Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00061
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text
DISPLAY

FIA NFIA AIrchiCT
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of tho AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS









1959
















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JULY, 1959






74e



Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



le 7i Is4se ---


Office Practice Seminar Scheduled for August 7 .
Five Ways to Improve Specs . . . .
The Inner City .............
By Howard F. Allender, AIA
Planning the Junior College Campus ..
By William T. Arnett, AIA
Message from The President . . . .
By John Stetson, AIA, President, FAA


4
6
9
. 4
. 6

. . . . 13
. 13

. 18


FAA Professional Awards Program, 1958 19-22
Office, Alliance Machine Company, Coconut Grove 19
Davis Medical Building, Tampa 20
Central National Bank, Jacksonville 22
Pre-Stressed Hyperbolic Paraboloids
Now Available as Standard Units 24
FAA Office to Move ...... ............. .27
Advertisers' Index ....... ............. ..27
News and Notes ........ ............. .. 28
State Board Grants 56 New Registrations
at Mid-Year Meeting 29

F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach The FLORIDA ARCHITECT Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach American Institute of Architects, is owned by
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly, Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Cen-
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32. expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
DIRECTORS reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krusi; BROWARD COUNTY: and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete; .. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C. comed, but mention of names or use of Illus-
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson; trations, of such materials and products in
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST: either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl, ation of Architects. Advertising material must
J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar; conform to standards of this publication; and
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH: the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
THE COVER Printed by McMurray Printers
The architect of the Davis Medical Building in Tampa is Mark Hampton, who
last year was the subject of a special, 16-page "Progress Report" in Prog-
ressive Architecture. His work, characterized as "exceptionally competent" ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
by that publication, has been the object of many design awards. More data VERNA M. SHERMAN
on the Davis Building appears on pages 20 and 21. PAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 71959
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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Office Practice Seminar


Scheduled for August 7


The all-important subject of better
office practice will be the concern
of the second meeting in the FAA's
1959 Professional Seminar Program.
This is scheduled for August 7, just
prior to the FAA Board of Directors'
meeting August 8. Place is the Col-
ony Hotel in Palm Beach. The day-
long Seminar is open to all FAA
members; and the program, as an-
nounced by FAA Vice President
ROBERT H. LEVISON who is also
chairman of the FAA Office Practice
Committee indicates that both
interest and profit await those who
can attend.
The program has been arranged in
a series of four sessions of an hour
and a quarter each. In the morning,
from 10:00 to 11:15 BENMONT
TENCH, JR., will discuss "Architecture
and The Law" including such
topics as contracts and bonds as they
relate to professional liability, the
lien law, various office procedures
Sand significant situations relative to
partnerships.
Second session of the morning will
be moderated by HILLIARD T. SMITH.
It concerns the subject of "How to
Increase Your Income". Included will
be a consideration of various methods
to reach this goal and in addition a


discussion of how the problem of
taxes can be eased, if not completely
solved.
The first afternoon session, starting
at 2:00 PM, will be in charge of
THOMAS LARRICK and EDGAR C.
HANEBUTH. It has been given a gen-
eral heading of "Office Forms -
AIA", but the content of the discus-
sion will also involve presentation of
various office procedure shortcuts and
working drawing "tricks" assembled
by members of the Office Practice
Committee.
The final session of the all-day
seminar will deal with "Professional
Relations" and will be moderated by
Chairman Levison. As now planned,
invited speakers will deal with this
subject as it relates to the architect's
work with engineers, consultants and
contractors.
In a report of this program to the
FAA Board's Executive Committee
at its May 30 meeting in Miami,
Chairman Levison emphasized the
desire of his committee that this
second FAA Seminar present material
of real value and importance to its
participants and audience.
"Primarily," he said, "This Sem-
inar is being directed to the small
(Continued on Page 6)


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The Executive Committee of the FAA Board met Saturday, May 30, in the
Florida South Chapter Lounge in the Dupont Plaza Center. Left to right above,
Verner Johnson, 2nd Vice President; Robert H. Levison, 1st Vice President;
Francis H. Walton, Secretary; John Stetson, President; and H. Samuel Kruse,
Immediate Past President. Regional Director Clinton Gamble attended the
meeting also.
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Office Practice...
(Continued from Page 4)
practitioner. We hope and believe that
the larger, well-established firms will
offer their experiences along the lines
indicated by the topics outlined. By
doing so they will be directly con-
tributing in a very real way to
the improvement of professional prac-
tice in our state."
In expressing his hope the Office
Practice Seminar would be well at-


tended, the Committee Chairman
directed a special invitation to large-
firm members.
"Helpful information on the legal
side of architecture, on taxes and on
ways of improving office operations
are just as valuable to the large firms
as well as the small ones." he said.
"So I hope that architects with large
firms and with long experience will
attend too not only to participate
in discussion, but to carry back with
them a trick or two to make their
own good operations even better."


Five Ways to Improve Specs...

This report of the BRI Specification Workshop first appeared in
the "Inland Architect" and is reprinted here with appreciation.


During recent years numerous meth-
ods for reducing constantly mounting
building costs have been explored.
One means which many segments of
the construction industry believe
holds promise of lowering these costs
is the use of specific, definitive and
concise specifications which convey
to the estimator the exact require-
ments of the job and are so organized
as to facilitate take-off and estimat-
ing. Many general contractors have
testified that the use of such speci-
fications results in lower contract bids.
Many professional organizations,
such as the American Institute of
Architects,. Producers' Council, Asso-
ciated General Contractors, National
Electrical Contractors Association,
and the Construction Specifications
Institute, have made the improve-'
ment of construction specifications
one of their major activities, and the
widespread interest in this subject is
demonstrated by the growth of the
Construction Specification Institute,
whose membership has increased sub-
stantially during the past year.
On February 27-28, 1957, the
Building Research Institute of the
National Academy of Sciences, Na-
tional Research Council, sponsored a
Specifications Workshop to which ap-
proximately sixty architects, contract-
ors, engineers, manufacturers, trade
association executives and govern-
ment officials were invited. This
group included representatives of 23
professional societies and trade asso-


ciations and is believed to be the
broadest cross-section of the industry
ever assembled to consider the sub-
ject.
It was generally recognized by
those attending the BRI Specifica-
tions Workshop, previously referred
to, that no single method of specify-
ing quality and physical characteristics
of building products is applicable to
all cases. The following methods cur-
rently used for specifying materials
were discussed and their advantages
and limitations noted.
1. Use of Standards. It was recom-
mended that, where suitable stand-
ards exist, such as those developed by
the American Society of Testing Ma-
terials (ASTM), American Standards
Association- (ASA), American Con-.
crete Institute (ACI) and similar
nationally recognized organizations,
they be used and included in the job
specifications by reference. However,
it was recognized that such standards
are not available for some building
products.
2. Use of Detailed Descriptive
Requirements. While detailed de-
scriptive requirements 'are generally
necessary as a means of specifying
installation and workmanship, it was
recommended that, in specifying ma-
terials, they should be used only as
a last resort.
3. Use of Performance Specifica-
tions. Performance specifications were
not; in- general, considered suitable
(Continued on Page 5)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



































Spartanburg High School, Spartanburg, S. C.
RAY LILLARD, A.I.A., of HAROLD WOODWARD ASSOC., Spartanburg,
S. C., Architect; RAYMOND J. GAUGER, Augusta, Ga., Structural Engineer;
FISKE-CARTER CONSTRUCTION CO., Spartanburg, S. C., Contractors.


