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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Four traveling scholarships established...
 Theme of 1959 convention will be...
 Survey on status ranks architect...
 Message from the president
 Appropriation bills omit College...
 House for Dora Ewing
 House for Earl M. Starnes
 Tourist center, Silver Springs
 FAA public relations workshop
 The enforcement side of the registration...
 News and notes
 Advertising
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00060
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: June 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00060
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Four traveling scholarships established at university
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Theme of 1959 convention will be centered on design & Do you want to be loved?
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Survey on status ranks architect first
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Message from the president
        Page 11
    Appropriation bills omit College of Architecture funds
        Page 12
    House for Dora Ewing
        Page 13
        Page 14
    House for Earl M. Starnes
        Page 15
    Tourist center, Silver Springs
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    FAA public relations workshop
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The enforcement side of the registration statute
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    News and notes
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertising
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




























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MARKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS


F A. HERBERT MATCHES, A.I.A.'
^^ t A~rchitert on the new Fontainebleau Convenlion Hall and Addilio 1


*A:



The Herbert Mathes architectural touch is represented in many diversified areas of the Florida
scene. Among the Mathes-created buildings are TV Studios, Oceanfront Luxury Hotels and Shop-
ping Centers. The now-under-construction giant Convention Hall and 500 additional rooms to the
magnificent Fontainebleau Hotel on Miami Beach is another Mathes contribution to the Florida scene.
The plumbing and heating on the addition, as on the original building, is by Markowitz Bros., Inc.







I /the style leader in plumbing fixtures
B EA U T Y W AR E


:. r. ". j*
.... ........ .,
CONVENT AND ACADEMY of the SACRED HEART, Bloomfeld Hills, Midch. Architects: Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Assoclatoes. Plumbing Contractors: Harrlpn & Reed Hosting & Plumbing Co.


Briggs I
Heart A
two size
bination


Briggs ;
tains for
ara vit


New Academy of the Sacred Heart features'

the compatible color of Briggs Beautyware



Balanced design, functional superiority, the modern beauty of color! The
architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman and Grylls Associates found that
Briggs Beautyware met each demand in their design for the Academy
and Convent of the Sacred Heart. For the girls' academy the architects
specified Briggs Beautyware fixtures, many of them in color. For your
Milton Lavatories specified for Sacred own commercial and institutional work, you'll find that Briggs Beauty-
eoademy are of fine vitreous china in ware commercial fixtures offer decided advantages. Choose from a
s, 24'x20" and 20"x18', for 8 com-rn
fittings. 4 colors were used. complete easy-to-install line of well-balanced designs, created by
Harley Earl, Incorporated, for Briggs, in fine high-density vitreous china.
Rigid quality controls insure that Briggs fixtures meet every plumbing
specification as well as every test of the designer's eye.




Inpiter Foun- Briggs Tot Water
the Academy Closets, vitreous china
r u china svnhnnt-actinn -mnldep


wall-hung models, in 10b high, used in the
3 Beautyware colors. Academykindergarten.


B E A


U T YW A R E


JUNE, 1959







74




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



n 7Ti 1sew --


Four Traveling Scholarships Established at University
Theme of 1959 Convention Will be Centered on Design
Do You Want to Be Loved ... ? .........
By Roy M. Pooley
Survey on Status Ranks Architect First . . .
Message from The President . . . . .
By John Stetson, President, FAA
Appropriation Bills Omit College of Arcchitecture Funds
House for Dora Ewing ............
1958 FAA Honor Award
House for Earl M. Starnes .. . . .....
1958 FAA Merit Award
Tourist Center, Silver Springs . . . .
'1959 AIA Merit Award
FAA Public Relations Workshop . . . . .
The Enforcement Side of the Registration Statute .
News and Notes. .... ...... ...
Advertisers' Index .............
Two Levels of Conduct . . . . . .
Editorial, By Clinton Gamble, AIA Regional Director


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krus6; BROWARD COUNTY:
Robert E, Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C.
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl,
J. Snyder, Jr., FAIA; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar;
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH:
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.

THE COVER
The winning of exhibit awards is rapidly-becoming habitual with Victor A.
Lundy, Sarasota, member of the Florida Central Chapter. Again this year he
scored in the AIA Honor Awards Exhibit. His design for the Tourist Center
at Silver Springs received a Merit Award and was the only entry from Florida
to appear in the winners' list. The Silver Springs project received recog-
nition in design award program of "Progressive Architecture." Mozart photo.


.4
.6
.6


. . . 11

. 12
. 13
. . .13


. 14

. 16

S 20
. 22
....... 28
. 28
. 31
. . . 32


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida- Association of" Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9 1

NUMBER 6 1959
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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501 N. W. 54th St., Miami


Four Traveling Scholarships


Established at University


.
1~EtiS% ~
~I*c


EDWIN T. REEDER, AIA, Miami,
and B. ROBERT SWARTBURG, AIA,
Miami Beach, have contributed
$2,000 to establish two scholarships
for 1959 and two in 1960 to enable
outstanding students in the Depart-
ment of Architecture, University of
Florida, to visit and study important
examples of American architecture.
The awards are to be known as the
CODA American Architectural Trav-
eling Scholarships. Each carries a
stipend of $500.
The scholarships were established
to enable student architects to study
at first hand the finest examples of
American architecture of all periods.
CODA scholars are to be chosen by
the faculty of the Department of
Architecture from students who have
completed the fourth year of the cur-
riculum in Architecture and who,
upon completion of the scholarship,
will require at least one semester
to finish the requirements of the
professional degree. Scholars are to
be selected on the basis of previous
academic performance and on their
promise of high capacity for profes-
sional growth.
The scholarships will be used for
a systematic inspection trip during
a minimum of ten weeks of the
summer recess. The scholars will fol-
low an itinerary approved by the
department faculty. At the com-
pletion of their tour, the scholars
will submit a report and prepare an
exhibit of photographs and drawings
made during the tour. This exhibit
will be displayed at the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts and at
the annual convention of the Florida
Association of Architects.
The 1959 recipients of the first
CODA scholarships, as announced
by Professor JAMES T. LENDRUM,
head of the Department of Archi-
tecture, are JULIAN S. PETERMAN, of
Pensacola, and G. EDWARD SHAFER,
of Warren, Ohio. In 1957, Mr. Pet-
erman won first prize in the Pearce-
Uible Competition and also received
a merit award at the convention of
the Florida Association of Architects
for his design of a pediatrician's
office. He has had practical expe-


^ s '
,. : ..
. ,'" .'


-







B. Robert Swartburg, AIA.


rience in the offices of MAX J. HEIN-
BERG, JR., AIA, Pensacola, and DAVID
P. REAVES, AIA, Gainesville. He is
a member of Gargoyle and, during
1958-59, has served as vice-president
of the University of Florida Student
Chapter of the AIA. Mr. Shafer is
a member of Gargoyle and has served
as a member of the Executive Coun-
cil of the Lyceum Council of the
University of Florida Student Gov-
ernment. He held a university schol-
arship in 1957-58, and has had six
years of practical exeprience in heat-
ing and air conditioning.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Ewdin T. Reeder, AIA.






























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GREEN COVE SPRINGS, FLORIDA is the site
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now producing Solite-a proven structural
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A CONTROLLED PROCESS Solite is pro-
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In giant rotary kilns it is exposed to tempera-
tures up to 23000 F., then allowed to cool
naturally. The resulting Solite is not a by-
product but a thoroughly annealed, chemi-
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aggregate.
A PROVEN PRODUCT Solite is extremely
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lighter than ordinary masonry units-Solite
structural concrete is 1/3 lighter than concrete
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Write Us For Full Information on Solite
PLANTS


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Green Cove Springs, Fla.
OTHER
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Box 5735, Bethesda, Md.


