Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00063
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text



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SEPTEMBER, 1959


0,


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74




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



IN 7T 1s -9 e


Weed Replaces Pancoast as State Board Member . .
A New Office Address for the FAA . . . . .
Office Practice Seminar Hailed as Outstanding Success .
Toward Better Mortgage Loans . . . . .
Message from The President By John Stetson, AIA

1959 AIA Residential Design Awards . . . .
1- Honor Award, Custom-built Category . . .
2 Merit Award, Builder Category . . . .
3 Merit Award, Builder Category . . . .
How Much Light Is Enough? . . . . . .
FAA Standards of Good Practice . . . . .
Office and Job Forms
1959 Convention to Stress Scope of Design . . .


. . 4


. 10


. . 12-17
. 12-13
. . 14-15
. . 16-17
. . 19
. . 21-24


. 25


News and Notes .........
Advertisers' Index ........


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.
DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krusi; BROWARD COUNTY:
Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C.
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl,
J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar;
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH:
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.
THE COVER
How do YOU like it . ? This is the second of a series of covers designed
by a committee of the Jacksonville Chapter and executed by the John E.
Ropp Studio in Jacksonville. It seems probable that the idea of specially
designed covers suggested by Jacksonville readers will gain general approval.
Ideas for covers for 1960 issues we're all set for the rest of 1959 -
must be floating about. Let's hear from other AIA Chapters and even
from individual members so we can develop fully a tradition of cover
design by those for whom the magazine is published.


. 28
. 31



The FLORIDA ARCHITECT Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of Illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 91959


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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STORES AND INSTITUTIONS


SEPTEMBER, 1959







Weed Replaces Pancoast


As State Board Member


ROBERT LAW WEED, AIA, of Mi-
ami, has been named by Governor
LEROY COLLINS as a new member of
the State Board of Architecture to re-
place RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA, of
Coconut Grove, whose appoint-
ment expired July 1st. The Governor
re-appointed two incumbent Board
members whose terms had also ex-
pired, ARCHIE G. PARISH, FAIA, of St.
Petersburg, and MORTON T. IRON-
MONGER, AIA, of Ft. Lauderdale, who
has served as Secretary to the Board
since his initial appointment in 1955.
The term of appointment to the State
Board is four years.
The new Board member has had a
long and distinguished professional
career and has been active in com-
munity affairs. Born in Sewickley, Pa.,
he studied architecture at Carnegie
Tech and moved permanently to Flor-
ida during the booming twenties,
opening his own office in 1922. His
present firm is Weed, Johnson Asso-
ciates. He is registered to practice ar-
chitecture in seven states and holds an
NCARB Senior Certificate.
Married and the father of three
children a son is now an associate
of his firm Mr. Weed has served
in two World Wars, first as a Lieuten-
ant in the Coast Artillery Corps and


RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA
. . wise counsel for thirteen years


again as a Lieut.-Colonel in the
World War II Air Transport Com-
mand a three-year assignment dis-
tinguished by six awards, including a
Presidential Citation and a Com-
mendation Award. He has long been
a member of the Miami Board of Ap-
peals and the Dade County Develop-
ment Committee. Work of his firm
has won national recognition; and he
has been a contributor to national
publications on several occasions.
His AIA membership dates from
1929; and since then he has been
active in AIA affairs at both Chapter
and State levels. He was Vice Presi-
dent of the FAA for two years and
President during 1942.
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA, retires
from the State Board after thirteen
consecutive years of service marked by
a self-effacing and dedicated effort to
advance the professional status of ar-
chitects through the firm, but fair
administration of Florida's architect-
ural registration law. He was named
as a State Board member in 1946 by
Governor MILLARD L. CALDWELL as
an interim appointee to fill the unex-
pired term of JOHN L. SKINNER, FAIA.
Subsequently he was reappointed for
three full terms, in 1947, 1951 and
(Continued on Page 6)


ROBERT LAW WEED, AIA
. . a new phase of public service
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















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(Continued from Page 4)
1955. He has served the Board as Pres-
ident and for many years as Chairman
of the Board's important Examination
Standards Committee.
During the 13-year period of Mr.
Pancoast's membership on the State
Board, architectural registration in
Florida has increased almost three-
fold, from a total of 598 in 1946 to
over 1625. Revisions to the architect-
ural law, in 1953 and in 1955, have
strengthened the Board's administrat-
ive authority relative to both standards
of competency and the enforcement
of its provisions. Enforcement activ-
ities have been greatly increased since
the 1953 revision gave the Board pow-
er to obtain injunctions against illegal
practitioners through civil action. As
a result of increased effectiveness dur-
ing the 13-year period of Mr. Pan-
coast's service on the Board, Florida
now stands close to the top of the list
relative to the technical standards of
competence as a basis for registration.
With regard to enforcement activities,
it is believed that, compared with re-
ported activities of other State Boards,
the Florida Board is far in the lead
with respect to both its enforcement


program and the results which this
program has developed toward pre-
venting violations of the State regis-
tration law and in stopping violations
through injunction where these have
been found conclusively to exist.
Obviously, the duties of the Board
and the pressure of administrative
activities have greatly increased since
Mr. Pancoast first became a member.
This has necessitated gradual increases
in the staff; and since the Board's pro-
gram is financed entirely by registra-
tion and renewal fees, it is understand-
able that renewal fees have increased
from $5 annually in 1946 to $25 at
present. These fees finance a program
that includes two yearly examination
sessions in January and June -
now held simultaneously in Jackson-
ville and Miami, due to the number
of applications which must be ser-
viced. Included also is the enforce-
ment program which currently entails
efforts of the Board's attorneys, HARRY
T. GRAY, of Jacksonville, and the
Board's two investigators, BENMONT
TENCH, Gainesville attorney, and
RICHARD GLAVIN, of Daytona Beach.
With regard to examination proced-
(Continued on Page 18)


A New Office for The FAA...
4-. r TAMPA rA4MAM reAl. S.W8 s8 .
About the middle of this
month the FAA's admin-
istrative office will have
a new address. It will be t
251 University Drive, i
Coral Gables, Florida. To
those who know the 6 4 %
Coral Gables area, the 4 I
new FAA headquarters
lies between Le Jeune i 1 '
Road-S. W. 42nd Av- 7^ MVb A'**.
enue and a direct route 1 MiAnet Me As A .~ ,A. w-y
to the new Miami Inter-
national Airport and C C R A L
Ponce De Leon Boule-
vard. It is within sight A
and a short walking block <
of the new FHA Build- t LU^tesirVzt,
ing. Those not familiar 0
with the area can easily ( \ s
find the office via any ,.
one of the roads marked /
on the skeleton map at %
the right . The build- G A LE 45
ing which houses the new to ;I
office was designed by i4 S.
George Fink, member of (
the South Florida Chap- C < co'f 07u
ter. The space itself is w.Bes '
on the ground floor and 0is v
is being developed for -M- / I SRI
use by Verner Johnson
and H. Samuel Kruse, "Do
members of the FAA 0
Board's Executive Com-
mittee . New tele- [
phone numbers will be 4tq
announced as soon as 0
possible.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































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of the story.
Solite played a particularly important role in the 14,407
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groceries are kept under rigid temperature control. Solite's
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SEPTEMBER, 1959