CITATION for Design


Spartanburg High was among 29 schools to
receive a recent AASA* citation for design.
250 schools exhibited.
The crisply designed buildings of Spartan-
burg High are divided into functional units,
related for over-all efficiency. They separate
various activities, eliminate the traffic and
noise of a single, big school building.
Noise was further controlled by the use of
Solite lightweight masonry units on interior
walls. Exposed, Solite absorbs over 50% of
room noise, controls disturbance.
Another good. reason for selecting Solite


BREMO BLUFF, VA.
AQUADALE, N.C.


was interesting texture. Solite masonry units
provided a natural beauty perfectly in keep-
ing with the indoor-outdoor plan of low build-
ings and grassy courtyards. Still another
reason was Solite's natural resistance to fire
-a vital factor with parents and educators.
Quiet, beautiful and safe, Solite is playing
an increasingly important role in such
thoughtful, modern designs as this. In fact,
Solite's many natural advantages its
compatability with all building materials and
techniques ., makes it the logical choice for
outstanding projects.
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JULY, 1959 7


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


)


WB







Our Inner Cities...


In Florida, as elsewhere, Downtown is being choked by its own growth

... Here is a guide to a re-birth of value, convenience and attractiveness ...


Cities throughout the country are
pouring out miracle-dip concoctions
for creating, "The City of Tomor-
row." They are busy adding every
herb and mint they can lay their
hands on, from monorail to metro-
politan government. One ingredient
these proposals have in common is
open-space in the form of new
pedestrian precincts, alleys converted
into malls, new plazas and parks.
This is a revolution of thinking,
for many cities are still dominated by
influential downtown merchants who
earnestly believe that congestion is
good business. Yet they drive home-
ward to some distant suburb where
they can enjoy their private lawns,
lovely views, and low taxes. This
typical downtowner still regards flow-
ers in the downtown as sissified and
any downtown land not occupied by
one-story, tax-paying buildings or
high-turn-over parking lots on grade,
an economic waste. He feels that no-
body likes to walk anymore so why
bother to improve downtown walk-
ways and that every man has a
right to drive his automobile wherever
he chooses. The idea of a downtown
reserved for people on foot is likely
to be classified as subversive.
But these fellows are in for some
hard knocks. Their best friends are
saying, "My wife doesn't like to come
downtown anymore." Their book-
keepers know too well that downtown
income isn't what it used to be. Some
blowhards are still insisting that
things are hunky-dory. But all of a
sudden, nobody's listening.
These are seeds of desperation.
And desperate men begin to yearn
for new solutions. In their despera-
tion lies the key to tomorrow's more
livable city a city in which there is
new open-space for fountains, fun and
frivolity; for color, lights and action.
This is the city worth working for.
So widely misunderstood and mis-
JULY, 1959


applied, however, is the use of open-
space, that there results only neutral
space neither open nor occupied
by buildings. The new architecture of
city building is basically the sensitive
art of handling the open spaces.
Crisis for Our Cities
There are ample reasons for re-
doing downtown-falling retail sales,
tax bases in jeopardy, stagnant real
estate values, impossible traffic and
parking conditions, failing mass tran-
sit, encirclement by slums. With no
intent to minimize these serious mat-
ters, it is more to the point to con-
sider here what makes the center of
the city magnetic, what can inject the
gaiety, the wonder, the cheerful hurly-
burly that makes people want to come
into the city and linger there. Mag-
netism is the crux of the problem!
All the values of downtown are its
by-products.
Unfortunately, planners and busi-
nessmen are seized with dreams of or-




ABOUT THE AUTHOR . .
The text of this article has been devel-
oped from the substance of two talks
given before the Clearwater Art League
and the St. Petersburg Lions Club as
part of the P/R program of the Florida
Central Chapter. The author is a partner
in the St. Petersburg firm of Allender,
Bruce, Parrish and has been actively en-
gaged in the field of planning for the
past five years. In addition to his Insti-
tute affiliation, he is a member of the
Amercan Society of Planning Officials,
the St. Petersburg Planning Board, the
Community Planning Association, and the
Church Architectural Guild. He is cur-
rently chairman of the City Planning
Conference for the National Council of
Churches.


der and become fascinated with
bird's eye views and scale models.
The design philosophy is to make the
city fit some abstract concept; and
citizens who should know better are
so fascinated by the sheer process of
rebuilding that the end results are
secondary to them. There is almost
entirely one standard solution for
every need: Commerce, medicine,
culture, government whatever the
activity! A part of the city's life is ab-
stracted from the hustle-and-bustle of
Downtown and set, like a self-suffi-
cient island, in majestic isolation.
And each project looks like the next
one, even though they are in differ-
ent regions of the country with differ-
ing environments. They will have at-
tributes for a dreary scene, with no
hint of individuality or surprise, and
no hint of a city with a tradition
and flavor of its own. The end results
will be as helpful to the city as the
dated relics of the "City Beautiful"
movement, which only fifty years ago
was going to rejuvenate the City by
(Continued on Page 10)


By HOWARD F. AL LENDER, AIA































































A NEW TOMORROW FOR DOWNTOWN . .


In his proposal for the re-development of Forth Worth, Texas -now the
object of emulation by some 100 other American cities Architect-Planner
Victor Gruen, AIA, offered an approach to the re-birth of Downtown that is
now, apparently, being widely accepted by planners. It is not the progressive
de-centralization of Downtown, but the greater use of Downtown facilities;
not the dispersion of the inner city, but the concentration of new values and
conveniences that is the prime objective. This concept rings Downtown with a
new system of traffic arteries and provides terminal parking facilities around
the perimeter of the inner city. But only pedestrian traffic is permitted in *he
heart of Downtown's area; and the city's core thus becomes a sort of urban
island in which the pace of both activities and developments is geared to the
purposes and pleasures of people instead of machines.


The Inner City . .
(Continued from Page 9)
making it park-like, spacious, and
monumental.
The underlying intricacy-and the
life that makes Downtown worth
fixing at all-can never be fostered
synthetically. No one will find what
will work for our cities by looking at
the boulevards of Paris, as the "City
Beautiful" people did; and they can't
find it by looking at suburban "Gar-
den Cities," manipulating scale
models, or inventing dream cities.

The Nature of Our Cities
Cities are shaped by daily deci-
sions, which in most cases are based
on short-term economic considera-
tions. Yet in our time we can design
cities which are functional, economi-
cally profitable and aesthetically en-
joyable if we have a design philoso-
phy based upon elemental needs of
the people who are to use the City.
A City is a combination of many
sensory stimuli in addition to the
visual one. Most of these and even
some of the visual ones are outside
the control of the designer. But the
makers of cities seem unaware that a
full esthetic experience exacts the use
of all the senses, not just the visual
alone; and that this experience is
more sensuous than intellectual. The
character of a city is composed of its
smells, its noises, its taste, as well as
its sights. Its sights include people,
their clothing, conveyances, flowers,
trees, fountains. A city has an unseen
history which also forms its esthetic.
A city is not architecture alone -
perhaps not even principally.
Consider that historically cit i e s
have been mainly for the slow pedes-
trian and for daytime effect. They
have had approaches and magnets of
general interest. Now we must re-
design the approaches and re-design
the magnets of the city centers. We
must do this on a new time-scale -
including the speed of an airplane -
and on a 24-hour basis. This will not
be accomplished by a few towering
geniuses alone, but by a critical sense
instilled in the citizens who must use
the City. They must demand good
design in the restoration of their
cities.
In the future man will be more
and more crowded into urban places;
and the designers of cities must pro-
vide him not only with a more effi-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






cient urban machine, but with a
physical setting capable of meeting
all of man's needs. These include a
feeling of order, identification, par-
ticipation and esthetic enjoyment
that rests the soul or stimulates the
mind. In order to achieve this end,
the City must have: Scale of the
human being, relative to his move-
ment on wheels and foot; Open
Spaces, which stir the senses; Conti-
nuity of visual experiences; and Forms
which are varied, meaningful and
memorable.
By a sensitive application of these
urban d e s i g n considerations there
will be encouraged the growth of
urban activities, such as civic par-
ticipation, sociability, cultural pur-
suits, and commerce. It will also con-
tribute to the revitalization of urban
values, which is of great importance
to development of civilization.

