.
Other

Plumbing:
Soil Piping L. Sum
Water Piping L. Sum
Fixtures L. Sum
Sheet Metal L. Sum
Insulation L. Sum
Other

Electrical:
Conduit & Fittings L. Sum
Wire and Cable L. Sum
Boxes and Covers L. Sum
Panelboards L. Sum
Transformers L. Sum
Others




Totals
Total Work performed and in Place
Materials Stored at Site (furnish in detailed form on separate sheet)
Change Order approved to date
Total Earned to Date
Less 10% Retainage
Net Sum Earned to Date
Less Previous Payments
Due This Request


Note: Show in detail each other trade using appropriate units.
56 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Office and Job Forms ..





Office and Job Forms ...


STANARD 0

- I . RATI


REQUEST FOR PARTIAL PAYMENT (SUBMIT IN TRIPLICATE)
OWNER. REQUEST IS MADE FOR partial payment, as shown

section with the work FOR


a10

below, in con


PROJECT NO.
SCHEDULE
ORIGINAL PREV'LY THIS PER TOTAL
DESCRIPTION OF WORK CONTRACT DRAWN REQUEST CENT COMPLETED

General Conditions
Excavation and Grading
Concrete Work_ _
Masonry and Stone
Waterproofing and Drain Tile
Structural Steel
Steel Joists
Roofing and Sheet Metal
Miscellaneous Items
Roof Deck
Carpentry and Millwork
Insect Screens
Lathing and Plastering
Ceramic Tile and Marble
Composition Floors
Acoustical Treatment
Insulation
Caulking
Glass and Glazing
Finish Hardware
Painting
Equipment
Electrical
Plumbing
Heating-Vent.-Air Cond.

TOTALS
CHANGE ORDER NUMBER
CHANGE ORDER NUMBER
CHANGE ORDER NUMBER
CHANGE ORDER NUMBER

TOTALS

TOTAL OF CONTRACT COMPLETED TO DATE
LESS RETAINAGE OF PER CENT
TOTAL
LESS AMOUNT PREVIOUSLY PAID
TOTAL DUE THIS ESTIMATE
This is to certify that the work as listed above has been completed in accordance with the contract documents, that all lawful
charges for labor, materials etc., have been paid and that the amount due under this request for partial payment is
Dollars ($


Contractor


19-- Per


Date
NOVEMBER, 1959








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News & Notes


Watch That Clause
In Revised Article 20
Provisions in Article 20 of the
recently-revised AIA General Condi-
tions are apparently disturbing the
peace of mind of general contractors
throughout the State. This article
reads, in part, ". . The contractor
shall remedy any defects due to faulty
material or workmanship, pay for any
damage to other work resulting there-
from which shall appear within a
period of one year of the date of final
payment of from the date of the
owner's substantial usage or occupancy
cf the project, whichever is earlier,
and in accordance with the terms of
any special guarantee provided in the
contract. Neither the foregoing or any
provision in the contract document,
nor any special guaranteed time limit
shall be held to limit the contractor's
liability for defects to less than the
legal limit of liability in accordance
with the law of the place of building."
The italicised portion of that quo-
tation is what worries the contractors.
In Florida the statute of limitations
for a contract under seal is 20 years;
and if the contract is not under seal,
the statute of limitations is 5 years.
Under the terms of the new Article
20, it would therefore seem that con-
tractors could be held liable to pay
for defects of materials or workman-
ship for a minimum of five, and under
certain circumstances for 20 years.
At least in the Palm Beach area
AGC contractors have asked archi-
tects to rule on whether or not the
statute of limitations would apply to
contracts undertaken in Florida.
FREDERICK W7. KESSLER, Palm Beach
Chapter Director, raised the question
at the FAA Board meeting October
10. As a result of a general discussion
which included comments by the
FAA legal counsel and the AIA
Director for the Florida District, the
following points were agreed upon:
1 . Architects should not rule
on a matter of legal interpretation for
general contractors. The best advice
they can give relative to application
of Article 20 clauses is that the con-
tractor should seek, and be guided by,
his own legal advice and counsel.
2 . The clause relative to the
statute of limitations should probably
NOVEMBER, 1959


be left in the general conditions as
a notice to both owner and contrac-
tors as to the overall policy of the AIA.
3 . Each contract should con-
tain some specific references to the
contractor's term of liability.
The general feeling was to the
effect that the new clause relating to
the statute of limitations would not
control the contractor's liability if the
contract were definite in fixing the
terms and limits of his liability after
completion of the building. However,
the Board expressed a warning that
both architects and contractors should
familiarize themselves with the Article
20 revisions and to refer the matter
to their own legal counsel in any
case where a question arises with
reference to Article 20's legal effect
in a particular situation.

U/F Alumni Asked to
Support Loan Fund
University of Florida alumni have
an opportunity to be of great service
to struggling students by supporting
the drive, now under way, to estab-
lish a revolving fund for use by those
requiring special training in critical


fields. The basis of the fund is an
allocation by the US Government
called the National Defense Loan
Fund. This provides that for every
dollar contributed toward a university
student loan program by a university
involved, the Government will pro-
vide nine dollars. The combined
amount would then be lent to stu-
dents on the basis of repayment
within certain stipulated terms.
Unfortunately, the U/F itself can-
not budget the one-to-nine contribu-
tion needed for the participation of
U/F students in the loan fund pro-
gram. It is a state agency and there-
fore cannot even borrow the match-
ing funds needed. As a result, the
University must depend on the un-
derstanding and good will of its
students and alumni to provide the
basic dollars needed to involve the
total required.
The University has determined that
for a four-year period its total loan
fund requirements will be approx-
imately a million dollars, or about
$250,000 per year. This means that
some $90,000 or about $22,500
per year must be raised by dona-
(Continued on Page 60)


Jacksonville Chapter, CSI, Gets Its Charter...


- ON

ite.


The Jacksonville Chapter of the Construction Specification Institute was fully
constituted at a dinner meeting October 12, when Charles H. Huckleberry,
CSI Chapter Development Committeeman, presented the Charter to the newly
formed group. The chapter included names of 10 active and 24 associate
members . Newly elected as Chapter officers were: Norman E. Washer,
President; Lamar Drake, AIA, Vice President; George C. Griffin, Secretary . .
Guests representing professional and trade associations included: Taylor Hard-
wick, AIA, president of the Jacksonville Chapter, AIA, James E. Hammond,
president, Jacksonville Chapter, ASHVE, and Joseph Aresenault, AGC. . .
Pictured above are, left to right: Hardwick, Huckleberry, John M. Creamer
(Jacksonville architect who has acted as the Chapter's temporary president
during the past year), Hammond, Griffin and Aresenault.