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


MY







Office Practice Seminar



Hailed as Outstanding Success


The FAA's Professional Seminar'
Program this year has been experi-
mental- as the Executive Commit-
tee charged by the FAA Board with
its development has frankly admitted.
But based on the two thus far held -
the P/R session in Gainesville during
April and the Office Practice Seminar
held in Palm Beach during the full
day of August 7 the experiment has
been successful with hardly a qualifi-
cation. Results have undoubtedly es-
stablished in the Board's collective
mind both the desirability of, and the
need for, expanding the Seminar Pro-
gram next year. It is probable that
plans will be laid early for 1960 and
that announcement of specific sem-
inar subjects will be made well in ad-
vance of dates so that individuals
throughout the State can shape their
schedules to include attendance at
each one.
Attendance at the Office Practice
Seminar last month totaled just un-
der 70 a figure almost five times
as large as the total attendance at FAA
conventions ten to twelve years ago.
Inquiry revealed that the majority of
those present were young practition-
ers architects practicing independ-
ently for five years or less. Also most
of the offices represented were small
ones a great proportion of them
containing not over three men. This
was precisely the audience which the
O/P Seminar Committee, headed by
ROBERT H. LEVISON, had hoped to at-
tract; and it was primarily for the ser-
vice of the profession's younger, less
generally experienced members that
the program had been shaped.
The first morning session, starting
at 10 AM, was concerned with the
general subject of "Architecture and
The Law." BENMONT TENCH, JR., was
the speaker; and his remarks were fol-
lowed by a series of questions from the
floor. Following this, HILLIARD T.
SMITH moderated a panel discussion
on the subject "How to Increase Your
Income." Panelists included IRVIN S.
SEPTEMBER, 1959


KORACH, EDGAR S. WORTMAN, ROB-
ERT H. LEVISON and JAMES L. DEEN.
The moderator skillfully developed
the meeting so that discussion be-
came rather general and the panelists
were joined by members of the audi-
ence. It was an idea-exchanging ses-
sion; and a future issue will present a
briefed abstract of conclusions reached
and suggestions offered.
Some results of the first of two
afternoon sessions that on Office
Forms- appear elsewhere in this is-
sue. Headed by THOMAS LARRICK and
EDGAR C. HANEBUTH, this portion of
the Seminar did not produce the vol-
ume of "working drawing tricks and
shortcuts" which the Committee had
hoped. But the collection of proven
office and job forms was value
enough.
The final session of the day was
moderated by Chairman Levison and


featured a discussion of "Professional
Relations" by CLINTON H. COWGILL,
FAIA, of the Institute's Washington
staff and editor of the Handbook of
Architectural Practice. This, too was
of more than passing value; and a
later issue will attempt a brief of Mr.
Cowgill's talk as a commentary guide
on one important phase of profes-
sional activity.
Comments at the close of the four-
part meeting were enthusiastic. These
and the program itself indicated two
things: One that the FAA can expand
its service to the profit of its member-
ship by continuing the Seminar Pro-
gram; and, two, that members would
probably attend in even greater num-
bers any Seminar geared to serve up
some practical answers to specific
problems of practice. The Executive
Committee would welcome comments
along these lines.


Desire of the FAA Office Practice Committee, as expressed during the Seminar's
planning stages, was that Seminar proceedings be published in The Florida
Architect as completely as practicable so that members not present at the
Seminar could benefit from it. Accordingly, a program to present "FAA
Standards of Good Practice" has been started in this issue (pages 21 to 24)
which initially offers some of the office and job forms exhibited at the
Seminar meeting. It had been planned, also, to report in this issue the substance
of the talk given by Benmont Tench, Jr., attorney, during the morning session
on "Architecture and The Law"-which had been outlined by the Committee
as covering contracts, bonds and the lien law as these relate to professional
liability and including also comments on office procedures and partnerships . .
Though Mr. Tench departed from this outline as to subject, his remarks,
given informally-and thus not to be regarded as either legal advice or as
any basis for action-were nevertheless of interest to architects in general.
Thus a report was prepared from the recording of his talk. This was submitted
to Mr. Tench for checking on the accuracy of his remarks-which he stated
to the editor of this magazine were based on some 37 hours of legal research.
Mr. Tench would not approve the report as prepared from the taped transcript.
He also stated that he would not permit publication of any report of remarks
"attributed to" him without first having the opportunity of revising copy as
he might deem necessary to reflect accurately the legal background of his
statements . Mr. Tench's wishes were observed. Since publication deadlines
made it impossible for Mr. Tench's edited version of his remarks to be
processed, no report of his interesting and informative talk is contained in
this issue . Immediately prior to press date Mr. Tench had not informed
the editor of this magazine as to his inclination to develop the subject of his
talk before the Office Practice Seminar in the form of an authoritative article
under his own by-line. Should he do so, and should he offer the article to
this publication under circumstances which would make its acceptance prac-
ticable, FAA members who could not attend the FAA Seminar on Office
Practice may reap its benefits.







ttesage wom 74 President...







Toward Better


Mortgage Loans



By JOHN STETSON, AIA,
President
Florida Association of Architects


The motivating factor in construc-
tion is, and always will be, money-
how much is available, what terms and
at what interest rate. When there is
money available, then and then only
do the Architect, builder, mechanic
and supplier enter the picture. For the
most part, after the money is spent
only the mortgagor and the mortgagee
are' the least bit concerned with the
financial success of the venture. The
owner's failure to make payments does
not concern the Architect and cer-
tainly not the plumber, once they have
received their payments for services
rendered. So, this month, let us direct
a message to the mortgage banker.
Most homes costing over $15,000
are financed through savings and loan
associations, banks and insurance
company mortgages. According to
State law, all of these residences must
be designed by Architects and the
working drawings must bear the seal
and signature of an architect registered
to practice in the State of Florida.
Due to a misinterpretation of the En-
gineering Registration Act, some offi-
cials permit the issuance of building
permits on drawings prepared by reg-
istered engineers. The State Board of
Engineer Examiners has specifically
stated that residential design cannot
be construed as something an engineer
can practice under existing laws. The
courts recognize this fact and we con-
tinually are involved in enjoining en-
gineers from this practice. Most vio-
lators are guilty, too, of just plain plan
stamping. In other words, for a small


fee usually $25- they affix a seal
and/or a signature to a set of plans
they have not even examined. This
permits the contractor or owner to
obtain a building permit. But what
does it do to the mortgagibility of the
house?
Even the youngest Architect has be-
hind him five years of college and
usually three or more years of actual
experience in another Architect's of-
fice. He is in a position to be of great
service to a mortgage company at no
cost to them. The majority of plans
submitted to savings and loan associa-
tions, for instance, are little more than
sketches. Rarely do specifications
and/or details accompany the plans;
and the information contained there-
on is too basic to permit an appraiser
to come within 25% of the actual
value. Properly prepared plans drawn
by the average architect alleviate this
problem and remove a great deal of re-
sponsibility from the appraisal com-
mittee and the directors of a lending
institution. No architecturally un-
trained draftsman, builder, lumber
salesman or engineer can produce
what leading institutions should re-
quire for their own protection and
operation economy.
The Home Loan Bank Board charg-
es the directors of Federally chartered
savings and loan associations to use
their best judgment in placing loans
on improved properties. Is it a man's
best judgment to approve a loan when
it is being made on a poorly prepared


set of plans containing little or no
information as to quality of materials
used? Does this appraiser or director
stand over the job to see that quality
workmanship and materials are in-
corporated? For that matter, how
many could be actually qualified for
this task? Yes, I know, "we lend for
the most part to builders who do the
best work and whose competence and
integrity are unquestioned." Does your
institution require that a bid from the
contractor doing the work accompany
plans and specifications as part of the
file-and that only this contractor
actually accomplish the work? Do you
require a list of sub-contractors?
Perhaps you wonder why these ques-
tions are raised with regard to such a
successful operation; one so void of
foreclosures. Since 1936 the building
industry has been unable to keep pace
with the demand for housing. Almost
any loan was safe on any home be-
cause if the original owner failed in
his commitments, a dozen others
stood ready to take over. The con-
tinual rise in building costs took up
all the slack engendered by too high
commitments, early depreciation and
poor design. Almost within reach are
new building techniques which will so
greatly decrease the cost of building
construction that twenty-year loans
made within the past five years could
very well prove almost a fifty percent
loss. Where will we first find our
problem mortgages? Certainly no one
will keep a poor investment. If the
(Continued on Page 32)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




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One leg of the H-Plan is the bedroom-
sleeping area, the center the outdoor-
indoor living area, and the other leg
the utility-work area. Interior courts
formed by the legs of the H are living
patios; and rooms adjacent are opened
to them by sliding glass doors. Thus liv-
ing spaces are disposed to provide the
owners with the greatest possible amount
of plan flexibility for meeting changing
requirements of use. Each element of
the plan may be closed off from others;
but when desired the whole area can be
made into one great free-flowing living
space.


