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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Convention program sparkles with...
 Are we spinning invisible...
 How to increase your income
 A cubicle for concentration
 FAA standards of good practice
 FAA By-laws
 Moisture penetration--Its cause...
 Notice of FAA annual meeting
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Editorial - An open letter to Florida's...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00064
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: October 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00064
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Convention program sparkles with star-name speakers
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Are we spinning invisible cloth?
        Page 9
        Page 10
    How to increase your income
        Page 11
    A cubicle for concentration
        Page 12
        Page 13
    FAA standards of good practice
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    FAA By-laws
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Moisture penetration--Its cause and cure
        Page 24
    Notice of FAA annual meeting
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    News and notes
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Advertisers' index
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Editorial - An open letter to Florida's next governor
        Page 37
    Back Cover
        Page 38
Full Text


A46






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OCTOBER, 1959 1







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



S9e 7 ue ---


Convention Program Sparkles with Star-Name Speakers .
Are We Spinning Invisible Cloth? . . . .. .
Message From The President By John Stetson, AIA


How To Increase Your Income . . .
Report on the Office Practice Seminar
A Cubicle For Concentration . . . .
The Office of Howard M. Dunn, AIA
FAA Standards Of Good Practice .. ...
Office and Job Forms
FAA By-Laws ...........
Moisture Penetration Its Cause and Cure
Notice of FAA Annual Meeting .. ...
News and Notes ...........
Convention Business to be Streamlined
Orchids for P/R
Advertisers' Index ..........
An Open Letter to Florida's Next Governor
Editorial By Roger W. Sherman, AIA.


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville
Francis R. Walten, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
H. Samuel Kruse, Immediate Past President, C of C Bldg., Miami

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 414 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.
DIRECTORS
BROWARD COUNTY: Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH:
David A. Lete; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara,
Robert C. Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H.
Johnson; FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: HughJ. Lefth; FLORIDA SOUTH; James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage,
Wahl J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene
Cellar; MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM
BEACH: Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.


. 11

. 12

. 14-16

. . . . 19-23
. ... 24
. 25
. . . . . . 32


. . . . 34
. . . . 3rd Cover


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contribution s, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. .. Advertisements of products materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of Illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S. .Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 10 1959


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT.


4
9


F,-,: 2








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OCTOBER, 1959















































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... KAMPHOEFNER


Convention Program Sparkles


With Star-Name Speakers


The Design Omnibus at Jackson-
ville next month- A Symposium of
Creativity-will provide Florida arch-
itects and their guests with a three-
day program bursting at the seams
with able and provocative commen-
tary. An impressive roster of educa-
tors, editors, artists and fellow-archi-
tects will examine the professional
man's creative function as a designer,
as a teacher and as a citizen -and
in between these three major sym-
posium sessions conventioneers will be
entertained by the .varied talents of
the Jacksonville Council of Arts.
Among the distinguished speakers
who will address the FAA's 45th An-
nual Convention are the following:
SAMUEL T. HURST, AIA, Dean,,
School of Architecture and the Arts,
Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Dean
Hurst will serve as the keynoter of
the Convention at its opening session,
Thursday morning, November 12.
HENRY L. KAMPHOEFNER, Dean,
School of Design, North Carolina
State College. Dean Kamphoefner will
serve as a member of the panel dis-


...PACHNER


...GOBLE


cussion on "The Architect as a Cre-
ative Teacher" on Friday afternoon.
JOHN FISCHER, editor-in chief of
Harper's Magazine, will speak as a
panelist on the Omnibus Session Sat-
urday morning dealing with "The
Architect as a Creative Citizen."
DouGLAs HASKELL, AIA, editor,
Architectural Forum, will moderate
the panel discussion on "The Archi-
tect as a Creative Designer," sched-
uled for Thursday afternoon and con-
taining such outstanding commenta-
tors as GARRET EcxBO, author, edu-
cator and landscape architect; FLOR-
ENCE KNOLL, famed as the talented
director of Knoll Associates; JAMES T.
LENDRUM, AIA, Head, Department of
Architecture, College of Architecture
and Fine Arts, U/F; and HERBERT
H. SWINBURNE, AIA, member of the
award-winning Philadelphia firm of
Nolen and Swinburne.
Artists WILLIAM PACHNER and ROY
C. CRAVEN, JR. Mr. Pachner, who
heads his own art school in Clear-
water and is a recipient of a 1959
(Continued on Page 6)


... CRAVEN
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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(Continued from Page 4)
Ford Foundation Award, a former art
director of Esquire and a winner of
an award from the American Academy
of Arts and Letters, will contribute
to the discussion of "The Architect
as a Creative Citizen" Saturda\ morn-
ing. Mr. Craven, currently an assistant
professor of art at the U/F, has
exhibited his work widely in the east-
ern .states, has been recipient of
various fine arts awards and is one
of nine American artists to be in-
cluded in the American Federation
of Arts exhibit "Forecast" which
recently toured the country. He will
join. Dean Kamphoefner in the dis-
cussion of "The Architect as a Cre-
ative Teacher" as a member of the
panel which also includes Paul Hef-
fernan and Dr. Fredrick Holschuh.
EMERSON GOBLE, editor of Archi-
tectural Record, will contribute to the
discussion of "The Architect as a
Creative Citizen" as a member of
the panel which will,be moderated
by HERBERT C. MILLKEY, FAIA, well-
known to FAA members as a former
director of the AIA's South Atlantic
District.
Not by any means least among
this roster of 'distinguished speakers
will be one whose dry wit and dead-
pan delivery has for years convulsed
architectural audiences in all sections
of the country. ROGER ALLEN, FAIA;
joy of toastmasters and dean of the


delayed punch-line, will regale his con-
vention banquet audience on Friday
evening after a convention commen-
tary by JOHN NOBLE RICHARDS, FAIA,
President of the' Institute.
At other dinner and luncheon meet-
ings the entertainment will be in the
hands of the Jacksonville Council of
Arts. Details of it have not been re-
leased; but the convention committee
has promised a parade of top-flight
talent at luncheon on Thursday and
Friday and at the traditional Product
Exhibit Award dinner on Thusrday.
This year more than usual eiiphasis
is being placed on the exhibit of arch-
itectural and student work. The con-
vention committee of the Jacksonville,
Chapter, the 1959 Convention hosts,
has already issued information and
entry slips for the exhibit; and this is
a reminder that all entry slips and
exhibit feesmust be' in the hands
,of the committee by October 30. All
exhibits must be received at Con-
vention headquarters by November, 9.
Room reservation and pre-registra-
tion forms are scheduled for distribu-
tion early this month. Since the
convention committee anticipates a
heavy response all FAA members are
urged to fill in and return both
forms as soon as possible after receiv-
ing them. Accommodations at the
Robert Meyer Hotel in Jacksonville,
1959 Convention Headquarters, are,
of course, limited: ard advance reser-
vations will necessarily be assigned on
a first-come-first-served basis.


Winner .of an approved AiA competition for a new civic center for Pompano
Beach was J. Patrick Lynch, whose design was selected by a three-man jury
.from the South Florida Chapter from among the six submitted. Shown here
at the judging which took place last month in the Dupont Plaza Center's
Buildorama are, left to right, T. Trip Russell, Charles R. Abele, Alfred B. Parker,
FAIA, and John Evans. Evans, president of the Broward County Chapter, acted
as professional advisor for the competition.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I II










































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'tecfage wom 7e Pteeadeet ..






Are We Spinning



Invisible Cloth?



By JOHN STETSON, AIA,
President
Florida Association of Architects


Nlan\ \ears ago, in a land far across
the sea, lived a king. a vain and
wealthl man long wearn of mundane,
hsing. IHe became quiCtl\ bored with
e\er\thing his artisans created. One
da\ his master tailors were called
before him and ordered to weave
material more fabulous than any ever
created, then to fashion a completely
newi attire for the King. more beauti-
ful than an\ heretofore tailored. You
ma\ recall that the\ sold the king
and just about e\er\one else on ab-
solutels nothing. The King donned
nothing but imagination and rode
forth to parade before his subjects.
barer than the top of Khrushchev's
head. Finall: a small lad exclaimed:
"Oh look at the king' He hasn't any
clothes on!" Unfortunately he was
right, probably equally as correct as a
professional man swho gave me the
idea for this article.
Our profession. while not wearingg
Sm\isible garments. is rapidly out-
distancing the buying public mn design-
ing structures too often not under-
stood. and certain\ too often disliked
by those to w hom we look for our
daily\ recompense. We seem to be
divided into three groups, the largest
being those who just want to make
a li\ng. but whose creative ability too
often is lost in in isibilit\. A second
group is composed of conservative
men more than able in their profes-
sional abilities, but reluctant to bridge
the gap from the classics to the con-
temporan. The third group. mostly
younger men. are almost blind to all
design not complete contemporary.
OCTOBER, 1959


Like the creators of the Clrisler and
Dodge automobiles of l(;4, the\ are
)cars ahead of their time.
JOHN Q. B YER is a lut like the liild
of the fair\ tale, particularly. MIR. AND
\IRs. HoME BUYER. whilee architec-
tural magazines and competitions hail
the ultra-contemporar\. Mr. BuNer.
being unaware of these creative le\\el,
goes out and bu\s Bastardian Colonial.
French Pro\incial and cten Ja'anese.
while e educators and editors sing the
praises of "machinistic functional
form". Mrs. Bu\er eagerly\ seeks out
tlih cute little( cottage \ ith the corner
cupboard, picket fence and green
shutters. furnishing it u ith AtuNI
BEssic's Ne\\ England Colonial break-
fast set. C;R.ANDn.\ LEE"' Southern
Delta living room suite. and Au NI
TESSIE's Louis XX' bedroom set. She
loads the mantle do(n with (very-
thing from an old Ming \je to
CR.\NDP., SNAZZIE'S sha\ing mug. The
floor is prohabl\ covered \sith hook
rugs. Turkish rugs and a bearskin Pop
shot while e on duts at .ttu.
\\h\ has the architect lost out to
merchant builders, plan services, pre-
fabs. plan books, etc.? I ma\ be wrong.
but I. too. am inclined to fed that
.\e'e spun too much of that invisible
cloth. case in point: Se\eral \ears
ago one of our most brilliant soung
contemporaries set up shop in a
southern city. His production of an\-
thing architectural brought additional
awards. Just about e\ernthing he de-
signed %as published, not once, but
often. He literally\ became an idol to
young designers and students. One


thling proud his undoing. Nhri. Bu\er
didn't read architectural magazines, or
judge architectural competitions. E\en
the people \\ho bought his creations
tired quickis. -Toda\ the\ are .cri
nearly unwanted, and our friend ad-
mits he could not make a l\ing at
his practice.
The smart developer has long since
learned, like the Paris female clothing
designer feature a radical design
to get the public to look at sour
offerings. but ha\e plent\ of the more
conserratle styles available for them
to buV. I1, who refuses to acknow\l-
tdge this fact can find success onl\
if he is an exceptional salesman and
is gifted with creative genius ap-
proaching F.L.\.
\\ here are se heading' Are \\e
designing for each other? Is it possible
that m the foreseeable future we will
design oursttl\s out of business? It
'.stll to bte the. oncensis of opinion-
that public acceptance is definitely]
not keeping pace with architectural
creation. particularly in the field of
home design. A- hat are w\e doing
about it' Nlost!\ complaining that the
public is stupid and cannot recognize
good design.
That may be. R\0olutionarN trends
are slow to be accepted. To expect
the average citizen to understand-
some of our designs. we must educate
him in that form of art appreciation.
If he has always lived in a cluttered
New England Saltbox. don't expect
him to feel jn\thing but naked in a
cubic or angular. glass-walled, simple
(Continued on Page 30)







































































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


i
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~IT----L--~
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I







Sweeni aand cC9e4(4ia%4,,


How To Increase Your Income...