I
_-"9dL_


Now


Aft







News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 59)


tion. A campaign has already begun
among students currently at Gaines-
ville to raise $20,000 of the $90,000
needed for the 4-ycar period. Alumni
are being asked to raise the other
$70,000.
So here is your chance! If you ever
studied at Gainesville or if you
recall rough financial going at some
other university get out the check
book and make a donation. It will not
only help students who may desper-
ately need it, but it will also help
you. First, it will give you the glow
of worthwhile giving. And, second,
you can deduct it from your income
tax return and thus channel a few
more dollars into efforts of our stud-
ent youth to build a better future
rather than be destroyed by it.

New Committees Named
At the FAA Executive Committee
and Board meetings, held at Winter
Park, October 9 and 10, FAA Presi-
dent Stetson named three new FAA
Committees in addition to the Nomi-


nating Committee as listed elsewhere
in this issue. These are:
Committee on Resolutions:
ANTHONY L. PULLARA, Florida Cen-
tral Chapter, Chairman, JAMES L.
DEEN, Florida South Chapter, and
JACK MOORE, Florida North Chapter.
Heretofore, this committee, though
an important one, has functioned
with comparative informality. How-
ever, the Board adopted, at its August
8 meeting, definite rules for sub-
mission, consideration and disposition
of resolutions. These rules are con-
tained in the Secretary's Preface to
the 1959 Board Report. Full con-
formation with these new rules and
regulations will materially strengthen
the Resolutions Committee's stature
and influence in FAA affairs.
Budget Committee: JOSEPH M.
SHIFALO, Mid-Florida C h a p t c r,
Chairman, ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL,
Florida North Chapter, and JACK
MCCANDLESS, Florida Central Chap-
ter. A report of this Committee is
being prepared for presentation and


discussion a t t h e pre-Convention
meeting of the FAA Board on Novem-
ber 11, at Jacksonville.
Committee on FAA Headquarters:
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, Florida
North Chapter, Chairman, ANTHONY
L. PULLARA, Florida Central Chapter,
TAYLOR HARDWICK, Jacksonville
Chapter, JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Mid-
Florida Chapter, VERNER JOHNSON,
Florida South Chapter, and FREDE-
RICK NV. KESSLER, Palm Beach Chap-
ter. This committee was charged with
the duty of conducting a feasibility
study for a new headquarters building
for the FAA. As now planned, it will
present at least an interim report of
its activities to the Convention at
Jacksonville.

AIA Issues New P/R Film
AIA Headquarters has announced
the availability of a new color film
as an addition to its P/R film library.
Called "Designing for a Better To-
morrow-A Career in Architecture",
the new film was designed primarily
for showing to the top three grades
in junior high and high school as-
(Continued on Page 62)


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ADVISORY SERVICE I






News & Notes-
(Continued from Page 60)


semblies. However, it is also suitable
for showing before parent groups to
stimulate consideration of a career
choice and provide basic understand-
ing of the meaning of architecture.
As with others in the AIA's film
series, this carries the recommenda-
tion that it be used primarily as a
speaker's aid. The new P/R tool has
a running time of 131/2 minutes, is
semi-animated and is regarded as the
best yet issued. The film is cleared
and suitable for television use. Cost
is $65 per print. It can be rented on
reservation for a charge of $5.

Personal Notes
FRED G. OWLES, JR., AIA, of
Orlando, and JOHN T. HART, AIA,
of Winter Park-both members of
the Mid-Florida Chapter-have an-
nounced formation of the new archi-
tectural firm of OWVLES AND HART.
Offices will be at 1401 Edgewater
Drive, Orlando; and the primary in-
terest of the new partnership will be
in development of residential, institu-


tional and commercial work.
JOHN EVANS, AIA, president of the
Broward County Chapter, has closed
his office until January 15, 1960. He
is presently attending the School of
Tropic Architecture in L o n d o n,
England.

Future Dates to Remember
The 46th Annual FAA Convention
in 1960, will be held at the Holly-
wood Beach Hotel, just south of Fort
Lauderdale; and Convention hosts
will be the Broward County Chapter,
according to FAA Covention Policy
Committee chairman VERNER JOHN-
SON.
Next year's National AIA Conven-
tion will be held at San Francisco
in April. The Northern California
Chapter will be hosts; and according
to pre-release information, the pro-
gram now building will be one of the
most outstanding in all AIA history.
The calendar says 1960 will be a
Leap Year. Depending on the extent
of your superstitions, that could be


significant. All current indications-
superstition or not-indicate that it
will be a significant year, with leaps
ahead in the progress of both the FAA
and the national AIA organization.

Duncan to Represent FAA
at Fire Safety Conference
C. ELLIS DUNCAN, AIA, Vero
Beach architect and member of the
Palm Beach Chapter, AIA, will this
month attend a three-day conference
on school fire safety in Washington,
D. C. Headquarters of the meeting -
official title of which is "Conference
on Safety to Life from Fire in Ele-
mentary and Secondary Schools" is
the Willard Hotel in Washington.
The meeting, which will be attend-
ed by architects, educators and build-
ing technicians from every section of
the country, has been arranged jointly
by the Building Research Advisory
Board, the National Academy of
Sciences and the National Research
Council and was made possible by a
grant from the Educational Facilities
Laboratory, Inc.
As Chairman of the important FAA
Committee on School Buildings Dun-


WEED-JOHNSON ASSOCIATES, Architect
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can has been active during the past
two years in working with the State
Department of Education, and educa-
tors and school board officials through-
out the State. He was instrumental in
developing the programs for the facili-
ties conferences held this year on
Junior High Schools for which the
FAA was co-sponsor.

;. ..s s 3 . .. .