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I I
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* a
* I
a a


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








1959 AIA Residential Design Awards...



1- Honor Award, Custom Built Category


This unique house the only honor
award, but one of eight awards given to
Florida architects in the 1959 AIA Homes
for Better Living Program is, in the ar-
chitect's words "an attempt to take advant-
age of the healthy indoor-outdoor use of
space through most of the year that Flor-
ida's climate makes possible." Also, its un-
usual character is "a study of different pat-
terns superimposed on one another and


working together in the entity."
The essentially H-shaped plan is shelt-
ered by a sweeping canopy of laminated
glued wood arches and wood decking. To
accentuate separation of walls and roof,
all interior and exterior partitions are built
to a uniform 8-foot height and glazed
above. Thus the curves of the roof can be
sensed inside without sacrifice of essential
privacy in any room.


House for
Samuel H. Herron, Jr.
Sarasota

Victory A. Lundy, AIA
Architect

Spear, Inc.
Contractors






















The living-dining areas -
open on both sides to screen-
ed and semi-sheltered patios
- is the circular core of the
house. Solid walls, inside, are
faced with gray-green cer-
amic-glazed brick. Exterior
walls are of white brikcrete
arranged in a simple pattern
developed by recessing alter-
nate units. All floors are
terrazzo. The house is heated
- and cooled when required
- by a forced-air unit sup-
plying an underfloor per-
imeter duct system.
SEPTEMBER, 1959








1959 AIA Residential Design Awards...



2- Merit Award, Builder Category


This is the basic scheme from
which six variations have been devel-
oped, ranging in cost from $10,000 to
$45,000. All have been built with
the same 6 by 16-foot module and
identical details have been used on all.
Roofs of 2 by 4 joists sheathed and
plastered have been varied with 2 by
6 t.&g. exposed roof decks; and the
stuccoed exterior walls have been va-
ried with stacked, exposed concrete
block.


The basic scheme, offered for sale
for $20,900, was of concrete block
stuccoed and furred and plastered in-
side with plaster ceilings. Floors are
concrete, terrazzo surfaced. Roof
beams are 2 by 12s with a 3/4 inch
spacer; columns, 2 by 4s with 3/4-
inch spacer.
The architect works as an overall
design consultant, developing all vari-
ations and details and advising on
color, decoration and landscaping.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Edward J. Seibert, AIA
Architect

Frank S. Tyne
Builder


.4










































































This model house, from which other var-
iants were developed, was painted beige
on the exterior. A soft green was used
on posts and beams. Trim was painted
off-white. Though utilizing the modular
structural system of this house, the six
major plan variations thus far developed
have been adapted according to the
factors of lot size, square foot needs and
orientation. Architect and builder have
worked closely on every phase of each
project; and results have been highly sat-
isfactory for both.
SEPTEMBER, 1959







1959 AIA Residential Design Awards...



3-Merit Award, Builder Category


The AIA Awards for Builder Cate-
gory house design point up the possi-
bility that if the architect-builder as-
sociation is nurtured and expanded,
small house design may yet emerge
from the doldrums of standardized
banality and achieve some measure of
distinction. This house offers partial,
but convincing proof that the possi-
bility is a practical one.
It was built in Bartow for about
$16,000, plus the cost of the lot. Like
many other small houses designed


for merchant builder construction,
this one was planned on a 16-foot
module, thus assuring economy. But
beyond that, rooms have been ar-
ranged for both privacy and pleasantly
open living. And the imaginative de-
velopment of an enclosed courtyard -
the walls will ultimately be covered
with vines gives the three-bedroom-
two-bath plan a quality of exclusive-
ness too often absent in merchant-
builder houses.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


House for
William 0. Henry

Gene Leedy
Architect

Robert McElroy
Builder






























Builder and owner both
reaped benefits from the
architect's ingenuity -
and the mortgage com-
pany undoubtedly made
a sound-value loan. No-
table points are: 1, de-
sign is simple, well-pro-
portioned, well-built of
steel post and beams on
16-foot centers, spanned
by standard-length joists;
2, plan is open, where
needed, otherwise com-
pact yet all rooms
open to outdoor views,
with courtyard walls and
rear living outlook assur-
ing privacy from public;
3, paneled interior walls,
cork floors, sliding glass
doors and complete air
conditioning provide
value and comfort un-
usual in a house of this
size and cost.


SEPTEMBER, 1959


9. .
.__ *. -






Weed Replaces Pancoast
As State Board Member
(Continued from Page 6)
ures, Board members customarily de-
velop all examination questions sub-
stantially in accordance with stand-
ards of the NCARB's most recent syl-
labus which in recent years has un-
dergone drastic revision and improve-
ment. For technical assistance in grad-
ing papers, the Board now employs, as
may be required, members of the
teaching staff of the College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts of the U/F at
Gainesville. Over the 13-year period of
Mr. Pancoast's service, the Board's
clerical, as well as administrative pro-
cedures have been streamlined; and
methods now used to keep records and
service applications, to care for all
the many details incident to examina-
tions, attend to a growing volume of
correspondence, conduct a constant
and aggressive campaign of enforce-
ment and issue promptly a growing
number of registration certificates are
the efficient result of the Board's care-
ful attention to administrative detail
as well as to regulatory policy.


With most of these varied advances
in policy and program Mr. Pancoast
has been closely identified. Like the
newly-appointed member who will
take his place, RUSSELL T. PANCOAST
has practiced architecture in South
Florida since the roaring twenties. He
has seen the ranks of his profession
expand with the growth of the State;
and with that expansion, he has rec-
ognized the variety of problems -
professional, technical, economic and
social which such expansion in-
evitably brings. Records of the Board
would show he has anticipated many
of them; and it would show also that
invariably his part in the Board's ad-
ministrative activity has been that of
a wise counsellor, a firm leader in the
initiation of sound advances and a
fair, but resourceful, champion of high
professional competency and perform-
ance. As a dedicated member of the
profession's regulatory body, RUSSELL
T. PANCOAST has, in the judgment of
those who have known and worked
with him, earned from all architects
in Florida basic thanks for his part in
achieving the professional climate and
security which they now enjoy.