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OFFICES
Box 1843, Charlotte, N. C.
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BUILT-IN ADVANTAGES Solite is self in-
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USED IN OUTSTANDING PROJECTS Solite
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the construction of the new Atlantic Coast
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PRUDENTIAL BUILDING JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


JUNE, 1959


















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Pensacola Call Jax I
Tallahassee . Al Yates


Jacksonv,lle . Gco. Griffin
Daytona Beach . Bob Gall
Orlando . iCall JaxI


Ocala .... .Van Akin
Tampa . Doug LaHayne


Palm BEach Ed Kader
Miami . Ed Henderson


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FLORIDA SALES REPRESENTATIVE

GEORGE C. GRIFFIN
P. O. Box 5151
Jacksonville, Florida


Theme of 1959 Convention


Will Be Centered on Design


Plans now underway for the 45th
Annual Convention of the FAA indi-
cate that this will be one of the
most uniquely interesting meetings in
all FAA history. Theme of the Con-
vention will be "Architects' Omni-
bus." The phrase suggests the wide
and varied scope of the architect's
professional activities; and the devel-
opment of this theme is shaping a
program as unusual as it is significant.
More than other FAA conventions
held during recent years, this one will
spotlight the art of design which is
the real core of the architect's pro-
fessional versatility. It will explore the
ways in which the art in architecture
can touch the life of the community,
the neighborhood, the family and the
individual.
To do this, the Jacksonville Chap-
ter, as the Convention's sponsoring
host, has enlisted the active coopera-
tion of the Jacksonville Council of
Arts. It has also prepared a roster
of nationally known talent and ac-
complishments as participants in the
Convention's seminar, discussion and
entertainment sessions.
Heavier than usual emphasis is
being placed on developing an exhibit
of architects' work. And if the success
of past exhibitions staged by Jackson-
ville Chapter is any criterion, the


1959 Convention exhibit will prob-
ably reach a new high relative to
both content and presentation.
As in former years, an exhibit of
building products will be an impor-
tant part of the Convention. How-
ever, this year exhibit spaces have
been limited to a total of 48; and
each exhibitor is being urged to de-
velop a presentation of his material,
product or services that will tie in
with the predominantly design theme
of the Convention itself. A substan-
tial proportion of available exhibit
space has already been reserved or
allocated.
A full Convention Committee has
been named by Chapter President
TAYLOR HARDWICK. Chairman is
WALTER B. SCHULTZ; and in charge
of specific phases of Convention ac-
tivity are: HARRY E. BURNS, JR., Reg-
istration; JOHN R. GRAVELEY, Treas-
urer; WAYNE P. MEYERS and CECIL
B. BURNS, Hospitality; ROBERT C.
BROWARD, Architectural Exhibits;
NORMAN H. FREEDMAN, Entertain-
ment; H. LAMAR DRAKE, Product
Exhibits; ROBERT E. BOARDMAN,
Awards, and ROY M. POOLEY, Pub-
licity. MRS. IVAN H. SMITH, presi-
dent of the Chapter Auxiliary, will
be in charge of the ladies' program.


Would you like to be appreciated
for the service you render? Recog-
nized for your contribution to so-
ciety? And paid accordingly in coin
of the realm?
To be perfectly candid, I must
admit that appreciation of my work
is balm to the spirit-and nothing
(but nothing) makes the spirit soar
like greenback appreciation. In fact,
you are entirely welcome to accept
this as one man's opinion of what
"Public Relations" is all about.
In his P/R Workshop Notebook,
Bob Denny (P/R Director for Henry
J. Kaufman Asso.) put it this way.


PUBLIC RELATIONS is the
practice of ..
EVALUATING your policies with re-
spect to the public interest,
IDENTIFYING your policies with the
public interest,
COMMUNICATING this state of iden-
tification to the people upon
whom your prosperity depends.
As to the business of the P/R
Committee Meeting, here's a capsule
report:
ATTENDANCE: Herb Savage & Roy
Pooley, Co-Chairmen; Ed Grafton,
Regional member, A.I.A. P/R
(Continued on Page 8)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Do You Want to Be Loved ...?

By ROY M. POOLEY, AIA








Over 100 Florida Installations



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1. Thermostat in each room-Temperature
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2. Low fuel cost-Temperatures easily re-
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3. Low initial cost-No other system can be
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5. Modulated heat-Both temperature and
volume of air are automatically modu-
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6. No power cost-No electricity required
for fans or thermostats; no wiring.
7. Filtered, circulated- air-Individual room
circulation prevents transmission of odors
and bacteria from other rooms.
8. Boiler location-Does not require cen-
trally located heating plaht. Uses gas or
oil.


University of Tampa
Eliot C. Fletcher, AIA,
Architect.
Charles T. Healy,
Engineer.
SelecTemp installed
in men's and
women's dormitories.


4. -.L


'SelecTemp is now
used in motels
ranging from 8 to
over 200 units.
Heating and hot
water from same
boiler.


We'll gladly furnish SELECTEMP data


MAIL COUPON, OR
PHONE COLLECT
FOR INFORMATION.



TAMCO


SUPPLY CO.
1302 GRAND CENTRAL
TAMPA, FLORIDA
JUNE, 1959


for your next installation.


Tamco Supply Co.
1302 Grand Central Ave. -
Tampa, Florida
-: Please send free SelecTemp booklet. ,
Please arrange for brief demonstration, in our office, of
SelecTemp unit in actual operation,
Name
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Want To Be Loved...?
(Continued from Page 6)
Committee; Bob Denny, Ad.A.
P/R Consultant; Bob Hansen,
John Grand, Fred Owles, Nils
Johnson and several guests.
RECOMMENDATIONS: *
1. Purchase of two each of the
four current P/R films from the
Institute at a cost of about $525.00.
These to be use as a tool in con-
junction with the proposed speakers
bureau, to be circulated from Chap-


ter-to-chapter with information on
their use.
2. Authorize and provide funds for
the Executive Director's office to
purchase necessary items for mailing
of printed matter, available from the
Institute, to a selected list now being
compiled.
3. Encourage development of a
celebration of the new regional status
for Florida to be held in conjunction
with the Board meeting scheduled in
July at Palm Beach.
,You may not know it, but Presi-
dent John Stetson gave your commit-


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tee quite a job-to-wit: "Make the
Architect the best known and liked
professional in the state" and all
in one year. Accepting the challenge,
your committee decided (with com-
mendable logic, I believe) that in
order to be the best liked, we will
first have to be the best known.
- Following this reasoning, it seemed
to be a good idea to ask our Archi-
tect Colleagues to meet people and
it looks like the best way to do this
is to be guest speakers at as many
meetings as possible-church, busi-
ness and civic clubs, P.T.A., and the
oyster shucker's picnic.
What's that whisper from the side?
"Oh sure,, but prithee, tell me how,
oh sage one?" Why, son, that's where
the film strips come in, of course.
By the way, if you, too, suffer from
fluttering butterflies arid galloping
heart throb at the lectern, I can
personally recommend Dale CaTnegie
and Toastmasters Clubs as good med-'
icine that's also fun to take.
Unofficial report by
Roy M. Poole., Chairman
P/R Committee F.A.A.

"These recommendations were approved
hv the Board of Directors at its April
25th meeting. The film strips are now
on hand, the first piece for selective
mailing is being ordered, and we under-
stand the celebration program is being
planned.