Forrest R. Coxen Resigns
As State School Architect
State School Architect FORREST R.
COXEN, AIA, has resigned as State
School Architect, effective Novcm-
bcr 2, 1959. He will establish his own
office for the general practice of
Architecture and City Planning at
the Avant Building, Suite 218, Talla-
hasscc.
The former State School Architect
was appointed to that position by
Superintendent THOMAs D. BAILEY
two years ago to fill the vacancy crc-
ated by the resignation of GEORGE
MEGGINSON, currently a member of
the staff of the Broward County
Board of Public Education. A member


of the American Society of Planning
Officials as well as the AIA, he is
a former president of the Florida
North Central Chapter of the AIA
and has served also as a member of
the FAA Board of Directors.
As now organized, the position of
State School Architect has been subor-
dinated in administrative responsi-
bility as a department of the School
Plant Administrator's office, headed
currently by Dr. CARROLL NV. Mc-
GUFFEY. This office now employs
three individuals on its architectural
staff, N. LEE. FAYERS, JR., Assistant
State School Architect, and RUDOLPH
J. FLETCHER and WVAYNE F. BETTS,
both Assistants to the State School
Architect.
In addition, the School Plant Ad-
ministrator employs NELSON E. VILES,
an insurance specialist, as Insurance
Consultant with the duties of advis-
ing county school organizations rela-
tive to fire safety programs and
insurance programs covering school
transportation facilities and work-
men's compensation. Finally, a Con-
sultant on Maintenance and Opera-
tion of school plants is employed. He


FORREST R. COXEN, AIA


is JOHN B. TOKHEIM, an FSU educa-
tional administration major, who is
charged with the duties of developing
maintenance programs and recom-
mending maintenance procedures with
county school boards throughout the
State.
No replacement for Mr. Coxen has
yet been announced by the School
Plant Administrator's office.


WILLIAM TSCHUMY, A.I.A., Architect
PRAHL BROTHERS, Contractor
THE RICHARD PLUMER COMPANY, Decorator


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155 Northeast Fortieth Street


NOVEMBER, 1959







Designing With Light...

This paper, by an outstanding authority in his
field, was presented at one of the Design Seminars
at the AIA Convention in New Orleans, La.

By STANLEY McCANDLESS
President, The Illuminating Engineering Society


Light has been the basic medium
of design, since the beginning of
time, but its production and control
by artificial means in recent years,
makes it possible to think of it as
a new means of expression, even as
a new building tool. Our whole
visual education in design is almost
completely conditioned by natural
lighting. Yet of late years-specifically
since the invention of the electric
lamp and the experience with its use
-a vast world of artificial lighting
uses and environments has condi-
tioned our concepts of design. The
artist and the architect are slowly
becoming aware of the fact that light-
ing is their problem, and that it is
a problem of design.
Lighting is technical in its execu-


tion; and this is the engineer's prov-
ince. But it is not basically an elec-
trical engineering problem. The preva-
lent misconception is that the illumi-
nating engineer can be expected to
assume the initial responsibility of
determining the design of the visual
effect as well as the technical prob-
lem of execution. In view of the
situation where the designer has not
indicated the ultimate effect, it is
surprising how often the engineer has
come up with acceptable results.
All architectural design has been
based to such a large extent on the
uncontrolled conditions of natural
illumination, that we are all basically
daytime designers. Yet we live and
work in an environment which de-
pends almost completely upon arti-


ficial light. For most of us city dwell-
ers this means seven-eighths of our
waking hours-a s t a r t art1 ing figure
which indicates that the light in in-
teriors is almost completely artificial
and further that the extension of our
activities out-of-doors after nightfall
is completely dependent upon man-
made light.
This is a challenge to, and a respon-
sibility of, the designer. No modern
designer can afford to overlook or
avoid either the responsibility or the
opportunity, for lighting today has
many features of a new building ma-
terial. But it takes experience and
time for great familiarity with the
functions of light in architecture.
Sources and eq uipment are still
primitive, compared to what we hope
for. Therefore, integration becomes
more difficult and aspirations must be
disciplined to strive for modest results.
Only in the theatre, has the de-
signer been given almost unlimited
scope of expression. Most of this de-
velopment has taken place in the last
thirty years. The scene designer knows
that he must work with artificial light.
He also knows that he will have a


Design and Progress

Like most good things, Florida architecture
did not just happen- the widely admired
commercial, industrial and residential build-
ings in our state are the result of the work
and imagination of highly skilled designers.
Florida architects are nationally recognized
as specialists in the design of the function-
al, the attractive and the comfortable . .
and in adapting to climate, topography and
progress.
Progress also demands skillful designs in
communications. Southern Bell is proud to
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most flexible machine and generally
an ample budget to work with. He
will have time and facilities to adjust
intei sities and distributions with
dimmers. He can pick and choose
from a wide variety of colors and he
can even make the same stage set
take on a visual character suitable to
widely different situations.
Lighting in architecture may never
be as flexible or dramatic as in the
theatre. But ultimately every designer
hopes he can re-create a visual aspect
-an atmosphere or a special com-
position which he must know can only
be created through the control of
artificial light. He must ask himself
just how can artificial light contribute
to architectural design.
This is an academic question not
easily answered. We have had so
little training and precedent that the
following outline is presented only as
a start. It is something upon which
to build a critical faculty for the
analysis and enrichment of any visual
experience and a foundation to guide
the imagination in the solution of the
lighting of any new project.
The functions of artificial light in
architecture, are to provide visibility,
comfort, composition and atmosphere.
These are general terms which need
clarification and definition. But they
help break down the problem into
separate objectives which with all of
the other factors in architectural de-
sign, must be integrated as seeing
elements with the rest of the struc-
ture. If it is agreed that these are
the proper objectives, then the de-
signer has a concrete goal to work
toward.
1. Visibility: This has to do with
control of the complete gamut of
sensitivity from threshold where de-
tails are scarcely recognizable, to
saturation where the eye can no longer
see detail, because of excessive stimu-
lation. Under the heading of com-
position, it should be noted that
lighting should reveal things in pro-
portion to their importance. This is
to say it is just as important to con-
ceal irrelevant and insignificant de-
tails as it is to reveal those which set
the whole key in the visual pattern.
This was brought clearly to mind
during the war. Concealment during
this period was of primary im-
portance, and so we learned to use
and control elements which avoided
(Continued on Page 66)
NOVEMBER, 1959


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For thin set tile installa-
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Manufactured by L&M Tile Products, Inc.
Contact Your Local Distributor


Designing with Light...
(Continued from Page 65)
the see-ability of detail, the means
for revealing things.
A. The amount of light falling
on an object or being transmitted
from it to the eye, is generally
proportional to its visibility; and
we whose eyes have been developed
in the vast levels of illumination
found in nature probably can ex-
pect the so-called standard levels
of artificial illumination for various
tasks to keep going upward, from
year to year.
B. Color, particularly in light,
has very little effect on visibility,
except in the extreme limits of the
spectrum-reds, blues and purples.
It is always easier to see things in
the illumination near the central
zone of the spectrum-for exam-
ple, the yellows, than it is in blues
or reds-and it is always easier to
see under a diluted color approach-
ing white light, than it is in the
pure wave length of any color.
C. The distribution of light is,
by all odds, the most important
factor in seeing detail-contrasts in
light, shade and color always pro-
mote a sense of plasticity and form.
The size of the object obviously is
important, because below a certain
size the eye does not see detail.
Age has something to do with it,
in that we tend to require larger
print, or the aid of glasses as we
get older. More light or greater
contrast is desirable, in this case.
D. Movement has only an in-
direct effect on visibility, in that
we tend to see things more clearly
the longer we have time to study
them. Quite obviously, if the de-
signer wishes to suppress a view of
certain details ,they should not only
be small, of low contrast and
illumination, but the o b s e r v e r
should not be encouraged to study
them carefully.
2. Comfort: Comfort is one of the
imponderables that are generally
accepted by the architect as a basis
for his design. Air conditioning,
acoustical treatment, the feel of
materials and now lighting, come
more completely into this picture.
Obviously, lighting alone has very
little influence on the body comforts,
except that of seeing. Good lighting
is essential to the feeling of comfort.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