FAA Board to Meet at
Winter Park October 10
The fourth meeting in 1959 of the
FAA Board of Directors will be held
in the Langford Hotel, Winter Park,
on Saturday, October 10. This will be
essentially a business meeting to con-
sider reports of committee activities
during this year and to prepare a re-
port of the Board to contain recom-
mendations for Convention action
the following month. The Board is
planning to follow the example of the
Institute in sending to the FAA mem-
bership a full report of Board actions
and recommendations a week prior to
the Convention.
No Seminar session has been plan-
ned in conjunction with the October
10 meeting. However, it is possible
that the Mid-Florida Chapter will ar-
range a meeting to act as Hosts for
Board members Friday evening prior
to the Board meeting, according to
tentative plans now being studied. As
at other meetings held this year,
Chapter members will be welcome to
attend the Board session, as observers
of, but not participants in, Board ac-
tion on items of the agenda.


SAll treated lumber contains chemicals which are highly com-
bustible and therefore extremely dangerous as a fire hazard.






Celcure Pressure Treated lumber does not contain creosote or coal tar
compounds, oils or other chemicals that are readily ignited. Celcured
lumber is not a fire hazard . it is actually fire-resisting.


For further information on CELCURE Treated Lumber, write to the
plant nearest you.

Treating Plants in:
TAMPA WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE GRACEVILLE
ORLANDO BOYD BUNNELL




AMERICAN WOOD PRESERVING CORP.

1074 EAST EIGHTH STREET JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Seei Is4 A Sience ...


How Much Light Is Enough?




We know that too much light is often as bad as not enough in
the complicated business of seeing. But scientists are still re-
searching the answer to what type and level of lighting is best for
various seeing tasks. Here's a capsule report on progress to date.


Through telescopes, it's now pos-
sible to see stars that are millions
of billions of miles away. Through
microscopes, we can take pictures of
particles so tiny that a million billion
of them, clustered together, would be
invisible to the naked eye. We've de-
vised electronic eyes, even supersonic
eyes. But in spite of all the progress,
one great question is still not fully
answered:
"How much light is required for
seeing?"
Architects and interior decorators
have to guess at the answer all the
time. How much light, for example,
should come from the fixture on the
kitchen ceiling? With too little light,
things become somewhat harder to
find. The likelihood of dropping a
dish or knocking over a bowl in-
creases. Without the full amount of
light she needs, the housewife sub-
consciously becomes annoyed-and
her annoyance rises to the level of
consciousness if she stays in her
kitchen long enough.
But too much light can be just
as bad-and have the same effects.
The room takes on the appearance
of an excessively light photograph.
There's too little distinction between
light and dark. Glare rankles the
nerves.
Those who plan lighting for store
windows face the same problem. Use
too little light, and people won't
notice the wares; too much and the
wares will be hard to see.
A major advance in the seeing
science came with the development of
the foot-candle, today the most widely
accepted unit of light measurement.
A foot-candle, logically enough, is the
SEPTEMBER, 1959


amount of light produced by a stand-
ard candle at a distance of one foot.
So-how many foot-candles do you
need? "As much as you can get with-
out burning your hair," was the
answer in days when the fire was the
sole source of indoor illumination. A
variation of this answer applied to the
gaslight and early electric days. But
soon, when it became possible to get
more than enough light, seeing scien-
tists answered the question based on
the size of the detail to be seen.
Knitting, for example, is a small de-
tail relative to washing clothes.
A major breakthrough in the sci-
ence of seeing came in the late
1920's when the team of Cobb and
Moss recognized that, in addition to
size of detail, other factors had a
bearing on the amount of light you
need:
1. How much contrast is there be-
tween the detail and the background?
Somewhat more light is needed to
wash white clothes in a white tub
than for blue jeans in the same tub.
If the task is knitting a black sweater,
more light is necessary with black
needles than with white ones.
2. What's the time interval of
seeing? The red traffic light may be
bright enough now. But if it were
to flash on for just an instant-
instead of remaining lit-it would
have to be far stronger.
During the years since Cobb and
Moss stated their findings, many other
men contributed to determining opti-
mum illumination levels. Names like
Luckiesh, Weston, and Blackwell be-
came well known as experts.
Recently, Dr. H. Richard Black-
well, Director of the Vision Research


Laboratories, University of Michi-
gan, developed a new method for
determining the illumination required
for various seeing tasks. At the core
of his method is his "Concept of
Visual Capacity"-a concept that
takes into account, in figuring out
how much light is needed for a given
task, how long the eye must rest on
the thing being seen. If an eye can
see and recognize something in a
second, it has the capacity of assi-
milating four bits of information in
one second. One ASP (assimilation
per second) means that the eyes take
one full second to see the task, and
10 APS means that it can see the
task in one tenth of a second-or,
to put it in another way, the eye can
see a succession of ten of the things
in one second.
Thanks to Blackwell's concept, it
is now possible to be much more
accurate in determining how much
light is needed for a given seeing
task. Blackwell found, for example,
that reading the writing of a group
of sixth graders who used a #2 pencil
required 63 foot-candles for five APS.
To read the writing of a stenographer
who uses a #3 (lighter than #2)
pencil, Blackwell found that 76 foot-
candles are needed. And to read a
fourth carbon copy of a letter requires
133 foot-candles.
But these seeing tasks are easy com-
pared with some tasks. To notice a
brown stain on a gray cloth, for
example, took 1100 foot-candles. A
brown spot on a red necktie required
2400 foot-candles! And in a textile
mill, spotting a broken thread on a
spinner-bobbin required light equiva-
lent to that of 2900 candles one foot
away!
Who cares about these findings?
Almost everyone should, for almost
everyone will benefit. Schools will be
better lighted, thus promoting educa-
tion and saving youthful eyes. Fac-
tories will also have more correct
levels of illumination, boosting both
safety and production. Stores will be
more attractive and sell more goods.
Offices will be disrupted with fewer
errors, homes by fewer arguments due
to eye-strain.
These predictions of better things
to come are not daydreams; applica-
tions are already underway. The Illu-
minating Engineering Society, for
example, has already published the
(Continued on Page 31)


















' -)


... but LET'S FACE IT...
FLORIDA HOMES
DO NEED HEAT
And you'll find built-in
home heating in most of
the beautiful new houses
now on the market in
this area.


lilI


-r


EL HOME

PEN


WARNING! Don't let last winter's "summer" weather
lull you into expecting more of the same. The average
Florida winter has many chilly days, some cold ones.
Ample, dependable home heating is necessary. Makeshift
"spot" heating method's can't do the job.
REMEMBER WINTER-BEFORE-LAST? Tourists left
early because of poorly heated rooms. Floridians with
inadequate heat in their homes suffered weeks of bone-
chilling misery indoors. We learned all over again there's
no practical substitute in Florida for a low-cost, central
home heating system. And that OIL is the cheapest,
safest, all 'round best fuel for heating your home.
BUYING A NEW HOUSE? Most of the best ones now
include economical "built-in" heating. Check before you
buy!


BUILDING A HOME? Assure a lifetime of economical
indoor winter comfort by including a central home heating
system using low cost fuel oil.


MR. ARCHITECT: Ads like this one are telling
your clients the advantages of fuel oil heating -
cheapest, safest, most dependable for Florida homes.
Your specification for central oil heating will be
readily accepted. For information visit our Buildo-
rama display in Miami.


*nloeA hOm SJn PKATINa ..*T,Tua.
Buildorama, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


11/




STANDARDS 01

F-I... PACIC


Office and Job Forms...


