Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00057
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00057
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text






























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M AKOWITZ BROS., INC.
MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS





HONORS the ARCHITECT

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MARCH, 1959


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



n7 7is 4wue ---


Junior College Planning Conference
Slated for April 10-11 at Gainesville . . .
April Board Meeting to Include P/R Workshop . .
Site of FAA's 1959 Convention . . . . .
January Board Meeting Set Attendance Record . .
44th Convention's Architectural Awards . . .
In This Project People Come First . . . .
FAA Honor Award, Robert C. Broward, Architect
The FAA's 1959 Committee Structure and Personnel .
Vertical Committee Assignments .. . ...
Non-vertical Standing Committee Assignments .
New Date Set for Regional Conference Cruise . .
Message From The President . . . . ..
By John Stetson, President, FAA
Workshop For A Professional .. . .. ... .
Office of William G. Crawford, Architect
What's Wrong With Specifications? . . . .
News and Notes ...............
State Board Grants 59 New Registrations . . .
Advertisers' Index ..............


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo, Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
Robert H. Levison, First Vice-President, 425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater
Verner Johnson, Second Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, Third Vice-President, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.
DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krus6; BROWARD COUNTY:
Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C.
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl,
J. Snyder, Jr.; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar;
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH:
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.
THE COVER
Robert C. Broward, of Jacksonville, received the only award given in the
Merchant Builder category of the 44th Annual FAA Convention's exhibit of
architects' work. The Honor Award was given for seven houses designed for
the new Laurel Grove development in Orange Park, near Jacksonville. The
illustration suggests how the project has been planned to provide good resi-
dential design in a setting wherein the natural beauty of the landscape has
been preserved to the greatest possible degree. The story of this development
starts on page 12.


4

4
4
6
9
. 11
12

16-18
16-17

18
19

20

. 23
. . . 26
. . . 29
....... 30


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub;
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of Illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN, AIA Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 31959

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


































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Junior College Planning Conference

Slated for April 10-11 at Gainesville


April 10 and 11 have been selected
as the dates for a two-day conference
on Junior College planning to be held
in Gainesville. Sponsors of the meet-
ing officially designated as "Flor-
ida Community Junior College Facili-
ties Conference" are the FAA, the
State Department of Education and
the U/F College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, in cooperation with the
Florida Association of Public Junior
Colleges, the U/F College of Educa-
tion and the College of Education of
FSU.
The major purpose of the confer-
ence is to provide an opportunity for
architects and others interested in and
concerned with junior college build-
ings to gain fuller knowledge and un-
derstanding of the overall needs of
this specialized type of educational
facility. Educators as well as archi-
tects will be welcome, according to
Dr. James L. Wattenbarger, Director
of the Division of Community Junior
Colleges of the State Department of
Education. Sponsors of the Confer-
ence view it as an opportunity for
both architects and educators to meet
on common ground in discussing some
of the technical aspects of junior col-
lege planning and in exploring possi-
bilities for the full development of
this comparatively new educational
facility.
Toward that end a program has
been mapped to include three general
themes: 1) Responsibilities and Po-
tentialities of Florida's Public Com-
munity Junior Colleges; 2) Site De-
velopment and Master Campus Plan-
ning; 3) Planning Requirements and
Problems. Under these headings will
be considered such specific subjects as
junior college surveys relative to both
curricula and buildings; principles of
campus planning; cost considerations
and data; and space utilization.
As now planned, attendance at the
Conference will entail a small registra-
tion fee which will be used to defray
the costs of reporting the various ses-
sions and panel discussions. It is
hoped that results of this two-day
meeting can be made available to


those attending in published form.
The Conference program took form
as a result of a day-long meeting in
Gainesville January 26 at the U/F
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts. Attending this meeting were
JAMES E. GARLAND, representing the
FAA on thd Conference SteeringCom-
mittee, E. ELLIS DUNCAN, chairman
of the FAA Committee on School
Planning, ROGER W. SHERMAN, FAA
Executive Director; A. EUGENE CEL-
LAR, SIDNEY R. WILKINSON, FREDER-
ICK W. KESSLER, EDGAR S. WORT-
MAN, also A. ROBERT BROADFOOT,
JR., and FORREST R. COXEN, State
School Architect. Representing the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
were Dean TURPIN C. BANNISTER and
JAMES T. LENDRUM. Present from the
State Department of Education we're
Dr. CARROLL W. MCGUFFEY, School
Plant Administrator, and Dr. JAMES
L. WATTENBARGER. Other educators
attending the meeting included Dr.
LEON HENDERSON, Dr. R. L. JOHNS,
Dr. EUGENE LAWLER, Dr. JOSEPH M.
LEPS, Dr. B. R. TILLEY and Dr. ROB-
ERT L. FAIRING.
A Conference Steering Committee
to work out final details for the April
meeting was named. Chairman is Dr.
Wattenbarger; and members include
James E. Garland, Dr. Bannister, Dr.
Henderson, Dr. Lawler and Dr. Mc-
Guffey.


April Board Meeting to
Include PIR Workshop
Attending the Jacksonville FAA
Board meeting was LESTER N. MAY.
And he left with the assurance that
the April meeting of the Florida
North Chapter, of which he is presi-
dent, will become a highlight in
annals of the Chapter. As a matter of
fact, the affairs of architects will
nearly, if not quite, take over Gaines-
ville during the week of April 20.
That is the week of the architectural
students' Home Show, sponsored and
directed by the AIA Student Chapter
at the U/F.
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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April Board Meeting ...
(Continued from Page 4)
In addition, the FAA's P/R Com-
mittee is planning to stage a two-day
"Workshop" session on April 23 and
24, just prior to the Board meeting
scheduled for the 25th. The work-
shop idea is the first of a series of
such affairs planned to be held in
conjunction with Board meetings and
was proposed at the Board's January
meeting by EDWARD G. GRAFTON,
Florida South Chapter president, who
is a member of the National AIA P/R
Committee. He and ROY POOLEY,
FAA P/R Chairman, are now work-
ing out plans for the program with
the AIA'S P/R counsel, ROBERT H.
DENNY, in Washington. Denny and
EDWIN B. MORRIS, JR. of the Octagon
staff will conduct the workshop ses-
sion.
Though the two-day meeting will
be largely an instructional session for
Chapter P/R men, presidents and sec-
retaries will be urged to attend. And
President Stetson has stated that any
FAA member from any Chapter will
be welcomed also. Dean TURPIN BAN-
NISTER has offered full cooperation of


his department; and it is likely that
the workshop will be held in one of
the architectural college buildings. De-
tails will be released later for publi-
cation in the April issue of The Flor-
ida Architect.
The meeting of the Florida North
Chapter will be held Saturday night,
April 24. All FAA Board members
have been invited to attend.


Decidedly worth quoting is this
paragraph from the News of the
Georgia Chapter, edited by WILLIAM
E. WILLNER.
"So far the Public Relations Com-
mittee has never suggested a free cof-
fee hour, but they have some other
ideas they'd like us to mention. They
think you should have an office bro-
chure of jobs done, film slides with a
viewer and a scrapbook--all within
easy reach. And, of course, a display
of your work in your office. These are
part of what they mean when they
ask, 'Does your office have available
adequate tools to explain the Archi-
tect's services to the client?' You are
on the right track if you can answer
'Yes'."