Survey on Status Ranks
Registered Architect First
Here's balm for the frustrated and
justification for the prideful! A sure)
b\ sociologist Vance Packard reported
in a recent issue of Look magazine
under the title of "The Pursuit of
Status," showed that a registered
architect is regarded as occupying the
very top rung on the ladder of social
status--at least by the good people
of Chicago where the survey was con-
ducted. The sure. established rank-
ing of occupations by status. The
architect was highest of seven status
groups. Next in line were stock broker,
medical specialist, executive of a na-
tional firm, Federal judge, law part-
ner in a prestige firm, flag rank
military officer and a Bishop-in that
order. Wonder what a Florida survey
would show?


.THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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This impressive $6,000,000 building
with its 446 apartments brings luxury
living to Chicago's business district.
On the 100ft. x 150 ft. lot, space was
at a premium. To make the most of it,
architects Milton M.'Schwartz & As-
sociates, Inc., and the Miller Engineer-
ing Company, both of Chicago, chose
concrete. With it, apartments are big...
ceilings a full eight feet. Yet floor to
floor height is only 8 ft. 104 in. Plaster
is applied directly to the concrete.
And concrete saved money-an esti-
mated $500,000. It saved time, made
easier scheduling, too. Concrete's al-
ways ready on short order.
Executive House sets a U.S. height
record for concrete. Today, for high-
rise buildings and monumental struc-
tures, more and more architects and
engineers are turning to concrete.


fowr cnerc -hear w-elrtmain croB
the width of the building provide neceamary
isftamce to wind forces.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
1612 East Colenial Drive, Oanl, Florida
A national organisition to improve and extend the uses of mnrrete


JUNE, 1959








;,j : ,i


Preference for Mutschler "design
original" kitchens is not confined to
builders and owners of individual
dwellings. For apartments, too, they are
the obvious choice. All homemakers
are quick to recognize the value of
Mutschler's many exclusive features, the
superb cabinetwork in both natural-
grain finishes and decorator colors
... and the Mutschler planning services
that fit the kitchen to personal operational
patterns. Consulting services of
Mutschler kitchen specialists are available
without cost to architects and
builders. For complete
information, mail coupon.


MUTSCHLBR KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
Subsidiary of MulscMer Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
299 N.L. 12t Terrace. Oakland Park, Fla. Phone: Logan 4-854
Please furnish me -with information about your services
for builders and architects.


name


firm

address

city, state


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Message from




The President



THE ARCHITECT vs. THE ENGINEER




By JOHN STETSON
President
Florida Association of Architects


For almost seven years the Florida
Association of Architects and the Flor-
ida Engineering Society have labored
to find an answer to the overlapping
of the two professional fields they
represent. We jointly approved an
"Architect Engineer Agreement"
which careful specified who-should-
do-what.. We all agree that this now
needs certain revisions, but basically
the idea is still sound. During the
years since the adoption of this docu-
ment, for the most part, we have co-
existed with no major flare-ups. Devi-
ations from the intent of the rules so
set up have been mostly by non-mem-
bers of the two professional organi-
zations. We have continued to do cer-
tain engineering, where it was a minor
part of the overall projects, just as
engineers continue to design build-
ings (not in their category) without
utilizing the services of an architect,
This exists in the best offices of both
professions.
Recently we have seen a widespread
infiltration of the field of architecture
by certain civil, mechanical, struc-
tural, and even air conditioning en-
gineers, as well as by land surveyors.
Residences, apartments, hotels, mo-
tels, commercial buildings, shopping
centers, schools and even churches
bear the seal of the engineer. A major
percentage of loans made by savings
and loan institutions in Palm Beabh
County have borne the seal of four
engineers. Not one ever received a
day's training in architecture. How far
could an architect go if he started
practicing engineering, before the
State Board of Engineer Examiners
JUNE, 1959


and the Florida Engineering Society
literally jumped down his throat?
On Thursday, April 23rd, Dick
Rogers, representing the State Board
of Architecture, Roger Sherman, Ben-
mont Tench and your president from
the F.A.A. met with the State Board
of Engineer Examiners and quite a
few engineers, at their convention in
Jacksonville. We presented our prob-
lem, were well received, and everyone
agreed that something should be done.
Their Board pointed out the crux of
the problem heretofore. The Board
of Engineer Examiners has no power
to keep engineers from practicing
architecture, but the State Board
of Architecture does, just as it can
stop shoe clerks or hod carriers from
doing so. Conversely, the State Board
of Architecture cannot stop an archi-
tect from practicing engineering, but
the, Engineering Board can. We
shouldn't look to the dentists or to
the realtors to, stop engineers from
designing residences; we should look
to ourselves.
Our Board for years has done an
admirable job, limited by lack of
funds, what everyone seemed to think
a weak registration law, foolish bick-
erings within the profession, etc.
While we argued over trifles, major
problems arose outside the jurisdiction
of the Board. Now the time has come
for our profession to stand firmly be-
hind those five men, giving them
every possible support. At a meeting
of the State Board of Architecture
held on May 1st, we reported our
findings. The Board immediately
ordered their attorney to take neces-


sary legal steps to enjoin three en-
gineers from the practice of architec-
ture. These will be used as examples
to encourage others to retreat into
their own realm. We assured the
Board that the entire profession will
always stand behind them in such mat-
ters, and if additional, even firmer
steps are required, let us proceed
immediately.
Photostatic copies of plans pre-
pared in violation of the Architectural
Registration Law have been and are
being accumulated. If you know cer-
tain chronic violators, let us hear
from you. If necessary, we'll enjoin
them. Our attorney points out that
this legal action then puts them in a
position whereby one further archi-
tectural commission attempted can
enable them to be "held in contempt
of court". We would like to see the
courts of the State remove some of
the policing load from our Board, but
there is no easy way to accomplish
this. A stronger Architectural Regis-
tration Law, while tougher to break,
would be more than proportionately
difficult to enforce. Before a culprit
can be tried in court, charges must be
filed by someone, and in our case
they must first come from you, then
from the State Board of Architecture.
Let us now face the result of all
of this. Yes, we will stop some en-
gineers, but others with the assistance
of unscrupulous architects and certain
building department officials, will
continue to find loopholes. Plan
stampers are no cleaner in one pro-
fession than in the other. Fee cut-
(Continued on Page 12)






Message from
The President...
(Continued from Page 11)
ters have been a major contributing
factor of our problems. Poor design
and inadequate planning and detail-
ing provide most of the rest. We can
blame no one but ourselves, so until
we improve this, little has been ac-
complished. From now on in, the en-
gineering profession will rightfully
watch the architects, to catch any or
all who continue to design structures
strictly listed as engineering by our


Agreement. Some architects will use
these facts to club clients now using
engineers for architectural work.
Our Boards have agreed to assist
each other in a general "houseclean-
ing" of this problem. We expect to
get an amended "Agreement" in the
hands of both Boards for printing
and distribution to the registered
members of their respective profes-
sions. We hope to get this Agree-
ment written into' their' by-laws, or
if necessary, State Registration Laws,
Thusly we can notify all state boards
and agencies of the situation, and it


will be unnecessary to re-write any
laws governing any other agency.
Actually, as an example, the State
Hotel Commission in allowing their
_employees to accept construction ap-
plications for apartments, motels and
hotels designed by engineers, are
knowingly aiding a violation of a
State Statute. For some years the
State Board of Health-has refused to
accept engineering plans prepared by
architects. We have been the for-
gotten lot, but this will no longer
be. We've been heard, but just for
the first time.


