<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Package deals - what's new ?
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Notes from the AIA Meetings
 Advertising
 Message from the President : Community...
 Advertising
 Direction for design . . .
 Advertising
 For South Florida Houses
 Advertising
 News & Notes
 Advertising
 News & Notes ( continued )
 Directions for design ( continued...
 Advertisers Index
 Directions for design ( continued...


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00062
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: August 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00062
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Package deals - what's new ?
        Page i
    Advertising
        Page ii
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
    Notes from the AIA Meetings
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Advertising
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Message from the President : Community Service
        Page 9
    Advertising
        Page 10
    Direction for design . . .
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Advertising
        Page 13
    For South Florida Houses
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Advertising
        Page 21
        Page 22
    News & Notes
        Page 23
    Advertising
        Page 24
    News & Notes ( continued )
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Directions for design ( continued )
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertisers Index
        Page 31
    Directions for design ( continued )
        Page 32
Full Text
the

florida architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFARCHITECTS CD
01

r









II
N "---"4



















Gamble, Pownall & Gilroy,

A.I.A., In A-..ocialioni With

Willard Woodrow's Carol

City Garden Homes


E- u


~*~ ~-


Gamble, Pownall and Gilroy number
among their achievements the designing
and planning of the 163rd Street Shop-
ping Center, the South Florida Mental
Hospital, and many other major projects
in the South Florida area. They recently
have worked in conjunction with Willard
Woodrow, one of the five top builders in
the nation, on the fabulously successful
Carol City Garden Homes that feature an
unusual interior Garden Room with trop-
ical planting. Markowitz Bros, Inc., due
to the scope of this 3,000.home project,
has re-entered the tract housing field
and is handling the plumbing and heat.
ing installation.

















Package Deals-





What's New?


Several times at the Convention in
New Orleans there was the question
"What's happened since the pack-
age deal committee last met"? This
article is partly to answer that ques-
tion and partly to present a personal
point of view on the subject.
The "Package Deal" committee
was discharged with praise after the
Cleveland Convention. It had raised
the question, investigated the facts
and offered some solutions. It was
realized, however, that the "package
deal" is part of the larger problem of
our changing professional place; and
so the specific question was resolved
into the larger question and given to
the Committee On The Profession.
This committee has recently been
asked by the Board of the Institute
to look into the question of limiting
the architect's field or of accepting
an ever-widening service responsibil-
ity. When an architect assists the
owner in program research, market
analysis, mortgage brokerage, tax re-
search, tenant procurement, govern-
ment relations, (on and on the list is
enormous) is the architect only per-
forming his normal duties-or should


he prohibit himself from doing these
things? And more important, per-
haps, how should he be paid for such
service?
It is evident the package dealer
must be involved in these same ques-
tions. How does he answer them? To
begin, the package dealer has no
bothersome professional ethics or
moral responsibility, which is the
same thing so he may claim he
will do all things, be all things and
solve all things. But notice carefully
where he has been most successful in
selling this "total" service. For ex-
ample, in a corporation without a
building department of its own the
harassed vice president, given the
building job as another corollary duty,
is only too glad to hand it quickly to
someone who claims he will answer
all the problems and turn a finished
project over to the corporation, so
relieving the vice president of all
management responsibility. f
Here, I think, is the clue to' the
package dealer's appeal. He can best
operate where the owner dbes not
want the management headaches of
construction. He serves no purpose


whatsoever where the owner is direct-
ly and vitally concerned with the
building; where he is willing to as-
semble the team and manage the con-
struction project. The architect, the
contractor, and others depending
on the kind of job it is are essen-
tial parts of the team. The architect
can best serve this owner by being of
assistance in coordinating the project,
advising as to what parts of the proj-
ect require the emphasis of consulta-
tion by specialists and interpreting
the project in the design. No captive
architect, submerged in the package
dealer's organization, can have the
objective professional approach need-
ed to give the owner direct advice on
coordination, the need for specialists,
or the balanced design that is the
best interpretation of the project.
Let me suggest, then, one direct
attack on the "package deal" prob-
lem. This is to see to it that pros-
pective owners realize that, when
hiring the "package" they are giving
up the one thing they can do best
themselves-the management of the
project and that the owner can
assemble a team wherein each indi-
vidual member can contribute his
best. Finally, the owner can use as
his best advisor you, the architect, to
arrive at functional, balanced proj-
ects that will really do the job.


By CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA
Director, Florida Region, AIA





















... At this year's FAA Convention the spotlight will
a i 1; be on Design and the theme suggests a program,
. i -now taking shape, that will explore the ways in which
the art in architecture is molding the life of the
i community, the neighborhood, the family and the
individual ... The Jacksonville Chapter will be the
Sponsoring Host; and its members invite your inter-
Sest, your presence and your participation Better
mark your calendar now for November 12, 13 and
14 at Jacksonville












Convention headquarters will be the
brand new Robert Meyer Hotel in
downtown Jacksonville. Convention
rates will be moderate. Full pro-
gram details will be sent you in
plenty of time to assure the com-
fortable accommodations you will
want When you receive them,
act promptly, for the Convention
program promises a heavy attend-
ance and reservations are always
and necessarily limited .
,~l~~~~~


45th ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE FAA

JACKSONVILLE -NOVEMBER 12 -14, 1959














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A FLORIDA. EILDERS


AUGUST, 1959


---- -- -- -








74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



lah 7is 4Iwe ---

Notes from The AIA Meetings . .
By Clinton Gamble, AIA
Eight Florida Architects Win AIA Design Awards
Memphis Architects Are Doing It Too .
Message From The President Community Service
By John Stetson, AIA
A Direction For Design . . .
By Samuel T. Hurst, AIA
Four South Florida Houses . .
1 Award-Winner on Key Biscayn .
2 Compact Comfort for The Keys .
3- The Rooms Are Hung from The Roof
4 -House on A Palm Beach Hill .
News and Notes ............
State Board Obtains Four More Injunctions .
Advertisers' Index . . .
Package Deals What's New? . .
Editorial By Clinton Gamble, AIA


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krus6; BROWARD COUNTY:
Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C.
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl,
J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar;
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH:
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.
THE COVER
With this issue, The Florida Architect, like a snake in springtime, sheds its
old cover for a new one. The change in format resulted from the interest of
a Publications Committee of the Jacksonville Chapter. At the April FAA
Board Meeting in Gainesville the Chapter came up with a series of cover
sketches for the remainder of 1959. These were enthusiastically adopted -
and you can look forward to some excellent cover design for the next four
months, at least. Finished art work was executed by the John E. Ropp Studio
in Jacksonville.


. 11


. 14-20
. 14
. 17
18
. 19
. . 23
. 23
. . 31
. 3rd Cover


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, pupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary



VOLUME 9

NUMBER 819


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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AUGUST, 1959

































CHECK LIST


for service!

Reinforcing Steel
Structural Steel
Complete Engineering &
Fabricating Facilities
Bar Joists
Aluminum & Steel Sash
Steel Doors & Frames
Miscellaneous Iron &
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Ornamental Iron
Steel Roof Deck
Steeltex
Highway Products
Corruform
Sonotubes
Metal Culverts
Polyethylene Plastic Film



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JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


Notes from The AIA Meetings...

By CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA,
Director, Florida Region, AIA


Florida is now a Region of the
Institute and I am the representative
for Florida on the Board. I get a
tremendous lift from this, because I
feel now wve are a closely-knit group,
better able to communicate about our
mutual interests and problems. That
can be a real force for good works.
Let's get to it!
What I outline here is by no means
a report of the New Orleans conven-
tion nor the AIA Board meeting that
followed it. But some points of each
are of particular interest to our Flori-
da membership. I think the theme
of the Convention is one "Design".
It is clear that our conventions -
State and National can serve a
really useful purpose to each architect
if the sessions are devoted to serious
study of our complicated profession.
Doctors, of course, are an obvious
example to us, for their meetings are
always notable for their serious, con-
tinuing study of their professional
techniques.
We must spend some time, of
course, on our organization itself. But
at all levels we should increase our
efforts to study our profession to-
gether. As an example, at New Or-
leans there was a particularly fine
seminar by Messrs. Pereira, Pratt and
Yamasaki, with Philip Johnson as
moderator. Pratt, a Canadian, argued
that modern contemporary architec-


ture is "classic," because classic has
always been represented by an ordered,
austere look as opposed to romantic
architecture with its unexpectedness,
playfulness and non-conformity.
The Board meeting brought out
certain matters of special interest to
us in Florida. One concerned Institute
organization. The Committee on
Structure is considering an entirely
new arrangement whereby regional
setups will be de-emphasized and
state organizations will become inte-
gral parts of the national organization.
Whatever may be the r.'iult,.toridk
is in a good position to be effective.
The Board also discussed the prob-
lem of the leasing activities of the
Federal government which has caused
architects unknowingly to be in com-
petition with one another by making
sketches for owners bidding on leases.
The decision was to do everything
possible to persuade the government
to change its procedure. Meanwhile,
it was suggested that architects avoid
making such sketches if possible.
Other matters of special interest:
In Texas the collapse of a brick grille
which killed a little girl is the basis
of a serious legal suite. Conclusions
of the Board's discussion of this were
to urge all architects to carry liability
insurance; to recognize that legal
responsibilities are far reaching and
(Continued on Page (6)


More than 40 Florida architects and their wives attending the AIA Convention
in New Orleans met at an FAA luncheon in the Monteleone Hotel on Thursday,
June 25. The luncheon was preceded by a cocktail party given by FAA
President John Stetson. At the head table, above are Regional Director and
Mrs. Clinton Gamble, President and Mrs. John Stetson and Mr. and Mrs.
Wahl J. Snyder, FAIA.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







New Briggs bathtub with features that count!


Once again Briggs Beautyware proves brand
does make a difference with its latest bathtub line
... a designing achievement in the new Medallion,
Pendant, and Signet models. Home owners will
appreciate this new tub's full-length seat, slip-


resistant bottom, roomy proportions, recessed
toe panel, and smart compatible colors. This
feature-full new bathtub, along with Briggs many
other progressive plumbing fixtures, will prove a
remarkably effective sale-maker.


Yours with Briggs new bathtub-the most profitable, most advanced design ever!


Lower Installation Costs with this
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bathtub design. The H-frame-
work at bottom permits in-
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-71


Leakproof Wall Flange extends up
behind wall surface on three
sides, with corners drawn to-
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water seepage. Tiling over
flange gives water-tight fit.


Extra-Strong, Lightweight vitreous
enameling iron tub weighs
just 120 pounds... two-thirds
lighter than cast iron tubs
weighing 375 pounds. Weight
and strength allow faster,
cost-lowering installation.


-------------



Full Depth and Full Length character-
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tub in right and left models.
16Y" high, 5' long, and 32"
wide, its porcelain enamel finish
is fused into not on metals.


New Seam-Free, One Piece Construc-
tion with seat and straight-
front models. Straight edges
at base and top of seat model
(shown) ease installation of
floor tile, linoleum, or wall
panels.


B E A U T Y W
BRIGGS MANUFACTURING COMPANY *


AUGUST, 1959


A R E
WARREN, MICH.
5


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backed by 43 years of con-
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alone.
May we be of service to
you anywhere in Florida?


ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR

& 'SUPPLY COMPANY
501 N. W. 54th St., Miami


6


AIA Meeting Notes .
(Continued from Page 4)
thus do everything possible to keep
proper legal form in contract relations;
to intensify P/R programs to explain
architects' positions in such cases.
Another: Various Chapter Affairs
Committees in Florida should get an
Architect-in-Training Program under-
way. The Institute's staff in Wash-
ington has much helpful information
on this program. Still others: Mem-



Eight Florida Architects
Win AIA Design Awards
Florida can be proud of the quality
of her residential architects. Of the
eighteen firms accorded honors at the
New Orleans Convention Homes for
Better Living program, eight were
from our own Sunshine State. Over
200 firms submitted designs in the
program to promote good residential
design co-sponsored by the AIA,
House 6 Home and McCall's Mag-
azine.
Florida award winners were: VIc-
TOR A. LUNDY, Sarasota, honor award


bership may be broadened at national
level soon. Possibilities of a national
student membership and a national
associate membership were discussed.
And, relative to membership, a new
national directory will be published
in 1960.
Finally, the 1960 National Con-
vcntion will be in San Francisco,
starting April 19, 1960.
See you at the Office Practice
Seminar Meeting in Palm Beach,
August 7!



in the custom-built category; ROBERT
C. BROWARD, Jacksonville, honor
award in the merchant-builder cate-
gory; PAUL RUDOLPH, Sarasota, two
merit awards, and ALFRED B. PARKER,
in the custom house ( ikg:riTr, '' ID
TUDEEN, St. Petersburg, and RORERT
B. BROWNE, Miami, merit awards in
custom-built category; and EDWARD
J. SEIBERT, Sarasota, and GENE LEEDY,
Winter Park, merit awards in the
merchant-builder category.
Publication of the award-winning
designs of these Florida architects is
scheduled for early future issues of
The Florida Architect.


Memphis Architects Are Doing It Too


Memphis is the most recent among a growing number of cities throughout
the country to benefit by the collaborative talents of architects. Above, in
model form are the results of an urban renewal study made by the League of
Memphis Architects, Inc., a working body which grew out of preliminary
research activities of the Memphis AIA Chapter's Civic Design Committee.
This project is similar in character to those which architects have initiated
in Baltimore, Md., and in Tulsa, Okla. Florida cannot use Federal Uurban
Renewal funds as can these other states. But what is preventing Florida
architects from working with officials of their city governments toward local
rehabilitation on a well-planned, long-range basis?
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. .











































The First National Bank Building, Miami, Fla.
WEED-JOHNSON ASSOCIATES, AIA, Miami, Fla., Architects
SNORMAN J. DIGNUM & ASSOCIATES, Miami, Fla., Consulting Engineers
ROONEY-TURNER, CO., Miami, Fla., General Contractors
Precast panels supplied by MABIE-BELL CO., Miami, Fla.


SBank in the Sky...