Site of FAA's 1959 Convention ...


The new Rdbert Meyer Hotel in Jacksonville will be the site of the FAA's 45th
Annual Convention scheduled for November 12, 13 and 14, 1959. Hosts to
the Convention will be the Jacksonville Chapter; and plans now being formu-
lated suggest that the program will be uniquely varied and full of inspirational
value. The stated theme is "Architects' Omnibus". Walter B. Schultz is the
Chapter's Convention Chairman. His committee will be named shortly.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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This engraving was made directly from an 11 by
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I


I







January Board Meeting Set Attendance Record



If numbers and the size of the agenda are indications, the FAA's 1959 Adminis-
tration is off to a rousing start. All but one of Florida's ten AIA Chapters were


represented; and the
dents as well as by


meeting was also attended by a number of Chapter presi-
several interested members of the Jacksonville Chapter


The first meeting of the 1959 FAA
Board of Directors was held too late
in January to report it in the Febru-
ary issue of The Florida Architect. It
took place in the Roosevelt Hotel at
Jacksonville on January 24, was at-
tended by 43 people and disposed of
an agenda containing 26 items to set
a new high for both attendance and
activity. CLINTON GAMBLE, present as
the AIA Regional Director, spot-
lighted the FAA's rapid growth by
commenting that this Board meeting
had drawn an attendance greater than
that registered for many FAA annual
conventions during the last ten years.
The evening before, most Board
members had attended a spirited
meeting of the Jacksonville Chapter-
also well attended by a vigorously
vocal membership. In opening the
Board's meeting FAA President JOHN
STETSON pointed out that a custom
had started which he hoped would
grow into a firm policy of future FAA
administrations. Each Board meeting
this year, he said, would be held in
conjunction with a Chapter meeting,
with the "Host Chapter" membership
invited to attend the Board meeting.
Before the meeting adjourned, the
following itinerary had been approved:
April, Chapter meeting April 24,
Board meeting April 25, with Gaines-
ville the place, Florida North Chapter
the hosts. The June meeting will be
in Palm Beach, with the Palm Beach
Chapter hosting a party on the pre-
ceding evening. In September the
Board will meet in Tallahassee with
the Florida North Central Chapter;
and the pre-convention meeting in
November will again be held in Jack-
sonville, where the local Chapter will
act as hosts for the 45th Annual FAA
Convention as well as the FAA Board.
The President reported the resig-
nation as First Vice-President of WIL-
LIAM B. HARVARD, from the FAA's
Central District. Nominations to fill
this vacancy included ROBERT H.
MARCH, 1959


LEVISON, ARCHIE G. PARISH, ERNEST
T. H. BOWEN, II, and ROBERT B.
MURPHY. In accordance with By-Law
procedure, the Board balloted and
elected ROBERT H. LEvISON, currently
a second-term president of the Florida
Central Chapter, to fill the office.
Directors approved the following
as named by President Stetson as
members of the Board's Executive
Committee: H. SAMUEL KRUSE, im-
mediate past president; ROBERT H.
LEVISON, first vice-president; VERNER
JOHNSON, second vice-president; AR-
THUR LEE CAMPBELL, third vice-pres-
ident; FRANCIS H. WALTON, secretary;
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, treasurer, and
CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA Regional Di-
rector and a member of the Broward
County Chapter.
Also appointed, was a Florida
Region Committee to work as a liaison
with the Regional Director in coordi-
nating plans and By-Law changes as
may be necessary to permit Florida to
assume full AIA regional status in


Robert H. Levison of Clearwater was
elected by the FAA Board as the FAA's
First Vice President to fill the one-
year vacancy created by the resigna-
tion of William B. Harvard. He is now
serving a second term as the president
of the Florida Central Chapter.


June, 1959, as already approved by
the AIA Board. Named were, for the
Region, IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, FAIA,
and FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, and for the
FAA H. SAMUEL KRUSE and AN-
THONY L. PULLARA. This committee
will work directly with the AIA Re-
gional Director and the FAA Presi-
dent.
The President spoke of the FAA's
need for long range planning and
State Board liaison for the FAA, and
proposed that a Planning Committee
be named to meet this. The Board
approved the suggestion of ROBERT
H. LEVISON that this committee be
composed of the presidents of Flor-
ida's ten AIA Chapters; and President
Stetson immediately appointed him
as the new committee's chairman.
The Board also approved the Presi-
dent's nomination for committee
chairmen. A full listing of the com-
mittees appears on pages 16 and 17.
Reporting on the subject of regional
development, AIA Director GAMBLE
expressed the hope and belief that
the FAA will shortly become "a direct
line" to the AIA national organiza-
tion. He stated he did not think that
Florida's new regional director would
have or need "a complete organiza-
tion administratively under his con-
trol". But as a member of both the
AIA and FAA Boards, close liaison
would be possible at all times, thus
making it practical to "let the FAA,
in this case, act as the administrative
part of the region". He pointed out
that this arrangement was working out
well in Texas and had been adopted
in all essentials by the California
Region formed last year.
Considerable discussion was held
over ways and means for advancing
the professional competency of FAA
members through enlarging the scope
of the FAA's service facilities to mem-
bers. The president touched on the
possibilities of holding seminars on
(Continued on Page 31)













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44th Convention's Architectural Awards


Among the outstanding features of
the 44th FAA Convention was the
exhibit of architects' work, ranged
along "Peacock Alley" of the Deau-
ville Hotel which commands a pano-
rama of the hotel's pool and the broad
Atlantic beyond. Some 40 mounts
had been submitted-this year hung
by a hard-working exhibit committee
of the Mid-Florida Chapter headed
by GEORGE BAGLEY and JOHN LANG-
LEY. Submissions were divided into
five categories-residential, commer-
cial, institutional, remodelling and
merchant builder. From them a blue-
ribbon, AIA top-brass jury picked five
Honor Awards and four Awards of
Merit.
The jury was composed of AIA
President JOHN NOBLE RICHARDS,
FAIA, AIA Past-President LEON
CHATELAIN, JR., FAIA, and PHILIP
WILL, JR., FAIA, the AIA's first vice
president. It selected the following
submissions for FAA honors:
Residential Honor Award to
ALFRED BROWNING PARKER for the
Coconut Grove house of Dora Ewing;
and a Merit Award to STARNES AND
RENTCHER, Miami firm, for a resi-
dence in Dade County.
Commercial The Honor Award
went to VICTOR LUNDY, Sarasota, for
his design of the Warm Mineral
Springs Inn, Venice. Two. Merit
Awards were given in this category:
one to ALFRED BROWNING PARKER for
his Alliance Machine Company build-
ing in Miami; the other to MARK
HAMPTON of Tampa for his design
for the Davis Medical Building in
Tampa.
Institutional The firm of
PULLARA, BOWEN AND WATSON won
the Honor Award for the North Side
Bank of Tampa; and the Merit Award
went to the Miami Beach firm of
SMITH AND KORACH for the design of
the Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity
in Gainesville.
Remodelling The jury picked
only one award in this category an
MARCH, 1959


The Awards Jury of the 44th FAA Convention. Left to right: FAA President
John Noble Richards, FAIA, Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, AIA Immediate Past-
President, and Philip Will, Jr., FAIA, AIA First Vice President. Flanking the
Jury are, left, Joseph M. Shifalo, 1958 Convention Chairman, and H. Samuel
Kruse, 1958 FAA President.