Appropriation Bills Omit

College of Architecture Funds


When an economy-minded House
and Senate passed, on May 21,
appropriation bills for the coming
biennium, they killed any chance
that the College of Architecture and
Fine arts at the U/F will move into
new quarters for at least three more
years, Last-minute efforts toward
Amending both bills to provide funds
for mnuch-needed building failed to
make even a small dent in the hold-
the-line policy of either house. The
result is that faculty and students
must continue to live under the do-
without and make-do policy which
has dogged the operations of the
College for the last decade.
That in itself is bad enough. Added
to it now is the distinct possibility
S that the National Architectural Accre-
diting Board of the Collegiate Schools
of. Architecture may strike the name
of the Uni\ersity of Florida from
its list of accredited institutions.
This possibility is foreshadowed by
the fact that in the recent past the
Board has found present conditions of
the College facilities to be "inade-
quate". With any improvement of
these conditions impossible without
funds; and with the door closed,
locked and bolted against availability
Sof these funds until 1961, there
appears to be a real and tragic chance
that the currently high status of the
country's fourth largest architectural
college at Gainesville may shortly be
cashiered.


Efforts to convey an understanding
of this situation to committees and
members of both legislative houses
have been of no avail this year. Dur-
ing the 1957 session, the College,
with support from practicing pro-
fessionals, won an appropriation of
$1,500,000 from a Legislature which
was as lavish with its fund-approvals
as the present one is frugal. But
with revenue of the last biennium
lagging some $64-million behind
1957 appropriations the victory was
hollow. Actual building operations
were curtailed along many fronts-
the College of Architecture among
them, though its building appropria-
tion had been given top priority.
This year the strongest representa-
tions from faculty, the Board of Con-
trol and the profession itself fell on
deaf ears of appropriation commit-
tees in both legislative houses. In the
final bill drafts, the total appropria-
tion for educational construction at
U/F amounted to only $2,672,720
in the House and to $2,509,560 for
comparable items in the Senate.
Amendments to both appropriation
bills were prepared in an effort to
bring the urgency of the building
funds required before the member-
ship of both chambers. The amend-
ment in the Senate was killed imme-
diately; and in the House it was
not even introduced!
The burgeoning Junior College
Program was also dealt a stunning,


though not as lethal, a blow. In the
House, $468,000 was added to the
base figure of $3,250,000 listed in
bills of both chambers. This brought
the appropriation up to that author-
iz-d for the four existing Junior Col-
leges during the 1957 session. The
Senate added $2,290,000 to its com-
mittee recommendations. But since
there now exists a difference of $17,-
500,000 between appropriations of
the two houses, the committee con-
ference necessary to adjust the dif-
ference will, in all probability, settle
for close to the,House figure.
In most instances, however, the
Iouse bill was more liberal than that
of the Senate. Some major items of
construction appeared in both bills.
For the U/F, both listed $1,418,960
for a "pharmacy wing and animal
facilities"-for which about $500,000
in matching Federal funds will be-
come available. For FSU a mathe-
matics and meteorology building was
listed at $1,182,359 and an addition
to the nuclear research building at
$451,220. Both bills contained an
item of $687,140 for renovation of
Lee Hall and dormitory construction
at Florida A & M; and common to
both bills also were two items for
the new University of South Florida
at Tampa-one a library and class-
room-office building at $1,965,000
and equipment for the first five of the
University's new buildings at $990,-
000.
But otherwise each appropriation
committee wrought its own curious
judgement on what undoubtedly was
a carefully documented list of Board
of Control recommendations. As a
(Continued on Page S0)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


WRIEMN&SKMMMUMMMORU
















































Ezra Stoller photo


House for Dora Ewing, Coconut Grove...


Masonry walls are natural gray concrete blocks laid on edge; others are
clear cypress, random-width boards. Roof is surfaced with rough-split
shakes. Chimney-ventilator is weathered copper. This building won another
award at the recent Cruise Conference of the AtA South Atlantic Region.
F R O(S OOF OV_.__-_-L _


HONOR AWARD
H SLEEPING
Residential Category

CLOSET

44th FAA Convention FIREgLACE
1958 A ETOP
RAMP UP- LIVING --CRP

TREE VERANODAH --RAMPUP---
ALFRED B. PARKER, FAIA, .._....... .
SEAT-
ARCHITECT
JUNE, 1959 13















MERIT AWARD
Residential Category


44th FAA Convention
1958


STARNES & RENTSCHER
ARCH ITECTS














Photos by Hank Koch


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































Residence for Earl M. Starnes, AIA, South Miami ...


F 7- '" "'\ Y- / -'\ "
This small house, planned for a family of four can best be .-
described in architect-owner's words:
"The idea of raising the building above the ground was
adopted from early pioneer Florida buildings. This increases
the quality of views from the house, it relieves some of the .
insect and moisture problems inherent in our climate and also '' ..; ..
makes more breeze available to the occupants. ,'
"The building is primarily shelter from sun and rain, about
40 percent of the area being porch and breezeway. Conceived ... /.-- /.
in a structural system that used timber in its best expression, i /
post and beam frames were pre-fabricated of Douglas fir on the
site and erected on the natural stone foundation walls, frames
spaced at 6' on center. Then 2" fir decking was placed on the ill "
roof and the floor beams, thus the structural decks became
finished ceilings and floors. Hinged doors were mounted di- r .
rectly to the structural posts to enclose the weathered-in spaces
such as living, dining and sleeping areas. The basic planning
concept was one of centering all activity about the open breeze-
way, thus dispensing functions to their best areas relative to this. J
"Where no openings were required stud curtain walls were
built and panelled with cypress. Redwood jalousies were used
in the living room west wall and jalousie doors used on the i -
east wall of the bedroom. /
"The bath was tiled with natural clay units, Dorothy -
Starnes being responsible for glazing some of the tiles to add "'
a bit of color to this area. The kitchen range and refrigerator ; '
is built-in. The ktichen counter is. polished keystone." ,


JUNE, 1959


































Mozert photo



Award of Merit-1959 AIA Honor Awards Competition

Tourist Center, Silver Springs, Florida Victor A. Lundy, Architect



These prize winning buildings-the only
Florida project to receive an AIA award
this year-were planned to replace the
original wooden structures which were de-
stroyed by fire in 1955. The new center
comprises three elements a boat dock
which sweeps in a great curve along the
edge of the Springs that are the bubbling
Source of the Silver River, the main pavil-
ion housing shops and rest rooms (with
offices on the second floor of the northern
portion) and a restaurant and coffee shop,
all inter-connected with covered walkways.
ld a Each of the units has been planned so that
additions can be made to follow the seg-
mental curves without disturbing the unity
of relationship that now exists. . Each
structure is framed in steel with both
columns and radial beams exposed as vig-
orous elements of the design pattern. None
of the walls are load-bearing; and on the
exterior they extend only to door height,
providing the illusion that ceiling and roof
canopy planes are "floating" above.
Victor Lundy photo
16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













































On the main building wide overhangs are cantilevered on both sides of a series of
exterior columns, the space between the shelter canopies and the building roof being
a skylight framed in aluminum, and glazed with blue-green heat-resisting glass.


Victor Lundy photos


JUNE, 1959


-s li































































THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Alm- Anu


















































The only homes that don't need

FULL M6 1 HOUSEPOI4WER

are strictly for the birds!

3 out of 4 homes in the United States, new as well as old,
suffer from low HOUSEPOWER... can't handle efficiently the
many electrical appliances now in daily use.
Wiring specifications for full HOUSEPOWER will make satis-
fied owners and more profits for you. Locally, F P&L is
backing the nation-wide, multi-million dollar HOUSEPOWER
campaign.., tells prospects "see your electrical contractor".


II












LIVE BETTER
eircrRitic0


JUNE, 1959


X.*s


. ::,_ V=
.aasw^*IJ-C








FAA Public Relations Workshop






Robert E. Denny, Public Relations Director for Henry J. Kaufman, Inc.,
of Washington, D. C., and P R Counsel for the AIA, conducted the first of
the FAA's new series of Professional Workshops held in Gainesville April
S :: 23-24, 1959. The day-and-one-half meeting was recorded; and published
S, here are significant excerpts from the transcript for information and guid-
ance of those unable to attend the meeting in person. Discussions have
been condensed; but direct quotations have been used where possible.