A condensed report of conclusions made during the second
panel discussion of the August Office Practice Seminar


Among the most pro ocati e of the
panel discussion-l which made'up the
officee Practice Seminar held in Palm
Beach on August \'\a that on
the si.ibect of "How to Increase Your
Income.' Though some of the "0-odd
people %who attended the session uwre
seasoned practitioners, most wserc
ioung architects "\ho had practiced
independently\ fur less than fiLe ears
and maintained offices employing not
more than three draftsmen. It \\as for
this category\ of F.AA mnemehrship that
the Office Practie Seminar had been
primarily\ developed. And the after-
math of enthusiasm for seminar results
indicated that both participants and
audience gained real \alue from all
meetings and oruld 'ilcome future
programs of a similar\ c ,nstructi,
Character.
This, rlorni ri sel'on \\as mnod -r-
ated hb HILLIlRD T. Sm IIH. a past-
president of the Palm Beach Chapter.
Panelists included EDn.\R S. \\'ORT-
_MAN, Lake Worth. past-pri.idcnt of
the FAA: IR IN KOR ICH. Nlianmi
Beach. past-president of the Florida
South Chapter. ROBERI H. Lr\i-
SON, president of the Florida Central
Chapter. FAA Vice-president and
chairman of the FAA Office Practice
Committee, and \MNIES L. DEEN. FAA
director from the Florida South Chap-
ter.
In outlining the subject of the
meeting. Mo:derator Smith listed three
topics. Increasing the \olume (f office
bumines:s increasing the efficiency\ of
the office, and u\ hit to do about taxes.
The time ran out before the last topic
e\en came up for discusion and most
of the session concerned the first one
Much of the commentary "as general.
for the program oas In:formal % ith
much gi\e-and-take con ersation. But
out of it came a number of specific
points-all based on the variedd ex-
periences of those present whichh
stood out .as sizns alone the road to:


improved professional practice.
)On increasing bu'in.e con1'.nsu-.
of thi panel \jas that no peihrti.
formula existed to rico-mplish this
First point made \\as that busints.
groii l i proportion to the degree tit.
ar.hlnctt accepts refponsribiith.
"Clients ill eventually\ select 'ou."
said one panclirt. "And \ou ha3e t V-
acLtpt thc responsibility, for ,aniny.
them instead of \our \\n individual
\%hims The profession of architecture
is foir ccriLbod. And if \1u arc goin,-
to practice it o-u ha e toi accept thi1
resprn-lbiht\ of all its varied facets.
"O(ne \\a\ to increase \our income
is to increase \our knowledge of your
clients needs and problems-specif-
icall\ and in Eeneral. How do things
work? How does a small factor,'
opera.t' \What's the basis for ani
appraisal and ho\s Is an appraial
cdeeloped' W\hat's a good report-
and ho\ do \nu rite one and use
it tot s're \our client's interests'
You can control thi application of
pure design. But \our knio,'ledge of
other things and ho\\ the\ \o:rk i
prohabl\ the measure of hi\s much
you'lll be able to apple it."
A second point concerned iiavs ct
cxpandiing contacts. Comnimunit scrx-
ic( \as emphasized as one mcans--
s"ork on g., crnlmeintl boards. menm-
bership in cl\le or service clubs, in
churches, and in country\ clubs. This
uill Ihlp \iou learn about people and
affairs--and it uill also let people
knovs aboui.t \ni and the profession
\iou represent Also, it pro\ ides oppor.
tunit\ to "sell" good architecture
through selling .ourself as well as the
scope, abilities and iilues of \our pro.
f ssion.
A third point of agreement wa's.
don't turn ai'av the ,small client. And
a coroHllr to this admonition \as
.nothcr to charge for vour sen'ices.
however minor. The small job can
be bread upon the waters on three


count'- first. h\ accepting the -smal-
job client. \ou probably \%ill niake a
cuniert to the cause of architecture
as a profession: second, if \ou do
his small job %ell. .ou iill have- made
a friend Mho % ill tell others of his
expcrience: and. third, in ecery small-
Ilb commission lies the germ of the
big proicct of the future.
Tlic serM ice-fec is piriopiIrtionattel.
c cellenit relati toi small lobs A d ice
on the proper design of a fireplace.
for amplel. mla I in\mole onl\ n $10.
But in tern's oft t hi c'. thii ma\ bc
the equialeiit if $501 per hour-in
addition to the fact that \our advice
ha.i helped a member of \our com-
munrits. has probably made a friend
and riila\ hate laid the foundation
for a en r or thr while future project.
The discussion placed hears em-
phasis on increasing the quality o(
office iorfk. This has nimaning in
depth. Not rnlh the quality of archi-
tectural design is inolls ed or the
excellence off the dra" ings and specifi-
cationsi issued b\. '- our office. The
quality' of sen ice is equalll important.
Clients arc entitled to something
tangible--like adherence to dead-
lines promptness at appointments, ac-
curate ohb accounting. the rendering
of inspection report in addition to
good design and i.'od working draw-
ings and specifications. Tihouh it \\as
conceded that qu.llit\ of iork and
services might be- primarily an in-
direct mietlihd of increasing the office
volume. it was general\ recognized as
a prime essential to the success of
an\ architect's office. Said one sem-
inar participant:
"\\hen fello\is complain to me
that the\ c.n't gct full fees. I sI \
'Shi.i ime a typical set of \o-ur plans'
Then it'" eass to see the reason. The
draw.in-g Jre too meagre, the speci-
ficatio-ns too often a mere outline.
Both lc.ae too much to the contrac-
(Conit ini, d .'.1 Per( 1 1)


OCTOBER, 1959












































A Cubicle for Concentration ...


Office of Howard M. Dunn, AIA,
Designed by Howard M. Dunn, Architect


In 223 square feet careful planning has made room
for a client reception and conference room, sup-
plies, plan files, samples, a secretarial desk and two
drafting tables.


This little office fron ting oin Nll am's hLca ili\-traveled Brick1ll
.Acinue. is il\ing proof that a nsall space can be equally as
effective a professional P R tool as .1 large ne and that
even a quiet ind capsul_ denln'instritiion (of ingeriuit' in
planning and dcsiin (i n n Ate in a client nlmre handle\
than clainis and clamor . he open character ,f thi,
notice '\as deliherate The architect \isioned hi s \ %rklin
homec as i sort of total displa\1 cince.led h\ an ingeni:isl\
ci:ntrihed 'liding pl.istic scr.-n onl\ \ ih i the %Estern *un
tna'ks our and thus a melanr ft.or letting thL pa~'inrg public
see h,~ i an .:rchitct i\:,rks. (O)nl\ the client-cmnference area
i normrnl\h hidden from the street b\ a di-nr-heiht di\ider
\%hich acts in hboth l lient ira aind dr.ittin_ rioonm is a displ j
pa-in . Spai i i\s utilized hl.r. almnot as ilcttic ulous'l
as in the cabin i:f a i.ruiser ()nc all is lined % ith storage
cihinmet closed 'ith flush pinel accnrdiln doors, fitted i\th
,primg-nitu.ited hircd:l r.e and manilt ctitch st(L to keep them
na.th a\ lignid. Driaf ine desks ,ha'e built-in dra.\ers for
drifting supplies. Fber iastebiskets are suspended from the
inch-scquir tuhular -teel fr mninri of the desks .ind tables.
And a pr\ailinmg oiffi(c rule is that spic-ind-span order
prejails t all tin-,,. Thu.. workingg or emnpt% thi, little oiffi.e
is .ii\\ .iln j3rchitectuial sh.\\.-c s ..


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





















































Fholo: b, Norman Tr gg


Opposite page, the street
front, with the plactic yel-
low screen closed at the
left-hand edge. The design
below the architect's name
is a Chinese good- luck
symbol, now used as an
identifying mark on draw-
ings . Above, right, is
the client-conference space
-the width of a comfortable
sofa bench and paneled on
two sides with walnut-
stained sumara plywood.
Plaster here is painted a
pale yellow; the carpet is
tan; and the table is white
formica, fitted to the same
sort of black-painted steel-
tube frames are are used
for drafting room tables.
Trim is solid walnut. . .
Right, a close-up of the
storage wall showing how
cabinets are fitted behind
the folding doors.


OCTOBER, 1959













Office and Job Forms...


Forms presented this month, as an
outcome of the FAA Office Practice
Seminar held in Palm Beach August
7, are office forms. The ones on this
and the opposite page are actually
part of the same form which was orid-
inall. developed for reproduction on
a legal-size sheet. Here it h.is been
split into two parts, one. on this page.
relating to general space requirements
and that on the opposite page relating
to items of construction and equip-
ment.
It is suggested that for office con-
venience. these two forms be repro-
duced on the front and back of a
standard, 8? 2 b\ 11-inch sheet. The
one below might well be used under
Sthe name and address of the office
on the face of the sheet. pro\ idmng
space below\ it for additional client's
notes as needed. That on the opposite
page would then complete this re-
quirement checklist on the back of
the sheet
.\ form such as this can be par-


ticularli helpful in clarif ing client
ideas and needs in confirmation of
preliminary\ conferences and thus pro-
vide some realistic basis for develop-
ment of preliminr.i sketches. It is,
of course, primarily. useful for thr
architect with a residential practice.
But in general character and scope
of information it could easi\ be
adapted or expanded to ser\e infor-
niational needs relative to other build-
ing types. The original form %as
developed for use in the office of
JOHN SIETSON. Palm Beach. The form
on page 16 can be used uith a wide
\ariet\ of remodeling lobs. It was
developed for a specific t\pe of proi-
ect. but can be cail\ adapted to
special needs of man\ offices.
Both forms ma\ be reproduced for
office use on letter-size sheets h\ the
inex\pns,%c photo-lith or multi-lith
process. Processing should follow the
suggestions relative to placement
noted on page 21 of the September
issuc of The Florida Architect.


REQUIREMENT CHECK LIST

Present Address
C-_


Terrain


Occupants nuaget
Other

ROOMS SIZE FLOOR WALLS CEILING OTHER
Living Room
Dining Room
Kitchen
Pantry and, or Bar
Service and Laundry
Study
Powder Room
Master Bed Room
Other Bed Rooms
Bath No. 1
Bath No. 2
Dressing Room
Closets
Storage
Garage or Car Port
Other



14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


AUlLe


WnIF Ic-


Site


Location -I,


urientatoln


STNDRD O


|




STANDARD. O I

FAAGOOD PRACTICE


GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

Exterior Walls Sash
Floors Roof


CONCRETE, CEMENT AND MASONRY
Footings Sidewalks
Foundation Walls Driveway
Walls Fireplace
Patio Walls Patio Paving




CARPENTRY
Siding Insulation
Sheathing Floors
Felt Base
Cornice
Interior Wood Walls




MILLWORK
Doors Bed Rm. Cabs.
Screens Kit. Cabs.
Glass Stairs
Woodwork



TILEWORK AND SPECIAL FLOORS
Floors Tub
Wainscot Shower
Soap dish, Towel bar, etc. Stools
_Kit. Cab. Tops



PLUMBING
Toilets Washer
Lavatories Dishwasher
Tubs Septic Tank
Showers Water Heater
Sink




ELECTRICAL
Range Water Heater Phones
Refrigerator Washer Door Bell
Vent. Fan Dishwasher Fixture Alw.
Flood Lights Lighting




OCTOBER, 1959 15





STADARS FmQM
fAAGOD h PRATC


TABULATION OF BIDS


JOB

ADDRESS


JOB. NO.

DATE


General Contractor

Base Bid

Time

Renv. plast mas sy

Excv. soil per cy

Mass Cone per cy

Forms per sf

Plast bond per sy

2 coat plast per sy

3 in. tile part sf

3 coat paint plast sy
deduct
Alternate No. 1 add
deduct
Alternate No. 2 add
deduct
Alternate No. 3 add



Heating and Plumbing Contr.

Base Bid
deduct
Alternate No. IP add
deduct
Alternate No. 2P add



Electrical Wiring Contr.

Base Bid

Linoleum Contract

Base Bid

Library Equipment
Contractors

Base Bid
deduct
Alternate No. 1 add
deduct
Alternate No. 2 add

16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Increase Your Income. .
(Continued from Page 11)
tor's guess. He will. talk about the
kind of job you do; the job will cost
too much because of contingency\ fees.
and eventually the client will be lost
because he wasn't given the service
and clrompetence he had a right to
expect \\iork like that:not only isn't
worth a full fee, it's not worth a
recommendation on the next jib."'
Related to this matter of uork
comptcenc was the matter of d o.o
citing iuth thi c\pcrts.
"Too man\ architects feel they are
experts in every field of practice,"
declared oine panelist. "Actu.ill they
-can't be: things art too spec) ialitd
nou. If \our client \aints a shopping
center or a supermarket. and you've
ne\cr done ani. gi\e him the expert
kn.ln ledg lie should 1haie b' asso-
ciating \ith a firm who knows all
the details. Lean on the expericncc
of \our fello\ pr.ititon .ei.. The\
on't gouge .ou -and you'lll learn
plenty\ from the association. Also. \ou
ill ha\e a\oided perpetrating a sorri
set of dra\imng e and a mal-functioning
result to the betterment of all con-
cerned and the profession in general."
Finally\ the discussion turned to
the matter of related wrnicc as os ne
means for broadening the scope of
practice and increasing the \olume
of office work. Fields of related ser\
i\es mentioned included feasibility\
reports, engineering actditic. indus--
trial and interior designing and land-
scape architecture. Comnmentary was
\arled. but tl- coU ns nus. of opinion
\\as to the cffeLt that a practical
decision on this matter was up toi
the individual concerned. One pir.
ticipant framed it this way:
"WVe're basically a design profes-
sion. and if we'ree qualified to do
anything at all, we're more qualified
to delve into the \arjous facets of
design than \e are to make reports
on financial or legal matters. \\e
should be able to design anything
%tc \\ant to--\hether interior-. or
furniture or landscapes or esen auto-
mobiles. But to do so \\e must
broaden our educational base. Choice
of the design field is up to the indi-
sidual. But he must know \\hat his
goal is. and he must drne straight
to it. The danger is that young archi-
tects may confuse a financial goal with
a philosophical or design objective
OCTOBER, 1959


T0 o rllan arte falling pri\ to Illone-
naking proplositions."
"The criterion 'if \oIur prict!ce is
the cn ice l.ou render." declrtd
another s minar participant "If \ou
render sen ice. \ou'\e done archi-
tecture."
From an expi.ricnced membe, r of ,i
successful firm came some \\wrds of
0 uning
"There are so man, things to: do
in our protesf.lsni. So 1a111\ tippor-
tunities in such broad ficids. that O-
must start thinking about limiting.
initkad of broi:adinin,. our field of
atIti\,t\. All th(ie facets of related
ser\ ice can pri.,babl\ be d>'one within
the scope of our profesi:ional practice.
But \cL must neccssaril. limit our-
seI's t -i doing th. lst things \\e can
do kell. Otherwise e mani be Nscri-
licing \ hat recall should he the mar.ir
pait of our practicc- the d\elop-
mcrnt of architecture through the de-
signing of buildings."
The srs-io-,n barely\ touched on the
slihict of incrtea'in- (offi C ifftici nci v
as far a: ajn\ dctaild dicusMion \\ja
concerned Some suggestions \\crC
offcred, and the subject of modular
ctoOrdination \\as introduced as a topic
for possible future d Cis(csion in lin
with this general subitct Nlattcrs of
saying csts through sa\ ing time dreN
this observation from one pandelit:
"'.l arihitkctur-l olticts, large or
small, use the same basic mechanics."
he said. "'And here both time and
innct\ can be sa\ed. If \our oFuice
overhead rate is $4.1.11.1 per hour. for
example. file minutes amounts to
eight cents. H-oi long does it take
to letter a title block--or e\cn use
a rubber stamp for the same purp'-',ie
For fie cents each \ou can bu\ title-
block decals and in our office their
use sa\es eactl\ 2L) cent' per sheat
of the time of ourjfast.et man.
"This. of course. Is small point.
But small points like that add iup
in terms of a better, less cost\ .ipe-
ration. Ho%\ man\ sheets of st'ationer,.
for example, does %our secretary\ throw,
away? Is sour \\ife helping \:,u in
your business or are iou pa\ ing a
maid more than 0ou'd pay a good
secretan' Those arc the things whichh
can count up. Sit down and exanine
%our office operation along such lines
and ;oui can pro:ihahl\ increase \our
efficiency\ \ihich means reduce costs
also about forh percent in one
u eek."