Honor Award to THE EDWIN T.
REEDER ASSOCIATES, Miami, for execu-
tion of the Central National Bank
in Jacksonville.
Merchant Builder The single
Honor Award went to ROBERT C.
BROWARD, of Jacksonville, for his de-
sign of seven houses in the Laurel
Grove project in Jacksonville.
The FAA Annual awards were pre-
sented to winning architects by AIA
Regional Director CLINTON GAMBLE
at the Convention's Awards Lunch-


eon, Thursday, November 20.
This year, unfortunately, no selec-
tion was made by the jury for a
traveling exhibit as undertaken last
year and in 1954 by the Florida Cen-
tral Chapter. Details of routing and
scheduling these former travelling
exhibits have been carried out by the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
of the U/F, under direction of JOHN
L. R. GRAND. This year the College
has found it impractical to continue
this activity.


PUBLICATION OF AWARD WINNERS . .
Prior plans had contemplated publication of all award-
winning buildings in this issue of The Florida Architect.
Lack of space, however, and the necessity of including
other important FAA activity reports made this impractical.
Therefore, only one of the awards is included in this issue
- the houses in the Laurel Grove development at Orange
Park, for which Robert C. Broward received an Honor
Award in the Master Builder category. Publication of other
award winners will appear in forthcoming issues. The
exception to this is the Warm Mineral Springs Inn for which
Victor Lundy received an Honor Award in the Commercial
category. This appeared in the August, 1958, issue.


7 ~








In This Project People Come First...


~ C T 0 R
4e r


HONOR AWARD
Merchant Builder Category

ROBERT C. BROWARD
ARCHITECT
Jacksonville Chapter


~""""'
"""~"~
........,
_1


The award-winning houses at Laurel
Grove are proof in themselves that
suburban Florida could, if it wished,
escape the crawling curse of the pro-
ject house devoid of understanding,
taste or skill. According to its architect
Laurel Grove itself is ". . an attempt
by an enlightened builder and an
architect to create a quiet residential
neighborhood conceived, designed and
constructed according to the technical,
esthetic, social and financial circum-
stances of the age in which we live".
As developments go, this is a small
one. Completed it will contain 48
homes, most of them built according
to one of seven standard layouts, but
varying widely in three-dimensional
treatment and utilization of materials.
This, of course, is standard procedure.
But where the average project builder
runs plans up in lines along a waffle-
grid of streets to squeeze the final
advantage from site mass-production,
in Laurel Grove the standard plan has


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


become merely one element of design.
Others are the land itself, the growth
of pine and palm and palmetto which
makes the Florida landscape, finally
the people themselves who will make
Laurel Grove into the kind of neigh-
borhood its developers have visioned.
Thus standardization is, in itself, a
variable here. And the whole tract is
a kind of complex, unfolding as it
grows according to a master plan, but
with utmost flexibility of design to
maintain the original intent at every
stage.
As concerns planning, lots are a
minimum of 15,000 square feet. Each
house is planned for freedom, open-
ness and convenience--but each is
set relative to others so that privacy
is secured. Much glass has been used,
as the architect expresses it, ". . not
because it was the thing to do, but
because by planning properly we have
saved natural beauties of the land
which are worth viewing through


L I


3.; -N














glass". Where required, fences of nat-
ural wood are used as screens; or a
wall of masonry will outline an in-
terior court or patio. In practically
every case a wall of glass on one lot
looks toward a screening wall of mas-
onry or wood on another.
Construction of these houses is the
result of studies to determine methods
giving greatest design freedom in the
choice and detailing of materials. The
structural system is based on the maxi-
mum span of a 4 by 12 wood beam
and the maximum span of 3 by 6
double t-and-g wood decking. In every
house ceilings are the exposed surface
of the decking. Exteriors are of pat-
terned masonry (both brick and con-
crete), board and batten and grooved
plywood variously combined. Masonry
surfaces are left in natural colors,
wood is stained gray or painted in
muted, neutral tones. Details, such
as door and panels are finished in
bright and vivid colors.












. "- .. ..... - . .
...... 1 '










r t t \ / \ :J,
\1L.3







RA-!
..^^~- ':'I': [ __ \ / __
ii


MARCH, 1959






















































































14


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Suburbia's Hope-"Good Design is a Good Investment"


1---



- [-- 1L7
I~ 6 I


L__I__


* L


Another of the "standard" plans
which is that for the house shown in
two views on this page. Houses are in
the $20,000 to $30,000 class and
contain up to four bedrooms.


.u- -




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,- p .q - '- -

** ," -A'. ., -, .
h.sr -. .i ". a "'"

MARCH, 1959 15


I,
CP-i~P~CBe"~ ~~3
as~7~L~i~
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"c'+'
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Personnel and Duties of Vertical Committees for 1959






DAYTONA FLORIDA FLA. NORTH FLA. NORTH FLORIDA JACKSON- MID- PALM
BROWARD BEACH CENTRAL FLA. NORTH CENTRAL WEST SOUTH VILLE FLORIDA BEACH
I ... CHAPTER AFFAIRS-
Chairman, John L. R. Grand (Florida North)
Dept. of Arch. Univ. of Fla., Gainesville Herbert S. William P. Sidney R. Jack Ernest J. Ula Edward G. Thomas E. John A. Raymond H.
Johnson Greening Wilkinson Moore Stidolph Manning Grafton Ewart Burton Plockelman
Duties: To make the Chapter absolutely necessary to the pro-
fession locally and to the individual practitioner, and the
individual a completely necessary segment of the Chapter,
through proper enlightenment of each as to the duties to
and benefits each can offer the other.

2 ... EDUCATION -
Chairman, Thomas Larrick (Florida North)
730 N. E. 9th Ave., Gainesville Robert E. Ralph Donald J. Thomas C. Ernest R. Daniel T. Trip George R. Richard B. Edmond A.
Hansen Spicer West Larrick Daffin Hart Russell Fisher Rogers Pachner
Duties: To bring the profession closer to higher education and
higher education closer to the practicing professional. And to
set the machinery in motion to develop a state-wide group
of local training programs for draftsmen and office help to
accomplish the many tasks required of them by a profession
already overcrowded by too many principals.

3 ... OFFICE PRACTICE -
Chairman, Robert H. Levison (Florida Central)
425 So. Garden Ave., Clearwater Herbert S. Edwin M. Edgar C. Thomas C. Ernest Hugh J. Clarence E. George R. John T. Hilliard T.
Duties: To immediately set up workshops for the practicing Johnson Snead Hanebuth Larrick Daffin Leitch Hamer Fisher Hart Smith
architect to provide training in architectural law, streamlined
office operation, specification writing, bidding procedures and
better income potentials from professional practice.