Towering against the Miami skyline, the
First National Bank Building makes a strik-
.ng.architectural contribution to a thriving
metropoliss. Space, comfort and efficiency are
wrapped up in a shining building that is un-
compromising in line. warm in feeling...
a product of the latest construction tech-
niques and materials.
In this beautiful, multi-story building,
Solite lightweight structural concrete was
used to back the building's precast, tilefaced
panels. Since Solite concrete is 1/3 lighter
than ordinary concrete, the tremendous dead-


BREMO BLUFF, VA.
AQUADALE, N.C.


weight of the panels was offset and the struc-
tural system of the building considerably
reduced.
Solite's light weight and strength, its com-
plete adherence to performance under test
conditions have led to its use in many of the
most outstanding construction projects along
the Eastern seaboard. In fact, Solite's many
inherent advantages its compatibility
with all building materials and techniques ...
have made it the natural choice for all types
of construction.


PLANTS:
LEAKSVILLE JUNCTION, VA.
GREEN COVE SPRINGS, FLA.


OFFICES:
BOX 9138, RICHMOND, VA. BOX 5735, BETHESDA, MD.
BOX 147, COLUMBIA, S C. BOX 1843, CHARLOTTE, N C.
BOX 6336, RALEIGH. N C.
PRUDENTIAL BUILDING, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


WHATEVER YOU BUILD-The professional advice of an architect or engineer can save
you time and money-and provide the integrity of design that means lasting satisfaction.

AUGUST, 1959







CHROMASTATS...Photo Copies in



Full Color -at amazingly low cost


This engraving was made directly from an 11 by
18-inch full-color CHROMASTAT which faith-
fully reproduced all the colorful technique of
Joseph N. Smith, III, AIA, who executed the
original rendering. This was approximately 20
by 40-inches. Note how clearly all details and
color values have been maintained even after
two reproductions and two reductions in size.


In the accurate presentation of your design concepts color is king!
Only in full color can the complete range of those concepts be shown -
and with CHROMASTAT photo reproductions all details are maintained in
all their relationships. Colors are clean and brilliant as in the original, the
definition sharp, with every tone, every depth and highlight present .
CHROMASTATS can be processed in three days from any type of rendering
and in sizes from 8 by 10-inches to 20 by 30-inches. Costs are amazingly
low for example, an 8 by 10-inch CHROMASTAT costs little more than
,a standard black and white photo


SQUARE MIAMI


635 S. W. First Avenue, Miami 32.
Phone: FRanklin 9-4501


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


iwill( ...OoooooilILC








7Ces4age frnw 74e President...






Community


Service


By JOHN STETSON, AIA,
Presiderr
F.:.rda A:' ciation of Archtiecrs


The founders of the College of
Fellows of the American Institute of
Architects, in their infinite wisdom,
set up three categories for admission
to fellowship: Design, Service to the
Institute and Community Service.
Some members have the rather
warped idea that Community Service
means an active life in politics. To
others, the mere thought of an en-
trance into politics is distasteful. To
the profession, and for that matter
to any clear thinking citizen, com-
munity service should mean just what
it says. Service to the community in
which we live can best be given by
a professional in the form of leader-
ship along the paths in which he is
most expert. No one expects the
architect to be a fiscal agent, a trans-
portation expert or an authority on
tax structures. But just in case you
are not aware of it, once the populace
thought he was a planner who put
all the beauty of the surrounding
area ahead of his own personal ambi-
tions.
Today a few farsighted architects
are carrying the banners of the pro-
fession into a better world to live in
through Community Planning. Some
serve without recompense. Others,
banding together, have stimulated re-
construction programs, revitalizing the
cities in which they live. All who
have so served have been more than
amply repaid for their labors. Those
of us who prefer to sit in our little
cluttered garrets of design not only
become cultural recluses, but too
often economic problems to ourselves
and to our neighbors.
AUGUST, 1959


No matter whom we hear exhort
the virtues of a good public relations
program, he inevitably mentions com-
munity service. There are hundreds
of public service jobs-non-paying,
naturally-in every town and city,
carried on by public-spirited citizens.
Take a look at fund-raising cam-
paigns, youth programs, beautification
campaigns! How often do you see an
architect among those serving? Un-
fortunately too seldom. Most larger
areas can boast of at least one active
member of the profession doing his
bit; and usually this man is greeted
by sneers from his fellow practition-
ers for his position. To them he is
only seeking free publicity or the
limelight. If he were being paid for
his efforts, then they would consider
him a disgrace to the profession. Just
about every public committee con-
tains the name of a lawyer and a
doctor. Wonder if their professions
feel the same way?
We are a practicing-professional
part of the largest industry in this
great nation. Repeatedly you have
been told that you should provide the
leadership to improve the standards
of construction, community and area
planning, and in community affairs
as well as in creative design. Too
many of us have stagnated to the ex-
tent that the unqualified appear per-
fectly capable of doing what we can
do-and, furthermore, are doing it
for lower fees and pushing us into
oblivion in those particular fields of
design. Too many of us sit in rapidly
deteriorating cities waiting for some-
one to produce not only the capital,


but everything else to promniite-40n-'
struction programs and thereby create
jobs for us. Why are not we banding
together and leading our fellow citi-
zens into a renaissance of American
cities and towns?
This year at the American Institute
of Architects national convention,
the work of a group of architects-
a most successful program for crea-
ting a new Kansas City-was recog-
nized by an Award. No doubt this
was gratefully received by these men.
But far more heartwarming to them
must be the physical success of the
program they launched. Memphis,
Philadelphia, Boston and other cities
have seen the success of similar
groups of architects joined together
in community service. Theirs was a
labor of love that produced not only
personal satisfaction for a job well
done, but created a booming build-
ing picture for their home towns and
financial gain for every man con-
nected therewith.
All of us have seen the time when
we faced the usual small town prob-
lems leading to the defeat of some
worthy (we thought) public enter-
prise. Too often the defeat was
brought about by selfish local inter-
ests, afraid that someone else would
gain from the venture. This will al-
ways exist. Good, sound progress
never hurt any area. Nothing stands
still. Stop progress, and it's like a
wagon moving uphill; there's only one
other way to go-down. Communities
that cease to progress stagnate. Then
they deteriorate. Suburban shopping
(Continued on Page 26)




















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Preference for NMut,, I ler -" deign
original" kitchen, is not confined to
builders and o ners ot' individual
dwellings. For apartments, too. they are
the obvious choice. All homemakers
are quick to recognize the value of
Mutschler's many exclusive features, the
superb cabinetwork in both natural-
grain finishes and decorator colors
S. and the Mutschler planning services
that fit the kitchen to personal operational
patterns. Consulting services of
Mutschler kitchen specialists are available
without cost to architects and
builders. For complete
information, mail coupon.


MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
Subsidiary of Mutschler Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
2959 N.E. 12th Terrace, Oakland Park, Fla. Phone: Logan 4-8554
Please furnish me with information about your services
for builders and architects.


name

firm

address

city, state


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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A Direction for Design


The closing address of the Convention at New Orleans was more than a
critique of the program. As a thoughtful commentary on some of the profes-
sion's philosophic pitfalls, it points the way to even greater accomplishments.