One tangible result of the Office
Practice Seminar was the collection,
by THOMAS LARRICK and EDGAR C.
HANEBUTH, of some 70 more or less
standard forms submitted by 10 firms.
All these were forms which had proved
their worth in keeping a variety of of-
fice records of both administrative and
operational character. Excluded from
the collection for the purposes of this
Seminar were forms relating to a
standard cost accounting system, con-
tract forms and forms relating to of-
fice filing. It is hoped that these may
be made the subject of a later seminar
or group discussion.
The seminar meeting dealing with
Office and Job Forms was moderated
by NEIL WEBB, of GUY C. FULTON'S
office, Gainesville, who named the
following four uses for well-planned
forms:
1...To serve as necessary records for
various types of office informa-
tion.
2...To aid in systematizing and in
simplifying office operation.
3...As a reminder-checklist to insure
completeness of both office and
job routines.
4...As a relatively inexpensive means
for raising the overall efficiency
of office operation and thus real-
izing economies in both time
and effort.
There are, of course, some disad-
vantages to forms. First, unless they
are carefully developed, they may
prove to be too complicated and dif-
ficult to use to justify their existence.
Also, they are completely impersonal,
since the information they record lies
completely in the area of routine, and
is- or should probably be -limited
to dates, figures or brief notes. Experi-
ence has shown that the larger the
office, the greater the need for forms.
But even in the small office their in-
telligent use will more than make up
- through accuracy and continuity of
record the routine effort needed to
keep them complete and current.
Forms submitted by the various of-
fices for use at the Office Practice
SEPTEMBER, 1959


Seminar were compiled into two sets,
reproduced and distributed to those
attending the meeting. One set in-
cluded general administration forms,
the other those relating to contracts.
Starting with this issue, The Florida
Architect will publish those forms se-
lected as being most generally adapt-
able to use by the majority of offices.
They will appear in forthcoming issues
as an FAA service to AIA Chapter
members and magazine readers.
Thus, over a period of time, forms
presented with a standardized format
will be easily available to practitioners
as one tangible means for improving
individual office practice. Presentation
will be typical of that on the following
three pages. Those selected for pub-
lication have been developed by well-
established firms and have been prov-
en in use. Their publication has been
generously permitted in the interests
of helping FAA members throughout
Florida. Those appearing on pages 22
and 23 were contributed by ROBERT
H. LEVISON, of the Clearwater firm of
WAKELING AND LEVISON. The Time
Record on page 24 was developed by
the St. Petersburg'firm of SMITH, Mc-
CANDLESS AND HAMLIN.
As presented here, both office and
job forms will be developed for office
use on a standard-sized (812 by 11-
inch) sheet. The forms themselves
measure 7 by 9 -inches as repro-
duced here thus allowing space at
the top of the sheet for inclusion of a
firm name and address if desired.
They may be easily reproduced for of-
fice use by either a photo-lith or
multi-lith process both of which are
inexpensive and accurate.
When reproduced for office use, the
method of binding should be consid-
ered in positioning the copy on the
sheet. If filing in a three-ring, loose-
leaf binder is to be used, position the
copy to leave a 5/8-inch margin on
the right hand side. This will provide
a 7/8-inch binding strip at the left. If
filing is by means of a top two-ring
binder, center the form on the 81-
inch dimension of the sheet and keep
a 5/8-inch margin at the bottom. This


will provide sufficient space at the top
for efficient use with either a ring or
clamp binder.
In developing your file of standard
forms as these appear in forthcoming
issues of The Florida Architect, it is
suggested that you consider use of col-
ored stock for various types of forms.
For example, administrative forms
could be reproduced in green; and
job, or contract, forms in buff. This
will help in filing and tend to avoid
confusion in use.

ROUTING SLIP
Date:
Referred
To:
By:
Subject:

Prepare rough draft reply
and discuss vith me
Prepare correspondence for my
signature

_- Reply direct with copy to

Investigate and advise
Consult with

Return with your comments and
recommendations
Read, initial, and pass to

Read and return

File
Check quantities and costs and
prepare change order


Use of a routing slip like this is an
efficient and convenient way to issue
instructions on a variety of matters.
It can save much time and conversa-
tion in an office but its value
depends on the realization, by all
staff members, that the instructions it
contains are to be followed as com-
pletely and as quickly as possible.
Otherwise, any routing slip becomes
little more than an ineffective note
of transmittal.




-STAlNDAR.DSO
fAAGOODPRACTIC


Office and Job Forms...


JOB RECORD- FORM 1


COMM#


TYPE


NAME DATE A B C D E F G H I J Other
























TOTALS


RECAP OF EXPENSES


Total Time This Week
Overhead at _o o
Mileage
1 at c Mile
2
3
Expenses
This Week Total


Brought Fwd. $
$







FORWARD


A-Sketches and Prelims C-Structural E-Mech. (Htg., Elec., Plumb.) G-Full Size I-Measurements
B-Arch't W'k'g. Drawings D-Conference F-Shop Drawings H-Supervision J-Travel Time
22 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I


NAME




Office and Job Forms...


JOB RECORD- FORM 2


QUOTE by
JOB DATE

Estimated Bldg Cost Estimated Fee
Drafting Overhead Assumed Profit

Time Spent Fixed
Prelims Scout Work
Wkg. Drwgs. Conf. Past
Spcs. Conf. Future
Eng. Fees Supervision
Shop Drwgs. Travel
Rendering

TOTAL TOTAL

Estimated Drafting Total
Estimated Overhead Total
EST. F JOB COST TOTAL
ACTUAL COST SUMMARY
Actual Bldg. Cost I Actual Fee
ACTUAL DRAFTING TIME AND COST
Drftsmn Prelim Hrs Prelim Cost Wk. Dwg.-Hrs. Wk. Dwg.-Cost Total Hrs Total Cost





TOTAL II II I
TOTAL DRAFTING COST


Actual Specs.
Actual Eng. Fees
Actual Shop Dwgs.
Actual Rendering


SUMMARY


Drafting Total
Others
Total Job Cost


SEPTEMBER, 1959


I ^ STANDARDS 0^m
FAAL GOOD PACTI


-----




STANDARDSO^F
:AA D PRACTICE


Office and Job Forms...


TIME RECORD


Name:
Week Endina:


JOB# 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6
I- I IT I I I -OT



Total Sun





STotal Mon
Iin 11 IIIII 41a III II___I_





__Total Tue





Total Wed




-T -I I I I _
Total Thu





Total Fri



Total Sat


P-Preliminary
S-Specifications
SD-Shop Drawings


W-Working Drawings
J-Supervision Jobsite OF-Office Filing


OC-Office Conference, Salesmen OR-Office Records


Total Wk


OM-Office Maintenance.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I







1959 Convention Program

To Stress Scope of Design


With the hard core of the 45th
Annual FAA Convention program al-
ready completed, the Convention
Committee of the Jacksonville Chap-
ter is now engaged in streamlining the
details of what promises to be one of
the most outstanding of all FAA con-
claves. The general theme-"Archi-
tects' Omnibus" has been broad-
ened by the descriptive phrase "A
Symposium of Creativity"; and the
development of the theme will occur
in three "Omnibus Sessions" slated
for Thursday afternoon, Friday after-
noon and Saturday morning, Novem-
ber 12, 13 and 14.
Thursday's session will explore the
role of the architect as a Creative De-
signer. FAA Vice President VERNER
JOHNSON will preside, DOUGLAS HAS-
KELL, Editor of Architectural Forum
will act as moderator and the discus-
sion panel will include such nation-


ally recognized figures as GARRET
ECKBO, FLORENCE KNOLL, JAMES T.
LENDRUM and HERBERT H. SWIN-
BURNE.
The Architect as a Creative teach-
er is the subject for the Friday after-
noon panel, Past President H. SAM-
UEL KRUSE will preside; and the mod-
erator will be RUSSELL HICKEN, Pan-
elists will include HENRY KAMPHOEF-
NER, PAUL HEFFERNAN, DR. FREDER-
ICK HOLSCHUH and RoY CRAVEN -
all distinguished in the fields of edu-
cation and the humanities.
On Saturday morning the Omnibus
Session will consider the architect's
role as a Creative Citizen, with ROB-
ERT H. LEVISON, FAA Vice President,
presiding. HERBERT C. MILLKEY,
FAIA, will act as moderator for a
panel composed of JOHN FISCHER,
Editor of Harpers, WILLIAM PACH-
NER, and EMERSON GOBLE, Editor of