A. The optimum amount of
light as a standard for various
functions, is increasing, in the eyes
of some, at an alarming rate. As
costs, heat loads and glare factors
are gradually overcome, considering
that our eyes are adapted to day-
light levels, it is quite possible that
we will continue to accept higher
levels of illumination as more com-
fortable than low-provided glare,
heat and cost are likewise not in-
creased. Recent studies conducted
for the Illuminating Engineering
Society by Dr. Blackwell, at Ohio
State University, have produced in-
teresting and scientific bases for
higher levels, in many basic opera-
tions.
B. Color has very little to do
with comfort, except in an esthetic
way. However, we do know that
it is difficult to see easily in high
levels of red and blue, the extremes
of the spectrum; and the greatest
comfort generally comes with the
use of white light. Of course, there
are specific exceptions-n a m e I v
that some individuals may be
affected by some colors more than
others. But even with the objec-
tions to the fluorescent color, for
example, the reaction is generally
more of a psychological nature
than physiological.
C. The control of the distribu-
tion of light for comfort is a tough
problem. We have not yet learned
in ordinary lighting practice, to re-
duce brightness contrasts in the
normal field of vision to a com-
fortable point, as we must in the
theatre. Until we learn how to
control brightness ratios in terms
of comfort, we can scarcely have
entirely satisfactory compositional
lighting effects.
D. In terms of movement, flicker
or even fluctuations in the amount
of light or color of light can quickly
create an unbearable situation. The
noticeable flicker in the early fluo-
rescent tubes is still remembered
by some who have since nursed this
bias to the point where they still
refuse to consider the fluorescent
type of illumination. They were
quite wrong, because this flicker
which caused a stroboscopic effect,
has been almost entirely elimi-
nated. The use of lead-lag ballasts
-throwing the start and stop of
(Continued on Page 68)
NOVEMBER, 1959


BEHIND


THIS DOOR





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finest materials and workman-
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Thompson flush doors, in beau-
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* 0


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AIR7 PLY CONSTRUCTION
* *.* * ** * *' Lightweight, but sturdy, Thompson flush
.* * * * * doors are noted for their rigidity and
resistance to warping and twisting. This
quality is the result of high manufacturing
standards that include: cores of wood ribs
spaced 4-inches apart and butted against
stiles on alternate sides to provide continu-
ous vent space; stiles of a 1 1/8-inch
Minimum width; rails of a minimum 21/2-
inch width; panels of 3-ply, cross-banded
plywood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
B 4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
-- both sides. Only non-shrinking, craze-re-
sistant adhesives are used to produce inte-
grated bonding that is highly resistant to
both moisture and mildew.
In addition to 11 standard sizes--1/6 x
0 6/8 to 3/0 x 6/8 interior and 2/6 x 6/8
to 3/0 x 7/0 exterior-Thompson flush
doors are obtainable in special sizes.



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Depend on Members of

AIR-CONDITIONING
REFRIGERATION
HEATING & PIPING
ASSOCIATION, INC.
1390 N.W. 43rd ST.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA NATIONAL
CON TRACTORS
Airko Air Conditioning Company
Cahon, Dudley M., Inc.
*Cenral Roof & Supply Co.
Conditioned Air Corporation
SDomestic Refrigeration
G* iflen Industrics, Inc.
Hamilton, Sam L., Inc.
hill York Corporation
McDonald Air Conditioning
Miami Air Conditioning
Miami Super Cold, Inc.
SPoole & Kent Company
SZack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
SUPPLIERS
A & B Pipt & e Gondas Corporation
Steel Co. Craves Refrigeration
Air Filters Co. McMiirray, H.L., Co.
Brophy, George Middleton, J. L., Co.
Clark Equipment Co. O'Brian Associates
Dean, A. C., Co. Southern Metal Prod.
Florida Elec. Motor Swiigert Air
Cen. Sheet Metal Cond. Engrs.
| & Roofing Trane Company


Designing with Light...
(Continued from Page 67)
lamps ninety degrees out of phase,
and even more importantly, using a
phosphor with a holdover lumi-
nosity of phosphorescent chemicals,
have done the trick. We shall have
a great deal to learn, to equal
natural illumination, in terms of
comfort in artificial illumination,
as compared with natural light. But
we do have control. It is up to us.
3. Composition: Composition is
the keystone, in the designer's tech-
nique. It need only be reiterated here,
that with the means whereby we see
under control, design in terms of arti-
ficial light has a promising future. A
new dimension of expression has been
added to the philosophy and tech-
nique of the heretofore daytime
designer.
A. The intensity of light under
control can reveal objects or
supress them, as never before pos-
sible in nature. It is, to some ex-
tent, comparable to the difference
between a photograph of a scene
and a painting, where the painter
has chosen or selected those things
which he wishes to be seen and
has hidden or omitted those which
are unimportant. The brightness
range at present in artificial light
is a little out of hand in terms of
composition. From the acceptable
and exciting glitter of a crystal
chandelier, to the garishness of an
exposed high intensity source; from
the soft luminosity of the sky, to
the sometimes overpowering mono-
tony of a luminous ceiling, we have
much to learn. The brightness pat-
tern in the field of view will always
be more vivid than a painting, but
we should learn to control it with
the same skill as the more limited
process in the hands of the painter.
B. Color in the terms of com-
position can be blatantly enhanced
in terms of colored light. In fact,
it is not strange that the average
sensitive designer shies away from
the use of colored light for this
reason. It is a great challenge and
a powerful tool which we hope will
engage the designer more com-
pletely in the future.
C. Distribution, or the pattern
of light, is almost synonymous with
composition and we see it most
vividly exploited on the stage and
some times in the rashness of dis-