The Workshop opened with a defi-
nition of Public Relations. This is
the practice of: "1 . Evaluating
your policies with respect to the pub-
lic interest; 2 . Identifying your
policies with the public interest; 3 .. .
Communicating this state of identi-
fication to the people upon whom
your prosperity depends."
This comprises the theory of P/R
in which all three points are inter-
locking and all necessary to the suc-
cessful application of the tools of any
P/R campaign or program. Evalua-
tion directly implies both an under-
standing of where you, as a compe-
tent professional man, fit into the
life of your community and a knowl-
edgeable conviction of what your
activity can contribute. It's developed
partly through observation, partly as
a result of experience. It grows
through personal contacts and it can
be sharpened and clarified through
research, formal or not according to
circumstances.
Identification is less abstract. It
denotes the alignment of your work
and your aims with the individual
and collective efforts of your com-
munity toward improvement. But it
must be an honest alignment. And
in claiming the public's interest as
your own, your contribution to that
interest must be based solidly on
technical competence, professional in-
tegrity and a personal ability and
willingness to deliver what you offer.
Communication simply means the
methods used to establish identifica-
tion to link what you can do and


want to do with what needs doing
in the community in which you live
and in the interests of the public
you serve. These methods are various.
Not just publicity-newspapers, mag-
azines, brochures. These constitute
one sort of media only. Others are
speeches, film presentations, TV and
radio programs. All are important and
powerful when properly used. They
become most important profession-
ally when used for group action. And
that means, at local levels, the Chap-
ter.
The Chapter's job is community
relations. "It is, in many ways, the
biggest single opportunity to deal di-
rectly with the public. This is the
place to reach the all important
group which exerts influence on the
thinking of the community." This
job of community relations cannot be
done at the national level-and only
partially at the State level. The na-
tional organization can provide you
with things to help your Chapter do
that job.
Leaders in your community will
make decisions for that community.
And they need your help in one way
or another in order to make them.
Through these leaders community
groups will form opinions leading to
certain attitudes regarding commun-
ity affairs and action based on those
attitudes. The tools of communica-
tion, used consistently and sincerely
by a Chapter, will automatically gen-
erate identification and understand-
ing-and as direct result, the kind of
climate in which professional activity


can grow and prosper.
Chapters, of course, arc made up
of individuals. So the effectiveness
of the Chapter in developing and
maintaining a high standard of com-
munity relations is the measure of
the individual practitioner or firm's
P/R behavior. What, specifically are
some of the P/R tools and how can
the individual use them for the bene-
fit of his Chapter, his profession, his
community and, to close the circle,
himself?
Speaking is one. The Chapter can
set up a speakers' bureau. And mem-
bers who can talk-better yet, who
can talk and draw at the same time-
can staff it. Key the subjects of the
talks to specific groups. Keep the talks
short and above all simple-for the
audience is always a lay one without
the technical background of special-
ized training and experience.. Talk
about something-a community pro-
ject, or a certain building type, a com-
munity problem to which architec-
ture can help contribute a solution.
And talk in company with some
visual aid-a drawing, an exhibit, a
model, charts, film slides, a movie.
Whatever the subject, the one who
presents it must be first competent,
then articulate. A finished delivery is
less important. Competent and sin-
cerity are the vital things; and often
a relatively poor speaker will score
notable successes because he has
them and has been able, simply and
directly, to get them across to his
audience.
(Continued on Page 25)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































S TRADE MARK



3-DIMENSIONAL ALUMINUM GRILLES FOR RAILINGS AND DECORATIVE SCREENS
REFER TO 1959 SWEETS FILE 6e/BIu OR SEND FOR CATALOG M-59
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH, 460 MELWOOD STREET, PITTSBURGH 13, PA.


ii


rF 1
-(I rt ~~t~







The Enforcement Side of



The Registration Statute



It sets standards of good practice to protect the public; and the
State Board is making sure that these standards are maintained.


The annual spring meeting of the
Florida State Board of Architecture
was held May 1, 2 and 3, 1959, at the
Gait Ocean Mile Hotel north of Ft.
Lauderdale. The Board's legal agenda
occupied the first two 12-hour days
of the session; and when this was
completed, seventy-five items relating
to the enforcement of the architects'
registration law had been acted upon.
Included were three personal inter-
views, one of which constituted a
hearing on the basis of formal charges
filed against a Fort Lauderdale
architect.
The architect was John M. Peter-
man; and the hearing was conducted
by the Board's attorney, Harry T.
Gray, of Jacksonville. The hearing
took over three hours, with all tes-
timony being recorded by a court
stenographer. Charges had been filed
under Section 467.14, Florida Stat-
utes, on the basis of "gross incompe-
tency or negligence in the construc-
tion of buildings." As a result of the
testimony and its own deliberations,
the Board ordered that the certificate
of registration, No. 1001, of John M.
Peterman, be suspended for a period
of one year. The finding was made on
each of the two counts gross in-
competency and negligence but
the Board's decision stipulated that
disciplinary action on each should run
concurrently. The law provides for an
automatic reinstatement of a registra-
tion at the end of a suspension period
upon payment of required fees.
The other appearances before the
Board were largely for the purpose of
clarifying for the individuals con-
cerned the application of the registra-
tion law to their activities. One con-
cerned local representation of a corpo-
ration seeking to practice architecture
in Florida. The other involved the
legal authority of an architect to use
his seal on documents prepared in


large part by others. These two cases
point up provisions of Florida's regis-
tration law which still appear to be
misunderstood by a substantial seg-
ment of the architectural profession
in our State but which are an
especially important part of the
Board's regulatory activities.
The Florida law-Section 467.08-
states that no certificate of registration
shall be issued ". . to any corporation,
partnership, firm or association to
practice architecture in this state, but
all certificates shall be to individual
persons". In recent years a number of
"package dealers" and engineering
corporations have attempted to get
around this provision of the law by
employing registered architects as
"representatives" or "branch manag-
ers" or associates". Some architects,
in all good faith, have thus become
employees of such organizations. In
some instances they have obtained
jobs for their employers and have done
technically creditable work in prepar-
ing all documents necessary for con-
struction. But service contracts have
been between the building owner and
the firm-not between owner and
architect-thus indicating that archi-
tectural service was being furnished,
not by an individual, but by a corpo-
ration or firm employing the architect.
This situation is clearly a violation
of the existing statute. The Board's
position, under the law, is that the
service contract must be between the
owner and the architect producing and
sealing the documents. Legally, there
is nothing to prevent an architect in
Florida working with, or for, any
organization of his choice. But he,
not the organization, must furnish
and be responsible for whatever arch-
itectural services may be involved. He
must be the architect, in fact and by
contract.
As to the use of an architect's seal.


the law is equally clear and specific.
Section 467.15 states, "No architect
shall affix or permit to be affixed his
seal or his name to any plan, specifica-
tion, drawing or related document
which was not prepared by him or
under his responsible supervising con-
trol ...". This covers a wide range of
situations. One involves the operation
of an architect registered here who
maintains an active office in this state,
but spends the vast majority of his
time in an out-of-state headquarters
office. If he seals the documents pre-
pared in his Florida office without
more than perfunctory attention to
them, he is violating this statutory
provision.
This provision may also involve
operation of "branch offices" by
architects resident in Florida. And it
certainly applies to those resident
architects who labor under the misap-
prehension that as "associates" they
can legally affix their seal to docu-
ments prepared in all major aspects by
out-of-state individuals who have not
obtained registration to practice archi-
tecture in this state. Involved in this
type of situation are many operations
undertaken by chains of stores, motels,
restaurants and the like. A Florida
architect may, without question, per-
form services for such organizations.
But when he does so, he must accept
responsibility for their structures. He
must insist that he be in the position
to prove that his seal has been used
legally and that documents involved
have been prepared "under his respon-
sible supervising control," thus desig-
nating him-in fact and of record-as
the architect.
Records of the Board's enforcement
activities would show, however, that
such misuse of an architect's seal is
rare in comparison with the extensive
activities of individuals who practice
architecture within the framework of