Architectural Record.
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, FAA Vice
President, will preside at a Friday
morning Omnibus Session for stu-
dents the program of which is now
being developed by the students them-
selves. The Convention will be key-
noted Thursday morning by SAMUEL
T. HURST who presented the summary
address of the AIA Convention at
New Orleans.
Luncheon and dinner speeches have
been ruled out of the Convention -
except at the Convention Banquet,
Friday night, and the closing lunch-
eon meeting Saturday noon. The
Banquet speaker will be ROGER AL-
LEN, FAIA, the inimitable Sage of the
Grand Rapids Coathangers, who has
promised a penetrating discourse on
"a scholarly subject." On Saturday
CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA Regional Di-
rector, will summarize the significant
results of the Convention program.
Entertainment at luncheons on both
Thursday and Friday and during din-
ner Thursday evening will be fur-
nished through cooperation of the
Jacksonville Council of the Arts.


IT'S NEW! IT'S GREAT!


DISTRIBUTED BY:
Hamilton Plywood of Orlando, Inc.,
924 Sligh Blvd., GA 5-4604
Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc.,
2860 22nd Ave., No., Phone 5-7627
Hamilton Plywood of Ft. Lauderdale, Inc.
1607 S. W. 1st Ave., JA3-5415
Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc.,
1043 Haines St. Expressway, EL 6-8542 -----

SEPTEMBER, 1959 7










0







0

J




0


aL
0


LIVING


Homes designed and built with ALL-ELECTRIC
Laundries sell faster and at a greater profit...
Because everybody knows that it's cheaper to use al
to use a combination of fuels. It's cleaner, cooler a
So "sweeten" your sales with these essential TH
MODERN Florida Living, Electrically:
ELECTRIC RANGE
S* ELECTRIC WATER HEA
FULL HOUSEPOWER ft
Tomorrow's electrical applian

Selling aids and factual
data available to you
through any Florida Power
& Light Co. office


THERE'i


10 MAT(


FOR


ELECTRIC


IN


C




Kitchens and

l-electric than
nd safer, too.
[REE . for


\TER
>r Today's and
ices.
T0







THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


FAA To Co-Sponsor New
School Conference
All architects interested in school
building are invited to attend a con-
ference on Junior High School plan-
ning to be held at the Roosevelt Ho-
tel, Jacksonville, September 24, 25
and 26. The Conference will be co-
sponsored by the FAA, the State De-
partment of Education, the Depart-
ment of Education, U/F and the
School Facilities Council. As with the
Junior College Facilities Conference
held last spring, the Jacksonville
meeting will entail a small registra-
tion fee to meet costs of processing
the conference proceedings.
This Junior High School Facilities
Conference has been set up to clarify
the changes which have recently de-
veloped in the overall junior high
school program and to study the prob-
lems of providing plant facilities in
terms of educational needs, planning
possibilities and equipment require-
ments. The meeting will be organ-


ized as a series of working sessions
during which study committees will
discuss various phases of the subject.
Nationally known authorities in the
fields of the special interests covered
by the Conference will work with
committees and assist in coordinating
the conclusions and recommendations
of various study groups.
Expected results of the meeting are
a series of broad recommendations to
serve educators, architects and engi-
neering consultants as a guide to the
progressive development of improved
junior high school plants.

New Design Film Available
A new motion picture, "American
Look," is now available for showing
without charge before such groups as
AIA Chapters. Printed in Technicolor
and coordinated with a sound track,
the film was developed as a sort of
"design preview" to indicate what top-
flight designers are doing to mold the
pattern of future American living. The
film is a behind-the-scenes glance into


the working studios of such designers
as Saarinen, Bertoia, Florence Knoll,
Yamasaki, Dreyfus, Paul McCobb and
others.
The film has been awarded a Free-
doms Foundation medal for excel-
lence; and it should provide the basis
for a most provocative Chapter meet-
ing to which a selected list of mem-
bers friends and clients could be in-
vited as a practical P/R gesture. The
film can be obtained from the pro-
ducer, THE JAM HANDY ORGANIZA-
TION, 2821 East Grand Boulevard,
Detroit 11, Mich.

Two More Injunctions
Obtained by State Board
Civil actions instituted by the at-
torneys of the State Board of Archi-
tecture have resulted in the granting
of injunctions against two more indi-
viduals who, within the meaning of
the statute, were found to have been
practicing architecture without having
been duly registered to do so. One, F.
(Continued on Page 28)


FEATHEROCK VENEER


* Lightweight-seven pounds
to the square foot .
Beautiful new colors and
textures Silver Gray and
Charcoal . . Easy to shape
and apply perfect lasting
bond . . Durable with-
stands weather and freezing
. . Chemically neutral . .

*FEATHEROCK VENEER is
a natural lava stone quarried
in California, but available
locally . .




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0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


Distributed in Florida by:
Kissam Builders Supply, Orlando . . Steward-Mellon Co., Jacksonville . .
Steward-Mellon Co., Tampa . . Dunan Brick Yards, Inc., Hialeah . .
Doby Brick & Supply, Boca Raton . .
And in Georgia by:
F. Graham Williams Co., Atlanta

6331 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD LOS ANGELES 28, CALIFORNIA


SEPTEMBER, 1959






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 27)
EDGAR MORRIS, had been operating on
the west coast in the vicinity of Clear-
water. The court action was brought
against him personally and as doing
business as "Century Builders" and
"Century Builders Inc." He and both
organizations were enjoined from con-
tinuing the illegal practice of archi-
tecture.
The other injunction was granted
against JAMES 0. BRYANT who had
engaged in the practice of both archi-
tecture and engineering without hav-
ing first been registered either as an
architect or engineer. The court's or-
der perpetually restrained him from
continuing activities in either profes-
sional field.

Personal . .
The Palm Beach firm of PLOCKEL-
MAN, POWELL & EDGE has been dis-
solved as a partnership. The firm in
the future will be known as RAYMOND
H. PLOCKELMAN; but the address will
remain the same, 230 S. County
Road, Palm Beach.


WILLIAM B. EATON, formerly in
practice with ROBERT WEILAGE in
Tampa, has joined the Jacksonville
firm of REYNOLDS, SMITH AND HILLS
as Chief Architectural Designer.
JACK MOORE and LESTER H. MAY
have announced the formation of the
firm of MOORE AND MAY, Architects,
in Gainesville. The new firm's address
is 518 N. E. Fourth Avenue. It was
formed as a successor to the firm of
GOING AND MOORE.