Nature of Downtowns
The best way to appraise design
values for Downtown is to get out
and walk, and critically observe. You
will note that it is not in the nature
of Downtown to decentralize. You
will note that it is an astonishingly
small place which quickly gives way,
outside a small, high-powered core, to
underused area. Its tendency not to
fly apart but to become denser is a
fundamental quality of Downtown.
And this persists for good and sensi-
ble reasons.
The best way to plan for Down-
town is to see how people use it to-


day; to look for its strengths and to
exploit and reinforce them. There is
no logic that can be superimposed on
the City. People make it; and it is to
them, not buildings, that we must fit
our plans. This does not mean that
we accept present conditions. Down-
town does need re-design. It is dirty,
it is congested. But there are things
that are right about it too; and by
simple, old-fashioned observation we
can see what they are. We can see
what people like.
The best place to look is at the
street. One had better look quickly,
too, because in many projects that
are doing away with the noisy auto-
mobile traffic, they are making away
with the street itself. In its stead
will be open spaces with long vistas
and lots of elbow room. On-grade
parking lots gash the street, destroy-
ing a sense of enclosure, and create
barren voids that prevent compact-
ness to make the Downtown work
well.
But the street works harder than
any other part of Downtown. It is
the nervous system. It communicates
the flavor, the feel, the sight. It is the
major point of transaction and com-
munication. Downtown needs not
fewer streets, but more especially
for pedestrians. The real potential is
in the street and there are far more
opportunities for exploiting it than
are realized.
The plan for Fort Worth, Texas,
has been chiefly publicized for its
arrangements to provide enormous


parking garages and to convert Down-
town into a pedestrian island. But its
main purpose has been to enliven the
streets with variety and detail. This
is a point over-looked by some 100-
odd cities that are now seriously con-
sidering emulating Architect Victor
Gruen's traffic principles.


New Downtowns
There is no magic in simply remov-
ing motor traffic from the Down-
town; and certainly none is stressing
peace, quiet and dead space. The re-
moval of motor traffic is important
only because of the great opportuni-
ties thus provided to make streets
work harder and to keep Downtown
activities compact and concentrated.
Experiences gained in the design of
regional shopping centers can be ap-
plied directly to Downtown in its
street treatment, sidewalk arcades,
poster columns, flags, vending kiosks,
display stands, outdoor cafes, band-
stands, flower beds and special light-
ing effects. Street concerts, dances
and exhibits are to be fostered. The
purpose is to make the streets more
surprising, more compact, more varie-
gated, and busier than before not
less so.
Any Downtown re-design m u s t
work with. existing buildings and
this is a positive virtue not just a
cost-saving expedient. Think of any
city street that people enjoy; and,

characteristically, it will have old
(Continued on Page 30)


OUR CHANGING URBAN PATTERN . .

So far the battle for Downtown has been waged
against the symptoms, not the sources, of its troubles.
The fact is that Downtown is obsolete. It has not kept
pace with the growing capacities or aspirations of its cit-
izens. Thus it is being deserted, ringed with slums. Its
concentration is now one of confusion rather than con-
venience.
In the growth of this decay lies the destruction of
values, the decline of markets and the deterioration of
physical character and backgrounds.
The problem is to reverse this trend. To do so we
must recognize the forces working to change Downtown
-and then use them to create new patterns for modern
living and working. Here are some we must deal with:
1 ... POPULATION GROWTH During the next
15 years this will add to our urban population the equiv-
alent of 38 new metropolitan areas, as New York, Chica-
go or Los Angeles. Also, population analysts are now
predicting a nation of the predominately young.


2... TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS -Cheap
power and the automobile are only two of the many which
have already made the physical structure of our cities
obsolete.

3... PUBLIC POLICIES FHA, grants in aid,
highway programs these have all altered customs,
speeded the forces of change and dispersion.

4.. EXCLUSIONISM Segregation is more than a
matter of race. Economics is a tremendous force for sep-
aration.

5 ... SPACIOUSNESS -Competition for space is
establishing new and important urban values.

6 ... LEISURE TIME Increased middle bracket
income and the shorter work week have created new lei-
sure opportunities, resulting in soaring demands for
goods, services and facilities.


JULY, 1959 11











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More than 33,000 pieces of 13/8" glazed ceramic tile were used to create this mural. Side panels use 82" x 41/4" tile. Color Plate No. 405.


This colorful mural in the entrance lobby of the DuPont Plaza Center in
Miami, testifies to the way ceramic tile can be used to achieve striking
decorative effects. Created by American Olean's design department, this
impressive 24 x 35 ft. mural will greet hundreds of thousands of visitors
to the Architects' International Bureau of Building Products each year.


CERAMIC TILE

merican

Olean


AMERICAN OLEAN TILE COMPANY. EXECUTIVE OFFICES: LANSDALE, PENNSYLVANIA. FACTORIES: LANSDALE, PA., OLEAN, N. Y.. MEMBER: TILE COUNCIL OFAMERICA, PRODUCERS' COUNCIL







Planning the Junior College Campus...


The Junior College Facilities Conference, held April 10 and II, and co-
sponsored by the FAA, the State Department of Education and the U/F
College of Architecture and Fine Arts, developed, among other data, this
noteworthy comment on site planning . Proceedings of the Conference
are now being readied for publication by the State Department of Education.


Someone has pointed out that a
plan is many things, depending upon
how you look at it. From the point of
view of society as a whole, a campus
plan is an instrument of policy, a
means for attaining a certain goal.
From the standpoint of the architect
it is the solution to a problem of how
a certain amount of space may be best
organized for a particular educational
activity. For the people who occupy
the completed buildings, it is a control
mechanism which will, to a large
extent, determine the degree of satis-
faction they will derive from living
and working together.
Campus planning may therefore be
considered from many points of view.
Our concern here is with physical plan-
ning-the shaping of physical relation-
ships for the purpose of facilitating
educational relationships.
The planning process has been well
described in these words: "Planning is
the rational adaptation of means to
ends. It is a process of thought, a
method of work, the way in which
man makes use of his intelligence.
People always act with some anticipa-
tion of the future-with some picture,
however cloudy, of the ends they are
seeking; with some notion, however
inaccurate, of the conditions which
determine the extent to which they
can achieve their ends; and with some
appraisal, however inept, of what are
the appropriate means to attain their
ends under such conditions. It is the
purpose of planning to make such
anticipations of the future-such pre-
visions of goals, such calculation of
probabilities, and such appraisal of al-
ternative courses of action-as clear, as
realistic, and as effective as possible."
What is a campus plan? By a cam-
pus plan-or to use the preferred desig-
nation, a general development plan-
I mean an orderly scheme of func-
JULY, 1959


tional disposition of land and physical
facilities-both immediate and long-
term-for an educational institution.
More particularly, I mean a group of
separate yet inseparable concepts: (1)
a diagram of functions, (2) a scheme
of land use, (3) an arrangement of
circulation, (4) a disposition of build-
ings and open spaces, and (5) a plan
of landscape development. Finally, I
mean not a completed project, but an
on-going process; not a destination,
but a direction toward a goal. I would
agree with the assertion that in ori-
gin (a plan) must be realistic; in scope
it must be broadly inclusive; in outline
it must be bold and imaginative; in
detail it must be flexible."