play, such as Times Square at night.
Store windows, since the war, have
exhibited a great appreciation of
this function of artificial light and
the same spirit has gone into the
store in some cases, and proved to
be an economic asset, even though
it cost more on paper, at first.
Actually, the costs of controlled
light are puny, compared to the
economics of air conditioning, and
even acoustical treatment.
D. Movement is the touchstone
of vitality in design. All of the fine
arts painting, architecture and
sculpture in daylight are frozen
images. Under artificial light they
come alive and are vitalized, even
to the point of taking on the guise
of musical compositions, in a
sequence of changes. The colored
fountains of the Longwood Gar-
dens and the spectacles of light
and sound now popular in Europe,
are examples of this control of
light.
4. Atmosphere: Whether we like
it or not, every visual experience is
translated in the mind as having a
certain atmosphere, or mood. Archi-
tects reluctant to face this problem
have made a very important place, as
a result, for the interior designer or
decorator. Atmosphere created by
light is an imponderable, dealt with
mostly in the theatre. But the de-
signer should be aware of the general
possibilities for creating a particular
atmosphere by means of light.
Intensity is generally associated
with brightness for gaiety, with
dimness for tragedy. Color is
generally used as follows: warms
for comedy or gaiety, and cools for
tragedy or subdued atmosphere.
Distribution is generally associated
in terms of details with playfulness
or comedy, and masses with tragedy
or formality. Movement is fast for
comedy and slow for tragedy, and
so on.
The foregoing is an attempt to un-
fold some of the great possibilities of
lighting for the designer. It is without
any real tradition; and yet we can find
examples as old as architecture itself.
The general intent, of course, is that
today, with new sources, new instru-
ments, new methods of control and
new concepts, the designer has a
much broader field of expression than
he ever had before. And only he can
put them to proper use.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






For apartment houses, motels, hotels,
office buildings and commercial users


I
0


Here's proof. 250 gallons #2 fuel oil produces the same
amount of BTUs as 368.4 therms of natural gas. Oil costs
only $37.00. Natural gas costs $61.41 (published rate
in Dade County). The oil dollar buys 66% more BTUs
... actually saves $293 a year!


Oil is unquestionably the cheapest
and best fuel for hot water and fully
automatic heat. Oil is safe to use and
to store. Oil supplies are ample;
deliveries always dependable. But
natural gas, "home based" thousands
of miles away, can leave the com-
mercial user out on a limb in case
of a pipeline emergency or low pres-
sure in cold weather.


Fuel oil can be bought from any
number of local firms . the free,
competitive system at work. But
natural gas is a one-source monopoly
. . and as Fortune magazine says,
"Gas prices have never shown a dis-
position to go anywhere but up."
Stick to modern Oil Heat! Recom-
mend it to your clients ... they'll be
glad you did!


BETTER FUEL COUNCIL of DADE COUNTY
W LITTLE BILL says ...
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for lowest cost and maximum heat!"
HELAT


NOVEMBER, 1959


FUE


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rr 7
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need lots of always-ready hot water.
Among the best reasons
we know for easily-installed...

ELECTRIC WATER HEATERS
Far and away preferred by most of your customers


it'sd ch"caa
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o g toyo
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
I Y


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NOVEMBER, 1959






















































Mr. and Mrs. Eddie
Bush and son Jackie
(above) live at
68 River Drive,
Tequesta, Florida


THE BUSH FAMILY DID...


was $14.32.




Jackie Bush, aged two, is a boy who
likes his comfort. He approves of the
family's central oil furnace because
he doesn't have to bundle-up like an
Eskimo to keep warm. His mother
says, "I wouldn't use anything but
oil for house heating. We just set the
thermostat and that's all." Mr. Bush
9I ; -adds, "Last winter our fuel bill was
/- e only $14.32 partly because we
bought the correct size heating sys-
tem; partly because the house is in-
sulated; but mostly because fuel oil
is so inexpensive."



Why envy the Bush family when you
can have safe, economical, efficient oil
heating so easily? Fuel oil will save
you money it's by far the cheapest
and best fuel for home heating in
Florida. The supply is always depend-
able. No premium price is charged
when you use it only for home heat-


MR. ARCHITECT: This "Move up to Oil
Heating" story is being told in news-
papers and on TV and radio all over
Florida. This campaign should help to
Remember-Florida homes do need heall assure ready acceptance for your recom-
Even South Florida homes require an aver- mendations of central oil heating .
best and most economical for Florida
age ol 42 days- of dependable home heat- homes.
ing each year when temperatures drop
ito the 50's r lower... ...
U FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
NOVEMBER, 1959





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L


NOVEMBER, 1959







GREETINGS!



The Harris Standard Paint Company
.. 4arest PaUin Manftactwrer ie lorida . .

Extends Best Wishes to The

Florida Association of Architects, Inc.

During Their Annual Convention

Over 50 years of servicec e to the S.otith
Specializing in
ARCHITECTURAL FINISHES
U. S. Government (Military & Federal)
Specification Finishes
State Road Department Specification Paints


LOOK US UP ... IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
Join in our SILVER DOLLAR GAME!

HARRIS STANDARD PAINT CO.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Long Live The King...
(Continued from Page 19)
that insensitivity is inherent in con-
temporary architecture-and that we
should not stray from the small-
thought range of John Q. Bourgeoise
and his Mother and her poor furni-
ture.
A creative architect's strongest urge
must be to educate everyone of the
architectural middle class to his point
of view. The most successful archi-
tectural education of the public is
accomplished by meaningful (com-
pletely) contemporary buildings,
whether revolutionary or not. A build-
ing cannot be meaningful without full
reference to the client. Only a cour-
ageous and sensitive architect is able
to bargain with a limited client in
order to close the gap between ad-
vanced theory and reality.
Architects must continue to "de-
sign" to please each other, gaining
valuable criticism from the best inter-
pretive minds of our times. Our worst
choice is to sit in the mud-puddle
of middle-class approval, making mud
pies to middle-class order.


Improved medical techniques
have cut the TB death rate.
Needed: A way to prevent active
tubercuosis in the 40 million
Americans infected.
Help solve vital TB problems.
Your Christmas Seal contribu-
tion can help research find new
weapons against TB. Answer
your Christmas Seal letter
today, please.

-Fight
TB
,.. ':-i with
V -ME Christmas
%,, Seals


NOVEMBER, 1959


1a^ A4tect


5-
Ucci


~foa#~


If you offer Quality to give the Service architects
demand they want to know about it. And the best
place to tell them is in THEIR VERY OWN MAGAZINE.

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers and general contractors.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building"-for through draw-
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create . .

Architects' specifications control your sales. To help
them specify the product or service you offer, tell them
about it where they'll see it regularly HERE . .


Florida's ONLY OFFICIAL
FAA Journal . Owned, read "
and used by architects






Florida Architect


414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32


FR 1-8331


I


Products?