By SAMUEL T. HURST, AIA
Dean, School of Architecture and the Arts,
Alabama Polytechnic Institute


It is a simple fact of life that
thinking man continually seeks justi-
fication of his works; justification to
himself, to those whom he serves, to
that higher purpose in his life which
he feels and may call God. Justifica-
tion is necessary in any personal or
social order based upon responsibility
of choice and action. Where choice
is unavoidable, choice begets action.
Action risks success or failure and is
accompanied by responsibility.
Where responsibility is great, justifi-
cation becomes urgent. It poses for
man the great life questions of why
- why be, why work, why serve;
for us the questions why design, why
design as we do design? In the great
Biblical myth recently made so real
by ARCHIBALD MAcLEISH in the play
"J. B.", a good and responsible man
called Job seeks to justify the world
as God and Satan play tag with his
soul. whence cometh thou"
asks the God symbol to which the
Satan symbol replies, "from going
to and fro in the earth, and walking
up and down in it."
Ours is not a simple "going to and
fro or walking up and down in it",
but is rather an avowedly purposeful
existence. We invite responsibility,
we seek leadership, we proclaim
beauty and offer our readiness to
provide it along with a full
measure of usefullness for as little
as six percent. No longer do we limit
our extended service to buildings, but
hold out our willingness and by im-
plication our capacity to "plan man's
physical environment; "to improve
the social order," "to design for
survival," to practice a "Social Art
for all men" and to do other high
sounding things of real and indis-
pensible benefit to mankind. Lest
AUGUST, 1959


we fall victim to our best public
relations, it is good that we annually
ask ourselves the questions the
whence, what, why, whither ques-
tions and seek honestly, and per-
haps humbly, to find answers in our
works.
You have heard clear statements
from some of our profession's ablest
individuals and have seen here excit-
ing evidence of their work. They have
been justified by recognition and
indeed almost sanctified by succes-
sions of followers. It is not my
purpose to evaluate their contribu-
tions, but rather to call us back to
look at some of the troublesome
realities of here and now, to observe
a few things and to launch a few
ideas, simply if possible, not in the
elliptical phrases which so often
characterize our pompous utterances.
How good is our "planning of
man's physcial environment" in
New Orleans, USA, or any other city
or town in the land? Humility be-
comes us as we answer this question
and as we contemplate the architect's
retreat from greatness and his equivo-
cal status in our time or as we
measure our national architectural
product as a whole against our vision
of "the Mother of the Arts". And
we hear the God symbol of MacLeish
as he says, "You won't find it beauti-
ful, You understand." To which the
Satan symbol replies: "I know that.
Beauty's the Creators' bait, Not the
Uncreator's: his Is Nothing, the no-
face of nothing, Grinning with its
not-there eyes. Nothing at all! Noth-
ing ever! Never to have been at all!"
It is too easy for us to measure
our production of architecture by the
premiated published work which is
systematically and attractively served


up by the professional journals. To
do so is self-deception.
Having passed the screen of the
publishers, such work is dealt with in
the most gentle manner. In the words
of one of our able editors, "let us
resolve that constructive criticism is
to be encouraged. If we are to pick
up our avoidable option to dotork
with deeper meaning then we must
have a sharper sense of evaluation.
The magazines are hamstrung in this
respect because the architects whose
work we publish will not allow critical
presentations."
I applaud this resolve, but I cannot
accept this abdication of journalistic
responsibility, nor the implication
that architects are so thin-skinned as
to condone only the treatment of
sweet accord. I should like to direct
this commentary not toward the ex-
ceptional, recognized, published arch-
itecture of today, or the forward
echelon of designers it represents,
but rather to the ordinary, undistin-
guished, unrecognized* and unpub-
lished work which constitutes the
bulk of our practice and largely
shapes the new face of our land -
the no-face of the sprawling urban
scene which demonstrates our enor-
mous capacity to replace God's
beauty with man's ugliness.
No profession can, I submit, be
justified by the exceptional perform-
ance of its ablest men. My concern
is for the norm of ordinary practice
and ordinary architects and for the
philosophy and method, or lack of it,
which predestines so much of our
effort to mediocrity.
And my concern is with that body
of sensitivities and disciplines which
can produce a whole building and
make architecture a reasonable art,
available and useful to all men.
I am not concerned with style as
a self-generating force, or with archi-
(Continued on Page 12)


. 0







Direction for Design
(Continued from 11 Page)
tectural symbols as such. I am not
interested in an aristocracy of pre-
cious buildings or an elite of creative
designers. Both will exist and serve
well the cause of progress; and critics
more capable than I are available to
evaluate the results. I am interested
in a higher level of performance by
a great many more architects produc-
ing projects which become progres-
sively more distinguishable as useful
art. I am concerned for a genuineness
which can produce honest work. I am
concerned for a wedding of Philoso-
phy and Method which is compre-
hensible to the public and distin-
guishable from the hocus-pocus
which surrounds the so-called crea-
tive process.
I believe that architecture is suffi-
ciently mature to be characterized by
a coherent body of ideas, princi-
ples and practices. I believe that a
method may be taught by means of
which philosophy can be put to work.
Without philosophy and method
clearly recognizable and broadly prac-
ticed, our professionalism is an hol-
low illusion. One can, I think, defend
the contention that we are not yet a
profession if the scope of our effec-
tiveness is any measure, but rather
we are struggling to evolve a profes-
sion and the point at which we may
say we have succeeded is the point
at which the public really entrusts
to us the shaping of physical environ-
ment and with measurable distinc-
tion we discharge that trust.
I have spoken of the architects
retreat from greatness. Perhaps it is
better to call it a retreat from
responsibility.
The Architect is heir to a great
tradition, be it in large measure a
myth. It is an aristocratic tradition
based upon the historic concept of
the master builder, enjoying enorm-
ous patronage and social and political
status and elevated to prominence
among his fellows. Sitting on the
right hand of the gods of ancient
Egypt, he was second only to the
Pharaoh. He was "Chief Architect,
Chief of Government, Prime Min-
ister, Chief Justice, Chief of the
Halls, of Karnak, Chief of all the
works of the King." So great was the
reverence for this exalted office that
the words Life, Prosperity, Health


which properly followed only the
name of the King, were sometimes
added to that of the Architect.
From the Master Builder of An-
tiquity, the Engineer-Inventor of the
Renaissance, we are reduced in the
public understanding to the "man
who makes blueprints". And high
school students are advised by their
counselors to take mechanical draw-
ing in preparation for entering archi-
tectural school! Of course the master
builder was an unusual individual
and no profession of architecture
existed or claimed to exist until
modern times. However, we perpetu-
ate the myth and give lip-service to
the idea that we have inherited his
prerogatives. I offer several explana-
tions for what I term our retreat from
greatness; they fit a pattern, a pat-
tern of drastically altered relationship
Sof architect to social and political life
and to the size of the job to be done.
While kingdoms gave way to repub-
lics, and crafts gave way to industrial
revolution, and stone technology gave
way to steel technology and control
of wealth spread from the few to the
many, the architect specialized in
becoming a "professional man".
While the demands upon his per-
formance were increasing, he formal-
ized his education in the Academy,
out of the main stream of social and
technical change and encouraged the
separation between conception and
planning on the one hand and execu-
tion and construction on the other.
In establishment of the professional
role of man of service, he gave up
the equally vital role of man of build-
ing. This kind of half-man was per-
haps adequate to the eclecticism of
the 19th and early 20th century. He
was most inadequate to cope with
the explosion of new concepts, prob-
lems and opportunities which
followed.
A new technology came, let us
admit from the engineers Roeb-
ling, Paxton and others and a new
esthetic came, from the cubist
painters and constructivist sculptors;
and the two are only nowbeginning
to meet. Missing still was a most
essential third element, a new hu-
manism which would remind us that
architecture was for man, for man
feeling, hearing, fearing, smelling,
touching and loving as well as seeing
- a new humanism which could put
structure and esthetics in proper