Determination of Purpose
The first and most important step
in planning a campus is to define the
objectives of the institution and the
purpose of its various parts. Unless this
step is well done, the resulting build-
ings will probably be poorly related
and unsuitable for their purpose. In a
recent study of thirteen liberal arts col-
leges with relatively new facilities, it
was found that in not one instance
were the facilities designed to meet the
curriculum. In another study of thirty
new classroom and laboratory build-
ings constructed during the last ten
years, it was found that in not a single
instance were the classrooms, lecture
rooms or laboratories planned on the
basis of optimum teacher-student
ratios.
There is a difference, of course, in
programming an entire college and in
programming a single building. On the
one hand, we are providing the ulti-
mate designers of individual structures
with the larger context in which their
particular works will be undertaken; on
the other, we are providing an archi-
tect with a detailed set of requirements


By WILLIAM T. ARNIETT, AIA
Professor of Architecture, U/F



for a single building. In programming
a campus, it is especially important to
take a long-range view of things, to
develop a long-range program in which
the possibilities of the future are no
less important than the needs of the
present.
Throughout all our work, the im-
portant thing to keep in mind is that
colleges are for people. Unless we know
and understand the needs of the peo-
ple whose daily activities we will shape
with our buildings, unless we know
something of their hopes and aspira-
tions, we shall have failed in our
design before we begin.

Necessity for Flexibility
An educational institution, unless it
be a candidate for speedy interment,
is a living, growing, changing thing.
While it may be difficult to anticipate
all changes that will take place over
the next twenty or thirty years, one
thing is certain: Whatever changes the
future may bring, they will require
room and space for their realization.
James M. Fitch points out that plan-
ners have at least learned this from the
recent past: They might not always
be certain which direction changes
might take, but they could always be
certain that there will be change. Not
to provide for change would be disas-
trous; and it is in such a context as
this that the modern planning con-
cept of flexibility has developed. A
flexible plan is one which permits the
organism whose energies it controls
to expand and contract, or to rear-
range its internal processes without
doing either.


Diagram of Functions
As an aid in visualizing the inter-
related activities carried on in a col-
lege, and as a means of determining
the most desirable relation between
the various parts, a functional dia-
(Continued on Page 15)







CUSTODIAN
,, ;l l D


M A N A T E E J U N I O R C O L L E G E
Located in Bradenton on a 100-acre plot of flat land, this college, established in 1958, will have an initial capacity
of 400 students. Architects were Croll and Wilkinson; the planning consultants, Neutra and Alexander. The School
Plant Administrator of the Department of Education offered this comment on this project: "The site plan indicates
a studied approach towards attaining maximum unity of dissimilar masses on a large site. Related functions have been
well grouped and properly separated to avoid distraction and noise. Parking and vehicular traffic are confined to the
perimeter of the site."








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P ENS A CO L A J UN I OR CO L L E G E
This plant was established in 1948 to serve Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. It occupies 80 acres of flat land on
the outskirts of Pensacola; and its 1958 fall enrollment was 1,613 students. Architects were R. Daniel Hart and Hugh
J. Leitch; the planning consultant, R. Boyer Marx. The Department of Education's commentary: "In the development
of the campus plan, strong emphasis was given to the library as the heart of the campus . the relationship of the
science and technology buildings is excellent."
4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
P E S AC O A JU NI O C OL L G
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th usirsfPescl;adis18fllerlen a1,1stdnsArhttsweR.DneHatnd ug

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Comprising 41.7 acres of flat lands, this campus is located in an urban area of Daytona Beach and serves Volusia and
Flagler Counties. The college was established in 1958 and will have an initial capacity of 480 students. Architects
were Griffin and Gomon; the planning consultant, Jefferson M. Hamilton. The School Plant Administrator, Dr. Car-
roll W. McGuffey, says of the layout: "In developing this plan, perimeter parking and vehicular traffic problems
have been largely solved in spite of numerous existing limitations. The east-west mall adds unity to the overall plan
as well as being an attractive feature. The administration building is well located so as to provide a visual prom-
inence and easy public access."


Campus Planning ...
(Continued from Page 13)
gram is helpful. Such a diagram is a
schematic design study embodying
both the immediate and long-range
aspects of the institution, and indi-
cating desirable functional relation-
ships. It is an attempt to set down
in graphic form answers to these ques-
tions: (1) Where should a function
-such as administration or library-
be placed with respect to other func-
tions; (2) what pedestrian circulation
is necessary between functions; and
(3) what vehicular access is required?

Scheme of Land Use
A general development plan for
a college should be based on the
functional use of land. At the outset,
we need to analize the site to discover
which parts are most suitable for the
varoius purposes: which parts are most
desirable for the different building
groups, such as teaching or recreation;
which are best used as part of the
JULY, 1959


open space pattern; and which should
remain for future development. This
functional study of land use is in-
timately related to the study of the
topography of the site. If the campus
is to have an individual character,
it is necessary to accept the individual
character of the landscape itself and
to make it part of the design. There
may be wooded areas, important hills,
level or sloping portions, lakes or low
ground which need to be taken into
account. If the campus is to have indi-
viduality, it is necessary to use the
over-all form and pattern of the topo-
graphy as a framework on which to
build the design.
If we are to profit by the experience
of older institutions, it would seem
desirable (1) to avoid placing the
heart of the campus too near the
boundaries of the site, and (2) to keep
the campus relatively compact.
Arrangement of Circulation
Someone has pointed out that the
irreducable requisite of any successful


plan is that it direct the flow of energy
consigned to it into the most produc-
tive pattern of movement. Unfor-
tunately, this criterion-except in, de-
sign dictated only by economic or
physical necessity-is seldom met in
our country today. Certainly it is sel-
dom seen in our cities, and all too
seldom seen in our educational insti-
tutions.
On a college campus we should be
concerned first and foremost with
people-with pedestrians-whose
movement is limited to perhaps three
miles an hour, or slightly less than
300 feet a minute. These people
weave a pattern of pedestrian traffic
throughout the campus which is diffi-
cult to predict in detail, a pattern
which changes each semester as enroll-
ments and classroom assignments
change. One thing, however, is cer-
tain: the pedestrian heart of the
campus ought to be planned exclu-
sively for pedestrians, and pedestrian
(Continued on Page 17)



































G U L F C O A S T
C O M M U N I T Y
J U N I O R C O L L E G E


--
F FUTURE BUI.' -
FIRST UNITS TO BE cOsNTRTucT
S VEHICULAR TRAFFIC-- ROADS. DRIVES S PARKING
r P- ESTRIAN TRAFFIC-- WALKWAYS 4 TERRACE AREAS


Established in 1957 to serve Bay County, this campus covers 80 acres of flat land near Panama City and had an
initial capacity of 265. Architect was Norman Gross; the planning consultant, Hugh Stubbins. The commentary:
"Among outstanding features are, 1) separation of physical education facilities and future shops from classroom
and academic areas; 2) grouping and location of various functions are considered excellent; 3) natural attrib-
utes of site and surrounding area have been utilized advantageously."


PALM BE ACH
J JUNIOR COLLEGE


WN.-B-d-


Last fall's enrollment of
this Lake Worth plant,
established in 1933,
was 1,190. The flat,
114-acre campus "feat-
ures an east-west mall
which promises a pleas-
ing visual approach, ter-
minating in the reflec-
S tion pool located in the
commons area. The lo-
cation of the library
emphasizes the primary
role it plays in the jun-
ior college program."
Architects were Edgar
S. Wortman and Fred-
erick W. Kessler.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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...