4 ... AWARDS and SCHOLARSHIPS -
Co-Chairmen, Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA (Fla. North)
Dept. Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville Robert E. Francis Donald J. Thomas C. Ernest R. Daniel Alfred B. George R. Joseph E. Philip M.
Hall Craig West Larrick Daffin Hart Parker Fisher Carlisle Jullien
Wahl J. Snyder, II (Florida South)
1177 N. E. 79th St., Miami Jorgen G.
Hansen
Duties: To encourage scholarships and awards to be given at
the high school level, for the purpose of developing better
college material and interesting students now lost to the pro-
fession.

5 ... PUBLIC RELATIONS-
Co-Chairmen, Roy M. Pooley (Jacksonville)
Suite 209, 233 E. Bay St., Jacksonville Joseph T. Arthur F. James Y. John L. R. Robert H. Roger G. Charles S. Roy M. Fred G. Reed B.
Romano Deam Bruce Grand Maybin Weeks Broward, Jr. Pooley Owles Fuller
Herbert R. Savage (Florida South)
2820 Coral Way, Miami
Duties: To make the architect the best known and best liked
professional practitioner in the state of Florida.

6... HOME BUILDING-CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY-
Chairman, John Stetson (Palm Beach)
P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach Robert G. Joel W. Edmond N. William A. Robert H. James A. Irving E. H. Lamar Joseph M. Frederick W.
Jahelka Savers MacCollin Stewart Mavbin Look Horsey Drake Shifalo Kessler


____~_


o





lien law, to help obtain a contractor's licensing law and to
help obtain a construction industry responsibility law.


7... COLLABORATION WITH DESIGN PROFESSIONS -

Chairman, Anthony L. Pullara (Florida Central)
2910 Grand Central Avenue, Tampa
Duties: To assist in setting up a state-wide association of the
design professions aimed at producing a more beautiful Florida,
and to assist in solving the problems jointly encountered by
the groups contained therein.

8 ... COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT -

Co-Chairmen, William T. Arnett (Florida North)
Dept. of Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
David A. Leete (Daytona Beach)
P. O. Box 1431, Daytona Beach
Duties: To assist the Florida Planning & Zoning Commission,
to aid in passing the necessary legislation to enable Florida to
come under the Urban Development Program of the Federal
Government, and to offer full assistance of the profession to
all local and State bodies interested in beautification and
organized development.

9 ... PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS-
Honorary Chairman, Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA (Fla.N)
Coll. of Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
Co-Chairmen, Harry M. Griffin (Daytona Beach)
P. O. Box 1671, Daytona Beach
Miss Marion I. Manley, FAIA (Florida South)
3356 Virginia St., Coconut Grove
Belford Shoumate (Palm Beach)
222 Phipps Plaza, Palm Beach
Duties: To prepa-e for Florida's coming Quadricentennial by
making a collection of photographs and data on historic buildings
to enable The Florida Architect to produce a special issue
commemorating the occasion, and to continue to foster the
preservation or these buildings within the State.

10... RESEARCH-

Chairman, Ernest T. H. Bowen, II (Florida Central)
2910 Grand Central Avenue, Tampa
Duties: To cooperate with the present research programs now
under way and to encourage the individual in developing new
construction techniques.

11 ... SCHOOL BUILDINGS -

Chairman, C. Ellis Duncan (Palm Beach)
P. O. Box 695, Vero Beach
Duties: To encourage the development of new techniques in
school planning and construction to produce more quickly and
inexpensively erected and safer school buildings within the
State.

12... HOSPITALS AND HEALTH-

Chairman, Thomas V. Talley (Florida Central)
P. O. Box 1104, Lakeland
Duties: To encourage better design and the use of in-the-state
architects for hospitals planned for within the State.


Carl I I
Gerken


Frederic B.
Stressau








Albert C.
Stewart













Robert G.
Jahelka


















William A.
GiIroy







Van W.
Knox, Jr.


Alfred
Kemmerer








David A.
Leete













Harry M.
Griffin


Edward D.
Wyke








James Y.
Bruce













James Y.
Bruce


William A.
Stewart








William T.
Arnett













William T.
Arnett


Craig J. Ernest T. H. David P. Prentiss
Gehlert Bowen, II Reaves Huddleston







William R. Richard E. David P. Prentiss
Gomon Jessen Reaves Huddleston


F. Treadway
Edson








F. Treadway
Edson


Scott B.
Arnold


Robert H.
Maybin








Prentiss
Huddleston













Prentiss
Huddleston


H. Lamar George A.
Drake Tuttle, Jr.








Warren C. L. Alex
Hendry Hatton


Ula David T. Warren C.
Manning Ellis Hendry


















Thomas H. Robert K. A. Robert
Daniels Frese Broadfoot


Ellis W.
Bullock


William A. Walter K. George R. David P. Prentiss Hugh J.
Gilroy Smith Tebrugge Reaves Huddleston Leitch


Frank E. A. Robert
Watson Broadfoot


Milton
Sherman


Henry P.
Whitworth


















Harold W.
Johnson


H. Samuel
Kruse


Robert B. Edgar S.
Murphy Wortman


I


A. Robert i Lawrence L. Frederick G.
Broadfoot Anglin Seelman


I I


Donald R.
Edge








Norman N.
Robson













David S.
Shriver


















Allen S.
Babcock








FAA Standing Committees for 1959...


1 ... LEGISLATIVE 9 ... ANNUAL C
Chairman, James K. Pownall (Broward) Chairman, \
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
As of this date, membership of this committee has not been Membership: Jam
named. All Chapter Presidents have been requested to name Bowen, II, Florida
one or more men from areas within their Chapter jurisdiction
10 ...FLORIDA
who will be willing and able to work with the Committee Chair-. FLORID
man and the FAA's Executive Director in maintaining close Chairman,
contacts with legislative affairs toward the end of providing the Membership: Joh
architectural profession in Florida with an effective and state- ida South; Antho
wide representation of its coordinated needs, vitzky, Florida So
Charge: To continue a "watch-dog" policy relative to legislation
and to cooperate with the State Board of Architecture in 11 ... FAA EXEC
formulation of bills to be presented in 1961 clarifying and Chairman,
unifying the profession.
Membership: Clin
2. MEMBERSHIP son, Florida Cent
SMEMLee Campbell, Fl
Chairman, Donald R. Edge (Palm Beach) Francis R. Walto
230 South County Road, Palm Beach Florida; Roger W
Membership: Broward, Herbert Johnson; Daytona Beach, Francis
R. Walton; Florida Central, Sidney R. Wilkinson; Florida North, 12 ... LIEN LAW
Jack Moore; Florida North Central, Ernest J. Stidolph; Florida Chairman,
North West, Ula L. Manning; Florida South, Samuel M. Puder;
Jacksonville, Thomas E. Ewart; Mid-Florida, F. Earl DeLoe; Palm Membership: Verr
Beach, George J. Votaw. Jacksonville; Rob
Kruse, Florida So
3 ... BUDGET -Personnel to be named at later date. GENERAL CHAR

4... NOMINATING -Personnel to be named at later date. Duties of each of
shall be as outli
structure. The Ch
5... JOINT COOPERATIVE COMMITTEE, FAA-AGC-FES requested to mal
Chairman, John Stetson (Palm Beach) participate, as re
P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach profession from tl
mencing in July
AIA; and automat
6 ... BY-LAWS Personnel to be named at later date. our chairman becoi
Let us make Flori
7 ... RESOLUTIONS Personnel to be named at later date.
GENERAL ASSIGN
8 ... BOARD OF TRUSTEES, FAA LOAN FUND To start commit
Chairman, MacMillan H. Johnson (Florida oNrth) cessive Board me
1617 N. W. 12th Road, Gainesville to date.