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





the statutory definition but without
registration as an architect. Action to
halt this type of violation is constant
on the part of the Board; and recently
it has been substantially widened and
accelerated. At its May meeting, for
example, the Board received a report
from its investigating legal counsel
that six injunctions had been granted,
four in the Orlando area, one in
Tampa, another in Clearwater. Three
new legal proceedings were author-
ized against illegal practitioners and
an additional three were initiated
against registered architects for illegal
use of their seals.
These regulatory activities have
ranged the state. Three of the newly
started actions, for example, sprang
from the Miami area. Another was
located in Pensacola, another in St.
Petersburg, the sixth in Hollywood.
The point is that though some areas
of the state appear to be more soundly
cursed with illegal practice than others,
no area seems entirely free of it; and
the Board will wield its regulatory
power anywhere within jurisdiction
whenever evidence supports an allega-
tion sufficiently to justify legal action.
Such action is not necessarily a "last
resort" on the Board's part. But by far
the greatest number of "cases" which
are periodically considered by the
Board are effectively handled either by
personal contact by the Board's mem-
bers or legal staff or through corre-
spondence. Often, what appears to be
a clear-cut violation has been brought
about by ignorance on the part of
the individual concerned. Many
illegal practices of non-registered indi-
viduals have ceased when the provi-
sions of the statutes were clarified. And
in several cases violators have indicated
their willingness to seek registration
through the designated routine of
examination.
A substantial proportion of the
Board's legal agenda refers to improper
designation of firm names. Sometimes
this has occurred through misunder-
standing of the Board's Rules and
Regulations; but in other instances it
has appeared that an architectural firm
had been loosely designated merely to
cloak an iniquitous collaboration of a
non-registered practitioner and a plan
stamper. In an effort to plug this sort
of legal loophole, the Board has re-
cently undertaken an intensive re-study
of this section (Rule 7) of its Regula-
tions. A revision is now underway.
JUNE, 1959


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FLORIDA HOMES
DO NEED HEAT!

And you'll find built-in .
home heating in most of
the beautiful new houses
now on the market in
this area.

.-.- .


WARNINGI Don't let last winter's "summer" weather lull you into
expecting more of the same. The average Florida winter has many
chilly days, some cold ones. Ample, dependable home heating is
necessary. Makeshift "spot" heating methods can't do the job.

REMEMBER WINTER-BEFORE-LAST? Tourists left early because of
poorly heated rooms. Floridians with inadequate heat in their homes
suffered weeks of bone-chilling misery indoors. We learned all over
again that there's no practical substitute in Florida for a low-cost,
central home heating system. Last summer in South Florida alone
permanent heating was installed in 15,000 homes.

BUYING A NEW HOUSE? Most of the best ones now include eco-
nomical "built-in" heating. Check before you buy!

BUILDING A HOME? Assure a lifetime of indoor winter comfort by
including a central home heating system in the plans.


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newspapers reaching 535,000 homes, one magazine reaching
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


b



,---'






P. R. Workshop ...
(Continued from Page 20)
Another P/R tool is your office-
though from the looks of many, it
would seem most architects don't
realize this. It needn't be plush. But
neither should it look like the junk
yard which so many resemble. Fix
up your office so it reflects your own
personal competence and taste. And
key every element of your operation
likewise-your letterheads, cards, bro-
chures, photographs, renderings, Job
cards, specs binders. More people
than you realize see these things;
and what they see helps to determine
what they think of the individual of
which these things are a reflection.
Publicity is, of course, a vital P/R
tool, but one that's often little under-
stood and often misused. Chief thing
to remember about the mechanics of
publicity is that it's a two-way street.
Newspapers wants stories. But editors
usually don't have architectural knowl-
edge or experience. So you must give
them the facts they need to write in-
telligently about what you have done.
Furnish them with good photos and
a complete fact sheet on projects you


have done or may be doing. Name
the owner, the builder, the people
behind the project. Tell the editor
briefly about the job-what it is for,
what it will contribute to its location,
why it was designed as it was, how
it will help solve some business or
community problem, how materials
were used to produce certain design
effects. By doing this you will prob-
ably assure publication of your work,
for you will have been instrumental
in helping the editor to write an
accurate, complete story. Thus you
will have helped your. clients and
yourself by establishing identification


with the community's interests. And
you will also have helped your pro-
fession by showing the public what
good architecture is and how it comes
into existence.
A recent survey of opinion from
among editors of newspapers indi-
cated that architecture was news-but
that editors were having a hard time
getting this kind of news from archi-
tects. This suggests that much excel-
lent publicity can be generated by
getting to know newspaper editors,
finding out what they want-and
how they want it presented-and
(Continued on Page 26)


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P/R TOOLS AVAILABLE FOR CHAPTER USE FROM THE AIA
Four films issued by AIA have been purchased by the FAA for use by Florida
AIA Chapters in local P/R programs. They are: "What is a House", "A School
for Johnny", "A Place to Worship", and "Buildings for Business". Two more
are now in process, one on vocational guidance, the other on community plan-
ning. Also, Chapters can obtain "Plan for Learning" a new color film on schools
sponsored jointly by the AIA and U. S. Steel, and "New Age of Architecture"
developed by Time, Inc. . Four new leaflets are scheduled for distribution
this summer from the AIA. They are entitled "Architecture is Your Business",
"Facts and Fancies About School Planning," "Building is Your Business,"
"Contemporary House What it Is and Why".


Afej ,. ,~~.*-: t 7 .k U ~ i






P. R. Workshop ...
(Continued from Page 25)
then taking steps, individually, and
collectively as a Chapter, to make it
available.
Discussion by Chapter P/R Com-
mittee chairmen indicated that some
P/R techniques were being used to
advantage by architects in Florida.
For the Florida South Chapter, Pres-
ident EDWARD G. GRAFTON outlined
a recent meeting which featured a
panel discussion on church architec-
ture to which 500 ministers and
church building committee chairmen
had been invited. About 175 attended
the meeting. The panel included
three architects and three ministers
of differing faiths; and in addition to
the discussion, the AIA film "A Place
to Worship" was shown.
The increasingly effective work pro-
gram of the Mid-Florida Chapter was
outlined by FRED OWLES, its P/R
Committee chairman. The industry-
wide awards dinner started last year
has been planned as an annual affair.
Concerted effort has been made to


improve press and radio contacts.
Also, the Chapter has made its influ-
ence felt in community matters and
has been especially active in helping
to promote civic and regional plan-
ning activities. Though the Chapter
is necessarily small, plans for the fu-
ture are ambitious.
The Chapter's P/R Committee
now has five members. One will serve
as director of a speaker's bureau now
forming. Another will be the director
of public service charged with devel-
oping identification of the profession
with community activities. A third
will initiate and guide activities of
architects in the radio and TV fields;
and a fourth will work in the area
of professional services and contract
relationships with engineers, builders
and trade groups with which archi-
tects work. Each will pick a commit-
tee of Chapter members to work with
him; and coordination of the program
will be the responsibility of the com-
mittee chairman and the Chapter's
executive committee.
Comments on this program stressed
the importance of the individaul


architect as a Chapter member, tak-
ing an active part in various com-
munity activities as a public servant
-as a civic official or member of
local planning, zoning and appeal
boards. Stressed also was the advan-
tages of active membership in various
type of service clubs and charitable
organization. The point made was
that identification of architects with
activities of this sort served the double
purpose of promoting public aware-
ness of the profession as such and
clarifying the fact that the services
offered by the profession were aligned
with the public interest.