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FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION



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- -. .~na a~~4 '# ~ ewoo


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IMPORTANT NEWS

for Architects

and Specifiers

*. . .. .


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L_


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Noncombustible Standard met by Lexsuco Vapor Barrier

and Lexsuco Adhesive R907T. Underwriters' Label granted.

* Underwriters' Laboratories, for the first time, has tested and accepted
a roof vapor barrier and adhesive. Extensive tests proved that the)
Lexsuco Vapor Barrier and Lexsuco Adhesive R907T meet, the non-)
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






- W *


* -. ..:


BY-LAWS

FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.

Certain revisions to the FAA By-Laws as approved at the 1958 FAA Convention have been proposed for consideration
at the 1959 FAA Convention. These revisions are shown here in italics. Proposed deletions in certain sections of the
1958 By-Laws are indicated by a series of asterisks. Copies of the 1958 By-Laws have been forwarded to presidents
and secretaries of all Florida AIA Chapters as a basis for comparaT;.e siud, and I;ll also be made available for use
by Chapter membermihlos at rhme I9 FAA Con.enrion.


ARTICLE I.-NAME OF SOCIETY
SECTION 1
(A) The NAME of this organization shall be the
"FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS, INC.,"
hereinafter referred to as the "Association," which is a
non-profit incorporated State organization duly chartered
by the American Institute of Architects and the State
of Florida.
(B) Application of terms. All reference in the
By-Laws to "Charter" shall re r to Articles of Incorpora-
tion; and references to "Association," "board," "commit-
tee," "officer," "members," "meeting," or other similar
designations shall pertain or refer to the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects of The American Institute of Archi-
tects, Inc.
ARTICLE II.-THE OBJECTS OF THE
ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
SECTION 1
(A) To unite the Architectural profession within
the State of Florida to promote and forward the objects
of the American Institute of Architects.
(B) To stimulate and encourage continual improve-
ment within the profession, cooperate with other pro-
fessions, promote and participate in the matters of gen-
eral public welfare, and represent and act for the
architectural profession in the State.
(C) To promote educational and public relation
programs for the advancement of the profession.
ARTICLE III.-ORGANIZATION
SECTION 1
The Association shall be a non-profit organization
composed of members of classifications and with quali-
fications, dues, and privileges as set forth in these
Articles.
ARTICLE IV.-MEMBERSHIP
SECTION 1
(A) The Association shall consist of all corporate
members and all associate members'of all Florida Chap-
ters of The American Institute of Architects. Every
registered architect in the State of Florida is assigned
to the jurisdiction of the Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects which covers the area in 'which
he practices or resides.
(B) A corporate member shall be defined for use
throughout this document to be a bonafide member in
good standing of the American Institute of Architects.
A corporate member shall have all of the rights, privi-.
leges and obligations embodied in full membership in-
cluding the right to vote, hold office and represent the
Association as a delegate or otherwise.
An Associate member- shall be defined for use
-throughout these By-Laws as any other classification of
Chapter membership recognized by the Institute, includ-
ing Unassigned Corporate members, members Emeritus
and Associates.


Student Associates shall consist of under graduate
and graduate students in Architecture in Colleges and
Schools of Architecture in the State of Florida who are
members of a Student Chapter of the American Institute
of Ar'chitects.
(C) The Association may sponsor Student Asso-
ciate Branches in Colleges and Schools of Architecture
in the .State of Florida as may be recognized by the
Association.
Student Associate Branches may function under
the sponsorship of Chapters or under the direct spon-
sorship of the Association. When they function under
Chapters, their relationship to the Association shall be
through the sponsoring Chapter. When they function
directly under the Association, their relationship shall
be directly with the Board of Directors of the Association
who shall be authorized to approve the Constitution and
By-Laws under which the Student Associate Branch
operates. -
RETIRED MEMBERS
(D) A member who ceases to practice architecture
as a gainful occupation and further ceases all -other,:
gainful occupation shall be eligible for "Retired
Membership."
OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIP
(E) Other types of memberships may be created as
the necessity arises in accordance with American Insti-
tute of Architects chapter By-Laws.
SECTION 2
Corporate and Associate members of the Chapters in
North Florida shall constitute the North Florida District
of the Association, those in Central Florida shall consti-
tute the- Central Florida District, and those in South
Florida shall constitute the South Florida District.
Student members of the Student Chapters shall constitute .
the Student District of the Association.
The Districts shall include the counties in the State
of Florida as follows:
North Florida District: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okla-
loosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Cal-
houn, Gulf, Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla,
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee, La-
fayette, Dixie, Columbia, Gilchrist, Levy, Baker, Union,
Bradford, Alachua, Marion, Putnam, Clay, Duval, Nas-
sau, St. Johns..
Central Florida District: Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Pinellas, Hillsboro, Manatee, Sarasota, Sumter, Polk,
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands, Lake, Volusia, Seminole,
Orange, Osceola, Brevard, Flagler, Lee, Charlotte.
South Florida District: Indian River, Okeechobee,.
St. Lucie, Martin, Glades, Hendry, Palm Beach, Brow- -
ard, Dade, Monroe, Collier.
SECTION 3
Each year the Association shall promote Corporate
or Associate membership in The American Institute of
Architects for all Registered Architects in Florida who
'are not then Corporate or Associate Members. Applica-
tions, as received, shall be referred for action to the
respective Chapter to which the applicant would be
assigned.


OCTOBER, 1959 19







BY-LAWS


SECTION 4
HONORARY MEMBERSHIP: Any person of good
character who is in sympathy with the objects of this
Association and who has rendered meritorious service
to it or the profession of architecture or its allied arts,
shall be eligible for Honoraly Mlembership, without the
right to vote.
SECTION 5
The Secretary of each Florida Chapter and of irch
Student Chapter in Fl/r.tid of the Ameirican Institute of
Architect- shall file ith the Setletary of the A-_socia-
tion the names of ill ,,,t,,,r 's in good standing at tile
beginning of each fiscal year or Ns,,i St1r, and -hall keep
said list up)-to-date at all times. The Association shall
issue to all persons, who have been thus certified, cards
indicating their membership in the Association.
SECTION -6
The grant to and the exercise and use by a membe,
of each and every right and privilege granted by the
Charter and By-Law-; shall be conditioned upon the
professional conduct and by payment of As-ociation and
Chapter dues of the member in his Chapter.

ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a
President; PitsideFr-Elect: Vice-Presidents, one from
each District; Secretary: Treasurer; tid tht iiirr dictol
Past Pi' suiidit ol tih .Associ;tiva. All elective officers
shall be corporate members of the Inatitute. Officers
shall be elected at the annual meeting of the Association
by a majority vote of the c(cr.ediltd d(tlgate.s isps(,t ar ,n
tolgry at said meeting.
(B) All Officers with the exception of the Vice-
Presidents shall be elected for terms of one year. No
officer shall be eligible for le-election to succeed hiimstlf
more than once, except the Secietary or Treasurer. who
may not hold office longer than two consecutive years,
unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at the annual
Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be
elected for a term of one year, one for a term of
two years, and one for a term of three years. Theie-
after, one Vice-President shall be elected each year
for a term of three years. The Vice-Presidents, one ftoni
each district shall be designated First Vice-President.
Second Vice-President and Third \'ice-Pre-ident, as such
Meeting.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or
memlneis of the Board for at least one year shall be
eligible for the office of President or Presidu t-Eltcil.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until
their successors have been elected and qualified. If a
vacancy occurs in any office of the Association, other
than the expiration of the term of office, then such
vacancy shall be filled as set forth iii the Chartc'.
(F) Officeis of the Association shall take office
at the beginning of the fiscal year.
SECTION 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and of the Board, shall exercise general
supervision of its affairs, and shall perform all the
usual duties that are required to be performed by hini
by law and by the Charter and By-Laws, incidental to
his office.
SECTION 3
(A) The Prside .,t-Elec rinks the I''ic-Precside,,ts
(til? shall. in lie ahsciore of the P sitR t. it, iresilde iiid
perfori'i oil fbli duties binlioscd iiitw Ithe Presi.eie'n.
(B) The Pr'csid int-Elfct still hliiii siit r'r;iiuoi of
rill coir,,i tit crs.


SECTION 4
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of the affair'
of his District. The Vice-Presidents in their order of
election shall, in the absence of the President. rnil P, 3i-
dlcit-El&it. preside and perform all the duties imposed
upon the President.

SECTION 5--THE SECRETARY
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall act as its recording
and its corresponding secretary and as secretary of
meetings of this Association and of the Board of Di-
rectois. He shall have custody of and shall safeguard
and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge
of the Treasurer. He shall issue all notices of this
Association, keel its miembeiship rolls, sipln all instru-
ments and matters that require the attest or approval of
this Association. except as otherwiie provided in these
By-Laws: keep its seal, and affix it on such instru-
ments as require it. prepare the reports of the Board of
Directors and this Association, in collaboration with the
President. have charge of all matters pertaining to the
meetings of this Association and perfolmn all duties usual
and incidental to his office.
(B) The Secret;aryv may delegate to an assistant
secretary the- actual performance of any or all of his
duties as recording or as corresponding secretary, hut he
shall not delegate his responsibility for the property of
this Association, or the affixing of the seal of this Associ-
ation, or the making of any attestation or certification
required to he given by him. or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.

SECTION 6-THE TREASURER
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall have charge and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs
and keep the records and books of account thereof. He
shall assist the Budget Committee to prepare the budget.
collect amounts due this Association, and receipt foL and
have the custody of its funds and monies and make all
disbursements thereof. He shall have custody of its
securities and of its instiumnents and papers involving
finances and financial commitments. He shall conduct
the correspondence relating to his office and perform
all duties usual and incidental to his office.
each annual meeting" of this Association arid a writtei
report at each meeting of the Board of Directors. Each
of said reports shall set forth the financial condition
of this Association, the state of its budget and appropi in-
tions at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures, for the period of the repoi t, and the
treasurer's recommendations on matters relating to the
finances and general welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person
to simn any order, statement, agreement, check or other
financial instrument of this Association that requires
his signature. unless such delegation is expressly per-
mitted in these By-Laws.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring
treasurer shall turn over to his successor a copy of the
closing financial statement and audit of the treasury,
all the records and books of account, and all monies,
-ecurities, and other valuable items and papers belong-
ing to this Association that are in his custody and posses-
sion. The incoming treasurer shall check the same. and
if found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer
his receipt therefore and a complete release of the
retiring treasurer fiom any liability thereafter with
respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer. personally, shall not be liable
for any loss of money or funds of this Association or
for any decrease in the capital, surplus, income or


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






BY-LAWS


reserve of any fund or account resulting from any
of his acts performed in good faith in conducting the
usual business of his office.