South Atlantic Region Changes


Date for Conference Cruise


Plans for the Cruise-Ship Confer-
ence of the AIA's South Atlantic Re-
gion have been changed from those
reported in The Florida Architect last
month. The cruise will not take
place May 22-27, which were the
dates first announced by the Regional
Conference Secretary. It will start
April 13 and will continue to April 17.
As now scheduled, the cruise-ship
Arosa Sun will sail from Charleston
at 5 PM, April 13th, 1959-but all
passengers are requested to be on
hand by 3 PM at the latest. It will


cruise to Nassau where passengers will
have shore leave until the ship sails
for Charleston again on the night of
April 15. Its scheduled arrival at
Charleston is 11 AM, April 17.
The business session of the Re-
gional Conference will be held early
in the voyage. Thereafter two sem-
inars have been planned, one on the
way to Nassau, the other on the way
back to Charleston. The first will be
of a technical character and will in-
clude a panel discussion on such mat-
ters as mechanical work, lighting and


CONVENTION -
Nalter B. Schultz (Jacksonville)
. O. Box 4817, Jacksonville
es M. Hartley, Broward County; Ernest T. H.
Central; Verner Johnson, Florida South.

REGION -
Clinton Gamble (Broward County)
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
n Stetson, Palm Beach; H. Samuel Kruse, Flor-
ny L. Pullara, Florida Central; Igor B. Pole-
uth; Franklin S. Bunch, Jacksonville.

UTIVE COMMITTEE -
John Stetson (Palm Beach)
P. O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
ton Gamble, Broward County; Robert H. Levi-
tral; Verner Johnson, Florida South; Arthur
orida North; H. Samuel Kruse, Florida South;
n, Daytona Beach; Joseph M. Shifalo, Mid-
.Sherman, FAA Exec. Director

REVISION -
James K. Pownall (Broward County)
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
ner Johnson, Florida South; Franklin S. Bunch,
ert H. Levison, Florida Central; H. Samuel
uth; Charles L. Hendrick, Mid-Florida.

GE:
the Committees listed on the foregoing pages
ned by the AIA in its vertical committee
airman, in addition to the charges noted, is
ke an active effort to have his committee
quired by the Institute, in the affairs of the
he Chapter through the national level. Com-
this year we will become a region of the
ically, due to the vertical committee structure,
nes a member of the like national committee.
da the number one region.

NMENT:
ee work immediately, reporting at each suc-
eting in person the progress of the program





acoustical treatments.
The other will be a discussion panel
by the heads of the architectural col-
leges of the five educational institu-
tions embodied in the present four-
state region. The subject will be "The
Continuing Education of the Prac-
ticing Architcct"-a subject of con-
siderable importance to the firm or
individual interested in keeping in
touch with current advances.
Good attendance on the part of
FAA members is urged by the Re-
gional Director. For those who will
not find it possible to attend, the
meetings will be tape-recorded. The
transcripts will be briefed as neces-
sary; and the substance of the Con-
ference will be published in an early
issue of The Florida Architect.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Message From The President

By JOHN STETSON
President
Florida Association of Architects


The old dilemma, "Which came
first, the chicken or the egg?", seems
much easier answered than that fac-
ing our profession today. The hue and
cry from the membership seems, for
the most part, concerned mainly with
fee cutting and with the inroads be-
ing made by other professions into
our design field. Perhaps it is time to
make a really complete inspection of
our own closets. Bilge water rarely
gets there except from a leak in the
boat's hull. We may have more leaks
in our dike than we have fingers to
plug them with; but now is the time
to take active steps before we have to
use both hands just to keep our heads
above water.
Inadequate Service:
Far too many plans prepared by
registered architects today are no
more than preliminary sketches, and
complete specifications covering these
are almost non-existent. This has
evolved from fee cutting, lack of
knowledge and just plain laziness.
The result is chaotic. The profession
gets a bad name and the participating
practitioner is the loser, together with
the owner and the community. The
general contractor will invariably add
a contingency to cover items not spe-
cifically detailed. He will either shy
away from bidding jobs from offices
with poor reputations, if he is tops
in his field, or he increases his bid to
cover the "Architect's mistakes." So
the owner either pays extra for poor
plans and specifications, or the job
goes to an unqualified operator who
turns out a poorly finished product
and ends up in a hassle over extras
and mistakes.
Fee Cutting:
A firm that cuts fees admits to its
inadequacy. This pertains to all pro-
fessions. Architects never got rich
even on full fees. Now, with con-
struction volume at its highest record-
ed peak, hundreds of practicing archi-
tects are barely existing because they
are willing to work for nothing. Cer-
tainly they suffer, but in this miser-
able situation they affect the entire
MARCH, 1959


profession. As the sore spreads, the
immunity of all is challenged.
My feeling is that here the chicken
came first. The start was the inade-
quate professional who "chickened"
into a reduced fee to cover his lack of
knowledge. His business boomed, be-
cause of bargain seekers, and the
fight was on. We are admittedly the
world's lousiest salesmen. All busi-
ness today operates on salesmanship.
To be a successful salesman, first you
must sell yourself, not only to others
but to you. Then you must have a
product. Fee cutting-poor product,
poorer salesman.
Plan Stamping:
Thanks to the excellent work of
our State Board and its legal counsel,
this has taken a marked decline with-
in the profession. Here again, practi-
tioners unable to make a legitimate
living otherwise find that the flexing
of muscles around an architect's seal
produces an easier living than pushing
a pencil. They have absolutely no
pride in their work or their profession,
yet usually they are among the first to
criticize the lack of pride in his job
shown by a mechanic.
With the driving underground of
these birds within our profession,
we've flushed a real, king-sized covey
from one of our sister design profes-
sions. At their present rate of taking
over the architectural profession, we'll
all soon be forced to take up real
estate selling. How come? A personal
check of a dozen of the criminals
proved that not one could make a
living in his own chosen art, so his
stamp is now producing grits from
our grist mill. His State Board? They
aren't proud of him, but until we
squawk loud enough it appears they
won't admit to his existence.
The Answer:
Solomon himself couldn't provide
all the answers necessary. Certainly
our obvious salvation lies in the in-
nate ability to create a more beauti-
ful structure, plan it to achieve the
ultimate in satisfactory usage, detail
it in the fullest to provide a clear and