5th Annual Roll-Call---1958-1959


Listed here are the firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA
grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they
make or sell are of a quality to merit specification. They seek your approval.


ADVANCE METAL PRODUCTS, INC.
2445 N. W. 76th Street, Miami
Mfgrs. specialty building products.
AIR-CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION,
HEATING & PIPING ASSOCIATION,
INC.
1390 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami
Air conditioning, refrigeration, heating
and piping installations, sales and
servicing.
Agency-Long Advertising Agency
815 West Flagler St., Miami
AMERICAN CELCURE WOOD
PRESERVING CORP.
1073 East Eighth Street, Jacksonville
Wood preservative process.
Agency-Bacon, Hartmen & Voll-
brecht, Inc., First Federal Savings
Bldg., Jacksonville
AMERICAN OLEAN TILES OF
MIAMI, INC.
1150 South Miami Avenue, Miami
Ceramic Tile
Agency-Arndt, Preston, Chapin,
Lamb & Keen, Inc.
160 No. 15th St., Philadelphia, Pa.
ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR & SUPPLY
COMPANY
501 N. W. 54th Street, Miami
Pneumatic tube systems, access panels.
BETTER FUEL COUNCIL OF DADE
COUNTY
Oil Heating.
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc., 3361 Southwest 3rd Ave., Miami
BIRD & SON, INCORPORATED
1255 Franklin Circle, NE, Atlanta, Ga.
Termibar, termite and moisture
resistant vapor barrier.
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURG
460 Melwood Street, Pittsburg, Pa.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts, aluminum
grilles.
BRIGGS MANUFACTURING CO.
Warren, Michigan
Plumbing fixtures for residential,
commercial and industrial use.
Agency-McManus, John & Adams,
Inc., Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
BRADENTON STONE COMPANY
P. 0. Box 256, Bradenton, Florida
Quarriers and fabricators travertine.
BRYANT HEATING SPECIALISTS
3306 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables,
Florida
Heating systems
Agency-Compton & Woodruff
Advertising
181 Maderia Avenue, Coral Gables
BUILDERS PRODUCTS COMPANY
221 E. Eighth Street, Jacksonville
Metal Building specialties, toilet
partitions, curtain wall, hollow metal.


BUILDORAMA
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami, Florida
Building products displays.
Agency-Harris & Company
Advertising, Inc.
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
CAMPBELL-LURIE PLASTICS, INC.
5440 Highway Ave., Jacksonville, Florida
Fabricators insulated panels.
Agency-Crisp & Harrison Agency
502 O'Reilly Bldg., Jacksonville
A. R. COGSWELL
433 West Bay Street, Jacksonville
Architects' supplies and Reproduction
service.
CRADLE DRAIN CORPORATION
707 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami, Florida
Drain field system.
Agency-Agey Associates, Inc.
1451 No. Bayshore Drive, Miami
GEORGE DORO FIXTURE COMPANY
102-28 Florida Avenue, Jacksonville
Custom-designed interiors and fixtures.
Agency-Bacon, Hartman &
Vollbrecht, Inc.
First Federal Savings Bldg., Jacksonville
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11 th St., Hialeah, Florida
Decorative masonry materials,
Burr-Southern barbeque units,
Featherock.
DWOSKIN, INCORPORATED
Atlanta, Georgia
Wallpaper and wallcovering.
Agency-Bearden-Thompson- Frankel
& Esstman, Scott Advertising Agency,
22 Eighth St., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia
DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA, INC.
621 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Manufacturer kitchens for motels,
resorts and hotels.
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd at Harrison, Elkhart, Indiana
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING
COMPANY OF FLORIDA
4550 37th Street North, St. Petersburg
Electric heating systems.
EVERSHILED LIQUID TILE OF FLORIDA
1111 N. E. 7th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Self-baking liquid tile coating.
FEATHEROCK, INCORPORATED
6331 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, Cal.
Lightweight garden and landscape rock.
FLAMINGO WHOLESALE
DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
1002 E. 27th St., Hialeah
Floor coverings.
FLORIDA BUILDERS, INC.
Trendline Division
P.O. Box 11769, St. Petersburg, Florida
Modular kitchen components.
Agency-Henry Quednau, Inc.
404 Thirteenth St., Tampa, Florida


FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WKS.
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami
Ornamental castings.
FLORIDA GEORGIA BRICK & TILE
COMPANY
P. 0. Box 6308, Jacksonville
Masonry materials.
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
Buildorama, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Oil and gas heating.
Agency-Bevis Associates, Advertising
Ingraham Building, Miami
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa
Portland Cement.
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Asso., Inc.
206 S. Franklin St., Tampa
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Miami, Florida
Electric utility
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden, Inc.
3361 Southwest 3rd Ave., Miami
FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
215 So. Rome Avenue, Tampa
Reinforcing steel and accessories.
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Asso., Inc.
206 S. Franklin St., Tampa
FLORIDA TILE INDUSTRIES, INC.
608 Prospect Street, Lakeland
Manufacturers of glazed wall tile
and trimmers.
Agency-Henry Quednau, Inc.
404 Thirteenth St., Tampa
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
"B" & "G" Aluminum windows
and window walls.
Mirawall panels.
HAMILTON PLYWOOD
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Ft. Lauderdale
Cabinet and paneling plywoods.
Agency-Travis Messer, Advertising
P.O. Box 7368, Orlando, Florida
HARRIS STANDARD PAINT COMPANY
1022-26 No. 19th St., Tampa
Paints and paint products.
HOLLOSTONE COMPANY OF MIAMI
480 Ali Baba Ave., Opa Locka, Florida
Precast concrete products.
HOMASOTE COMPANY
Trenton, New Jersey
Insulating building industrial
board.
Agency-R. T. O'Connell Company
420 Madison Ave., New York City
HOTEL ROBERT MEYER
Jacksonville, Florida
Agency-Newman, Lynde &
Associates, Inc.
1628 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville
THE HOUSTON CORP.
St. Petersburg, Miami, Jacksonville,
Orlando, Lakeland, Daytona Beach,
Eustis
Natural gas installations.
Agency-Grant Advertising, Inc.
201 S. W. 13th St., Miami