ARTICLE VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SECTION 1-MEMBERSHIP OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS
(A) The membership of the Board of Directols
shall consist of the same officers. with the same tirmsl
of office, as of the Association ...... aini one oI mnot
Directors elected from each Florida Chapter of the Amet -
ican Institute of Architects as provided in these articles.
Directors shall be Corpoiate Member, of The American
Institute of Architectt. The Diictoi of the Florida Dis-
trict A.I.A. shall be Directo'-oji-Lri'gi.
(B) The Directors. one oL mole fiomu each cor-
poiate Chapter as provided in Article VI, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting. An
Alternate Director, one for each Director, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting to
function for the Director in case of his inability to
serve. Each Chapter having up to 19 Institute mneml-
bers shall have one Director; each chapter having from
20 to 59 Institute members shall have two Directors;
and each chapter having 60 or more Institute members
shall have three Directors. Institute membership shall be
determined by the cu rent membership roster of the
Institute.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall
be represented on the Board by a Student Representative
whose duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the
As-sociation and the Student Chapter.
(D) Upon the effective date Florida becontes a
regional district iof the Institute, the office of the director
for the Florida district shall be created and the d;3lirict
director shall take office in accordance with the provisions
set forth in the Institute By-Laws of the American Insti-
tute of Architects then in effect.
SECTION 2-AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD
The Board shall be vested with the authority to
manage, direct, control, conduct and administer the
property, affairs and business of the Association, and
in the interim between Annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directions and instructions adopted at a meeting
of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems
expedient. and shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations, supplementing but not in conflict with the
Charter and these By-Laws, to govern the use of the
property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of the Asso-
ciation, to gove i the affair. and business of the Associa-
tion. Each director land alternate director in the absence
of the director) shall convey to the Chapter which he
leplesents all decisions and actions of the Board and
shall convey to the Board the actions and requests of the
Chapter he represents.
SECTION 3-VACANCIES ON THE BOARD
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled
as set forth in the Charter.
SECTION 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall
hold at least four regular meetings each year and shall
fix the time and place of its meetings. One meeting
shall be held immediately prior to the opening of the
Annual Convention of the Association and one meeting
within thirty days after the beginning of the fiscal
year following the adjournment of said convention.
Ten members of the Board shall constitute a quorum.
2nd all decisions shall be rendered by concurring vote
of not less than the majority of its total membership
present. unless otherwise required by these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meet-
ing of the Board may be called by the President, or
on the written request of a majority of the Officers


of the Association, or of six members of the Board,
at time and place so designated by Party or Parties who
called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting
of the Board shall be sent in writing by the Secietary
to each member of the Board not less than five days
before the date fixed for the meeting. Minutes of the
meetings of the Boaid z-hall be recorded by the Secretary
and apl)roved by the Board in its succeeding meeting.
SECTION 5-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
(A) Executive Officer: The administrative and
executive offices shall be in charge of an executive
officer, who shall be known as the Executive Directoi.
The Executive Director -ihall be employed by and shall
Iepoit to the Boaid.
Upon appointment by the Boaid the Executive
Director shall act as Assistant Treasurer.
(B) Duties of Executive Dilector: The Executive
Director shall be and act as the chief executive office
of the Association and as such shall have general man-
agement of the administration of its affairs, subject to
the general direction and control of the Board and the
supervision of the administrative officers of the Asso-
ciation.
The Executive Dilector shall have general oversight
of all of the departments of the Association. and in
general hall be the interpreter of the directives of ihe
Boa rd.
He shall be the officer in whom the Board shall
place the responsibility for carrying out its general
policies.
He shall be changed with the duty of stimulating
the progianis under the various departments and shall
check the coordination of all inter-departmental affairs.
He shall maintain contacts with other professional
societies particularly those in the fields allied to archi-
tecture and with trade associations in the construction
industry so that he may be constantly informed as to
activities in those fields, extending the cooperation of
the Association as circumstances may warrant.
(C) Assistant to Executive Ditector and Duties:
The Board may employ assistants to the Executive
Director to perform such duties as may be assigned to
him by the Board and by the Executive Director, includ-
ing the details of the administrative work of the Asso-
ciation.
ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
SECTION 1-CLASSES OF COMMITTEES
There shall be standing committees and special com-
mittees. Standing committees shall be vertical and non-
vertical; vertical standing committees shall be those
designated by the Institute and non-vertical committees
those necessary to the administrative operations of the
Association. Special committees may be established by
the Board of Director- or the President.
SECTION 2-COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
(A) The vertical standing committees shall be com-
posed of a chairman and of the chaiimen of the chapter
committees performing the same functions as the Associ-
ation committee. Whenever functions are combined at
chapter level, the chair man of the chapter committee
will serve as a member of each of the Association Com-
mittees he represents functionally at the Chapter level.
Committee chairmen shall be appointed by the President
with the advice of the Board of Directors for three year
ternis.
(B) Every special committee shall expire with the
fiscal year, but any thereof may be recreated. Members
of special committees shall be appointed by the Presi-
dent and their terms of office shall expire with the com-
mittee.
(C) Regional F.A.A. A.I.A. Committees: These
committees -hall seive in the Florida tdis/i-ie A.I.A. and
parallel national committees. The Chairriien of these com-
mittees will be appointed by the Boaid of Directors


OCTOBER, 1959






BY-LAWS


A.I.A. The membership of these Comnmittees shall consist
of one member from each of the chapters in the district
and be appointed by the Board of Directors, F.A.A. These
Committees shall be those national committees designat-
ed by the Board of Directors, A.I.A. to be organized on
the district and chapter levels.
(D) Regional Judiciary Committee:
Duties: The duties of the Regional Judiciary Com-,
mittee shall be to conduct initial hearings on charges of
unprofessional conduct against a Corporate Member of
the Association which have been referred to it by the In-
stitute. All such initial hearings and procedures shall be
in strict accordance with the By-Laws of the Institute and
the Rules of the Board.
Composition: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall
be composed ot three Corporate Members and one alter-
nate, normally serving staggered three year terms, and
the alternate a one year term. Members and alternate
shall be members in good standing in the Institute and
shall each be fiomn different chapters in the District. The
SDstrict Director and the officers of the Institute shall
not be-eligible for service on the Regional Judiciary Com-
mittee.
During the initial year of the Regional Judiciary
Committee, three members shall be elected to serve one,
two and three year terms, respectively. The one leceiv-
ing the highest number of votes shall be elected to ihe
three year terni, next highest the two year term, third
Highest one year term and the fourth highest shall be des-
ignated as alternate.
Chairman: During the initial year of the Regional
Judiciary Committee, the member serving the one year
term shall be Chairman. Thereafter, the senior member
shall be Chairman during his last year of service.
S Meetings: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall
normally hold meetings to conduct hearings one day in
advance of the convention and meetings one day in ad-
vance of the spring meeting of the * * Board, pro-
viding it has cases before it referred to it hy the Institute.
Expenses of the committee members attending the
Meetings shall be reimbursed by the Institute in the man-
ner and in the amount as prescribed by the Treasurer of
the Institute.
SECTION 3-NOMINATING COMMITTEE
(A) The President, at least thirty :30) days befoie
the annual Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Com-
mittee, composed of a Chairman and a member from
each District, whose duty it shall be to nominate mem-
h: bers qualified to hold office in the Association for each
of the Offices about to be vacated.
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by
the Nominating Committee, other Nominations for any
or all of the offices about to become vacant may be
made from the floor in the Convention. Elections may
proceed by acclamation or ballot at the will of the Con-
\ention.
SECTION 4-OPERATIONS
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with the right to request and receive all information
in possession of the Association and all records necessary
to discharge the duties imposed upon them.
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the
Chairman and or the members of the various committees
of their committee assignments, and furnish them the
names and addresses of all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member
of all committees, and the secretary may act as secretary
foi the committee if so selected by the committee. The
majority of members of the committee shall constitute
a quorumn. Committees shall report their findings.
recommendations and actions to the body which created
it; Decisions, recommendations and other actions of
the Committee shall be made in accordance with the
concurring vote of the majority of members present or
by a majority vote of a letter ballot.


(D) Apprr.priations: The chairman of any com-
mittee requiring appropriations shall submit written re-
quest to the Board for the amount required and the
reasons thereof, and if granted, file with the final report
of the Committee a detailed statement of all monies,
if any expended.
(E) When their terms expire, committee chairmen
and members "ill transmit to their successors all records
necessary to the continuing work of the committee.
SECTION 5-REORGANIZATION
The President may, at any time, discontinue a com-
mittee, alter its classification, or make any changes in
its personnel without regard to the terms of appointment
of the committee members.

ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
SECTION I-FISCAL YEAR
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on
the first day of January and end on the thirty-first
day of December of the same calendar year.
SECTION 2-COLLECTION OF DUES
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually
from each corporate member and associate member
assigned to that chapter, and shall remit promptly to
the Treasurer of the Association, an amount for the
succeeding year, to be determined by the Association
at its Annual Convention which shall be contributed
by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expense of
every kind of the Association.
SECTION 3-CONTRIBUTIONS
The Boaid, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate
the privileges and rights of any member.
SECTION 4-DEPOSITS AND WITHDRAWALS OF
MONEY AND SECURITIES
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all
monies of this Association in the name of this Associa-
tion,' when, as, and in the original form received by
him, in one. or more depositories designated by the
Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Every disbursement of inoney
of this Association, except from the petty cash, shall
be by check of this Association, signed by the Treasurer
and countersigned by another officer designated by the
Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall
establish petty cash accounts as authorized by the Board
which may be disbursed for the usual petty cash pur-
poses by the person designated in said authorization
of the Board. * * Statements of the petty cash ex-
penditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and
the expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the
cash is replenished.
SECTION 5-ANNUAL BUDGET
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual
budget, by the concurring vote of not less than two-
thirds of its membership present, showing in detail the
anticipated income and expenditures of the Association
for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial
liability of the Association and every expenditure of
money of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or persons properly authorized to incur the expense,
liability or expenditure, except a petty cash item as per
paragraph (c) of Section 1. Article VIII.


'I '


'* ,"*f
4 'S


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'"'''
.it: ' `r


" e ,


uT~







BY-LAWS


(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed
to do so at an annual Convention or Special Meeting
of the Association, the Board shall not adopt any
budget, make any appropriations, or authorize any ex-
penditures or in any w\ay obligate or incur obligation
for the Association. which. in the aggregate of any
fiscal year, exceed: the estimated income of the
Association for such year.

SECTION 6-AUDITS
The Board shall authorize employment of a Certified
Public Accountant to audit the books and accounts of the
Association for report at the tfir'. Board mi-retig of oelac
Si'i'ol i(r(r. .


ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION

SECTION I-ANNUAL MEETINGS
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold
an Annual Meeting, herein called the Annual Conven-
tion; the time and place shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors if not fixed by the preceding Annual Con-
vention.
(B) Delegates rat A.i.mal Co 'ceiili'i: Each cor-
iporcat Clopter s hall hav/tl drflegas to the .4A,,,anl C'r,"-
i'Fatiit o one for (:iclI 10 curporati slo in irbers or I'r, ictioi l
thereof'. ,11 mbiers uitnst he in good stanindlig with Thei In-
st;itlic and The .Assec;tiont th ;irt'l days pIiiio to fh( .4n-
1oinal M'lhltilg as shall bt ddcerii'itd by fthe S er-tnar'.
Drl g(tls haIf ll hr duly crtil ;, to byh thei Pr,. ;vcdt or
Secretary of each CI,.ibrt na(,ld sl ll i.i prinhiild ,i;ll, i
credential card firisherd byif tl e Se'ri-tury.
(C) Report-: The President. the Presi/det-Elct,.
the Secretary, the treasurer uid tlh Deirct cor-at-Lorgy
of the Association shall each make an annual report in
writing to the Annual Convention.
(D) Election of Officees: New Officers for the
ensuing year shall be elected to succeed those whose
terms of office aie about to expire.

SECTION 2-SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a
meeting of the Association or is voted by the Board
upon the concurring vote of two-thirds of the Board,
or is voted by not less than one-half of the Florida
Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of the respective govern-
ing boards thereof, or by a written petition to the
Board. signed by not less than twenty-five percent of
the total number of members in good standing of the
Association.

SECTION 3-NOTICE OF MEETINGS
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association, by letter or in official publication
of the Association, stating time and place of meeting
thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention shall be
served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less
than fifteen (15) days before such meetings.

SECTION 4-VOTES
I'ot;,,g iiray l, by, a fir'r-,iatn; ii af a ra t Ie bte ballot
s8 ricqat styled by a qtalifi/ d dcligalt, ,it which lile 1 ri'oll
call ote of ( glget'nts d lall b. thk~ir wilit a orecarririny
col of 0a ainiority. ol, othiriis', us rceqtird b thit By-
Lawsi.. d(r ;diig fthe jiirs;iil. ODlrgatl.s priies3 t I ani y i l ut
the ini,,ii.betr f 1 o4l" s ossiglid i t tfi, nmI (if at reitidi ;il
for h/i nitling lit ,ihi;h the qi 5 t/;i i. s t,;. g i oiisiie retd.


SECTION 5-PROXIES AND LETTER BALLOTS
(A) Proxies: There shall be no voting by proxy
at a meeting of this Association.
(B) Letter Ballots: No vote * * shall be taken
by letter ballot.
SECTION 6-DELEGATES TO AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS CONVENTION
The State Delegate, or DclIyuef(s r,.i pi',sfti,,g this
organization at the Annual .41.4 Cor,,iil ,tfi;o, shrll kf
(orlii-'tr ti ,,rr,,ii s 4i The Institute selected Iby the BRoaii
-of Dir et'l os of lh I; .4Asociation.
SECTION 7-SUSPENSION OF BY-LAWS
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting,
for the transaction of any special business by a two-
thirds vote of the members present. When the special
business has been disposed of, the By-Laws shall im-
mediately be in force again.