DO WE HAVE YOUR
CORRECT ADDRESS?
1 . If you change jobs or
move your home to another loca-
tion, get a change-of-address card
from your local Post Office and
mail it to us.
2 .. If you join an AIA Chap-
ter, tell us about it, listing your
current address. Busy Chapter sec-
retaries sometimes forget to file
changes promptly.
Don't let yourself become an
"unknown," a "moved," or a
"wrong address" . .


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






President's Message ...
(Continued from Page 18)
- and are you willing to contribute
the time necessary to serve on a
committee to study this problem?
We abhor bid shopping. But do we
assist the A.G.C. in their efforts to
stamp out this practice, by our own
endeavors? Who can say he was never
guilty of proselytism of someone
else's employee? Your executive di-
rector and your president continually
receive requests for short editorials,
to be written by members of the
profession. Why don't you write
them? That is what we need to
hear from more of you directly. Send
in articles, editorials and news. We
need them.
One of our greatest weaknesses is
silence. Those who wish to supplant
us or see us become the unknown
profession sound off through the
written and the spoken word, We
contribute little or nothing to the
medium of the press, radio or tele-
vision. An architect appearing as a
speaker at a civic club is as rare as a
Corinthian capital in modern design.


The old cliche, "It's the squeaking
wheel that gets the oil," is quite
apropos. Are we going to sit quietly
inert until our bearings burn out? Do
you expect others to do your talking
and writing? If you do, then it was
nice knowing you. See you at the
national convention of the Society
of Designing Draftsmen or the Ar-
chitectural Engineers of America in
1965.!




FAA Office to Move ..
As of July 1, the FAA's administra-
tive office will have a new address in
the Dupont Plaza Center. Since Feb-
ruary, 1958, it has been occupying
one small corner of the Florida South
Chapter's Lounge on the mezzanine
floor of the building. However, need
for more working space, coupled with
a revised set-up for the Lounge area
made the move desirable. The FAA
Executive Director's new office will be
Suite 414, Dupont Plaza Center, Mi-
ami 32. It is hoped that no change in
telephone numbers will be necessary.


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American Celcure
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Bryant Heating Company . 30
Cradle Drain Systems, Inc.. 25
Dunan Brick
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Electrend Distributing Co.. 30
Florida Foundry &
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Florida Home Heating Institute 26
Florida Portland Cement Co. 23
Florida Power & Light Co.. 32
Florida Steel Corp. . . 4
Florida Tile Industries 1
George C. Griffin Co. . 6
Hamilton Plywood . . 24
The Houston Corp. . . 3
Markowitz Bros., Inc. 2nd Cover
Moore Vents . . . 28
Perlite, Inc. . . .. 29
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. . 5
Solite . . . 7
Tiffany Tile Corp . . 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 31


JULY, 1959


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News & Notes


FAA Board to Meet
in Palm Beach August 8
The third 1959 meeting of the
FAA Board of Directors will be held
Saturday, August 8, at the Colony
Hotel in Palm Beach. At the May 30
meeting of the Executive Committee,
President JOHN STETSON announced
that the Palm Beach Chapter had in-
vited the Board to attend its meeting
the evening of August 7; and he in-
dicated that some sort of after-meet-
ing entertainment was being planned.
The day preceding the Board meet-
ing, Friday, August 7, will be devoted
to a Seminar on Office Practice.
This will be a particularly import-
ant meeting of the Board; and Chap-
ter Presidents and Director-represent-
atives are urged to communicate with
the FAA President, Secretary, or Ex-
ecutive Director relative to matters af-
fecting their Chapters which may in-
volve the state-wide activities of the
FAA and thus require consideration
by the FAA Board.
The matter of by-laws revision will
be a special order of business before
the Board at this meeting, since sub-
stantial changes appear necessary in
the by-laws as one result of Florida's
new regional status. A committee
named by President Stetson is now
working on this matter. It is the same
as that previously named as the "Flor-
ida Region" Committee-- CLINTON
GAMBLE, chairman, JOHN STETSON,
H. SAMUEL KRUSE, ANTHONY L. PUL-
LARA, IGOR B. POLEVITZKY and FRANK-
LIN S. BUNCH.
Another important item of the
agenda will be consideration of rec-
ommendations from Chapters relative
to possible revisions to Florida's reg-
istration law.

Smathers Introduces
New Tax Deduction Bill
Senator GEORGE SMATHERS has in-
troduced another bill to permit self-
employed persons, like architects, to
take deductions currently on a de-
ferred basis. His measure is the same
as the Keogh-Simpson bill (H.R. 10,
as reported in The Florida Architect
for May, 1959) except that it has an
effective date as of the taxable year
1961 instead of 1959. Object of the
change is to overcome present objec-
tions of the Senate Finance Commit-


tee which is now studying the Keogh-
Simpson measure.
The Florida Senator has taken steps
to furnish all architects in Florida
with information relative to his bill.
Watch for his communication. Read
and study it. Then write the Senator
your reaction. And write also to Sen-
ator HARRY F. BYRD, Chairman of the
Senate Finance Committee to which
the Smathers Bill has been referred.

New Conference Planned
on Junior High Schools
Preliminaries have been cleared for
setting up another school planning
conference under the joint sponsor-
ship of the FAA, the State Depart-
ment of Education and the U/F Col-
lege of Architecture and Fine Arts.
The Conference would be specifically
focused on junior high schools and
would be designed to clarify applica-
tion of new planning standards which
have emerged from a number of re-
cent research activities. Currently the
Conference is planned as a three-day
session tentatively scheduled for Sep-
tember 24, 25 and 26.


State Board Grants
56 New Registrations
at Mid-Year Meeting
The State Board of Architecture,
through its Secretary, MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, has announced that 56
new registrations to practice have
been granted since the Board's Janu-
ary meeting. Only 18 of these repre-
sent registration on the basis of writ-
ten (Junior) examination. Included
in this category were:
JOHN P. LYNCH, Ft. Lauderdale;
LARRY N. JUSTICE, THOMAS T. MAYO,
JR., LESTER N. MERWIN, and JOHN
ALLAN RUDOLPH, St. Petersburg;
HOWARD B. BOCHAIRDY, NORMAN E.
WASHER, Jacksonville; JAMES C.
CHAPMAN, JR., JOHN B. LANGLEY,
Winter Park; JACK R. JONES, Lees-
burg; EDWARD L. MEADOWS, Tallahas-
see; ROBERT C. PEACOCK, West Palm
Beach; JOHN B. GOSMAN, Palm Beach;
JOHN J. JETTON, Sarasota; SHERMAN
T. WHEELER, Fort Meyers; FRANK E.
SANCHEZ, JR., North Miami; HAROLD
E. SECKINGER, Miami; and HARVEY J.
EHRLICH, Miami Beach.
Those granted registration on the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