relationship to man, which could
assimilate the meaning of Freud and
of Thoreau when he wrote; "when
the farmer has got his house, he may
not be the richer but the poorer for
it; and it be the house that has got
him. But lo! men have become the
tools of their tools. The man who
independently plucked the fruits
when he was hungry is become a
farmer; and he who stood under a
tree for shelter, a housekeeper."
Finally, while knowledge of the
physical and social sciences expanded
at a staggering rate, telling us things
about man of which we formally only
dreamed, architecture indulged itself
in over-specialized education, dis-
pensed too liberally by underquali-
fied and underpaid teachers.
So I say that the architect's retreat
from greatness is his fiiluic.4,r.k
in relation to the job to be done.
Our willingness to claim new prero-
gatives has exceeded our willingness
to prepare for them. We have had
to assume new areas of responsibility
before we were ready to discharge
them. We have in short, been too
busy to be educated, too wise to need
research, too arty to admit the engi-
neer to our inner sanctum as a
creative equal, too intuitive to sub-
mit to a systematic design procedure
and too good at selling to feel it
necessary to improve our product. As
a consequence, the body of our work
can still be in large part characterized
as aesthetically whimsical and arbi-
trary as we chase off aftef each rising
star of inspiration, technically inept
and irrational as we disdain a respec-
table scientific method; and econom-
ically promiscuous, if not actually
reckless, as we bask in ignorance of
some of the facts of life.
These consequences, I believe,
need not be. Creativity is not slave
to whimsy. Instead it is the concerted
response to intuition and experience,
sensory, emotional and intellectual,
disciplined by purpose, guided by
intellect and justified by use. A
systematic design procedure can exist,
not guaranteeing our common genius,
but increasing the chance for good
work by ordinary men. Such a pro-
cedure has four stages. You may
rename them, sub-divide them, or
rearrange them, but essentially they
are adequate to the design process.
These are Interpretation, Ideation,
(Continued on Page 28)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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Four South Florida Houses


ROBERT B. BROWNE, AIA, GEORGE F. REED, Jr.,
Architect Associate




1-Award-Winner on Key Biscayne .


This house, for Mr. and Mrs. Ken-
neth McClave, won a Merit Award in
the custom house category of the
AIA's 1959 Homes for Better Living
Program. It has been widely recog-
nized as being designed so in tune
with its site and for the climate of its
locality as to be an "about perfect"
example of what people think of as
"Florida living". Yet the award jury
commented that its design seemed
"too traditional".
Actually, this is a real, though pos-
sibly a back-handed, compliment to
the designer. He sought a proven tra-


edition in this building not one of
form or style, but one of usage, of
protection and of comfort. And in the
design of this house these traditional
elements have been admirably adapt-
ed to the needs of modern living.
Essentially, the building is a con-
crete platform raised from the ground
to minimize effects of humidity, the
attack of insects and mildew and pos-
sible damage from ground water.
Supported by regularly spaced posts
ad a barn-like construction, the plat-
form is sheltered by a great, white-
coated roof and is screened on all four


sides. Within this enclosure, are two
living areas separated by a central
lanai which not only traps the breeze,
but funnels it into the interior parts
of all rooms. ., -
What has been achieved in this
house by reason of analysis and dis-
ciplined refinement is what tradition-
ally was built into the "cracker"
houses on the basis of trial-and-error
experience. Use of the materials em-
ployed is "traditional" too, in that
simplicity, directness and economy
characterize a design that is a sincere
and unique statement of its purpose.


Photos by Ezra Stoller


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 0


























Right, looking southeast I 1
from the living room to4
the screened porch. Slid- i i
ing jalousies form mova- 0Ai2
ble walls of the room;
and above them clear
glass panels have beenAi
used to provide the t
needed element of en- .
closure but enhance the
sense of openness with- r. .
out sacrifice of privacy :"
which is characteristic
of every portion of this
house. The long, low
silhouette, opposite page,
against the vertical .
background of palms -..
the white of the roof
against the green and
brown of the foliage -
suggests from without
the sort of sheltered cool
and comfort for rhich
the interior was
fashioned.




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-41


AUGUST, 1959







































Photos by Ezra Stoller


Award -Winner on Key Biscayne


Above, the central lanai is a combination
of breezeway, open porch and outdoor
living room. Left below, screen enclosure
is four feet out from living area walls;
and the roof projects another four feet,
thus minimizing sun and sky glare.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































2-Compact Comfort for The Keys .


This cottage being built on Key Vaca will
overlook the ocean to the southeast and will
give its owners, Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Barrows,
the sort of simple comfort and uncomplicated
relaxation they are seeking after a busy indus-
trial career near Chicago. They know the Keys.
They like the climate, the scenery, the pace
and informality of Keys living. For their retire-
ment home this house was deliberately de-
signed as "beachcomber's paradise" in which
modern comforts are merged with the practical
whimsy of simple in some cases almost
elemental materials and structure.
Like its fishing-shanty inspiration, the
structure is all-wood except for the great
over hanging roof which has been designed as
a standing-seam custom-fabricated membrane
of galvanized iron sheet, coated on the outside
with white epoxy. But all wood will be pres-
sure-treated against insects and mildew. Floor
will be 2x4s spiked solid over beams, set 3'-6"
above grade and covered with heavy coco
matting.. Creasoted posts support two beam
bands, one at the perimeter, the other inside
at the roof break. Roof framing is of 2x4s on
edge, spaced 35Y" o.c. Walls are all wood
jalousies and louvered doors to permit com-
plete openness when desired and ventilation
control at all times.
AUGUST, 1959


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3-The Rooms Are Hung from the Roof..
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Planned for Mr. and Mrs. John Vereen and
their three young daughters, this house proves
that requirements for comfortable living in
South Florida can be met in more ways than
one. Essentially this is a screened shelter 36'
wide, 72' long and 20' high, covered by four
precast concrete folded plates supported at the
ends by twin-legged, Y-shaped concrete col-
umns. From this roof structure are suspended
two air-conditioned apartments, separated by
an open hall serving a stairway. Below these
is the general living space which is free of any
vertical supports and has no fixed walls except
on the north side. The other three walls of
this family-and-friends area are fitted with
closure elements hinged at the top so that
various exposures can be opened or closed at
will. Upstairs rooms are walled with wood
jalousies.
The basic structural scheme for which
Walter C. Harry was the collaborating engi-
neer-suggests a wide range of design pos-
sibilities in which the "traditional" elements
of south Florida living can be provided for
through the most ultra-contemporary of tech-
nical means.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


stCTnoN A.A
Srro -






4-House on a Palm Beach Hill ..


Alexandre Georges


A hilltop site studded with fine trees and a
limited budget with large space needs dictated the
design of this house. The hill was pushed back from
the street to the north; and at the rear of the house,
on the south, the property was terraced with a retain-
ing wall which actually enters the living room.
Outdoor and indoor living areas thus flow together,
for first floor spaces can be opened with a series
of sliding glass doors. Direct access from the second
floor to rear yard and paved terraces is via an outside
stair leading from a balcony which gives access to all
four bedrooms. Exterior materials are native oolite
stone and rough-sawn cypress.