SECTION 8-RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any
vote or statement of its officers or menibers nor be
pledged or bound in any manner except by the approval
of the Board, in conformity with these By-Laws.
SECTION 9-RULES OF ORDER
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance
with Robert's Rules of Order.

ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS
SECTION 1-AMENDMENTS BY MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION
(A' TIh Ch-r.,h, ,rf t" Ili .4 ,ci;tio;o, iitd thil By-
Laws may be amendled at any riyitltr iiiii eol meeting of
this Association, provided that a notice stating the
pIurpose of each proposed amlendmentl and the reason
therefore and a copy of the proposed amendment is sent
to every member and associate not less than thirty (301
days prior to the date of the meeting at which the pro-
posed amendment is to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the total number of corporate
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amended the Charter of tih .4-lsocilitiio, io,,d the By-Laws.
(C) Every resolution of this Association amend-
ing these By-Laws shall state that the amendment will be-
come effective only if and %when it is approved by the
Institute. Immediately following the adoption of such a
resolution, the Secretary shall -ubmit a copy of the
amendment and the adopting resolution to the Secretary
of the Institute for such approval. Upon receipt of said
approval the amendment shall become effective and the
Secretary shall enter the amendment aind the approval
at the proper place in these By-Laws. with the date of the
amendment and approval.
SECTION 2-AMENDMENTS BY THE INSTITUTE
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may
amend any provision of these By-Laws that the Associa-
tion fails to amend after due notice so to do from the
Institute. Each amendment made by said Bo-id shall
have the same forte and effect as if made by this Asso-
ciation in the manner hereinabove provided, and shall be
effective immediately on receipt of the notice of the
Secretary of The Institute containing the amendment,
and the Secretary shall enter the amendment at the
proper place in these By-Law; with the date it was made
SECTION 3-TITLE AND NUMBERING
-From time to time and without further action of
the Association, the Secretary may rearrange, retitle.
renurnber or correct obvious errors in the various
article'. -ecttions and paragraphs of these By-Laws as be-
conies necetsa y.


OCTOBER. 1959









Moisture Penetration-



Its Cause and Cure


Penetration of moisture through
building walls-with the resulting
damage to interior surfaces and fin-
ishes has long been a problem to
the solution of which h architects and
research engineers hase de oted much
thought and effort. In regions of high
humidity like Florida. the problem
becomes a serious one. Thus, Infor-
mation as to the cause and cure of
moisture penetration can provide
building technicians with another
means for assuring high performance
of their building designs.
Theories as to the beha ior of
moisture in walls hase not always
matched pragmatic situations. For
example, it has been said that furring
was first developed as a means for
keeping the plaster membrane awa;
from contact rith the w\et pores of
a masonry wall-as well as to act
as additional thermal insulation. But
in countless instances moisture dam-
age to plaster had appeared in furred
construction.
Again, the theory of capillar\ pene-
tration brought about a technique of
sealing walls inside and out, the
obvious idea being to present passage
of moisture from one side of the \wall
to the other. But condensation of
moisture \apor has often occurred
within walls thought to be hermet-
ically sealed. Also. it has proved
generally impractical to so stabilize
interior wall moisture sapor or to
control the moisture content in struc-
tural elements as to present moUlture
movement as a result of temperature
changes.
The recognition that pressure is
the chief sillian in the picture has
come onl] within a comparatniel.
recent period. One of the first to
suggest that pressure and not mere
capillary movement w\as the chief
cause of moisture penetration in
buildings was FRANKLIN 0. ADAMS,
FAIA, of Tampa. In an article written
for the Architectlural Forum several
years ago he advanced the idea that
since air-tight sealing was impractical
24


_and ineffective as well means for
neutralizing the pressures acting on
moisture could accomplish the sought-
for result the prevention of interior
damage through moisture movement
or condensation \within the wall.
Hle devised a system of wall con-
struction \whereb pressures \,-re kept
constantly. equalized through a free
flow of air within the wall structure
itself. In some instances this \\as
accomplished through use of \ents.
baffled to present influx of w water
during storms. In others he made
certain that soids of the ma.ionri
structural units used for the wall %\ere
kept continuous. In this w\a\ pressures
within the wall were automatically
maintained at those of the atmos-
phere. The result \was that condensa-
tion was presented inside the \\all
and moisture damage as a result of
pencration through pores of the "all
materials "as eliminated.
More eicentlh confirmation of these
data was developed as a result of ad-
ditional research b\ the Small Homes
Council at the Unisersit\ of Illhnois
and the Engineering Experiment Sta-
tion at the Pennsyhlania State Col-
lege. Tests showed that variation in
temperature was the prime cause of
pressure fluctuations within a wall
structure. High temperatures created
high pressures. and lwh-en tempera-
tures suddenly. were Ic,"-re.d as the
quenching action oif a rai against
the sun-hcated a all a ncgati\e
pressure w\as created which tended
to suck moisture into ports of \\all
materials through which the hot. ex-
panding air had sought escape under
influence of heat.
Tests hase further sho in that onlh
an infinitesimal amount of heat energy\
is necessary to increase material' the
pressure \within an enclosed volume of
air. You can demonstrate this b% a
simple experiment. Place a dime over
the top of a still-cold. recentlh-emptied
beer bottle. Insert the bottle so the
residual moisture will seal the dime
in place. Then set the bottle right


side up and the dime x~ill begin to
vibrate as a relief valve to equalize
the inside pressure generated as the"
bottle warms. You can accelerate the
action by warming the bottle more
quickly with )our hands.
IIn this tpriment. of course, the
temperature range is extremely small.
But the pressure generated is still evi-
dent. In a wall, however, the same
sort of action can be calculated. As-
suming a 20 degree rise in the tem-
perature of air in an enclosed wall
void, the inside pressure wouldd in-
crease approximately. a half-pound per
cubic inch. or about -0 pounds per
cubic foot. Cooling through the same
temperature range would produce a
corresponding drop in pressure and
a resulting powerful suction.
Data developed from experiments
on test walls indicate that internal
\all pressure relief can be obtained
by providing about one-half square
inch of \entilation per lineal foot of
" all. Further. the tentilatio:n is most
effective if placed both at the top
and near the bottom of the '\al:
This technique of \jall ventilation
does not, of course. indicate that
means to seal porous wall surfaces
should he abandoned. But it does indi-
cate that comnplhte sealing an at-
tempt to render the building surfaces
air-tight is a contributmg cause of
pressure changes inside the wall
u which. in turn. cause moisture mo\e-
ment. Indeed. various tests hae shown
that the tighter a building is sealed
the more pressure or vacuum \\ill be
generated within its "all structure.
And. conmersel\, as such pressure 'a-
riations are presented through ade-
quate \entilation. the movement of
moisture \apor is minimized and the
danger of ultimate condensation and
actual moisture damage to interior sur-
faces sirtual1 eliminated.
Widespread application of this vall-
ventilation technique could undoubt-
edl\ stabalize internal moisture con-
ditins at an improved Ic el in man\
t pts of Florida buildings. In some.
for example. code requirements act to
seal wall construction tightly\ at both
top and bottom. \\hcn walls arc
scald against the weather and are
un\ented, the effects of high hu-
midities and temperature variations
are to create moisture conditions and
pressure gradients which. unless re-
lieved ma\ easily reach damage
le els.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Notice of FAA Annual Meeting


NOTICE OF REGULAR ANNUAL
MEETING OF THE FLORIDA ASSO-
CIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCH-
TECTS, INC. AND OF RESOLLITIONS
TO BE PRESENTED TO EFFECT
AMENDMENT OF CHARTER AND
REINCORPORATION
Members and associate members of
the Florida Assotition of Arthitetts of
the American In.titute of Architcct,. Inc.
a corporation not for profit, organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Florida are hereby notified that:.
1.--The regular annual meeting of
the Florida Association of Architects of
the American Institute of Architects. Inc .
siI be held 12, 13 and I-1 Notember
1959 at the Robert Meyer Hotel, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
II.-At said regular annual meeting,
the following resolution will be presented
for action thereupon by members of the
corporation, a concurring vote of not less
than two-thirds (2/3) of the total num-
ber of corporate members present at the
meeting, together with approval by the
American Institute of Architects, being
necessary for the effective adoption of the
resolution:
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the profession of architec-
ture has grown with great rapidity neces-


sitting changes in the organization of
the corporation in order to provide greater
eifi,.ienc. in its management and in
order that the corporation may better
serve the best interests of the people of
the State of Florida, the profession of
architecture, the building industry% and the
members of the corporation; and
\\HERE.\A. rCcent changes in the las
ct the State of Florida make it desirable
t., riinc'orporat this corporation under the
protlsions of Florida Statutes, Chapter
617, as amended. in order to take adsan.
tage of the pro simons of that chapter
No". THEREFORE, BE II RESOLVED
b\ the Flonda Association of Architects
of the .menican Institute of Architects.
Inc, a corporation not for profit. organized
and existing under the las, of the State
of Florida, at its regular annual meeting
dul\ assembled this .......---.....----..---- day
ot November. 11;'. that the president of
the corporation be. and he here\ is.
aii.thorized and directed to, sNcure copies
of the original charter of the corporation
and all amendments thereto, certified as
such by the Clerk of the Circuit Court
with whom they are recorded, and
BE It FURTHER RESOLVED that the
president of the corporation be, and he
hereby is, authorized and directed to file
said charter and all amendments thereto
with the Secretary of State of the State


of Florida, together with the certificate-
hereinafter set out, and-
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the
president of the corporation be, and he
hereby is, authorized and directed to make
and, complete by the insertion of appro-
priate names, addresses, dates, figures and
words, execute and forward to the Secre-
tary of State of the State of Florida, a
certificate, and the secretary of the cor-
poration be, and he hereby is, authorized
and directed to attest said certificate
under the seal of the corporation, b\
which certificate, the corporation shall,
and it hereby does, accept the pro visions
of Florida Statutes, Chapter 61". as
amended, and in which certificate the
corporation shall set out the provisions
required in the original Articles of Incor-
poration h\ Florida Statutes. Chapter 617,
as amended, in the uords and figures con-
tained in the certificate \shich hereafter.',
follows:
CERTIFICATE
This certificate. executed this.---
day of................... 19__, made by the
-President of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
rF ARCHITrCTS, INC., a corporation not
for profit. organized and existing under
the laws of the State of Florida, and
attested tn b\ the Secretar\ of said cor-
poration. 'who, has affixed the official s'al
of the corporation hereto as an official
act of this corporation
WITNESSETH:
1. The issuance of this certificate "a,
duly authorized by a regular. called
meeting of the corporation's members.
having Mioting rights
(Coolintt d oni Page 27)


new process


You'll be amazed! By a photographic
process, beautiful wood grains,
prefinished to perfection, are now
available at the low cost of inexpensive
plywood. There's no plastic, no paper;
it's all wood, and it's beautiful!
Call collect for full details.

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS:
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc. GArden 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc. 5-76 '
Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc. JAckson 3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville ELgin 6-8542


OCTOBER, 1959






We're telling your prospective clients:


You hit the "better livin'
Jackpot" when you
moved to Florida...


...but LET'S FACE IT- FLORIDA HOMES DO NEED HEAT!


Yes, you're lucky to live in Florida. But don't let
one freakishly-warm winter make you forget that
Florida homes need dependable heat in "cold snap"
weather.
WINTER-BEFORE-LAST caught us napping. Poorly
heated rooms made life miserable for home folks
who tried to keep warm with spot heaters and other
makeshift equipment.
WE PAID DEARLY to be reminded that a central
heating system is a "must" in every modern Florida
home. And that central OIL home heating is by far


the cheapest, safest and most dependable Thousands
of Floridians installed oil heating in their homes last
summer And this great modernization program is
still picking up speed'
BUILDING A HOME' Accept your architect or build-
er's recommendation of built-in oil heating You'll
be glad you did every winter of your life'
In specifying oil house heating you are assuring highest
heating efficiency plus greater safety and long-term
economy for your clients. Can we help with information?
Visit us at the Miami Buildorama.