concise pattern for all trades and see
it is built to be the strongest and yet
least costly possible.
By so doing we have made a full
fee the best buy in the building oper-
ation. Anything less is worthless to
all. This isn't so difficult. For the
same fee structure that we recom-
mend, a British architect also pro-
vides the owner with a quantative
analysis. To produce this, first must
come a complete set of drawings. A
contractor bids on the labor and on
the material takeoff provided by the
quantative analysis. Here a slip-up can
be attributed to the architect.
How would you like that kind of
responsibility? Is it any wonder that
in a country demanding this kind of
service fee cutting and plan stamp-
ing are unknown? Let us hasten to
accept the offered responsibility, do
our best and then watch the others
necessarily scurry to other scrap piles.
My comments are based on experi-
ence gained with the State Joint Co-
operative Committee, through an
active liaison with the Associated
General Contractors and from a first-
hand knowledge of the profession as
practiced in other countries. It is my
desire that our profession will pro-
vide the leadership necessary to pro-
mote and have passed during the
1961 Legislature a "building industry
responsibility law" whereby, starting
with the design professions, each par-
ticipant in a building program will be
required to assume full responsibility
for his phase of the operation. But
before this can come to pass, we have
a job of house cleaning and educa-
tion ahead of us. When do we start?
19








Workshop for A Professional...


The Office Of

WILLIAM G. CRAWFORD

ARCH ITECT

Fort Lauderdale


Designed by The Owner


Photos by Sante, Schwarm, Sheldon, Inc.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

































All professional men, probably,
have at some time visioned an office
of their own in terms of what might
be considered ideal for their particu-
lar needs. Comparatively few, it
would seem, actually achieve that
ideal. Fewer yet have planned and
built their own headquarters as a
statement of purpose and conviction
and as a tangible reflection of their
professional scope and organization.
One of these few is WILLIAM G.
CRAWFORD, member of the Broward
County Chapter.
His office building, located in a
fast-growing new section of north Fort
Lauderdale, is noteworthy in a num-
ber of respects. It is thoughfully


planned as a self-contained working
unit. It reflects a decision to operate
with a comparatively small staff of
high-caliber talents-though possibil-
ities of some future expansion have
been taken into account. It provides
unusually good working conditions for
the office staff as well as its principle.
It employs a novel method of con-
struction. And it was completed as
illustrated here for the modest cost of
slightly over eight dollars a square
foot.
As to plan, the drawing below
speaks for itself. Administrative con-
trol is easily maintained; and the
centrally-located secretarial area pro-
vides efficient and constant contact


with administration (Mr. Crawford's
private office) with the public (re-
ception and the special Hotel and
Restaurant Commission waiting
room) and with production (drafting
room). The drafting room has been
laid out to provide each draftsman
with a semi-private cubicle, equipped
with table, counters and shelves, high-
level lighting and peg-board walls.
The structural system is a rigid,
two-span welded steel frame with all
beams and columns exposed. The cor-
rugated steel roof deck is exposed in-
doors and covered with insulating
board and built-up roofing. On the
west, a stacked concrete wall guards
(Continued on Page 22)















3E3::::- H^


MARCH, 1959


PAMKINM



























Photos by Sante, Schwarm, Sheldon, Inc.


Above, the drafting room,
one of the semi-office cu-
bicles of which is shown in
detail at the left. Below, at
the left, is a view from the
reception room through the
secretarial space to the
drafting room. At the right,
below, is a view of the "cof-
fee corner" which includes a
built-in sink and coat closet.
Furnishings here, in the re-
ception room and in the
private office were done by
Knoll, Inc.


Architect's Own Office...
(Continued from Page 21)

against the afternoon sun; and with
surfaces exposed provides an integral
decorative pattern. On the east, the
wall is made of non-bearing panels,
glass with insulating panels below.
Finishes are impressive' where
needed, but economical and easy to
maintain. Exposed concrete is painted,
as are exposed steel members and the
roof deck. In reception, secretarial
and private office areas-and in the
coffee room also-walls are surfaced
with pre-finished walnut plywood
panels. The floor in reception areas
is travertine marble; that in the pri-
vate office is carpeted wall-to-wall.
In the drafting room it is surfaced
with asphalt tile.
The building is air-conditioned
throughout with a reverse-cycle sys-
tem. Equipment and ducts are on
the roof and the drafting room sup-
plied through ceiling grilles. In the
private office and reception areas wall
grilles are used. A central music and
call system have been provided.
This building was the basis for two
craftsman awards in the recent Brow-
ard Chapter-Builders' Exchange pro-
gram. One was for work done on the
steel work, the other for the crafts-
manship displayed in the block wall,
particularly for the pierced grille in
the exterior wall adjacent to Mr.
Crawford's office.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







What's Wrong With Specifications... ?


Finding the answer to that question is one of the chief rea-
sons for the existence of the Construction Specification Insti-
tute, the Greater Miami Chapter of which now numbers over 70
interested and active members. At a recent meeting of that-
Chapter a panel of contractors explored, from their special view-
point, some suggested approaches to some of the answers.


A recent meeting of the Greater
Miami Chapter, CSI, took the form
of a panel discussion by four con-
tractors on ways and means of im-
proving architects' specifications. The
meeting developed into a plain-
speaking session; and from it came
a goodly number of practical hints
from the practical men who translate
construction documents into three
dimensions.
The general topic of the meeting
was "What Is Wrong With Our
Specifications". Speakers who said
what they thought about that topic
were, JERRY NAGEL of the Witters
Construction Co., and W. H. SPARKS,
of the Sparks Construction Co., for
the general contractors; LAWRENCE
MARR. of the Marr Plumbing Co.,
and JOHN MEYERS of the LaVigne
Electric Co., for the sub-contractors.
Here, in part, is what they said.
Mr. Nagle....Most concrete speci-
fications could be shortened. Most
of the concrete bought today is
ready-mixed; and can be controlled
by testing both at the plant and on
the job. If owners would pay for
inspecting and testing concrete, then
the mix could be controlled- in strict
accordance with specifications -
which would then be merely the
strength required on a particular job.
Sometimes the architect specifies
3000 lb. concrete. But one of his
engineer's structural drawings may
contain some little note to the effect
that concrete in certain columns shall
be 5000 lbs. Job superintendents be-
come confused by reading one thing
in the specifications and another
thing on the plans. It would help
greatly if such contradictory points
were more carefully checked.
Relative to insurance, specifica-
tions lately have contained "hold
harmless" clauses which state that the