AUGUST, 1959









House on A Palm Beach Hill


Photos, Alexandre Georges


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Curtained with an acre of glass...this Chicago

building is 100% reinforced concrete!



WHEN AMERICA BUILDS FOR DURABILITY. IT BUILDS WITH CONCRETE





It's one of Chicago's finest luxury apart-
ment buildings, 21 stories overlooking
Lake Michigan at 320 Oakdale. Beneath
its attractive exterior, 12,000 cu. yds. of
concrete form a frame and floor skeleton
of outstanding strength.
Architect Milton M. Schwartz of
Chicago and structural engineers from
Miller Engineering Co. chose reinforied-
concrete for its rigidity and durabilffy--
and passed along big bonuses in economy
to their client, too.
Concrete saved an estimated $200,000
through reduced materials cost, easier con-
struction scheduling. It made a simple job
of the cantilevered overhangs. And be-
cause floors are flat slabs, it saved a full
story in total height.
Concrete needs no special fireproofing.
It can't rust or rot. No other material
offers such low maintenance cost. More
and more architects and engineers are
specifying concrete frame and floor con-
struction today. They're finding the same
kind of economies for all structures, of
.both conventional and modern design.













Reinforcement being placed for large, canti-
levered 2nd-floor slab, a construction so easily
achieved in reinforced concrete.
-/ -- N !


FOR STRUCTURES...
MODERN ? *i

concrete PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
AUGUST, 1959 5-





Look what Natural Gas is doing in


ORLANDO


Think of natural
gas not just as a
better fuel for
cooking food and
heating water .
but as a willing
and versatile serv-
ant in 7 essentials
of modern living.
Details? See below.i


G6A S6EtlE
GAS WATER
Fast, slfe, dep


For landscape lighting for cooking and water heating
S. for ease, comfort, convenience, economy natural gas
is setting the keynote for a whole new way of life at Orlando's
new luxury suburb, Sky Lake. We'll be glad to tell you the
Sky Lake story show you how natural gas can serve your
clients wonderfully and well. Won't you call any Houston
office, today?


natural. gas

HEATING- GAS COOKING-IN% heat control .. GAS HEATING- -_
enable and completely automatically No slow warm-up- Quick comfbrt... ideal for I
automate. cheaper lool no hangover" l Florida s sudden changes. =
S .; heat waste.-


GAS AIR-CONDITIONING- GAS CLOTHES DRYER-
Most modern of all ..combines with healing Today's greatlet work saver...
for oil-year comfort most economical by la \

ERATION-Silenl. sale
pendable in emergencies, too.


THE HOUSTON CORPORATION


ST. PETERSBURG MIAMI JACKSONVILLE
ORLANDO LAKELAND DAYTONA BEACH EUSTIS
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Like







News & Notes


August 7 is Date for
Office Practice Seminar
This last-minute notice-reminder is
to urge your attendance at the FAA's
second Professional Practice Seminar.
Place: Colony Hotel, Hammond Ave-
nue, Palm Beach. Time: August 7,
1959. Seminar sessions will start
promptly at 10:00 AM, ending at
4:30. Subject: One of the most im-
portant in your practice how to run
your office better, how to save money
doing it and how to make what you
do pay you more for doing it.
So drop everything else and
COME! For prompt and free trans-
portation from the West Palm Beach
airport call HILLIARD SMITH--JUstice
5-6448 or JACK WILSON JUstice
2-8136.
As a bonus FAA President JOHN
STETSON will play host at a cocktail
party from 6 to 8 PM at his office-
home, 249 Peruvian Avenue, Palm
Beach. A phone call to let him know
you'll be there will be appreciated. A
dutch-treat dinner will be available at


the Petite Marmite one of the best
gourmet restaurants on the whole east
coast.
So, again COME! Come alone
if you must. But better yet, bring
your wife and plan to make a three-
day holiday at Palm Beach.


Eckhoff Joins Rader Group
ARNOLD W. ECKHOFF, JR., has
joined the Miami firm of Rader and
Associates as an architectural partner.
A native New Yorker, Eckhoff is a
corporate member of the Florida
South Chapter, AIA, and has been in
Florida since 1940, the last five years
as a member of Weed, Johnson
Associates.

FAA Set Record for
Convention Attendance
More than 40 members from the
FAA's 10 Chapters attended the AIA
Convention in New Orleans, with all
but two Chapters represented. Florida


IU Ll Many people believe that all treated lumber is processed
with chemicals to poison wood parasites and these chemicals
are also harmful to humans.





CELCURE Treated Lumber does not rely on poisons to kill fungi and
termites. Instead CELCURE combines with the cellulose eliminating its
food .value to wood parasites. CELCURE contains no arsenic, oils or
chemicals that will stain hands or harm the skin.
(Second of a Series)
For further information on CELCURE Treated Lumber, write to the
plant nearest you.
Treating Plants in:
TAMPA WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE GRACEVILLE
ORLANDO BOYD BUNNELL




AMERICAN CEGHT SR WOOD PRESERVING CORP.

1074 EAST EIGHTH STREET JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


S.,AUGUST, 1959


South was tops with 14; Florida Cen-
tral next with 11. Others sent: Palm
Beach, 5; Florida Northwest, 4; Jack-
sonville, 3; Florida North and Brow-
ard County, 2 each; and Mid-Florida,
one. No delegates or members were
registered from either Daytona Beach
or Florida North Central chapters.



State Board Obtains
Four More Injunctions
Continuing its active program of
enforcing the State law regulating the
practice of architecture, the Florida
State Board has successfully com-
pleted injunction proceedings against
four more individuals who were prac-
ticing architecture without rea -
tion. All of them were in the Orljnd':
area, which for some years has been
the seat of particularly flagrant dis-
regard of the regulatory statute.
Permanent injunctions were ord-
ered by the Circuit Court of Orange
County against Robert D. Say, indi-
vidually and doing business as the
(Continued on Page 25)





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State Board...
(Continued from Page 23)
Golden Rule Plan Service; Robert
Reiche; Hilton C. Danner, and R. F.
Abbott. This brings to at least nine
the number of restraining orders
which have been obtained by the
State Board thus far this 'year. A
number of other actions are now
underway and some are pending final
action by the Circuit Court having
jurisdiction.
The language of the court order
enjoining an individual from the
practice of architecture is of interest
to any practicing architect-if for
no other reason than the very specific
character of the language in which
it is phrased. In all such cases, of
course, the State Board is the "plain-
tiff," the individual involved the "de-
fendant." In part, a court order reads
like this:
"The equities are with the plaintiff
and against the defendant; and plain-
tiff is entitled to the relief prayed for
in the complaint.
"Defendant has engaged in the
practice of architecture; defendant has
offered to engage in and has engaged
in the planning and designing for
the erection, enlargement or altera-
tion of buildings for others; defendant
has not sectired and does not have
a Certificate of Registration as an
architect as required by the statutes
of the State of Florida and he has
never had such Certficate.
"It is ordered, adjudged and de-
creed that defendant should be, and
he hereby is, enjoined and restrained
from offering to engage, or from en-
gaging in, the designing or planning
for the erection, alteration or enlarge-
ment of buildings for others and from
offering to practice and from prac-
ticing architecture without first being
registered and qualified to do so, and
such injunction shall be permanent,
perpetually so restraining and enjoin-
ing the defendant ."
As pointed out previously in these
columns, once such a decree is issued
by the Court, the State Board no
longer is concerned with the matter.
Enforcement of the injunction is up
to the Court who can then impose
penalties for contempt if the indi-
vidual enjoined fails to obey the
Court's order to refrain from the
practice of architecture without reg-
istration.
AUGUST, 1959


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The FAA Welcomes a New First Lady ...