FLORIDA HOME HEATINGG INBTITTr
BUILDORAMA, DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Notice of FAA Meeting...
(C.,;,i,'iir'd from Page 25)
2 The t,.:,ipi:ation; does hereby accept
the pr.i.sk, I.ns of Florida Statuts Chap-
ter '.!. it aiTitnded
Tlh, pr.." i'ons required in original
Xrtikl ...I f [ .i'-. iporation hi-. Florida Stat.
utes Su. 3.1- iI art a. tollor.
\RTICLFS OF INC()RF(R \ ION
(F THE
FLURID \ AS.\S CITIION OF \RC Ii.
TEC IS OF THE .\IERIC.\N I\Sli
TUi F (F .\RC HITFCTS. INC.
LUNDL R 1-LORIDA S I 1 U I E.
CIINPTEtR r.!-. .S .\MLNDELL
\RI ICLE I
NAME
I he n inr .:f thli;, I'.:,latl.mn ii ll bi
the Ic l lik \:--I C n I I o t.il ,Ch<-HII CTS
01 v F .\ NIL I;IC \N IN .TI .iiE LE I A| .14 ili
TEC I,. IN> t. ils bcri_' .) r.in,. lipurai'hl
uridr Florida Statut's. Chap.ter (l" ]a.
arit'decd. of that corporation n':.t f:or
plttit knorin :, the Flortid \'.,ota nloi
of ArLliirtcts. niii.rporai tcd bi ,,rd-r ot
the Cicuiit Court of Florida in and tor
Di-nal C:Liunt'. Florida. dated II lMa.
l',14. .hlich ordti r is rc.orided bei liiiiiin ..
at pact "4I In o..:rpratio:n Bo,,k -. .,f thi.
pillili, r.: ,irds of Dui a! C iount',. FI...rida.
as anieiitn d ht ..hrd-r oi i .id court datc.d
4 .\pril I'-i l. .i .i.h order is rt .oirded
hcgiiiniriiC at p ,c 1t:,I In ,,riorati:in Book
2'-.. of the public records ot said U.,unth.
as aiTi-endcd bi order ot .aid .cou.irt dated
Il Jul l'o-i ihich orderr is rct ,rdtd b[it
11iitiii-_ at paJ,, 3-". lIn .orporati'hn B IIook
]. o:f the p iiihh; rc .:.'rds of said outiint\.
a. amendd h'. order r iAt .lid court t datkd
_ .\uiaiist I'4;" ihihil order is rco..rded


. c-inniniz at page 344, Volume 345, Othi
,.ai Rc..':rd. of said county.
Th, prin'.ip:l offices of the corpora-
tir, dlull Ih located in Dade County,
Ilin'di, inid t such oi:thr phl0 c ..r plaji.
as from time to time mib hb : tiutlhoiii:d
by the Rard of Drr:ctor, .it tih co:r.
portion.

ARTICLEE II
'i RP(OS E
I I. crri..rial rnirc ir f this .'.orporitihon
,. tdi,.:l.i i.nal. c thaiiii lhNi. .ind si.
c, hihti( I lr I .l.' i.':t, ar.- t, ir;alni c arind
nritl. In I ll, ,he, |hwt i t in e.ibr.. t,, L.,rm .
i[,,.-, lCir cif.:rt mi.. ij to, pf.nmote thu
ISthc iI. Icnt1 h a1 Id praC.i. ,. 1 >:th.
*:,cn.\ Of th d arcit-: turajl pIr..H.-sron: to
]:hidiit thile ( :n:. r'd arc.t lt plnniing-
and Luildine i-\ jdi adtaiiir the standardss
ot dr..-i tc.- t.ir]l t .du>.itli. n rcsc.in ,.li. train
iiI' 3ILd piat-jt I- ,.'r: rdinatc the uild
ic irdui.tr. and rhit Lif ll.iin ,if airtlhl.
tf..ti.irt t, in.iir..c t a.d'.ianciimenrt ,t t the
iin-, stalnd.ard ,:4 the pepic, -, through
th-ir [in|)pr.. ld t1r\1 Ior ,1-ic-rt. and t. m akli
thi: .rt'l. ,I n ot L c ini crcai-,o siri! i
to ,tcittl 1T h li :irpoirjion i hail tarri
on alid tiindulit a ti\ltic aiid uindcrtak
ii ,s tir [tin I nistiit-tii.n arid cni lit.innlent
ot its melilhcr- aind th...ic engajid in
aichiltclural aid building LOn-itrutn.rion
aiti itk .. and it shail cnii.a i ,i uij.li
lirc ar;,. cduic htinil. ;.:,i'. t i c.. r ,carch.
bii:ni .!itrit and hirilahbl aichtitic, a
slill ad'an.c itie iindi:r.tiiidin arid
cro.l oth of tlh lrt aind ,.l'.nlh rcltiri-i
tr. art-li tcctlurce jnd the practice tlih rct
Ihi- ..orp-rato-r. shall hij < the pou'c- to
cr.s.ie an\i aind all appriopa-t,. ...rpor'lhitt
autlhi,rit\ and t., doi all tliinse rict.c.r'. .
or dcsiral.ic in oauii\ iiil, out tic p,.iirpolci
o- the c .\rtIckk


.R I ICLE III
QUALIFICA I IUN AND MISSIONIN
OF MEMBERS
The qualifications of members and the
manner of their admission shall be as
follows:
All corporate members and all associate
niinTribcr of ill 1l ridi Cha.ptr,. [ ii r iid.
!igh Studint Chalptrs lIoated %itlinl the
State o( Floridl. oi t [li .Anmri.an inrti
tile -,i Ar.. itcctt shall be micmnl.)i-l of
thi' c..rpo'i ttion. aind lshiil hit adminttcl toI
IneiidL lh II li t ,is ....ip1 a t iii, tlipon a
o>lio,, Iri th., r rli .f i micr- ,p in 1 I' l.,idJ
Ch'pt r .ri a Student ChaptCr loI:at.d
,*ithii th.. Stjltc of H- 17r,.1 -.t the \ ,ilcr
1.i.n In. tit e tll t \ri..l t.i: .ts F .i r ti. iiput.
io:""s % ( thect .\rti.ic,) of l ,Iifnu p irat 'in
a unipir.at. nitmlhcit .h!! be defind ,d
3 btonatide inicimbcr. li o, 'od standiln.
of a Flor-da C'lipici ot1 thi,. Airicaill
[ntilri. tc :,f \r.:h tc.;,:t

l.r.r- .it C lil Florida C haptt r f tli.:
\mi:rihan In -;ittute Oif \inhit,.:t- %hall
lt,.t t dc ,ca.-- or d'-lir it, q hi a sh ll
r.:prcslrt the chapter and Io ,sh'jll act
,iI tbchallt oi1 Hl: chapter and ts k nIci immbh r
at the rCgular laniU.ll m ctini g :if the
,-orp...taitlOl The nij il-.ci of dt l.!gatc,
Clectcd bi ca..h hl-1aptri. thC quahli .rIr iooi,,
otf tht dceleatc. iid [lit minntcr of their
ertifi..ation a' at r,.ditcd dcle-at',- 1t
tlit itciular arinui'l ni'.: tin. : ..- f thit. .or
i,,,rit,,on -lji! b.:. a, I.r:,,idcd in tht:
il. I a ..
.ARTICLE I\
TERM
Ihi: .o.rporatio.n sh ll hale pcirpeltlai
cMlatle.nl utlic s dilmiled pur'iant tr.
tilt pr|.|, O ll. (.f Floridi Sta ti.tes. Chap
tcr a.1 ai aiinudcd
(Couitiwed I.1 Ptpf. 2.S)


All lumber when treated is merely dipped in a preservative
and the resulting coat does not penetrate deep enough to
protect the layers around the heartwood.






CELCURE Preservitive, through pressure treating, penetrate 1 all the
way to the hearcnood n hich is innately preserved by nature. The "Full
Cell" process is used to /ill each cell of the w ood with preservative . .
not just coat it. lou can be sure of deep penetration and la-sing pro-
leclion hlen oi. .-pecif' CELCURE TREATED LUMBER.


For further information on CELCURE Treated Iumber, write to the


plant nearest you.

Trea
TAIM['\ EST PALM BEACH
ORLANDO


ling Plant, in:
FT. LAiUDERDALE GRACEVILLE
BOYD BLNNELL


AMERICAN Ce/ WOOD PRESERVING CORP.


1074 EAST EIGHTH STREET


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


OCTOBER, 1959






Notice of FAA Meeting ...
(Co,,;,diiiiil from Page 27)
AR I ICLE V
SUBSCRIBERS
The names and residences of the sub-
scribers to these Art..lcs are as foll\ous
NAME RESIDENCE



ARTICLE VI
MNAN.\AEMEN I
The atfirs ofr this corporation shall be
conducted h\ a ga:,erning board called
the Board of Dirctors. herein reterred to
as the Board. \shich shall consist of thi(
officers of the corporation and three or
inore other members snietted as herein
atter provided. (-)nc member of the Board
shall be clncted from the St'ate at-Large
and shall he desinattd and serc as the
Director of the Florida District ot the
American Institute of architects: other
members of the Board shall be elected
from the Florida chapters of the .Amner
ican Institute oif Architelt ts in such num.
bers as shall bc pr.,,lidd in the b\.lan\s
if the corporation. but in no e\cnt shall
a chapter be withoutt representation b\ at
least one director The officers of the
,orporation shall be a President. a Presi-
dent.Elect, di\ers \ ice-Presidents. one
elected from each district thinn the State
of Florida. the territorial limits of s hikh
districts shall be as provided in the b\-
jla s.,f the corporation. a Secretar: a
Treasurer: and the inimedite Past Presi
di.nt ot thel corporation The ofticcri
and members of the Board shall perform


such duties. hold office for suc'- sterns.
and take rttice at such times as shall he
provided in the b,. laiAs of the corpora.-
tion.
The iftrcers and mnenmbers o- the Board
shall be let.ted at the reni.lar annual
mee'.ngc ot the corporati..on. h which regular
annual nircttiii shall blt held ._,n the last
Saturday. in (.Otbc-ltr : ,f (J.:ii calendar
year; pro, id d. lt.i'.i cr Ii t t appec rs in
the h- r intrftt., (.t thlc o:rpo:ration. the
Board nma dmsinati in, date subse-
quent to th. last Saturdl, in ( ):to:her in
the calendar .ear. a, the date of the
regular annual rreeting b' gn irg a v.rit.
ten notiCP to ca.h Li:crporate member of
the coorporat:ion ot the .ubbcqucnlt date .of
the regular annual mi.:ting. noi.t lck than
tittccn i da\s prior. to thi last Sat.
uirda\ in ( )tober. u.tlI nIitit.: I1 bi
sufficient if it is piublisi i.d not Its than
fiftccn i1 i das priCnr ton the last Sat.
urdai in (m tober in Thu Florida .rchi
tete. or such other publniation as ma'
he designated b\ the Board as the ottrcial
Journal of the corporation.
The President. itlth the cion-ent of the
maiorit. of the Bo.ard. ma\ appoint an
E\icutnLe Commiittee of not Icl than
fne i1 i members of the Board. on: (of
,hi. m shall be the Director. State at.
Large. and one of .'hom shall bc the
Prtsident.Eket. to act in behalf of thK
Board and to exercise its pomer; in the
interim periods between meetings of the
Board: prnnidcd. h:oic\ser. that nio action
b\ theF ELcutisc Conmiiaittrc shill be
binding upon the Board nor upon the
corporation. unites t is preniousl author
izd. or isubscquentIt ratified. b the
Board or Ih. th.: mnie ihrs of the eor
portion.


\ hcrne.er any i.:ano occurs in the
i-ffi.e or an\ officer or other member of
the Board of Directors; other than by
expiration of term of office, such vacancy
,hall be filled in the following manner:
(a) \ atan:.; in the office i.,f an\ offi.
cer-director hall be filled b,. a
majority v-t, olt thin member :of
the Board sittiii in an\ rieular
or special mcetinlr of the Board.
of which proper notl:e has been
given pursuant to the bilaws of
the corporation
h(i \'atan,.\ in the office of an\
iTnembiner of itlhe Bu.ard of Direktors
elected from a lurida Chapter
of tlie .\ ricr.-ani Institute ot
.Arhitcnts, shall b.e filled b\ th.
affected chapter in tihe manner
provided in its Articles rf Incor
rporation. Constirutiin or B\s
La3%s
i i \ aant. in the ioftice of members
of the Board of Directors. State.
at.Laree. shall b fhilld for the
p'rtiihn ot his term rcnmainini
until the ric\t regular annual
mniting of the corporation. hb
inaii.,riti slte of the imntbers of
th BRoird sitting in m n\ rceilar
or special meeting of the Board.
of ihich proper notice has been
i\en pursuant to the b% la\s: and
for the subsequent remainder oit
iucli term. if an\. such Iadani.
shall be filled b'. nmaioit\ ltce ot
the accredited delegates, present
and tming. at the regular annual
Ilimrtlln (of tlhe cirporation ne\t
follo\min the occurrence of such
\acan(\
(C('onitind n.oii Pagr .3n)


FEATHEROCK VENEER . ..


*Lightweight-seven pounds

to the square foot ..

Beautiful new colors and

textures Silver Gray and

Charcoal . . Easy to shape

and apply perfect lasting

bond . . Durable with-

stands weather and freezing

.... Chemically neutral ....

OFEATHEROCK VENEER is

a natural lava stone quarried

in California, but available

locally .


featherock, INC


Distributed in Florida by:
Kissam Builders Supply, Orlando . . Steward-Mellon Co., Jacksonville ....
Steward-Mellon Co., Tampa . . Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., Hialeah ....
Doby Brick & Supply, Boca Raton ....
Ind in Georgia by:
F. Graham Williams Co., Atlanta

6331 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES 28 CALIFORNIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








pt Redv. in


sales come easier when homes have


ALL-ELECTRIC KITCHENS

In Florida, MODERN means ELECTRIC. Smelly fuels
don't belong in an up-to-date kitchen. Also, it's cheaper
to go all-electric in kitchen and laundry than to use a
combination of services.
When you design, build, or remodel . count on Reddy
for extra sales appeal. You'll turn "lookers" into buyers
with these essential THREE:
AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC RANGE
AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC WATER HEATER
FULL HOUSEPOWER with the right
size wires throughout the house and ample
circuits, outlets and switches.
Our offices will gladly furnish details to help you capital-
ize on this new public awareness of the important part
played by electric service in MODERN Florida Living. .
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY VIB"""""T
Working with You to Build Florida


OCTOBER, 1959













Depend on Members of

SAIR-CONDITIONING
REFRIGERATION
HEATING & PIPING
ASSOCIATION, INC.
1390 N.W. 43rd ST.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMrBEIS OF RACCA NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
I l. .- I '.. .r...li ,,h I I ..r.
S |'i r l. I ... [n,.1. | .II ,
nII l K ..- .l 'd.I i .
(. ll.i n I r i r. il.n
.'.ri ..-..: Rcl.... .-r I.
*., l-r, Ir.lhjir.-.. In'.