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Campus Planning ...
(Continued from Page 15)
ways should be the only thoroughfares
across it or beside it.
On a college campus we are con-
cerned also with automobiles, with
vehicles which move from five to eight
times as fast as pedestrians. It seems
logical, therefore, that the longer and
more circuitous routes should be
assigned to vehicles, while the shorter
and more direct paths should be given
over completely to pedestrian traffic.
I am persuaded, furthermore, that a
campus will be a safer, more efficient,
more convenient, and more pleasant
place if these two channels of move-
ment-vehicular and pedestrian-are
kept completely separate.
Two additional items must be con-
sidered: service vehicles, and parking.
While it is necessary for service vehi-
cles to have ready access to each build-
ing, a campus should not be designed
primarily for the convenience of truck
drivers. Fortunately, if buildings are
properly located, they may be serviced
without u n d u e interference with
pedestrian traffic.
The parking problem, on the other
hand, is more difficult to solve well.
At the heart of the problem is the
over-all policy of the institution with
respect to the use of private auto-
mobiles for students, faculty, and em-
ployees. With enrollment numbered
in the hundreds, the problem can be
solved without too much difficulty;
but with enrollments measured by
the thousands, the problem begins to
assume major proportions. One thing
seems clear: parking is a problem
which must be faced squarely.. It will
not solve itself; and we cannot be rid
of it by imagining it does not exist.


Disposition of Buildings
and Open Spaces
In working out a pattern of build-
ing groups-of structures and open
spaces-we are not concerned with the
detailed planning of individual build-
ings. Rather, we are concerned with
developing an orderly scheme of dis-
position for the first buildings on the
campus, and of designating appro-
priate sites for future buildings. We
are concerned with devising a logical
arrangement of functional relation-
ships and a practical pattern of
growth, rather than with the exact
size and shape of specific buildings.
JULY, 1959


C.




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': L L L E


Established in 1958 at Ocala, this 60-acre.'
campus provided an initial capacity of 300 and -
serves Marion, Citrus and Levy Counties. Archi-
tects were J. Vance Duncan and Robert Bittner; the
planning consultant H. Boyer Marx. "Parking is well
located around the site perimeter, providing good access
to those elements requiring it. The administration building
is conveniently located for public access. The library is ad-
vantageously located near the center of the academic area."


'I


. .





- -E ,-S U R __"-_.__ )__ --











The flat, 23-acre site is located in urban St. Petersburg. Architect was C.
Dale Dykema; the planning consultant William T. Patterson. "The planning
of this campus represents excellent use of a small site. Service drives are
well planned without crossing pedestrian traffic and the prominent location
of the library gives strong emphasis to it as the hub of the campus."


The plan must be flexible enough
to permit the construction of one
building after another through the
years, and to permit organic extension
of any unit, without injury to the
effectiveness if the group during this
natural process of growth. No matter
how carefully established is the pro-
gram of a particular unit at the outset,


changing conditions and changing
theories of education may require
corresponding changes in the physical
facilities of that unit. The plan must
be capable of adjustment to meet
needs as they arise.
Concerning the building groups
themselves, the late Charles Z.
(Continued on Page 31)


J I, ,r I .'.


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Message from




The President




By JOHN STETSON
President
Florida Association of Architects



Why The Silence - ?


Four score and seven years ago,
our fathers brought forth upon this
continent a new nation, etc., etc.
Your President or your Executive
Director could probably fill this pub-
lication with just such famous quota-
tions without upsetting too many
members of the profession. If silence
indicates disinterest, then you have
no use for this magazine. If silence
means you agree with everything we
do and say, then we have really
achieved complete success.
No doubt a good many of you read
the "Florida Architect". Certainly
you peruse the ads, without which
we could not publish the magazine.
Somewhere along the line we must
say something you either do or do not
agree with. It is even possible that
one of the manufacturer's advertising
in our publication has produced an
article of slight interest to you. So,
way the silence? If the correspond-
ence received by your president is an
indication, architects from other
states, engineers, building material
suppliers and contractors are the only
ones able to read and write. In five
months this office has received the
barest number of letters from the
membership regarding the magazine
and the contents thereof. One manu-
facturer, and one of our best sup-
porters, received not one reply from
his recent ad aimed at drawing out
inquiries from you. How long does it
take to sign your name to a post card?
So you are busy. You have all of
the work you can comfortably handle
with your present organization. There
is no need to concern yourself with
the problems of your profession since


none of these problems affect you at
present. However, there are certain
danger signs which point to the ar-
chitect losing much of the business
he now enjoys, through the infiltra-
tion by other groups and individuals
into our design status and due to the
continual "drum beat" for stock plans
for schools, hospitals, churches, etc.,
among other things.
What are the danger signs? They
are many. As our schools turn out
more and more budding young archi-
tects, all convinced that they will
succeed F.L.W. as the world's great-
est, more and more individuals and
businesses are finding ways of sur-
planting the architect altogether.
Recently, an editorial in the publica-
tion of the "Actual Specifying Engi-
neer", June 1959, was furnished me
by the Jacksonville Chapter. The
editor writes under the title "Archi-
tectural Tail Wags Engineering Dog"
that the engineer is victim of a cul-
tural lag and that architectural regis-
tration laws were written to protect
architects, not the public.
Everywhere we see plan factories,
plan services, drafting services, em-
ployees of municipal departments,
etc. performing what once constitut-
ed architectural services. We see
architects offering miserably inade-
quate services for starvation fees,
while even the realtors have increased
their fees. If we are now known as
the "tail of the dog", then either the
tail needs trimming, or the dog is of
the wrong breed (parentage doubt-
ful) and the kennel needs a thorough
house cleaning.
Who is to blame? Each and every


one of us, singly and collectively. We
tend to be smug, supercilious, setace-
ous, self-righteous and even stoic.
Will we become superfluous to soci-
ety and servile to the engineer and
the construction industry? It is possi-
ble. We are told we need better pub-
lic relations. The A. I. A. is doing all
it can on a limited budget. The
F.A.A. currently spends more on this
item than any other. What are you
doing as an individual toward better
public relations for the profession and
for yourself? Only a handful of you
turned up at the workshop in Gaines-
ville, where you were offered some
good advice "for free". We have
another workshop scheduled on of-
fice practice, to be held in Palm
Beach on August 7th. You will be
shown ways to save on operating
expenses; and new methods of im-
proving your income will be dis-
cussed. Other professions, when such
workshops are held, turn out en
masse but not the architects; who
apparently already know it all. Will
you be present on August 7th?
At the beginning of this year we
asked you what you wanted. Where
you have replied, we have done every-
thing possible to comply and accom-
plish the goal you have asked. There
is much we need to do, but a few
will never succeed working practically
alone. Everyone is certain we need
a new registration law, but, as the
Editor says, who will it protect?
Which of you is going to stop his
practice and write it?
Many of you want higher fee
standards. Are you raising your own
(Continued on Page 27)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FAA Professional Awards Program ..


44th Annual Convention-1958


Office, Alliance Machine Co., Coconut Grove


Merit Award, Commercial Category



This is a design and administrative headquarters for the Interna-
tional Division of one of the country's largest makers of heavy
industrial and materials handling equipment. Built on a sloping
lot, the reinforced concrete structure faces Biscayne Bay with two
stories, with the entrance through a court at the upper level. It
was designed for the possibility of an additional two stories . .
Inside and out the building has been planned so that maintenance
should be practically non-existant, materials having been selected
to eliminate such continuing maintenance items as painting and
caulking. Window walls, for example, were built with pre-cast
concrete units which were self-forming and poured integrally with
the floors and roof. The units are glazed with colored marine and
hammered glass . Among other inside features is a completely
luminous plastic ceiling equipped to provide 100 ft. candles of
light at working level in the drafting room.
JULY, 1959


ALFRED B. PARKER, FAIA, Architect



































S The building is of rein-
forced concrete construc-
tion, with lower units
flanking the entrance
covered in black, un-
glazed tile. Vertical cores
containing utilities are
: sheathed in blue glass
mosaic tile; and solid
walls of upper floors are
enclosed with 4 by 10-
:: foot precast panels with
Sa gravel texture. Sun-
screens of windows over
east and west entrances
are precast in 4 by 10-
foot white cement panels.
Panels of the curtain wall
construction at window
areas are filled with light
blue porcelain sheets.