The AIA Convention
in New Orleans was
more than a profes-
sional gathering to
FAA President John
Stetson. It was also a
honeymoon; for he and
his charming bride
were married in the
First Methodist Church
of Palm Beach on June
20, the Saturday be-
fore the Convention
opened. Mrs. Stetson is
the former Beverly A.
Quaiel, born in Wor-
cester, Mass., and a
resident of Florida for
the past 12 yeras.
Much of the couple's
time at the old Creole
city was spent accept-
ing congratulations of
well-wishers. The FAA,
too, joins in wishing
them much happiness.


Message from
The President
(Continued from Page 9)
centers are no menace to downtown
areas that have not stagnated. Every
merchant and property owner in any
downtown district needs leadership as


they never have before. Who will
lead them? You, the architects, can-
but will you?
Certainly it takes time and money.
If you let someone else do the job,
you will only have time to eat. Money
can't be raised without a plah; suc-
cessful ultimate results can't be ob-


trained without a plan. Who furnishes
plans? The blueprints for success
eventually will be drawn by archi-
tects. Every community of any size
faces the same problems: No down-
town parking, poor downtown park
and recreation areas, buildings needing
replacing, poor civic and library facili-
ties, bleak and uninteresting streets,
no facilities'or provisions for pedes-
'trians, no light and air, traffic chaos.

Think it over. Why not start right
now? Gather together, those of you
who think along progressive lines.
Discuss the matter amongst your-
selves; then with progressive mer-
chants and property owners. Next;
submit your plan to your City Com-
mission or Council. Make it a com-
munity-wide effort. Enlist clubs and
organizations. First thing you know,
the plan will catch fire. When it
reaches its successful conclusion
everyone will have benefited; everyone
will be proud of a job well done.
You'll have found a remarkable pros-
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Direction for Design
(Continued from Page 12)
Comprehensive Analysis and finally
Dynamic Synthesis, as each design
element reacts to the other and they
are put together in a satisfactory
equilibrium of interests to form a
whole. Philosophy is at work at every
stage as values are assigned, principles
invoked and discipline applied.,
Where then does the profession
stand in the evolution I have men-
tioned? There is much cause for
optimism as we note the diversity
of good work being done. But let
me here play the cynic's role long
enough to look at some of the ugly
faces of the professional image, faces
which no amount of public relations
makeup can substantially alter. They
must be altered from within the
profession by those sensitive enough
to see, honest enough to recognize
and strong enough to act. Without
undue alliteration let me suggest at
least four of these facades behind
which we operate today.
1. The thin-face of professional-
ism It is clear that architects are
busy, enjoying an expanding volume
of work, demanding more graduates
than the schools can supply. It is not,
however, clear that this full employ-
ment represents any growth of pro-
fessionalism. In fact, it represents an
expanding national economy and a
growing skill in salesmanship on the
part of the architect, in large part
due to effective public relations and
a strong national and local organiza-
tional effort.
It does not, I think, represent any
real growth in public understanding
or appreciation for the Art of Archi-
tecture, which should be our unique


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contribution. This is true because
we too often compromise the art
quality of our work in order to build
it; and we compromise the truly
professional quality of our service in
order to keep the package dealer or
the marginal professional from rend-
ering it. Thus, I submit, professional-
ism is imperiled from without and
within. We cannot serve the cause
of architecture by doing a better job
than the package dealer in delivering
the same product he is capable of
delivering. Rather we serve that cause
by .delivering a superior work, recog-
nizably Art as well as building. Else
we become as he and indistinguish-
able from him; and architecture be-
comes diffused and lost in building
save for the extraordinary work of a
few men.
What are the essentials of pro-
fessionalism to which we need give
allegiance? Perhaps they are these:
a coherent professed philosophy, a-
dedication to service above reward,
to integrity above expedience, and
to learning as a continuing necessity.
Our culture, historically recognizes
three "learned" professions, Theolo-
gy, Medicine and Law. Must we not
become the fourth?

2. The fat-face of materialism -
I have quoted Thoreau who wrote
from Walden Pond, "he who. stood
under a tree for shelter has become
a housekeeper". The physical re-
sources available to the designer
today make it nearly inevitable that
architecture reflect our great mate-
rial wealth and development. But I
am concerned that we not create
enduring monuments to a materialist
society at the expense of our social
responsibility and in spite of our






knowledgement that man himself is
the object of our efforts to shelter
his body, release his spirit, and nur-
ture his development.
President Richards has repeatedly
reminded us that "Architecture must
serve all strata of society". I may say
this is true in New Orleans, in Little
Rock, in Montgomery and Atlanta
as well as in Washington and Toledo.
Ours is an age in which the great
potential of our technology is still
too largely the servant of military
preparedness on the one hand and
capital concentration on the other.
It is an age which produces the
finest housing in the world for its
machines, its merchants and its
actuaries but has not yet organ-
ized itself to adequately house its
schools or its people. By volume of
ideas, architects have made great
contributions to these fields, but by
volume of construction it is slight
indeed.
Therefore, we need to concentrate
on the distribution of ideas and the
in-fighting necessary to carry them
through. For every monument of the
masters there are a thousand modest
buildings to be done; and for every
custom built house a thousand hum-
ble homes that will not pay even a
fractional fee. Out of these homes
will come the clients of tomorrow's
architecture. Who will do these
houses which condition the character
of the future? Will they be delivered
by the architectural mid-wives as
they are today, or will the profession
really serve even if it is not so
profitable?

3. The all-face of superficiality -
For eighteen months I have watched
construction proceed at snail's pace
on a small bank near my office.
Somehow it sums up for me the
recurrent superficiality of so much
of our design. Three colors of marble
and two colors of metal panel and
much expensive aluminum trim are
employed to sheath a brick and
concrete block structure, tieing open-
ings together in panels of expression-
less verticality. There is nothing
genuine in it, nothing which reflects
a purpose or will or dominant con-
dition or idea.
Design is in search of the genuine.
We may find it in regionalism of
material or climate, or in clear re-
(Continued on Page 30)
AUGUST, 1959