M :D..rild Air ior,dJiin.),nre
lin-a 1 .\r lornr, l ni ning ;
Niair, o.[.-r C.li1. Ir...
SPi.,le A k nl C,.mrpi.n
Zjk Air C-jrJ..l.d -iilr & R l.rrerJi'.-n
SUPPLI ER
* i & 8 Pi.p & C.nd,, C.fporaior,
S tti C' O. r at ilR r 'erI t t..
* &..pAr. .ci, ,,t, ,t'..n. .IL... Ce.
* d.' lr i.. p nl C'. ('Br i .4.- cles
* F .,. .4 tC CC S.IrtIrn Ilnt ProI
* F W'il ti'. Ilt. ,,ig.,l 4l.
* GCn S.,ti irlal (Con.I. Er.r .
r R.rrr Traore C.r.pany


DESCO VITRO-GLAZE is a
vitreous-hard, glazed wall
finish that's attractive, sani-
tary, washable, colorful,
waterproof and economical.
It is available in many non-
fading, permanent colors
and is an ideal material for
use on walls of schools, hos-
pitals, churches and all pub-
lic and commercial buildings.

STEWARD-MELLON CO.,
Of Jacksonville
945 Liberty Street, Jacksonville
Phone: ELgin 3-6231


Notice of FAA Meeting ...
(Continued from Page 28)
\ARI ICLE VIII
OFFICERS
Ihe names of the ofticers. \iho shall
senc until the ekletion at the regular
annual n getting l ne\t follcl ing the filing
if thew A.rticils of Inuorporation. pur.
-uant t. Florida Statutes. Chapter i'".
is amended. are as follows
IList of Ot(.fcr;,
ARTICLE IX
The tirt Board of Directors \rho shall
,er;e until the election at the regular
annual meeting ne\t fol]lor in the filing
of these Article' of Incorporation. pur.
'uant to Florida Statutes. Chapter hi'.
as amended, shall consist of ...............
miemberi ;11ho0 namll and addrcsie are
ai folio" s.
tLit ot Directlort
ARTICLE N
BY.LA\\ S
Ihe b\-la\ of the corporation shall
bt made. altered. or rescinded b\ a to.
thirds i 2.. ,i ote of ad.redited delegates.
priserit and ootine. at anm regular annual
meeting of the corporation: provided.
houNeier. b\-l;i > shall not be made, al
tered cr reminded unlet;s writtenn notice
fir't is iu\en of the proposed b\.lan or
altered b..la\i or rescinded b .!3 u to
each corporate member of the corpora-
tion not less than fifteen I15 days prior
to the date of the rFgular annual meeting
Of the corporation: such notice shall be
sufficient if it is published not less than
fifteen I I1 I da\s prior to the datt of the
regular anniual meetinic of the corporation
in The Florida Architect. or such other
puihlication as ma\ he designated hi the
Board as the official journal of the cor
portion.
.AR ICLE NI
EM(OLUMLEN I'
No part of the net earnings of this
corporation shall inure to tlh benefit of
an% officer. director, private member, or
individual within the meaning of iUnited


The President's Message...
(Co,,tititid Iiro,,, Page '1)
design uttcrli deuid of those things
his mother and ft fe ha\c former held
dear. Certain\ you can convince him
his wife doesn't need walls to hang
pictures on. or that anything but high
\i ndo\s in his bedroom is a waste of
\all space. while e \ou are at it, gire
him a brief treatment on overcoming
claustrophobia or, perhaps. on
becoming accustomed to neighbors
ha\ ing a clear \ iew of his e\ern motion
through walls so solidly glasscd that
no average home bu.er can afford to
drape them. Along those lines. wh\
must w'e close in buildings x\ith
nothing but glass, thercb; increasing
heat gain and air conditioning loads:
lose all priac. unless we completely
drape, thereby losing what the glass
created in the first place: and increase.
insurance costs because \e cannot af-


States Internal Revenue Section 501; pro-
vided, however, any member, director; or
officer may be paid compensation in a
reisonable amount for services rendered
the corporation upon such terms and con-
ditions as ma\ be approved for pa ment
bh the Board of Directors and the %or.
portion mi\ confer benefits upon its
members in conformit. with its purposes.
and in the Ce nt ,.f dissolution or final
IIquidation of the I,.rporation. pulrsuaJIlt
to the provis-on, of Fl..rlda Statutes.
Chapter l"-. as amended. the corpora.
tion ma\ make distributions to its mem-
bers as permitted hs the court having
iurisdiltion thereof and no such pa ment.
benti t. or distribution shall be deemed
to L'c a di\idend or a distribution tf in
come. and provided further, that an%
memtbr shall he entitled to reimburse
incnt fi.r actual c\ptcnsis incurred in and
about the i\ork of the corporation. or
advances paid for the account of the cor.
portion. which mva bc paid hb the cor.
p,:ration to such member after a stite.
ment thereof shall ha\e been submitted to
and approved for payment by the Board
of Directors thereof
.R1 ICLF XII
.AIENDMENTS OF THESE
ARTICLES
These Arti.les of Incorporation ma\ hb
amended b\ a t'io-thirds 1 .'1 vote of
accredited delegates. present and voting .
at any regular annual meeting of the
corporation. provided, however, that these
.Articles of Incorporation shall not be
amended unless writtenn notice first is
gi\tn of the proposed amendment to each
corporate merimbtr of the corporation not
Ics, than fifteen (15 da\s prior to the
date of the regular annual meeting of
the corporation. such notice shall he
sufficient if it is published not less than
fifteen ( 151 da-; prior to the date of
the regular annual meeting of the cor
portion in The Florida Architect, or such
other publication as may be designated
b\ the Board as the official journal of
the corporation


ford unbreakable glass?

\\ith the Lever loiuse came the
rush for the curtain \\all. \hen first
constructed, this building \was without
a doubt a monument to design genius
No;w eern new\ building in Newt York
looks a "cold crib". ED SIONE dis-
covered rafter man% others including
the ancients I that a pierced-tile screen
looked good on smaller buildings.
gio ing them an air of serenity\ without
losing their importance. So e\ert small
building must have a tile screen, if
onl1 o\er one ;window\ or in one un-
iecessar; appendage panel. First we
tear off their clothes, then \we dress
them in a film\ earment! Just around
tlhe corner there appears our next
craze. the w\indow\less building. This
is no doubt most practical. \ hat with
nothing to look at anyway, lower air
conditioning costs and a better shelter
for the time \when either the Russians
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


C)n


PFJ






or the buming public decide to blow
us ll tio hell!
All lokig aside. it's a strange %uorld
of design i"hen furniture manufactur-
ers sell tent\ times more conention-
all\ designed furniture than contem-
porary, while not one architectural
school turns out a graduate capable of
determining the difference between
an ogee and a cove moulding. Who
is going to design the houses to put all
this furniture in? It looks mighty
silly in most of our modern designs,
but Mother isn't about to part with
it. .\nd it isn't just in residential
design. It seems to be an increasmn
trend in the commercial field, that
yearning to break a"Na: from the aus-
tere dcsi2ns of the last ten \ears,
Particulrl) is this true in the field of
interior decornition. \\e design struc-
tures of classic simplicity: and along,
comes a decorator who makes the
interior look like MADAME D lB.RRY'S
boudoir. Just to add insult to injury,
the landscaper sticks in a bunch of
trees hidine the main feature of the
design, the power company hangs a
battnr\ of transformers right in front
Of the tntrancc and someone opens
a all-night ice cream stand next door.
\\hat do \ou think' Should we
attempt to educate e\er\onc to our
1\a cOf thinking lan unsurmountable
task i' Should "e just go on designing
to please each other I a most un-
profitable ocationi? There had
better be an answer. The King isn't
naked, but the garments are both
transucent and threadbare.



FAA Board Meeting
Slated for October 10
The fourth regular F.A Board
meeting of 1939 has been set for
October 10. 15o. at the Langford
Hotel. \\'mter Park. It \\ill be an
all-da\ affair. \\ith President Stctson
calling the meeting to order at 9:'0
.\I. Amonng items for consideration
at this meeting will be rcpnrts of
variouss F.\. Committees. the FAA
adiminitrati\e organization for next
\ear and the F.\.'s 196) publihing
and public relation program. All F.AA
directors from all Florida Chapters
are especially urged to attend.
The Board meeting \\ill be preceded
b\ a meeting of the Board's Executive
Committee on the e'cning of Frida\.
October Q.
OCTOBER, 1959


BEHIND


THIS DOOR





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Thompson flush doors, in beau-
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both exteriors and interiors in
both standard and special sizes





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standards that include: cores of wood ribs
spaced 4-inches apart and butted against
stiles on alternate sides to provide continu-
ous vent space; stiles of a 1 18-inch
minimum width; rails of a minimum 212-
inch width; panels of 3-ply, cross-banded
plwood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
both sides. Only non-shrinking, craze-re-
sistant adhesives are used to produce inte-
grated bonding that is highly resistant to
both moisture and mildew.
In addition to ii standard sizes,--1/6 x
6. 8 to 3 0 x 6 8 interior and 2/6 x 6/8
to 30O x 7 0 exterior-Thompson flush
doors are obtainable in special sizes.



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Placed 4' on centers at top and bot-
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Phone TEmple 3-1976


News & Note


Convention Business
To Be Streamlined
Toward the end of expeditirin busi-
ness .session of annual F.\A coin\cn-
tions. the FAA Board. this \car. will
adopt the general procedure folli:wed
by the Institutc relatl\e to the presen-
tation of business matters for con-
sideration b\ It's \otlr i n ni beirship.
For the first time in F,\.\ history. ac-
tions of the Board taken during its
regular and special nmcctings in 1059
w ill be summarized in a single report.
Between the time of the Board meet-
ing of October 10 and the first busi-
ness session of the -4tth Annual Con-
\ention this report \\ill be processed
and forwarded to ever\ FAA mem-
ber. This \ill provide a general dis-
tribution of information on FAA af-
fairs: and it ill also gi\e each voting
member of the FAA an opportunity\
to inform himself relatl\e to actions
of the Board and to s\hate\er Board
proposals or recommendations ma\ be
slated for consideration and action at
the convention.
As no\\ planned, the FAA Board's
19051 Report \\ill he mailed to mem-
hers sufficient\ in advance of the
1 O9' Con\ention to permit thorough
stud\ and conultation as may seem
desirable with Chapter officers and
executive committees.
A particularly\ important part of the
Convention's business s\\ill in\'oicl
consideration and adoption of changes
in both FAA B-La\rs and Charter.
Elsewhere in the issue is printed the
legal notice of the FAA's Annual
Nleetmin and. as part of this. a rei\sed
Charter for adoption by the F.AA
membership. In addition, the B -Laws
have been presented \\ith proposed
changes indicated in italic t\pe. Pre-
printing of changes in either Charter
or B\-La\\s is a legal requirement: but
it also provides the FAA memberslhip
a chance to stud\ proposed changes
substantially prior to the time thc.
are brought to the Con\ention floor
for adoption.
This new program of streamlining
business sessions of the FAA's Annual
Con\mntions has developed as one re-
sult of the profession's growth in
Florida-and the fact thit \\ith the
chang,, in AIA status, the FAA. as a
state organization of the Institute,


must necessarily assume new organi-
zational responibilitics and an en-
larged scope of acti it\ The F.\. pro-
gram is no longer the uncomplicated
affair it was a few years ago Noi the
Board is charged with consideration
(f man\ neie matters of., pr'ograln and
policy imoling organization. proce-
dure and Institute liaison i \s well as
those dealing \ith regional commit-
tce work. legidlat e ictiit\ and o\cr-
all pubhc relations .\V future organi-
zation plan' of the Institute dc\clop,
F.\.\ adniinistrati\ c .ct tisi must
necesars!\ be adjusted and possibly
expanded according\.
It is to facilitate the handling of
F.\. administration affair- that tlh
Board's nt\\ procedure has been initi-
ated. It \\ill probably not operate as
smoothly ( this \car as man\ would d
\\ish. But \sith the interested and
active cooperaticin of all concerned it
should ample! i ustif its continuance
b\ providing F.\.A members nire
complete informlati,.in than in the past
and b\ sa ing much time in explani-
tor\ discussion at Con\sention busi-
nes1"> S sions.


Personals .
LLE HOOrPR. AI., formcrl\ \\with
the Jackson ille office of Re\nolds.
Smith and Hills. has been named
cnordinatine architect for the firm's
Tampa office. according to a recent
announcement.
HILL STIGGINS. .I.. has announced
the remo\al of his office in Orlando
to 7"'' North Thornton Street.
Orlando.
In Clear\\ater. the Architects
League of Clean\ater has elected ne\\
officers for the 19q)-60 term. The\
are: D\N\s B. IOHI.NNES. .president:
DONALD S. \\'ILLI.\s S. \ice president:
and JOSFPH L. COGo\N. secretarn-
treasurer.