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Davis Medical Building, Tampa. .


MARK HAMPTON, AIA,
ARCHITECT .


MERIT AWARD ;'
Commercial Category
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JULY, 1959
































Central National Bank


THE EDWIN T. REEDER ASSOCIATES
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS

HONOR AWARD
Remodelling Category


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'.


AGRICULTURE

Which

FL "
TOURIST
helps you ? u

Which Florida benefits your business or
profession --industrial, tourist,
agricultural or retirement?
They all do! Every activity that helps to improve
the economy of Florida contributes to your success.
You profit when Florida prospers!
Keep Florida prosperous! Buy Florida products! Use Florida cements!

S .i ; Memm to Forido contractors:
l, aDollars spent for Florida products
BI generate more dollars for Florida
Construction. Use Florida products.
ISE


GENERAL PO-RTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
I,,JULY, 1959 23


INDUSTRY
i ..





stock items and in a range if sizes
from 8 by 10 feet up to 100 by 100
feet.
Availability of the new design units
was formally announced at a recep-
tion for the Florida Central Chapter
of the AIA on June 13, with SAM P.
JOHNSON, president of the West
Coast Shell Corp. acting as host.
Prior to this formal introduction, a
number of West Coast architects had
experimented with the pre-stressed
form. VICTOR LUNDY used it to roof
his prize winning Warm Mineral
Springs Motel. CARL VOLLMER em-
ployed several paraboloids spanning
34 by 55 feet in the design of a
Sarasota furniture building. Other
units have been adapted as swimming
pool shelters, and as a design element
in a shopping center, a warehouse
and a highway refreshment building.
In practice the shells are fabricated
at the building site and placed on
their central column with a minimum
of form work. Currently, nine stock
sizes are being made available. But
through use of transportable forms,
a wide variety of sizes is being made
possible. Obvious advantages of the
new forms include clear spans of


The Cortez Shopping Plaza, Bradenton, for which Edward Dean Wyke and
Lathrop Douglass were architects, embodies a series of the pre-stressed hyposs."


Pre-Stressed Hyperbolic Paraboloids


Now Available as Standard Units


A new pre-stressed concrete form
has recently been made available to
enlarge the design vocabulary of those
architects, who believe in using, to
the greatest possible extent, the prin-


ciple of prefabricated units. The
West Coast Shell Corporation, of
Sarasota, a Florida pioneer in the
pre-stressed concrete field, is now
fabricating hyperbolic paraboloids as


94


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Hamilton Plywood of St. Petersburg, Inc., 2860 22nd Ave., No., Phone S-7627
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Hamilton Plywood of Jacksonville, Inc., 1043 Haines St. Expressway, EL -I8542
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





varying diameters, fast ercction. low
maintenance, thus presumably. long
life, and easy drainage of roof areas
through the central supporting col-
umn. As now being fabricated, the
shells are made with S.000 lb. con-
crete and arc designed to withstandd
winds of 125 miles per hour with
a 100 per cent safety factor.


Five Ways to
Improve Specifications
(Continued from Page 6)
for specifying architectural building
products. It was recommended that,
if performance specifications are used
to specify building materials, the\
should state results desired or prop-
erties desired and method of appli-
cation, but not both.
4. Use of Trade Names. It was
recommended that, if building prod-
ucts are specified by trade name, the
"special conditions" contain a clause
providing that substitutes %%ill be con-
sidered on a qualih and price basis
and that the phrase "or equal." fre-
quently included in such specifica-
tions, be eliminated.
The following paragraph, providing
for substitutions, was suggested:
"Variation from Materials Speci-
fied: It is intended that materials or
products specified by name of manu-
facturer, brand, trade name or b\
catalogue reference, shall be the basis
of the bid and furnished under the
contract, unless changed by mutual
agreement. \\here two or more mate-
rials arc named, the choice of these
shall be optional with the contractor.
Should the contractor \ ish to use an.
materials or products other than those
specified, he shall so state, naming
the proposed substitutions and stating
what difference, if any, will be made
in the contract price for such substi-
tution should it be accepted."
q. Use of Allowances. It was recom-
mended that "allowances should be
used only with great discretion"; and:
"In all cases of allowances there
should be sufficient description to
indicate to the contractor the extent
of labor required to install the items
for which allowances are listed. Also,
all the allowances should be listed
under special conditions or under a
separate section with -cross reference
to the individual trade sections in-
volved."


NOW AVAILABLE...

The New, Proven, Drain Field System...


CRADLE DRAIN!

1 CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN APPROVED by the Florida
State Board of Health on the basis of a 1 to 4 ratio...
a 75% reduction in the length of the ordinary drain field.


2. CRADLE DRAIN IS THE ONLY drain field in use today
where the distributor is both above the reservoir and
above the 12-inch rock-bed absorption area.


3. CRADLE DRAIN HAS A PEAK-LOAD storage reservoir
above the absorption area holding the air-equivalent
of 2 gallons of water.


4. CRADLE DRAIN HAS BEEN TESTED by the Wingerter
Laboratories, Inc. of Miami, Florida...and Report
44094 states conclusively that Cradle Drain will with-
stand a destructive force of 12,000 pounds.



S CRADLE DRAIN CORPORATION
DUPONT PLAZA CENTER SUITE 707
MIAMI 32, FLORIDA
FRanklin 3-3371


JULY, 1959











W We're "orbiting"

in America's year 'round

Land of Good Living!


...but LET'S FACE IT- FLORIDA HOMES DO NEED HEAT


The winter of 1958, when poorly heated homes
made thousands miserable, signalled the end of
the makeshift home heating era in Florida.
Today we're going modern fast. Almost every
new Florida home is equipped with permanent
built-in heating. Be sure to check before you
buy . if oil's the fuel, be thankful. It's by
far the most satisfactory house-heating fuel -
cheaper, safer, easier to get whenever you need


it. And you can buy it for home heating only
without paying a premium price.

This and other advertisements are emphasizing the
advantages of central oil house heating equipment,
which has proved the most practical and economical
for homes in this state. We hope our advertising will
pave the way for quick acceptance by your clients of
your recommendations for permanent oil space
heating.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


@**MIP 8146 HEAING m.s.u.






President's Message .
(Continued from Page 18)
- and are you willing to contribute
the time necessary to serve on a
committee to study this problem?
We abhor bid shopping. But do we
assist the A.G.C. in their efforts to
stamp out this practice, by our own
endeavors? Who can say he was never
guilty of proselytism of someone
else's employee? Your executive di-
rector and your president continually
receive requests for short editorials,
to be written by members of the
profession. Why don't you write
them? That is what we need to
hear from more of you directly. Send
in articles, editorials and news. We
need them.
One of our greatest weaknesses is
silence. Those who wish to supplant
us or see us become the unknown
profession sound off through the
written and the spoken word. We
contribute little or nothing to the
medium of the press, radio or tele-
vision. An architect appearing as a
speaker at a civic club is as rare as a
Corinthian capital in modern design.