contractor has to be liable for about
anything that happens on a job. Also,
the "hold harmless" clause is put in
with the liability paragraph and can
be overlooked easily.
One item we would like to see
included would save time on the job.
That is a contingency allowance
which would permit the architect,
at his discretion, to approve extras
when they are necessary. Expendi-
tures for each extra could be limited
if the owner desired. But if this
contingency item were $5000 for a
job of any size, no doubt that much
could be saved in delays to the con-
tractor and additional work for the
architect by eliminating the need for
going back and forth to the owner
with different cost breakdowns.
Painting suggests another way to
improvement. Confusion exists rela-
tive to field coats for steel. We would
like to see this in the painting speci-
fication and not in the structural
specifications where architects have
been putting it. If it were included
in the painting specs, the painting
contractor could find it easily and
would know just what he had to do
-and we could write one purchase
order covering his section. Field coat
painting is a big item on a large job.
Painting structural steel can amount
to a great deal of money; and if
it is considered necessary to paint
steel that is to be encased in con-
crete, it should be so stated and
specified in the painting section.
Some specs are directing that cer-
tain trades should install certain
items. We do not think specs should
state who or what trade will install
materials. We have had trouble with
unions in regard this point, especially
relative to new acoustical materials.
We would like to see a Miscel-
laneous Section as a kind of catch-


all listing of all the many little items
on a plan not called for clearly in
the specs. A check-off list of this
kind would be of considerable help
in accurate bidding. Also, specifica-
tions should include a list of items
not in the general contract-and also
items not furnished by the general
contractor, but to be installed by
him. In bank work, particularly, this
last is important. Such separate list-
ings would also help bidding in that
it would do away with the need for
a contractor to go through every plan
sheet searching for NIGC items.
Finally, we hope to see more
standardization of specifications. It
would be of tremendous help if all
specifications were to follow the same
basic outline or index and include
the same type of sections covering
separately all the various trades and
items involved.
Mr. Sparks....The effort toward
standardizing specifications is one of
the biggest steps towards unity in
the construction industry which
could be taken. The first of my sug-
gestions for helping this along is con-
cerned with the "or equal" clause,
which seems to be in almost every
specification today, but which is one
of the most unfair of all specifications
items.
This clause makes it extremely dif-
ficult to prepare a bid, because no
one can tell just what "or approved
equal" might finally turn out to be.
In its place are other methods for
permitting a final choice. One is to
list alternates under the trade or
product sections where they are
applicable. This would aid greatly
in preparing bids.
The writer of the specification
should be familiar with the item he
is specifying. Frequently we find an
(Continued on Page 24)


MARCH, 1959






Specification Panel . .
(Continued from Page 23)
item specified that may or may not
be available. Often we can't find it
unless we call the architect; and then
we often discover that many of these
items are obsolete and are actually
not available-or if they are, do not
meet the intent of the architect
specifying them. That's especially
true relative to fixtures and appli-
ances; many that are specified are
not even in manufacture.


Some of this trouble probably
comes from the fact that many speci-
fications for one job are written from
those developed for another job. They
are applicable in general, but in many
cases the items called for are not at
all suitable for the particular job be-
ing bid and built.
Items specified for the sub-contrac-
tors should be clearly specified and
the listing of them complete. In the
mechanical trades particularly we
find things left out. A small example
is the disconnect switch on air condi-


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tioning equipment. Electrical speci-
fications will carry up to it. Air con-
ditioning specifications will pick up
from the disconnect switch. But the
switch itself is not listed for furnish-
ing by anybody and the prime con-
tractor is generally stuck for it.
All cash allowances should be
listed in one place. Often we find
that details and specifications do not
jibe. Relative to mistakes in general,
the paragraph holding the prime con-
tractor responsible for the architect's
errors should be omitted from speci-
fications. This reads, in effect, "...if
the architect is not notified in a cer-
tain length of time, the contractor is
responsible for these errors." The
architect is more familiar with the
plans than the contractor can be
within the time limit set and so
should not be held responsible for
errors made by the architect's office.
Bonds are another touchy matter.
Specifications should state clearly
that a bond, if it is to be furnished,
will be paid for by the owner. But
too often specifications are written
in such a way that the bond refer-
ence is subject to interpretation-
and in that case the contractor
usually ends up paying for it. As to
a penalty clause, where this exists
there should also be a bonus clause.
And to be fair to both owner and
contractor there should be stipulated
a period of time between the penalty
and the bonus.
Mr. Meyers....Specialty trade speci-
fications should be more complete,
with a cross reference to other sec-
tions which contain items concerning
a specialty trade. An electrical con-
tractor, for example, won't read
everything in the plumbing, air-
conditioning and heating and ven-
tilating sections. So, unless all items
are covered and cross indexed, some
item usually gets left out-like the
disconnect switch already mentioned.
Following the panel discussion a
question and answer period developed
the following pertinent comments:
Q...What is the attitude of the
general contractor toward the re-
quirement of listing by name sub-
contractors he has used at the time
of bidding a project?
A...A general contractor's main
objection to that is the time it takes
to evaluate which bid is really low.
Bids are telephoned in by subcon-

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






tractors. You never know till the last
minute who is low; so it's difficult
to make up an intelligent list of sub-
contractors to turn in on a bid form.
It would be ideal if all the subs'
bids were in and all bidding stopped
two to four hours before the bid
opening. This would give time to
evaluate all bids and you could turn
in an intelligent bid and know your
subs were in with you correctly.
Q...Do you as a sub-contractor,
believe it is unethical on the part
of the architect or engineer to re-
quire payment for copies of plans and
specifications? If all who requested
documents were furnished them free,
the printing costs for architects
would run to $10,000 on a big job
and on some projects even double
that.
A...We usually buy the mechanical
plans and, in some cases, complete
plans when we consider them neces-
sary or important to prepare an in-
telligent bid. When we spend the
time and money to prepare a bid
that will give the kind of a good


and economical job you want, we or
the general contractor should not
have to pay for these plans.
Q...Penalty clauses are usually
written to assure the owner that
completion of his project will be
done in time to prevent loss to him.
It is assumed that work running be-
yond the contract time will entail
additional rent and expense and con-
tracts are let on this basis. If the
work is completed ahead of time, it
may not shorten the lease nor save
other expense. Therefore the owner
probably would not be interested in
paying a bonus. What is your
opinion?
A...There should be a period of
time between the bonus clause and
the penalty clause depending on the
size of the job. If the penalty clause
could be a month ahead of the bonus
clause, it would give the contractor
something to work toward. A con-
tractor can be and has been stalled
on bonus clauses with respect to
completion due to the architect's
postponement of acceptance.