Joint Cooperative Council
Approves By-Law Changes
The morning portion of the Au-
gust 15 meeting of the Joint Cooper-
ative Council, at the Langford Hotel,
WVinter Park, was devoted to a de-
tailed discussion of the organization's
Charter and By-Laws. Members fin-
ally voted approval of the extensive
changes made, subject to review of
legal counsel to be appointed by the
Executive Committee.
The afternoon session was devoted
to committee reports and discussion
on policies relative to a variety of
activities. Progress is being made on


development of recommendations on
improved bidding procedures. The
sub-committee dealing with this is
slated for a final report at the Coun-
cil's next meeting November 11 at the
Robert Meyer Hotel, Jacksonville. An
outline of a proposed Contractor's
Licensing Law was presented for dis-
cussion and tentatively approved as
the basis for a sub-committee's pro-
gram to introduce this measure at the
1961 legislative session.
JOHN STETSON, who presided at
both Council sessions, drew the mem-
bers' attention to the need of a new
building for the College of Architect-
ure and Fine Arts which includes a
Department of Building Construction
- and asked that all member organ-
izations be urged to support requests
for its financing at the 1961 Legis-
lature.
The Council also discussed newly
revised provisions of the AIA General
Conditions relating to local applica-
tion of statutes of limitations as these
involve the contractor's liability for
his work. In Florida the term is
twenty years; and a literal interpreta-
tion could fix liability for that period.


. DESIGNS ................


......... UNLIMITE


thanks to the Miracle of

LAMINATION!!
A new era of freedom in --
architectural design is here! You are .00
free, Mr. Architect, to dream of Bf
exciting new combinations of
structure, space and mass . .
free to design in a boundless -
latitude that is yet within
the realm of economic reality.
As pioneers of lamination in America, we offer the
services of master craftsmen who can and will custom
build laminated wood members to meet your most
advanced design requirements.


Our staff of experienced structural engineers, trained
product consultants and efficient estimators can help
you keep your projects "in the money". For complete
details, write or call us. No obligation, of course.


PESHTIGO. WISCONSIN
AND MAGNOLIA. ARKANSAS
CHARTER MEMBER OF AITC
UNIT STRUCTURES. INCORPORATED GENERAL OFFICES: PESHTIGO. WISCONSIN


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


SEEOUR
CATALOG IN
SWEET S_





Tk i nn Ynu Nv.


SEPTEMBER, 1959


..... NOW AVAILABLE...
Learned in School NOW AVAILABLE...
By James T. Lendrum, AIA,
Head, Department of Architecture, The New Proven, Drain Field System...
University of Florida N r Fed y e
A year ago the new revised curricu- -
lum in Architecture went into effect
here at the University of Florida. You
would, no doubt, find the titles of
most of the courses familiar. We still
teach Architectural Design and Struct-
ures, as well as Construction, History,
and Graphics. One course entitled
"Professional Seminar" might puzzle
you. It is a new course for us; and even
from the catalog description you
might have trouble deciding just what
we were studying. In the catalog the
course is described as "an examination
of Architecture and its relationships
within the building industry." This,
like all catalog descriptions, is suffi-
ciently vague to enable us to cover
"all the things you never learned in
school."
Approximately a third of this sem- .I .
inar is given over to a study of the
(Continued on Page 30)

CRADLE DRAIN!
1 CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN APPROVED by the Florida
State Board of Health on the basis of a 1 to 4 ratio...
UNIT STRUCTURES, INC. a 75% reduction in the length of the ordinary drain field.
General Offices Peshtigo, Wisconsin
General Offies Pehgo, Wisconsin CRADLE DRAIN IS THE ONLY drain field in use today
SALES OFFICES: where the distributor is both above the reservoir and
above the 12-inch rock-bed absorption area.
3. CRADLE DRAIN HAS A PEAK-LOAD storage reservoir
FLORIDA above the absorption area holding the air-equivalent
WALTER & JOHNSON of 21/2 gallons of water.
430 Kanuga Drive 4 CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN TESTED by the Wingerter
West Palm Beach, Florida Laboratories, Inc. of Miami, Florida... and Report
Telephone: TEmple 2-4956
44094 states conclusively that Cradle Drain will with-
stand a destructive force of 12,000 pounds.

GEORGIA
ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS,
INC. | CRADLE DRAIN CORPORATION
285 Hull Street DUPONT PLAZA CENTER SUITE 707
Atlanta, Georgia MIAMI 32, FLORIDA
Telephone: JAckson 3-8241 FRanklin 3-3371


I




























STAINED GLASS
FOR
CHURCHES HOTELS
BUSINESS BANKS

VERO BEACH, FLA.






As f. COGSWELL

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Architects' Supplies




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433 W. Bay St.
Jacksonville, Fla.


Things You Never Learned
(Continued from Page 29)
other design professionals with whom
an Architect must work: the Mechan-
ical Engineer, Structural Engineer,
Landscape Architect, and the Interior
Designer. We generally meet one eve-
ning a week for about two hours, and
each week we invite one of these to
visit us. Sometimes the discussions
become most lively. It has been a
shock to some of the students to dis-
cover that a Mechanical Engineer who
was our guest one evening occasionally
had problems which could only be
solved by making an adjustment in
the Architect's design.
The last two thirds of the semester
were given over to what we might
call case history studies. Architects
throughout the state were invited to
come to Gainesville, meet with the
class and present a detailed study of
an actual job, preferably one that had
either unique problems, or problems
that were solved in a special or un-
usual manner. Two such evenings
stand out. One was a presentation by
TAYLOR HARDWICK, A.I.A. of Jackson-
ville, and the other by ROBERT H.
LEVISON, A.I.A. of Clearwater.
Mr. Hardwick arrived complete with
a three drawer file cabinet and bar-
rel-size roll of drawings. These were
the complete office records on a Pro-
fessional Building he had recently
completed in Jacksonville. For the
class, he went through a step-by-step
description of the processes involved
in the development of the program-
even a "sales brochure" was required.
This was followed by a description of
the difficulties in designing a series of
individual offices, the combining of
these offices into a building and the


construction of the building. The
unique problem here was a "multiple
client," a group of unrelated profes-
sionals with widely divergent ideas
and requirements.
Mr. Levison not only brought office
files, but accompanying him were the
owner and the building contractor.
The special problem here was the cre-
ation of a rental type office building
which would provide not only prestige
quality offices for the owner, but a
sound return on the investment. The
solution involved management type
construction contracts and the modi-
fication of the design to provide for
an additional floor on the building,
which provided increased revenue and
helped support the land cost.
We feel that the Seminar has been
successful and that it is important for
students of architecture to realize that
problems of administration and man-
agement and organization and diplo-
macy are just as real a part of an Ar-
chitect's practice as are problems of
design and planning. While we have
a program of visiting lecturers and
while we have been fortunate enough
to have such people as PHILLIP WILL
describe some of the schools that his
firm has planned, and while other vis-
iting lecturers have talked about the
work of various Architects, there is still
need for the case history approach. I
have already asked some Architects to
report on special projects which we
know they have completed. This is an
invitation to all Architects to take part
in this Seminar. If you have a project
under way, please take some construc-
tion sequence color slides and please
volunteer to come to Gainesville and
report on the project to our Senior
class. We are eager to arrange a date
for you at your convenience.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


WRITE FUR FKEE MANUAL ANU A.I.A. riLE rv.u&m
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
4550 37 St. No. St. Petersburg, Fla. Phone HEmlock 6-8420







How Much Light...?
(Continued from Page 19)
new, more accurate figures indicating
required levels of illumination. And
now that it's known how much light
should be cast, for example, on the
desk of a school child, science has
even devised a method for maintain-
ing that level of light constantly-
automatically boosting the output of
electric light when natural light de-
clines, decreasing electric light as
natural light increases. Designed by
Superior Electric Company, the de-
vice is called a Lumistat and actually
does with light what a thermostat
does with heat! The complete system
is known as the Luxtrol Automatic
Light Controller.
Of course, much research work in
the lighting field remains to be done.
Still unanswered are such questions as
how much extra light is needed for
older eyes . what's the best way
to light our roads for peak seeing
efficiency . how can we answer,
with even greater accuracy, the ques-
tion of how much light is required
for a given task?

ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Air Conditioning, Refrigeration
and Heating Institute . 32
American Celcure Wood
Preserving Co. . . 18
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 11
A. R. Cogswell . . 30
Cradle Drain Systems, Inc. 29
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co. . 30
Featherock, Inc. . . 27
Florida Builders, Inc. . 5
Florida Home Heating Institute 20
Florida Portland Cement . 8
Florida Power and Light Co. 26
Florida Steel Corp. . . 6
Florida Tile Industries Inc. 1
George C. Griffin Co. . 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 25
Markowitz Brothers,
Inc. . .. . 2nd Cover
Moore Vents . . . 32
Conrad Pickel Studio, Inc. 30
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 3
Solite . . . 7
Unit Structures . . 28-29
F. Graham Williams Co. . 31

SEPTEMBER, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






ESTABLIJRED 11e0

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1084
LONG DISTANCE 470


ATLANTA

GA.


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
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BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
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BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
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We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
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7&44 & a

MOORE VENT


It
is set
into the joints
/ of a masonry wall to:

I Keep Walls Dry
2 Make Walls Cooler
3 Save Owners Money
Placed 4' on centers at top and bot-
tom of walls, aluminum Moore Vents
provide gentle air circulation to relieve
water-vapor pressure, prevent inter-
nal condensation . An effective,
inexpensive means of assuring free-
dom from moisture troubles. Write
for sample and full technical data . .



f (flts "Stop Wall
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Phone TEmple 3-1976








Depend on Members of

AIR-CONDITIONING
REFRIGERATION
HEATING & PIPING
ASSOCIATION, INC.
1390 N.W. 43rd ST.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Phone NE 5-8751
MEMBERS OF RACCA -NATIONAL
CONTRACTORS
SAirko Air Conditioning Company
SCawthon, Dudley M., Inc.
SCentral Roof & Supply Co.
Conditioned Air Corporation
Domestic Refrigeration
SCillen Industries. Inc.
SHamilton, Sam L., Inc.
SHill York Corporation
SMcDonald Air Conditioning
Miami Air Conditioning
e Miami Super Cold, Inc.
Poole & Kent Company
Zack Air Conditioning & Refrigeration
SUPPLIERS
A & B Pipt & Gondas Corporation
Steel Co. Graves Refrigeration
Air Filters Co. McMurray,H.L.,Co.
Brophy, George Middleton, J. L., Co.
Clark Equipment Co. O'Brian Associates
Dean, A. C., Co. Southern Metal Prod.
Florida Elec. Motor Swigert Air
Cen. Sheet Metal Cond. Engrs.
& Roofing Trane Company


^ *.


Better Mortgage Loans...
(Continued from Page 10)
house is poorly designed and poorly
built, a great many people would
move out and into something newer,
better built and cheaper. Under these
conditions, who would pick up the
tab on the old, unsightly one?
How do you get this guarantee for
nothing? You require that the land
involved have clear title, but care not
for the design or quality of construc-
tion in what is placed therein. You
make the loans on what you see. The
owner pays for the architectural ser-
vices whether he gets them or not.
Note how often a set of plans is pre-
sented with no Architect's name
noted (or even an engineer's). If you
visited the building department after
the permit for the house has been is-
sued, you would note that the set of
plans on file with them does then
bear the seal of an Architect or en-
gineer. You will often note, too, that
additions or changes have been made
in these plans, changing the very in-
tent of those contained in your file.
You can greatly reduce your problem
and efforts by requiring that the plans
of residences costing over $10,000
shall originally bear an Architect's
name and seal, shall include specifica-
tions and a statement that the plans
and specifications meet the Southern
Standard Building Code, if the house
or building is to be erected where no
building code exists.
What about complete specifications
and supervision of construction by the
Architect? Here are two of your best
insurances. Each should provide an
increase in a basic valuation on any
improvement. The final inspection
and approval by a registered Architect
is worth much more than that made
by anyone else. How many of you re-
quire such notations as concrete
strength, plaster and stucco mixes,
vinyl-asbestos tile thickness, cement
shingle butt thickness, number of
coats of paint, etc. on your plans and
specs? For instance, did you know
that terrazzo floors may vary in square
footage cost from 35c to over $1.00?
Commonly used redi-mixed concrete
strengths can vary from 1800 to 4000
pounds per square inch. Who checks
this? Building departments don't,
basically because city and county
building departments are too short
handed to give anything but the most


cursory inspections. Forward looking
building inspectors are giving build-
ings designed by, and construction su-
pervised by, responsible Architects ev-
ery consideration.
Certainly it is a competitive busi-
ness, this making-, of loans. The
"Quick-Buck Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation" down the street will make
loans on anything and for ridiculous
percentages of the appraisals, you say.
How can you demand these things of
your customers when the competition
won't? This really is your chance to
get something for nothing in obtain-
ing the working knowledge of others.
The Florida Association of Architects
would like to offer its services in set-
ting up workshops for your appraisers
covering such things as the determin-
ation of good from bad design. If your
appraisers don't know the difference
in value of a monolithic terrazzo floor
composed of grey cement and white
chips from one of white cement and
red Verona chips, then it's time to
seek the help of the Architects. If
you have appraiser problems, employ
an Architect to determine the value
of the building and a realtor to de-
termine the value of the land. Many
communities have competent apprais-
ers, but none are as continually in
touch with the changing costs of con-
struction as are the Architects. It is
our sole business, this keeping up with
costs and design.
Don't absorb this expense; usually
it's hidden somewhere in the total cost
to the owner. Help him to get a better
planning and design service-and help
yourselves to a greater feeling of se-
curity. Comes the slump, you'll sleep
nights. And the paper you hold will
look a lot better to your depositors
if there is a noted lack of mortgage
foreclosures on your part.
Several institutions require just
what we suggest. They had a good
reason for this. Others have recog-
nized the value of a good design and
complete plans and specifications by
increasing the appraised valuation. But
-most mortgage companies are jeop-
ardizing their investors' money by
making loans on construction that one
of these days no one will want. We
know we can't improve the taste for
good design; most people don't and
never will have it. But we can see to
it that the mortgage covers good
construction and fair value. Are you
certain you really do?
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






















Ornamental


Barandas


These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay we
import from Venezuela
They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama.
But they have the same
sort of slight color
variations and occasional
kiln ,markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished wall.


4. 4
9 4
4 4 *
4 4 4
4 4 S
34


4- .4'
3
3 .4 .4 4


.-. .-


* .*
" ." "


A.? 4 'j ^ '"1 .


., ...6 ,.. "
*: 0. 4 I ; o

b a.1:", 't "


BRICK


LK I


DUNAN BRICK YARDS,
INCORPORATED

MIAMI, FLORIDA TU 7-1525









Ai T TS '








... At this year's FAA Convention the spotlight will
be on Design and the theme suggests a program,
now taking shape, that will explore the ways in which
the art in architecture is molding the life of the
community, the neighborhood, the family and the
individual . The Jacksonville Chapter will be the
Sponsoring Host; and its members invite your inter-
est, your presence and your participation . Better
mark your calendar now for November 12, 13 and
14 at Jacksonville . .










Convention headquarters will be the
brand new Robert Meyer Hotel in
downtown Jacksonville. Convention
rates will be moderate. Full pro-
gram details will be sent you in
Plenty of time to assure the com-
fortable accommodations you will
want . When you receive them,
act promptly, for the Convention
program promises a heavy attend-
ance and reservations are always
and necessarily limited .










45th ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE FAA
JACKSONVILLE NOVEMBER 12-14, 1959




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