The old cliche, "It's the squeaking
wheel that gets the oil," is quite
apropos. Are we going to sit quietly
inert until our bearings burn out? Do
you expect others to do your talking
and writing? If you do, then it was
nice knowing you. See you at the
national convention of the Society
of Designing Draftsmen or the Ar-
chitectural Engineers of America in
1965.!




FAA Office to Move ...
As of July 1, the FAA's administra-
tive office will have a new address in
the Dupont Plaza Center. Since Feb-
ruary, 1958, it has been occupying
one small comer of the Florida South
Chapter's Lounge on the mezzanine
floor of the building. However, need
for more working space, coupled with
a revised set-up for the Lounge area
made the move desirable. The FAA
Executive Director's new office will be
Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Center, Mi-
ami 32. It is hoped that no change in
telephone numbers will be necessary.


Many people believe that all treated lumber . regardless
of the way it is treated . will leach out when used under
ordinary building conditions.


Celcure Treated Lumber will not leach out even when submitted to
strenuous tests. Celcure lumber is treated under rigid supervision
during which the required amount of chemicals are forced into the
wood. After the lumber is treated and dried the chemicals are locked
permanently into the wood. There is no danger of CELCURE coming
out in ground moisture, rain or even running water.


For further information on CELCURE Treated Lumber, write:


AMERICAN CO. WOOD PRESERVING CORP.


1074 EAST EIGHTH STREET


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


ADVERTISERS INDEX
American Olean Tile Co. 12
A. R. Cogswell ... . 28
American Celcure
Wood Preserving Co. . 27
Bryant Heating Company . 30
Cradle Drain Systems, Inc.. 25
Dunan Brick
Yards, Inc ... .3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 30
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 30
Florida Home Heating Institute 26
Florida Portland Cement Co. 23
Florida Power & Light Co.. 32
Florida Steel Corp . .4
Florida Tile Industries 1
George C. Griffin Co. 6
Hamilton Plywood . . 24
The Houston Corp. . 3
Markowitz Bros., Inc. 2nd Cover
Moore Vents . ... .28
Perlite, Inc. . . . 29
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 5
Solite . . . 7
Tiffany Tile Corp. .. 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 31


I I


JULY, 1959








MOORE VENT


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2 Make Walls Cooler
3 Save Owners Money
Placed at top and bottom of walls,
aluminum Moore Vents provide gentle
air circulation to relieve water-vapor
pressure, prevent internal condensa-
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means of assuring freedom from mois-
ture troubles. Write for sample and
full technical data . .


"Stop Wall
V If I 0 Condensation"
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Phone TEmple 3-1976





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"SINCE 1921"




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News & Notes


FAA Board to Meet.
in Palm Beach August 8
The third 1959 meeting of the
FAA Board of Directors will be held
Saturday, August 8, at the Colony
Hotel in Palm Beach. At the May 30
meeting of the Executive Committee,
President JOHN STETSON announced
that the Palm Beach Chapter had in-
vited the Board to attend its meeting
the evening of August 7; and he in-
dicated that some sort of after-meet-
ing entertainment was being planned.
The day preceding the Board meet-
ing, Friday, August 7, will be devoted
to a Seminar on Office Practice.
This will be a particularly import-
ant meeting of the Board; and Chap-
ter Presidents and Director-represent-
atives are urged to communicate with
the FAA President, Secretary, or Ex-
ecutive Director relative to matters af-
fecting their Chapters which may in-
volve the state-wide activities of the
FAA and thus require consideration
by the FAA Board.
The matter of by-laws revision will
be a special order of business before
the Board at this meeting, since sub-
stantial changes appear necessary in
the by-laws as one result of Florida's
new regional status. -A committee
named by President Stetson is now
working on this matter. It is the same
as that previously named as the "Flor-
ida Region" Committee-- CLINTON
GAMBLE, chairman, JOHN STETSON,
H. SAMUEL KRUSE, ANTHONY L. PUL-
LARA, IGOR B. POLEVITZKY and FRANK-
LIN S. BUNCH.
Another important item of the
agenda will be consideration of rec-
ommendations from Chapters relative
to possible revisions to Florida's reg-
istration law.

Smathers Introduces
New Tax Deduction Bill
Senator GEORGE SMATHERS has in-,
troduced another bill to permit self-
employed persons, like architects, to
take deductions currently on a de-
ferred basis. His measure is the same
as the Keogh-Simpson bill (H.R. 10,
-. - -1 ' r T'_ ._ A-- 1T.a-
for May, 1959) except that it has an
effective date as'of the taxable year
1961 instead of 1959. Object of the
change is to overcome present objec-
tions of the Senate Finance Commit-


tee which is now studying the Keogh- -
Simpson measure.
The Florida Senator has taken steps
to furnish' all architects in Florida
with information relative to his bill.
Watch for his communication. Read
and study it. Then write the Senator
your reaction. And write also to Sen-
ator HARRY F. BYRD, Chairman of the
Senate Finance Committee to which
the Smathers Bill has been referred.

New Conference Planned
on Junior High Schools
Preliminaries have been cleared for
setting up another school planning
conference under the joint sponsor-
ship of the FAA, the State Depart-
ment of Education and the U/F Col-
lege of Architecture and Fine Arts.
The Conference would be specifically
focused on junior high schools and
would be designed to clarify applica-
tion of new planning standards which
have emerged from a number of re-
cent research activities. Currently the
Conference is planned as a three-day
session tentatively scheduled for Sep-
tember 24, 25 and 26.


State Board Grants
56 New Registrations
at Mid-Year Meeting
The State Board of Architecture,
through its Secretary, MORTON T.
IRONMONGER,'has announced that 56
new registrations to practice have
been granted since the Board's Janu-
ary meeting. Only 18 of these repre-
sent registration on the basis of writ-
ten (Junior) examination. Included
in this category were:
JoHN P. LYNCH, Ft. Lauderdale;
LARRY N. JUSTICE, THOMAS T. MAYO,
JR., LESTER N. MERWIN, and JOHN
ALLAN RUDOLPH, St. Petersburg;
HOWARD B. BOCHMARDY, NORMAN E.
WASHER, Jacksonville; JAMES C.
CHAPMAN, JR., JOHN B. LANGLEY,
Winter Park; JACK R. JONES, Lees-
Sburg; EDWARD L. MIEADOws, Tallahas-
see; ROBERT C. PEACOCK, West Palm
Beach; JOHN B. GOSMAN, Palm Beach;
7-..-- y- .-.-.. o--...... o---.-
T. WHEELER, Fort Meyers; FRANK E.
SANCHEZ, JR., North Miami; HAROLD
E. SECKINGER, Miami; and HARVEY J.
EHRLICH, Miami Beach.
Those granted registration on the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