76 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Bridgewater, Massachusetts
Agency-Warner Alden Morse,
P.O. Box 720, Brockton, Mass.
JO TILES
Pan American Bank Bldg., Miami
Italian ceramic tile.
Agency-Bishopric/Green/Fielden,
Inc.
3361 Southwest 3rd Ave., Miami
KAISER MANUFACTURING, INC.
200 Harrington, Houston, Texas
Thin-bed mortars and grouts for tile
Agency-Erwin Wasey, Rutherauff &
Ryan, Inc.
5615 Fannin St., Houston, Texas
L & M TILE PRODUCTS INC.
Mortar mix.
Agency-Bob Baird & Associates
Advertising Consultants
4503 Worth Street, Dallas, Texas
LEXSUCO INCORPORATED
Box 326, Solon, Ohio
Roof construction materials.
Agency-Mills Advertising Agency
Box 209, Chagrin Falls, Ohio
0. 0. MCKINLEY COMPANY, INC.
Indianapolis, Indiana
Metal building products, canopies.
Agency-Jim Bradford Advertising
K of P Bldg., Indianapolis, Indiana
MARKOWITZ BROS.,JNC.
5600 N. E. 4th Ave., Miami, Florida
Mechanical contractors.
Agency-Dobin Advertising Incorpo-
rated, Roosevelt Bldg., 4014 Chase
Avenue, Miami Beach
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Prestressed concrete.
Agency-Robert K. Heady
Advertising, Inc.
561 Northeast 79th St., Miami
MIAMI WINDOW CORP.
Miami 48, Florida
Aluminum awning windows.
Agency-E. J. Schaeffer & Associates
1101 N. E. 79th St., Miami
MR. FOSTER'S STORE
835 West Flagler St., Miami
Office furniture, equipment, supplies.
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc., Ainsley Bldg., Miami
MONOSTRUCTURE INCORPORATED
Sarasota-Bradenton Airport, Sarasota
Honeycomb sandwich panels.
BENJAMIN MOORE & COMPANY
511 Canal Street, New York City
Paints and paint products.


MOORE PIPE & SPRINKLER COMPANY
Jacksonville. Fire protection equipment.
MOORE VENTS
P. 0. Box 1406, West Palm Beach, Florida
Wall condensation preventative.
MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
2959 N. E. 12th Terr., Ft. Lauderdale
Kitchen design and construction.
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd, at Harrison Streets, Elkhart, Ind.
NATIONAL BRONZE COMPANY
2180 N. W. 24th Ave., Miami
Bronze and aluminum tablets.
PERLITE, INCORPORATED
1050 S. E. 5th St., Hialeah, Florida
Lightweight aggregate.
CONRAD PICKEL STUDIO, INC.
607 East 14th St., Vero Beach, Florida
Stained glass.
RICHARD PLUMER
Business, residential interiors
Tally Embry, Inc. Advertising
Pan American Bank Bldg., Miami
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
Portland cement and products
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.
410 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.
PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CO.
Berkeley, California
Lighting fixtures.
Agency-L. C. Cole Co., Inc., 406
Sutter St., San Francisco 8, California
A. H.RAMSEY & SONS, INCORPORATED
71 N. W. 11th Terrace, Miami
Architectural woodwork and supplies.
Woodlife.
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS, INC.
155 Washington St., Newark, N. J.
Designers, fabricators wood products.
Agency-E. T. Holmgren Inc., First
National Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minn.
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND
TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Atlanta, Georgia
Communications
Agency-Tucker Wayne & Co., 1173
Peachtree St., Atlanta, Georgia
SOUTHERN LIGHTWEIGHT
AGGREGATE CORP.
Prudential Building, Jacksonville
Manufacturer of solite.
Agency-Cabell Eanes, Inc.
509 W. Grace St., Richmond, Virginia
SOUTHERN WATER CONDITIONING,
INC.
301 Fifteenth Ave., So. St. Petersburg
Water softener and conditioning.
Agency-T. R. Moorehead Advertising
15017 Gulf Blvd., Maderia Beach, Fla.


STEWARD-MELLON COMPANY
OF JACKSONVILLE
945 Liberty St., Jacksonville
Contractors for marble, tire, terrazzo.
TAMCO SUPPLY COMPANY
1302 Grand Central Avenue, Tampa
Distributors heating systems.
Agency-The Paul A. Lago Company
3337 Henderson Blvd., Tampa
TENNESSEE STONE COMPANY, INC.
705 Broadway, NE, Knoxville, Tennessee
Quarries and Fabricators Tennquartz.
T-SQUARE MIAMI BLUEPRINT
COMPANY, INC.
635 S. W. First Avenue, Miami
Photo copies-chromostats and
architectural-engineering supplies.
THOMPSON DOOR COMPANY, INC.
5663 N. W. 36th Avenue, Miami
Fine Quality doors.
BEN THOMSON INCORPORATED
530 Putnam Road, West Palm Beach
Glazed cement.
TIFFANY TILE CORPORATION
500 N. West Shore Drive, Port Tampa
Manufacturers, installations ceramic tile
Bill Simpson, Jr. Advertising Inc.
2306 Gray St., Tampa
TROPIX WEVE PRODUCTS, INC.
3590 N. W. 52nd Street, Miami
Manufacturers woven wood, "Shoji"
and louver panel doors.
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th Street, New York City
Interior and exterior plywood.
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Avenue, New York City
UNIT STRUCTURES, INC.
Peshtigo, Wisconsin
Glued laminated timbers.
Agency-Brooks-Pollard Company
Boyle Bldg., Little Rock, Arkansas
F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
1690 Monroe Drive, Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, products.
WOODCO CORPORATION
600 Fields Avenue, Jacksonville
Wood awning windows, doors.
Agency-Crisp & Harrison
502 O'Reily Bldg., Jacksonville
R. H. WRIGHT & SONS
1050 N. E. 5th Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale
Precast, prestressed concrete products
Agency-Peter Larkin
3132 N. E. 9th St., Ft. Lauderdale


A NOTE ABOUT THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT'S PUBLISHING POLICY . .

* As the Official Journal of the Florida Association of Architects which is a State
Organization of the American Institute of Architects The Florida Architect is a
professional magazine in the strictest sense of the term. It was developed to serve
the overall interests of the architectural profession in Florida. In doing so it also
serves the building industry of this state of which the profession is a part.
* So it is more of an educational and inter-industry public relations medium than a
commercial publication or trade paper. Because of this character it has come to be
regarded as an authoritative source of professional and inter-industry news, a forum
of professional opinion and a strong voice that calls constantly for sound professional
advancement, for improvement of construction industry practices and for enlight-
ened and progressive community development in all sections of our State.


NOVEMBER, 1959 77






PLANNED-

Fire Protection
By Moore


The architect who includes a
Moore Automatic Sprinkler System
at the blueprint stage gets a
smartly planned system that com-
plements modern design.
He gives his client round-the-
clock fire protection so depend-
able that insurance rates are
reduced 50% to 80%.
Write or phone today for
information.