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Direction for Design
(Continued from Page 29)
sponse to conditions of site, or in
technological expression or in dis-
tinguishable cultural patterns or
forms. I believe the embassies done
by American architects abroad are a
clear statement of genuineness as
they capture the spirit of the cultures
in which they are built. Why is this
so difficult at home? Are we in
America so heterogenious as to show
no character? I am not willing to
think so.
Thereare notable examples out of
the past, nearby examples on the
Mississippi Gulf Coast where one of
America's distinctive regional styles
existed. So responsive 'was it to cli-
mate, site, and manner of living that
its constituent elements are still valid
today, air conditioning not-with-
standing. Serious designers have long
protested facadism. The advent of
modular wall panels and masonry
and metal screens of intricate rich-
ness still does not grant us license to
ignore what goes on behind those
scenes. Texture is only one element
of design, even in the hands of
master ED STONE, and no matter
how rich to the outside observer, it
should remember inner space and
purpose.
4. The no-face of conformity -
Powerful forces in our culture move
us relentlessly in the direction of
conformity. For brilliant commentary
upon them, I refer you to Huxley's
"Brave New World Revisited" and
Galbraith's "Affluent Society".
Strongly independent work is rare at
best. And certainly difference for its
own sake is of no merit. However,
the creative spirit withers and dies
unless it can be operative within
broad limits of acceptance and unless
criticism, research and experimenta-
tion are a natural part of the process
of expression. Let us search out the
valid causes for diversity and nurture
personal expression. The changing
nature of the client, from.individual
to corporate or governmental, and
the structure of office organization
and group performance. All of these
things promote the primacy of the
average except as personal responsi-
bility and personal brilliance is pro-
tected within the group.
Let us come finally to the' theme
of this convention. Design is many


things to many people; and I think
we might assume that in its compre-
hensive sense it is the heart of archi-
tecture for most of us. I want to
speak of it here in triadic terms,
terms which I think state the prob-
lem, the triad of Disorder, Discipline
and Dogma.
We operate within a precarious
equilibrium between disorder on the
one hand and the super-order of
dogma on the other. Maintaining
our equilibrium and under-girding
design in all its applications is that
body of sensitivities and disciplines
of thought and action which distin-
guish creative effort. I am speaking
of discipline in the sense of control,
self-determined control, gained by
obedience to purpose, to principles
and to order; discipline which serves
to free the mind by ordering its pro-
cesses and to accommodate intuition
by channeling it into useful pursuits.
I am not speaking of blind discipline
or frozen discipline which becomes
dogma. Nor am I speaking of disci-
pline as a branch of knowledge or
academic research.
To be sure the line between disci-
pline and dogma is a narrow one and
is drawn most often by each man for
his own purpose. Without personal
discipline the designer's field is a
jungle of combat, where ideas devour
each other as whimsy, bias, pre-con-
ception and pre-judgment are the
only victors. Just as a free society is
possible only as a responsible society,
so is freedom of design pursuit pos-
sible only with a disciplined mind.
I want now to identify some of the
disciplines which seem to shape our
development and over against these
to point to the dogma which obstruct
creative processes and distort the re-
sults. This, over simplified, is a kind
of good man-bad man situation
with the good men becoming bad
men as discipline proclaimed for
narrow and partisan purpose, untest-
ed by reality or unwilling to acknowl-
edge change becomes dogma.

1. The discipline of LEARNING
and the dogma of the LEARNED -
Learning is to the scholar and pro-
fessional as breathing is to the infant
child, a natural life-giving, on-going
essential process. It is impossible not
to learn something in the course of
living, but most difficult to learn
much except as the process is en-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






courage by every available means.
Nor is it very possible to stop learn-
ing, except to die on the vine of life.
The dogma of The Learned would
let us believe that a plateau of knowl-
edge exists upon which we might
dwell with full assurance of accom-
plishment and no compulsion to go
further. The body of knowledge ex-
pands far more rapidly than our
ability to encompass it, and today's
learned man is too often tomorrow's
intellectual fossil.

2. The discipline of EXPERI-
ENCE and the dogma of TRADI-
TION Each of us brings to every
new encounter with knowledge a
background of experience, real,
direct, describable and consciously
or subconsciously the source of our
ideas, our values, and our judgments.
This experience as discipline provides
a yardstick by which to measure new
knowledge and understand its im-
pact. Thus it serves the creative
process. However, this experience as
tradition accepted as dogma,
accompanied by bias and loose emo-
tional interpretation of its meaning
(Continued on Page 32)



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AUGUST, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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Direction for Design
(Continued from Page 31)
no longer serves our process, but
rather obstructs it and diverts the
search for truth. I ask a sophomore
student to design a boy scout camp.
The first thing which enters his
mind is the boy scout camp he first
attended at age 13, and the wonder-
ful tradition of Camp Walekulama.
His first impulse is to design after
the fashion and within the limits of
experience at Camp Walekulama.
Thus the creative process, architec-
tural and intellectual, requires us to
evaluate the meaning of our experi-
ence, yet escape the limitations of
it for Camp Walekulama may
have not been designed at all, may
have occupied a completely different
terrain, and may be an utterly in-
appropriate prototype.

3. The discipline of FORM and
the dogma of FORMALISM--Form
gives unity and beauty to life and
makes it comprehensible to man.
But form in itself is not an end. It
is those elements which are formed
and the resulting structure which is
useful. To achieve form, we establish
system. System, corrupted, is then
elevated to a goal in itself becoming
the dogma of formalism.

4. The discipline of CONTINU-
ITY and the dogma of CONFORM-
ITY It is continuity which relates
present to past and to future and
event to event in the chain of natural
progression. Continuity allows room
for digression and accepts evolution;
it does not require the new to keep
the form of the old, but simply to
respect the old for what it is worth.
Conformity on the other hand makes
no allowance.

5. The discipline of COMMUNI-
CATION and the dogma of REC-
OGNITION The creative indi-
vidual in any fidld needs a degree of
communication with his time and
place. In the useful arts.it is espe-
cially so. That communication may
be that of violent opposition, com-
plete mis-understanding or passionate
acclaim. Communication becomes
the dogma of recognition when he
is so compelled by desire for agree-
ment and acclaim that his work
shapes itself self-consciously' toward
those ends.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


6. Finally, the discipline of AC-
CEPTABILITY and the dogma of
SUCCESS No honest man will
contend that he does not seek the
approbation of his fellows. Accepta-
bility means reward for work done
and the prospect of doing more. But
the dogma of success subverts in-
tegrity to the purposes of the market
place and the search for truth to the
service of selling.
This of course has been an ar-
bitrary alignment of good-man, bad-
man ideas and perhaps needs apology
to the words chosen to represent the
bad. I have no real quarrel with these
words. I have tried to say that good
discipline becomes bad dogma only
as we let it. Discipline is humble,
honest, expansive in' its effect, en-
couraging us to go out on a limb and
perhaps to live there. Dogma is
arrogant, restrictive, inhibiting in its
effect, requiring us to be overly
'cautious, circumspect, often just
average and above all secure. It re-
stricts the creative process,to the
popular service of man. Ours is a
responsibility to practice discipline
and to defend it against over-riding
dogma in those enterprises in which
we together are engaged.
JOB, we know, justified his world
and, we are'told, "he had also seven
sons and three daughters and in
all the land were no women found
so fair as the daughters of Job; and
their father gave them inheritance
among their brethren.",
We may yet justify our architec-
tural world and give inheritance to
the generation of our children. ED
STONE has asked us to be the pro-
phets of the 20th Century Great
Period of History. There is room for
hope that it may be so. There is here
the promise of the vigorous idealism
of the students who came to enrich
this convention, of the steady phil-
osophy of YAMASAKI and of Louis
KAHN who do have a "personal
theory of design", and of the rich
experience of WALTER GROPIUs who
at seventy-six exemplifies a life still
devoted to learning, to purpose and
to the relentless search for truth. Not
even the futility of PHILIP JOHNSON,
now MIEs-less, can dim this promise.
Let us then be Architects of the
20th Century. Let us be a profession
in the fullest sense of that noble
word.