basis of registration in another State
include:
JUDSON E. SCHNALL, New York;
ROBERT J. BOEREMA, Miami; JEAN-
PIERRE TROUCHAUD, Washington, D.
C.; HAROLD P. BERGEN, Ormond
Beach; CORRELL R. STINSON, Win-
ston-Salem; EDWIN H. CORDES, New
York; PAUL B. HENDERSON, Stuart;
RICHARD H. MITCHELL, Ft. Lauder-
dale; ALFRED KASTNER, Alexandria,
Va.; ALFRED D. REID, Pittsburgh;
CAMILLE E. CHARBONNEAU, Clear-
water; SAMUEL R. DE PEUGH, Largo;
THOMAS P. HERITAGE, Greensboro, N.
C.; CLARENCE W. DOLL, St. Peters-
burg; ALLAN H. GROSSMAN, Elberon,
N. J.; EDWARD K. SCHADE, Pittsburgh;
JEROME V. RAY, Springfield, Ill.; EU-
GENE J. D'ANOS, New York.
Registrations were granted the fol-
lowing on the basis of NCARB cer-
tificatcs:
JOHN E. HARWOOD, Brentwood,
Tenn.; EDWARD JOHNS, Atlanta; DON-
ALD WAYNE GOODWIN, Akron, Ohio;
AARON SCHWARZ, Brooklyn, N. Y.;
ABRAIIAM H. SALKOWITZ, Jamaica, N.
Y.; ROBERT W. KAHN, Trenton, N. J.;
BRADFORD S. TILNEY, New Haven,
Conn.; L. FRANK HARRIS, Tampa;
JAMES MW. BIRD, San Diego, Calif.;
VICTOR W. RONFELDT, Asbury Park,
N. J.; CHARLES LEONARDI, New York;
ROY D. MURPHY, Urbana, Ill.; AR-
NOLD NYE, Nashville, Tenn.; WAL-
LACE BEARDSLEY, JR., Auburn, N. Y.;
MORRIS KETCHUM, JR., New York;
THOMAS B. BEALLE, JR., Mobile, Ala.;
AUGUST L. POLIER, Raleigh, N. C.;
JOHN C. HUPFER, JR., Denver, Colo.;
Re-instatement of registration was
granted to NAT C. HOGDEN of Beth-
esda, Md. Registrations on the basis
of oral (Senior) examinations were
granted to JAMES P. GILMORE, Mont-
gomery, Ala.; and ALBERT K. WIL-
SON, Wilmington, Del.
The foregoing list brings to 142
the total number of registration cer-
tificates granted by the Board this
year. Only 56 of this number were
granted on the basis of the Junior
written examination. In January 124
candidates took the written examina-
tion; and of this number, 38, or 30.6
per cent passed. Last month the num-
ber of applicants totaled 158, but only
18 completed the examinations with
the passing grades necessary for reg-
istration. The number of successful ap-
plications represented 11.4 per cent
of the total taking the written exams
in June.
JULY, 1959


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The Inner City ...
(Continued from Page 11)
buildings mixed with new. This mix-
ture is one of Downtown's greatest
advantages, for Downtown streets
need high-yield, middling-yield, low-
yield and no-yield enterprises. The
intimate restaurant or good s t e a k
house, the art store, the university
club, the fine tailor, even the book
stores and antique stores it is these
kinds of enterprises to which old
buildings are so congenial.
Without a mixture on our streets,
our Downtowns would be superficial-
ly standardized. But old buildings and
large cities are especially suited to the
small, specialized enterprise which
must draw on supplies and skills out-
side itself. Its market is so selective
that it must have exposure to tens of
thousands of people. The chief mag-
net of the Downtown is the enormous
collection of small elements, where
people can see them, at street level.
The Citizen's Role
The citizen doesn't have to be a
planner or architect to ask the right
questions in the interest of his city:
How can new buildings capitalize on
the City's unique qualities? Does the
City have a waterfront that can be
exploited, or an unusual topography?
How can the City tie in new build-
ings with old ones, so that each com-
plements the other and reinforces the
quality of continuity a city should
have?
The ultimate expert on such ques-
tions can be the citizen. What is
needed is an observant eye, curiosity
about people and a willingness to
walk. He should walk not only the
streets of his own city, but the streets
of every city he visits. He will under-
stand his own city a little better-
and perhaps steal a few ideas.
There is a wonderful challenge!
Rarely before has the citizen had such
an opportunity to re-shape his city,
and to make it the kind of city he
likes and that others will like too.
Citizens can decide what end-results
they want- and then adapt the re-
building machinery to suit them. If
new laws are needed, they can agi-
tate to get them.
Designing a dream city is easy.
Re-building a living one takes imagi-
nation. It takes the desire of the
citizen as well as the three-dimen-
sional concepts of the Architect. Col-
laboratively it can be accomplished.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Campus Planning ...
(Continued from Page 17)
Klauder offers sage advice: "In deter-
mining the posture of buildings, as
much heed should be given to the
spaces between the buildings as to the
buildings themselves; that is to say,
the voids are as important as the
solids. One is reminded of the wheel
-usefulness depends upon the void
at its centre. These spaces must be
well proportioned in themselves and to
the adjacent or surrounding build-
ings."
The size of courts and the proxi-
mity of building to building deserve
the most careful attention. Everything
else being equal, it seems desirable
that buildings be compactly located
and set within close walking distance
of each other.

Plan of Landscape Development
The landscape setting of a campus
is no less important than the building
design. Planting serves as the means
by which buildings can be bound to-
gether visually, as the furnisher of cut-
door space in the same way that chairs
and tables furnish indoor space, as an
agreeable contrast to the geometric
form of buildings, and as a semi-
transparent solid which veils but does
not mask the surrounding buildings,
thus heightening their over-all beauty.
One cannot but be shocked at the
barrenness of so many Florida schools.
In an area where nature has provided
such an abundance of material, one
cannot but be amazed that years some-
times go by without the planting of
a single tree or shrub.
Somehow, our energies seem to be-
come so exhausted with the problems
of site acquisition and building design
that we have none left for the de-
velopment or maintenance of the land-
scape. I submit that a plan of land-
scape development, prepared and car-
ried out as a joint venture of land-
scape architect and college service
personnel, is as important and as ne-
cessary to the over-all effectiveness of
a college campus as a plan for build-
ings or a plan for circulation.
In summary, a general development
plan has three broad patterns: land-
scape, building groups, and circula-
tion. These are the means. The end
is a campus that is functional, econo-
mical, and attractive-an environment
that will touch the heart and enlarge
the vision.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


Ll1J A .L 1690 MONROE DRIVE, N. E.
A OFFICES AND YARD







STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154


JULY, 1959


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Wherever there are families, there's daily

need for torrents of hot water. Naturally, that

calls for a modern, fully-automatic

ELECTRIC WATER HEATER

Cleanest Simplest Safest Cheapest Coolest
Can be installed anywhere-no vents or flues needed


LIVE BETTER*
C^tcrRic .


* In FPL-served
areas, unit sales
of Electric Water
Heaters last year
were 6Y2 times the
national average.
* Selling aids and
factual data avail-
able through any
FPL office.




THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I~~UV~ --







0 Fealherock introduces E~t'ling new
departures in architectural. and
landscape design lor the creative
architect. Weighing one eighth Ihe
weight ol normal rock. Fealherock
r has a unique Stru(lure. enabling
ease of application, and maximum
latiludes in creating decorative
arrangements. UWed as wall lacing
Featherock can be easily formed
or tiled to any size or shape by
the simrrple use or chisel, bit or
6 saw. Available in grey or charcoal.
Featherock combines strength and
Q durability wilh a natural beauty






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"ARCH ITECTS'



OMNIBUS"


... At this year's FAA Convention the spotlight will
be on Design and the theme suggests a program,
now taking shape, that will explore the ways in which
Sthe art in architecture is molding the life of the
community, the neighborhood, the family and the
individual . The Jacksonville Chapter will be the
Sponsoring Host; and its members invite your inter-
est, your presence and your participation . Better
mark your calendar now for November 12, 13 and
14 at Jacksonville ..









Convention headquarters will be the
brand new Robert Meyer Hotel in
downtown Jacksonville. Convention
rates will be moderate. Full pro-
gram details will be sent you in
plenty of time to assure the com-
fortable accommodations you will
j want When you receive them,
act promptly, for the Convention
program promises a heavy attend-
ance and reservations are always
and necessarily limited. ....


45th ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE FAA