M





basis of registration in another State
include:
JUDSON E. SCHNALL, Nei' York;
ROBERT J. BOEREMA, Miami; JEAN-
PIERRE TROUCHAUD, W\'ashington, D.
C.; HAROLD P. BERCEN, Ormond
Beach; CORReLL R. STINSON, \Vin-
ston-Salem; ED\ IN H. CORDES, New
York: PAUL B. HENDERSON, Stuart;
RICHARD H. MITCHELL, Ft. Lauder-
dale \I FRFn k',;TNFR \Alriindria
\'d.; ALFRED D. REID, Pittsburgh;
C.AMILLE E. CH.RBONNEAU, Clear-
water; SAMUEL R. DE PEUCH, Largo;
THOMAS P. HERITAGE, Greensboro. N.
C.: CLARENCE \V. DOLL, St. Peters-
burg; ALLAN H. CROSSMAN, Elberon,
N. I.; EDWARD K. SCHADE, Pittsburgh;
JEROME \. RAY, Springfield, Ill.; Eu-
CENE J. D'ANOS, New York.
Registrations were granted the fol-
lowing on the basis of NCARB cer-
tificates:
JOHN E. HAR"OOD, Brentwood,
Tenn.. EDWARD JOHNS, Atlanta; DON-
ALD \\'AYNE GOODWIN, Akron. Ohio:
A_-RON SCHWARZ, Brooklyn, N. Y;
ABR.1H \I H. SALKOWITz, Jamaica. N.
Y: ROBERT \\. KAHN, Trenton, N. J.;
BRADFORD S. TILNEY. New' Hl'en,
Contn.: L. FRANK HARRIS. Tampa;
JAAMES \\'. BIRD. San Diego, Calif.;
VICTOR \V. RONFELDT. Asburv Park,
N. J.; CHARLES LEON.%RDI. New York;
RoY D. MURPHy, Urbana. Ill.: AR-
NOLD NYE, Nashville. Tenn.; \\'WL-
LACE BEARDSLEY, JR., Auburn, N. Y.;
MORRIS KETCHUM. JR., New York;
THOMAS B. BELLE, JR., Mobile, Ala.;
AUGUST L. POLIER. Raleigh, N. C.;
JOHN C. HUPFER, JR., Denver, Colo.;
Re-instatement of registration was
granted to NAT C. HOCDEN of Beth-
esda. Md. Registrations on the basis
of oral (Senior) examinations were
granted to JAMES P. GILMORE, Mont-
gomern. Ala.; and ALBERT K. \\IL-
SON, \\ilmington. Del.
The foregoing list brings to 1-2
the total number of registration cer-
tificates granted by the Board this
year. Only 56 of this number were
granted on the basis of the Junior
written examination. In January 124
candidates took the written examina-
tion; and of this number, 3S. or 30.6
per cent passed. Last month the num-
ber of applicants totaled 158, but only
18 completed the examinations with
the passing grades necessary for reg-
istration. The number of successful ap-
plications represented 11.4 per cent
of the total taking the written exams
in June.
JULY, 1959


FLORILITE PERLITE














A poured roof deck or fill of Perlite Insulating Con-
crete is one of the most efficient and inexpensive means
you can specify for reducing interior heat loads. For
example, "U" factors of a 1 :6 mix ratio range from .200
to .098 depending on the type of construction and the
thickness of roof fill used.

This high insulating effectiveness makes possible a
substantial reduction in air-conditioning costs. With les-
sened heat loads, smaller units, less tonnage and power are
required and economies like these are often greater
than the costs of the Florilite Perlite insulating fills that
produced them.

In addition . Perlite concrete is lightweight about
one-fifth the weight of standard concrete. So its use
makes possible construction economies, too thus still
further reducing the cost of using one of the most versatile
and effective materials in building .


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The Inner City ...
(Continued from Page 11)
buildings mixed with new. This mix-
ture is one of Downtown's greatest
advantages, for Downtown s t r e e t s
need high-yield, middling-yield, low-
yield and no-yield enterprises. The
intimate restaurant or good s t e a k
house, the art store, the university
club, the fine tailor, even the book
stores and antique stores it is these
kinds of enterprises to. which old
buildings are so congenial.
Without a mixture on our streets,
our Downtowns would be superficial-
ly standardized. But old buildings and
large cities are especially suited to the
small, specialized enterprise which
must draw on supplies and skills out-
side itself. Its market is so selective
that it must have exposure to tens of
thousands of people. The chief mag-
net of the Downtown is the enormous
collection of small elements, where
people can see them, at street level.
The Citizen's Role
The citizen doesn't have to be a
planner or architect to ask the right
questions in the interest of his city:
How can new buildings capitalize on
the City's unique qualities? Does the
City have a waterfront that can be
exploited, or an unusual topography?
How can the City tie in new build-
ings with old ones, so that each com-
plements the other and reinforces the
quality of continuity a city should
have?
The ultimate expert on such ques-
tions can be the citizen. What is
needed is an observant eye, curiosity
about people and a willingness to
walk. He should walk not only the
streets of his own city, but the streets
of every city he visits. He will under-
stand his own city a little better--
and perhaps steal a few ideas.
There is a wonderful challenge!
Rarely before has the citizen had such
an opportunity to re-shape his city,
and to make it the kind of city he
likes and that others will like too.
Citizens can decide what end-results
they want--and then adapt the re-
building machinery to suit them. If
new laws are needed, they can agi-
tate to get them.
Designing a dream city is easy.
Re-building a living one takes imagi-
nation. It takes the desire of the
citizen as well as the three-dimen-
sional concepts of the Architect. Col-
laboratively it can be accomplished.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WORKS
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Campus Planning ..
(Continued from Page 17)
Klauder offers sage advice: "In deter-
mining the posture of buildings, as
much heed should be given to the
spaces between the buildings as to the
buildings themselves; that is to say,
the voids are, as important as the
solids. One is reminded of the wheel
-usefulness depends upon the void
at its centre. These spaces must be
well proportioned in themselves and to
the adjacent or surrounding build-
ings."
The size of courts and the proxi-
mity of building to building deserve
the most careful attention. Everything
else being equal, it seems desirable
that buildings be compactly located
and set within close walking distance
'of each other.

Plan of Landscape Development
The landscape setting of a campus
is no less important than the building
design. Planting serves as the means
by which buildings can be bound to-
gether visually, as the furnisher of out-
door space in the same way that chairs
and tables furnish indoor space, as an
agreeable contrast to the geometric
form of buildings, and as a semi-
transparent solid which veils but does
not mask the surrounding buildings,
thus heightening their over-all beauty.
One cannot but be shocked at the
barrenness of so many Florida schools.
Inan area where nature has provided
such an abundance of material, one
cannot but be amazed that years some-
times go by without the planting of
a single tree or shrub.
Somehow, our energies seem to be-
come so exhausted with the problems
of site acquisition and building design
that we have none left for the de-
velopment or maintenance of the land-
scape. I submit that a plan of land-
scape development, prepared and car-
ried out as a joint venture of land-
scape architect and college service
personnel, is as important and as ne-
cessary to the over-all effectiveness of
a college campus as a plan for build-
ings or a plan for circulation.
In summary, a general development
plan has three broad patterns: land-
scape, building groups, and circula-
tion. These are the means. The end
is .a campus that is functional, econo-
mical, and attractive-an environment
that will touch the heart and enlarge
the vision.
JULY, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


:
YCI: ~iL .:- '~ji ;f~








Featherock introduces exciting new
departures in architectural, and
landscape design for the creative
architect. Weighing one eighth the
weight of normal rock, Featherock
has a unique structure, enabling
ease of application, and maximum
latitudes in creating decorative
arrangements. Used as wall facing,
Featherock can be easily formed
or fitted to any size or shape by
the simple use of chisel, bit or
saw. Available in grey or charcoal,
Featherock combines strength and
durability with a natural beauty.


BRIC




















S.. At this year's FAA Convention the spotlight will
be on Design and the theme suggests a program,
now taking shape, that will explore the ways in which
the art in architecture is molding the life of the
community, the neighborhood, the family and the
P P individual . The Jacksonville Chapter will be the
Sponsoring Host; and its members invite your inter-
est, your presence and your participation . Better
mark your calendar now for November 12, 13 and
14 at Jacksonville ...












Convention headquarters will be the
brand new Robert Meyer Hotel in
downtown Jacksonville. Convention
rates will be moderate. Full pro-
gram details will be sent you in
plenty of time to assure the com-
fortable accommodations you will
want . When you receive them,
act promptly, for the Convention
program promises a heavy attend-
ance qud reservations are always
and necessarily limited ...













45th ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE FAA

JACKSONVILLE NOVEMBER 12- 14, 1959




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