CSI in Florida Grows and
Grows and Grows...
Hardly\ more than IS months ago,
the CSI in Florida \\as hnl\ a gleam
in thie e e, of a fe\ dedicated building
professionals. Toda\ the state-\\ide
membership roster is close to 200).
\\ith three Chaptirs alrcad% function-
in and one more in thL. stage of
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FOR
CHURCHES HOTELS
BUSINESS BANKS


M I






News & Notes_
(Continued from Pige -12)
organiz.ition. Reflecting the police (of
the national CSI orsaniz.itin. local
chapters in NMiami. Jackson\ illc and
Taripa are hard at work dee-loping
ways and means of ilmpro ing specifi-
cation practices for the benefit of
building professionals in every phase
of construction activity.
Memberships are open to architects,
to engineers whose work involves
specif action and to iariiou, iprcscnt.i-
tives of building materials. products
or service organizations \\hise \\urk
brings them in contact x ith architects
and construction specifications
Oldest of the three Florida CSI
Chapters is that of Greater Miami
with a roster of 80 interested nimm-
bers. President of the Chapter is
DON 1LD C. SnII H. Vice president is
JOHN CRIMSH.\\V. FRNLSr C. NORLIN
is Secretary and SAMUEL NI. PItDER.
treasurer. All officers arc architects.
Tile Tampa Chaptir nm\\ nunmbIr
63. Eu.iGEN P. BO\.\KL is thl prTsi-
dent. and \\ N. 1. EiSEI F. of the U.S.
Pl\ ,-soid Corp.. is Secretar\-tre.asuri r.
The Jackson\ lle Chapt(r ha.i beii-
opra.ting during thc pat cear ithi
temporary\ officers. A Charter piLsen-
tation meeting at -.hich permanent
officers \\ill bt. namiid is scheduled
for October 12. Cuiding the group of
4- members during the Chapter's
formati\e period has been IOHN NI.
CREA.NER. president. .1nd CEORGE C.
CRII FIN. Secretar'-trea.surer.
All chapters ha\e started active
programs of improved specification
practices.

State Board to Issue
New Ruling as Basis
for Firm Name Style
For the p.st several months the
State Board of Architecture has been
stud ing a re vision of the "Approved
Style of Firm Name" as included
under "Rule "" of the Board's 195.S
Edition "Circular of Information."
Recently the stud\ %\as completed
and a revision of Rule processed
for final approval b\ Board members.
The new ruling has been framed
as a regulator\ measure to assure con-
formance with applicable sections of
the "architect', la\\." Florida Statutes
Chapter 46". As with other Board
regulations it % ill ha'e the force of
(Conid,ird o, Page .14)
OCTOBER, 1959


NOW AVAILABLE...

The New, Proven, Drain Field System...


CRADLE DRAIN!

1 CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN APPROVED by the Florida
State Board of Health on the basis of a 1 to 4 ratio...
a 75% reduction in the length of the ordinary drain field.
2. CRADLE DRAIN IS THE ONLY drain field in use today
where the distributor is both above the reservoir and
above the 12-inch rock-bed absorption area.
3. CRADLE DRAIN HAS A PEAK-LOAD storage reservoir
above the absorption area holding the air-equivalent
of 2/2 gallons of water.
4. CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN TESTED by the Wingerter'
Laboratories, Inc. of Miami, Florida...and Report
44094 states conclusively that Cradle Drain will with-
stand a destructive force of 12,000 pounds.



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TENNQUARTZ
.Trade Mark Reg. U.S.A. and Canada
the "original" Tennessee
Quartzite stone from the heart of
the Crab Orchard District. Since
1931.
Now in colorful smooth-sawn Panel
Walls and Spandr selected by lead-
ing architects for the following out-
standing jobs.
1-St. Peter's United Lutheran Church
Miami; T. Norman Mansell, Archi-
tect; Scott B. Arnold, Associate.
2-Catholic Youth Center, University
of Florida, Gainesville; George W.
,.Sickle and Associates, Architects.
3-leveland Trust Co Berea Bank,
Berea, Ohio; R. W. Weit, Architect.
4-Farrell Elementary School, Phila-
delphia, Pa.; George W. Stickle and
Associates, Architects.
5-First Christian Church, Flora, IIIll.;
Robert J. Smith, Architect.
6-Union Commercial Savings Bank,
East Palestine, Ohio; Roy W. Weit,
Architect.
Write for free data and name
of nearest distributors

TENNESSEE STONE CO., Inc.
QUARRIERS AND FABRICATORS
General Offices: 705 Broadway, N. E.
Knoxville 17, Tennessee Phone 4-7529
In Sweet's File-Architectural







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JUstice 5-1122
~v I


News & Notes
(Continued from Page 38)
law when adopted. It is expected that
final approval and processing will
make it possible for the Board to
issue its new ruling about November
1st. As now planned, the revised pro-
cedure will be published in the No-
vember issue of The Florida Architect.


Orchids for P/R...
The candle of the architectural pro-
fession isn't entirely hidden by the
bushel of misunderstanding. Recently
the wick has been neatly trimmed and
the light strengthened by two fine
suppliers of building materials. One,
the ARMSTRONG CORK Co., an-
nounced last month that again this
year its opening television program of
the "ARMSTRONG CIRCLE THEATRE"
will salute the architectural professions
and the role architects are playing in
" . changing the face of every city
and town in our land," in every phase
of building development . from
the initial ideas and the drawing of
plans through all the stages of con-
struction."



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
A-C, R, H & P Association,
Inc.. . . .. 30
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Corp. . . 27
Buildorama . . . 3
A. R. Cogswell . . 34
Cradle Drain Corp. ... .33
Electrend Distributing Co.. 6
Featherock, Inc.. . .28
Florida Home Heating Institute 26
Florida Power & Light Co. 29
Florida Steel Corp. . . 17
George C. Griffin Co . 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 25
Houston Company . .
Lexsuco Inc.. .... ... 18
Markowitz Bros., Inc. 2nd Cover
Moore Vents . . .. 32
Mutschler Kitchens of
Florida .... . . 10
Pickel Studio . . 32
Portland Cement Association 36
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 5
Solite . . 7
Steward-Mellon Co. . .30
Tennessee Stone Co., Inc. .. 34
Thompson Door Co. . 31
Ben Thomson, Inc... . 34
Tiffany Tile . . 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 35


The TV presentation-which will
be seen at 10:00 p.m. on the CBS
network, Wednesday, October 14-
will point out that the architect has
the responsibility of selecting all the
materials that go into his building,
from resilient flooring to acoustical
ceilings. Through this means the Arm-
strong Cork Company . will ac-
knowledge the nation's debt to the
architect for his leadership in creating
buildings in which to live and work."
The other salute to the profession
came from the BARRETT DIVISION,
ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION. It
was in the form of a release developed
about statements of. G. P. OLDHAM,
the organization's vice president, rela-
tive to the need for architectural serv-
ice in the residential field. The re-
lease, from the Company's publicity
agent, CARL BYOIR AND ASSOCIATES,
was widely circulated to the trade and
shelter press as well as newspapers. It
was, of course, directed to the poten-
tial home-builder and constituted a
"hard-sell" argument for retention of
architectural services. In part, the re-
lease said:
"An architect can insure that you
get the best possible home for your





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






money. When should an architect be
consulted? What does it cost to em-
ploy an architect? What service does
he render?
"G. P. Oldham, vice president of
Allied Chemical's Barrett Building
Materials Division, says ideally he
should be consulted even before you
choose the site.
"'An architect is trained to see
both the hidden liabilities and the un-
obvious assets of any lot,' says Old-
ham.
"Outlining the role of the architect,
Oldham makes these points:
"The architect should know what
you can afford to spend. In this way
he can help you to get the best home
for your money.
"Because no two families are alike,
the architect must study your way of
living, your hobbies and special needs.
This helps him in preliminary draw-
ings to show the general characteris-
tics of the home.
"Once these plans are approved, he
starts final working drawings. He sug-
gests and selects building materials.
. . His specifications not only in-
clude these items, but exact instruc-
tions as well on their installation. The
architect assists in getting bids from
contractors and supervising the work
of the contractor selected for the job.
The architect visits the site during and
dfter construction to make certain the
house is built to specifications.
"What does an architect charge?
His fee is a percentage of the cost of
the house. In metropolitan areas that
ranges from 10 to 12 percent. It may
be lower in other areas. All of his
services, from selecting the site to
designing the house, from helping
choose the builder to supervising ac-
tual construction, are included in his
fee.
"An architect gives you a house
with no waste space, because it is
tailored to your special needs.
'Most important, the architect
thinks of everything in advance,' says
Oldham.
"Recognizing that low-cost develop-
ment houses can't be designed on an
individual basis, Oldham recommends
in this case calling in an architect on
an hourly fee basis to look over the
plans and make certain you get the
best house for your money.
"Oldham concludes, 'In housing, as
in everything else, you can't beat a
pro.' "
OCTOBER, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pros. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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precast concrete panels give these

curtain walls their clean, modern look


WHEN AMERICA BUILDS FOR BEAUTY...IT BUILDS WITH CONCRETE


With its tower rising 28 stor-
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Bank building, Denver, Colo-
rado, is one more example of
concrete's importance as a
modern curtain wall material.
Large precast concrete pan-
els, both ribbed and flat, are
combined to give the tower its
strong and dramatically simple
vertical lines. White quartz ag-
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used to face the panels.
Panels, most of which are
5'6" x 6' x 2", were fastened di-
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with no back-up needed. The
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Architects everywhere are
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A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










An Open Letter to


Florida's Next Governor

MY DEAR GOVERNOR:
No one yet knows your name. But because you will have been elected through
the free democratic choice of your people, it is certain that you will be like your
predecessor an able, honest and astute gentleman dedicated to advancing the
overall progress of our State. So I venture to call your attention to certain aspects
of our economy which deserve not only informed recognition, but also decisive
action toward improvement as part of your four-year administrative program.
First, please consider the haphazard, strip-town building now mushrooming
throughout our State at an almost runaway pace. It is turning our highways into
sign-lined commercial slums, our suburban areas into sprawling, uncontrolled and
sub-standardized speculations. Lack of a firm, long-range land policy; the absence
of any planned coordination between cities, counties, regional areas and the state
government; and the political power of quick development dollars have combined
to produce a state-wide situation which is a mounting threat to the preservation of
sound values and an ever-increasing complication to the orderly conservation and
enlightened use of the natural beauties and resources which have provided the
foundation for our rapid growth.
This many-sided blight is a kind of creeping decay which is threatening our
cities, our suburban areas, our incomparable shoreline, even our matchless open
country. Thus, Governor, I urge upon you the formation of a policy and a program
to arrest its progress; and I urge further that you provide the constant and firm
leadership necessary to assure the wide acceptance and adequate development of both.
Second, Governor, I suggest you examine carefully the role of the construction
industry in the economy and potential development of our State. Currently it ranks
with agriculture and tourism as a source of income to, and employment of, our
citizens. Yet thus far it has been accorded relatively scant attention. Unlike agricul-
ture and tourism, construction is virtually unsupervised. Abuses of financial anl
technical responsibilities are common with little or no recourse to the statutes.
Incompetence is rampant with few state-wide standards of good practice, such
as regulate both resort and citrus industries, either codified or enforceable. As
specific examples, we have no state-wide measure of technical competence for the
contractors who erect the buildings in which we live and work; we operate in the
dark shadow of a mechanics' lien law which is unequitable, unfathomable and
unenforceable; and even our statutes relative to architectural and engineering
practices are confused, overlapping and below national standards.
It may be that such cancers in the body of our economy have developed because
of the very rapid growth of our State. Perhaps certain phases of our development
have been too rapid for the advances needed elsewhere to keep pace. If this is so,
Governor, you face one of the most tremendous opportunities for constructive
achievement ever enjoyed by any Florida governor.
Will you, sir, clearly recognize this opportunity? Seeing it, will you then accept
the challenge it offers to provide the leadership and action necessary to reach desired
goals? If you will, I am sure you will have the immediate and whole-souled support
of every element of Florida's huge and still-growing construction industry. Architects,
engineers, builders, material suppliers, product manufacturers, financial institutions
all are waiting for an answer. With your leadership and their support new
wonders can be accomplished in and for our State.
Cordially,
ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA
The Florida Association of Architects.




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Mark it on your Calendar! Next month's FAA Convention
at Jacksonville is a chance to bring yourself up-to-date
on the trends in design that will shape the character of
your future practice. .. .The design spotlight will shine
brightly on the art in architecture. And highlighting the
architect's place in his profession and his community
will be a magnificent roster of speakers each a bright
star in his own field of specialization. . Be sure to be
in Jacksonville next month . .


Convention headquarters will be the
brand new Robert Meyer Hotel in
downtown Jacksonville. Convention
rates will be moderate. Full pro-
gram details will be sent you In
plenty of time to assure the com-
fortable accommodations you will
want . When you receive them,
act promptly, for the Convention
program promises a heavy attend-
ance and reservations are always
and necessarily limited . .


45th ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 12, 13, 14, 1959 ROBERT MEYER HOTEL JACKSONVILLE