MOORE
PIPE & SPRINKLER CO.
JACKSONVILLE
Miami Tampa
Augusta, Ga.



MOORE'S
REGAL



WUall Stain

TOP SATISFACTION
FOR
INTERIOR PAINTING
Goes on smooth as satin
No painty odor
Soapy water cleans
painting tools quickly
One coat covers
Dries in an hour or less
Colors coordinated with
Satin Impervo Enamel

Benjamin

Moorepaints
BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.


Minority Report . .
(Continued from Page 17)
growth and the value of competent
architectural service in this growth.
4 ... The FAA shall be the source
of information and an advisory agency
for the individuals, the agencies and
the government bodies of the building
public in Florida.
5 . The FAA shall be the center
of coordinating and rallying the ac-
tivities of the various elements of the
Florida building industry toward im-
proving professional and trade prac-
tices.
6 ... The FAA shall be an import-
ant force in the public affairs of
Florida.
None of these or similar objectives
were adopted by the Convention or
the Board. And, having no objectives
to give direction to our efforts, no
program aimed at an objective, or
series of objectives, is now in force.
In our various offices we architects
use procedures for solving the most
complex architectural problems speed-
ily and efficiently. But even these
efficient procedures fail when there
is no program from our client. The
FAA organization is geared to solve
problems efficiently also. But it needs
a program also to delineate the prob-
lems which then must be analyzed,
solutions devised and action directed.
Without specific goals to guide him,
a new President is at a distinct dis-
advantage. Along with administrative
and organizational duties, he is not
apt to have much time for program-
ming. Little wonder he tells the Board
at its first meeting. "This year we will
change the By-Laws. I think they
stink!" Immediately the Board and
Officers are all embroiled in By-Laws
instead of the larger, more meaningful
tasks left undone.
Long-range objectives have been
proposed and discussed often. Now is
the time to crystallize our thinking
and decide our direction. This way
pointed programs can be devised
which, coordinated with a long-range
fiscal policy, can achieve results. Every
effort, every activity of the individuals,
the Committees and the Officers of
the Association can be geared to con-
tinuing programs pointed toward
achieving specific goals. In this way
effort "snowballs" in effectiveness, in
the accumulation of efforts year after
year.
Let us stop scattering our shots!


To Jacksonville

FAA Architects
See Our Display Booth 26

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Jacksonville, Fla.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ADVERTISER'S INDEX
A-C, R, H & P Assn., Inc. 68
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Corp. . .. 51
Associated Elevator & Supply Co. 4
Better Fuel Council of Dade County 69
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . . 43
Bradenton Stone Co. . ... 20
Builders Products Co. . .. 78
Buildorama . ... .. .. 36

Campbell-Lurie Plastics, Inc. . 29
A. R. Cogswell . . .. 78
Cradle Drain Corporation . . 65
George Doro Fixture Company . 46
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. . 3rd cover
Dwyer Products Corp . .. 47
Electrend Distributing Co. of Florida 10
Evershield Liquid Tile Co. . 28
Featherock, Inc. . . . 71
Flamingo Wholesale Distributors 18-19
Florida Builders-Trendline Division 8
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works 66
Florida Georgia Brick & Tile . 16
Florida Home Heating Institute . 72
Florida Portland Cement . .. 52
Florida Power & Light Co. . 70
Florida Steel Corporation . . 6
Florida Tile Industries, Inc. . .
George C. Griffin Co . . 1 1
Hamilton Plywood . . .. 60
Harris Standard Paint Co. . 74
Hollostone Company of Miami . 54
Hotel Robert Meyer . . 80
Independent Nail & Packing Co. 12
Jo Tiles . . . .. 58
Kaiser Manufacturing, Inc. . 13
L & M Products, Inc . .. 66
Lexsuco, Inc. . . .. 66
Markowitz Brothers, Inc. . 2nd cover
Maule Industries . . 48
Monostructure . . 3
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler . .. 78
Moore Vents . . 68
Benjamin Moore & Co. . . 78
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida . 44
National Bronze Co. . .. 61
Perlite, Inc. . . 73
Richard Plumer . . 62-63
Portland Cement Association . 14
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. . 28
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. . 9
Rilco Laminated Products, Inc. . 26
Southern Bell Telephone &
Telegraph Co. . ... 64
Southern Lightweight
Aggregate Corp. . . .. 5
T-Square Miami Blueprint Co., Inc. 30
Thompson Door Company, Inc. . 67
Tiffany Tile Corp . . 7
United States Plywood Corp. . 15
F. Graham Williams Co. . ... 79
Woodco Corp. ... 4th cover
NOVEMBER, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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INCORPORATED


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LONG DISTANCE 470


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OFFICES AND YARD


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GRANITE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE ALUMINUM WINDOWS
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE AND ALUMINUM
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154













~yr~ ~fa
x I


be

scinated

S -lotel


in THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Florida's newest and finest convention-commercial hotel holds
man. interesting innovations in hotel architecture that Xwill fascinate
ouLI. \\ hen you come for the 1959 convention you'll want to see and
study them.
The Robert Meyer offers a one-floor convention center with
meeting and banquet rooms accommodating from 25 to 1300ii people,
theater lighting, closed-circuit TV, ample exhibit space, c\e\r possible
convention facility and convenience plus a capable and experienced
convention staff.
Every one of the 55i air-conditioned outside rooms and suites
has free TV, radio and Hi-Fi. Drive-in registration with elevators
to roomn. -25-car garage.
And, of course, the decor from the spacious, colorful lobby to the
living-room bedrooms comes the most modern aitmosphCere of beauty
and charm.
Plan to attend the FAA ConMention at the Hotel Robert Meler.
For reserve tion, insforman1i, etc., phone or write:
ROBERT B. NEIGHBORS, Vice President General Manager



HOTELILL, WLOIr

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA











.. FOR EVERY ARCHITECTURAL NEED


To answer the constant search
by Architects, Builders and Home Owners,
Woodco has developed these three
outstanding window styles-
suitable to all types of construction
and design-all recognized for
functional sturdiness and long life.
Woodco Windows are factory assembled
for easy installation.


Specify These Other
Reliable WOODCO Products:
E] EXTERIOR & INTERIOR
Flush & Panel Doors
II "VENTDOR" Jalousie Door


SEE SWEET'S CATALOG FOR
ARCHITECTURAL INFORMATION

AVAILABLE THROUGH
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Concrete, I

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These three ingredients
have produced many
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architects have used in J
the design of big and
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employed with particular-
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J. Snyder, FAIA, in his
design of the J. Neville
MacArthur Engineering
Building, recently com-
pleted at the University
of Miami


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
Miami, Florida TUxedo 7-1525


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