Q...What is the point of specifying
by an association or a manufacturer's
quality name when grading varies and
manufacturers' quality names are not
accurate?
A...It is important that the speci-
fier be completely familiar with the
product he is specifying.
Q...What do you think of base bid
specification-that is, the naming of
the product desired as the basis for
bidding?
A...That is an ideal way to specify
an item wanted. The contractor is
then not forced to decide on the
quality of some competitive product
as when a product is named and "or
equal" is added. If two or three
different manufacturers of a product
were named it would also help the
contractor prepare his bid. During
a bid period time is not sufficient
to get from the architect all needed
information on product equality.
This lack of information brings up
serious trouble after the job. is under
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MARCH, 1959







News & Notes


Myrl Hanes Wins
New Gainesville Honors

MYRL J. HANES, AIA, practicing
architect and Mayor-Commissioner
of Gainesville, was named Gaines-
ville's Outstanding Young Man of
the Year when he was awarded the
local Junior Chamber of Commerce's
Distinguished Service Award for 1958
at a Jaycee luncheon held late in
January. He is the 13th recipient of
the coveted award which was pre-
sented for the first time in 1941.
The honor is one of several which
have marked the 33-year-old Univer-
sity of Florida graduate's rapid rise
to the peak of civic leadership in
Gainesville. He was successful in his
first political venture in 1955 when
he was elected to the city commission.
Upon his re-election for a three-year
term, he was named Mayor-Com-
missioner by his colleagues after serv-
ing on numerous commission com-
mittees. Largely as a result of his
leadership, major zoning and subdivi-


MYRL J. HANES


sion ordinances were adopted and a
slum-clearance, low-cost housing pro-
gram started.
He is head of his own architec-
tural firm, Myrl Hanes Associates,
in Gainesville and has been a mem-
ber of the AIA since 1951. Last year
he served as a director of the FAA


from the Florida North Chapter. He
was born in Indianapolis, Indiana,
moved to Florida in childhood and
graduated from Gainesville High
School in 1942. During World War
II he served as a naval aviation officer
on the USS Boxer and in the Pacific
Theater. Hanes has been a member
of the Jaycees since 1950; and in
addition has been active in service
club, charity and civic activities. He
is married and the father of two girls.




March 31 Is Deadline for
Entry in AIA Program
Architects, builders and home own-
ers from 10 Southern and Gulf States
will vie for honors this Spring in
the fourth annual "Homes For Bet-
ter Living Awards" program, spon-
sored by The American Institute of
Architects.
Any house designed by a regis-
(Continued on Page 28)


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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MARCH, 1959






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 26)


In the AIA's Third Exhibition of Architectural Photography recently held at
the Octagon in Washington, Hank Koch, Miami photographer, won honorable
mention with this picture of a house for which Rufus Nims was architect.


tered architect and built since Janu-
ary 1, 1956 is eligible for an award.
Awards will be made in two major
categories: (1) Houses designed spe-
cifically for an individual owner and,
(2) Houses designed for a merchant
builder and sold speculatively. Each
of the categories will have three sub-
classes; custom houses divided accord-
ing to floor area and builder houses
into price groups. Both categories
will be judged separately and the
jury is empowered to award as many
first awards and awards of merit as
they see fit.
This year the AIA will have the
cooperation of House 6 Home and
McCall's Magazine, as well as
twelve leading national organiza-
tions in the housing industry, in-
cluding the National Association of
Home Builders, the United States
Savings & Loan League, and the
National Association of Real Estate
Boards.
Entries will be judged by a jury
of nationally distinguished architects,.
builders, publishers and consumer
representatives meeting in New York.


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Announcement of awards and pre-
sentation ceremonies will be held
at the AIA Convention in New
Orleans June 22-26, 1959. Award
winners will be exhibited at the AIA's
Octagon in Washington and will be
published in House 6 Home. Dead-
line for entry notifications will be
March 31, and material must be
postmarked not later than May 1,
1959.
The program and entry slip can
be obtained from the Committee
for the Homes for Better Living
Award, American Institute of Archi-
tects, 1735 New York Avenue, N.W.,
Washington 6, D.C.



State Board Grants
59 New Registrations
The Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture announces the following of-
ficers for the year 1959, as elected by
that body in January: President,
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH; Vice President,
RICHARD B. ROGERS, Secretary-Treas-
urer, MORTON T. IRONMONGER, and
Assistant Secretary, ARCHIE G. PARISH,
FAIA.
Registration by exemption was
granted by the Board to CHALMUS E.
SUGGS, Philadelphia; THOMAS M.
RAINEY, Cleveland; EMMET J. LAUGH-
LIN, Miami; HAROLD J. LEOPOLD,
Scotch Plains, New Jersey; GEORGE
B. HALL, Bronxville, New York; PAUL
H. ELLIOTT, Jacksonville, and HER-
MAN R. LICHMAN, Miami Beach.
Registrations to holders of NCARB
certificates were granted to EDWARD
F. O'DWYER, Westport, Connecticut;
HENRY H. CALDWELL, JR., Birming-
ham, Alabama,and SAMUEL S. ARLEN,
New York City.
Reinstatements of registration were
issued to HERBERT J. GRASSOLD, Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin, and COLEMAN H.
SHERWOOD, Scarsdale, New York.
The examining committee of the
Board approved registrations for the
following persons who passed the
written examinations: WILLIAM B.
HOLMES, Clearwater; DANNY C.
DUCKHAM, CHARLES W.DUEMMLING,
ROBERT A. DENYSE, CHARLES R.
KERLEY and DONALD R. MOWRY, Fort
Lauderdale; WILLIAM R. FRIZZELL,
Fort Myers; RICHARD C. STEBBINS,
Fort Pierce; CONSTANTINE L. KLONIS,
Gainesville; HEBRERT L. ANSON,
(Continued on Page 80)
MARCH, 1959


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New Registrations ...
(Continued from Page 29)
Hollywood; DAN P. BRANCH, JAMES
O. KEMP, INMAN H. LEFF and FRANK
S. ROBERTS, Jacksonville; BRUCE A.
RENFROE, Lakeland; JOHN B. GES-
BOCKER, Lantana; GERALD J. WEM-
MER, Maitland; RALPH W. C.AYTON,
MRS. CLAIRE D. GILLER, PETER A.
JEFFERSON, SIDNEY L. KOTKIN, SID-
NEY M. WALKER and JOSEPH N. WIL-
LIAMS, Miami; ALLEN B. BERMAN,
Miami Beach; ARTHUR G. MCCREE,
Orlando; STEPHEN J. GINOCCHIO and
ROBERT W. RICHARDSON, JR., Palm
Beach; WALTER L. WILLARD, Pana-
ma City; ROBERT L. MILLER, St.
Petersburg; FRANKLYN W. TYE, San-
ford; JOSEPH R. BLAIS and EARL J.
DRAEGER, Sarasota; AUTHA W. FORE-
HAND, Tallahassee; GEORGE R. Mc-
ELVY and J. ARTHUR WOHLBERG,
Tampa; ROBERT H. BRAIDO, West
Palm Beach. MRS. CONSTANCE L.
ZURVER, Columbus, Georgia, and
FRED H. CURLIN, Valdosta, Georgia,
were out-of-state residents in this
group.
The total number of registrations
issued in January was 50.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX

A. R. Cogswell . 28
George Doro Fixture Co. . 26
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 30
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Co. . 30
Florida Home Heating Institute 32
Florida Portland Cement Co.. 10
Florida Power & Light Co. . 27
Florida Steel Corp. . . 4
Florida Tile Industries . 1
George C. Griffin Co. . 6
Hamilton Plywood . . 25
Homasote Company . 24
Markowitz Brothers 2nd Cover
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Prescolite Mfg. Co. ... 28
A. H. Ramsey & Sons . 3
Southern Water
Conditioning Co., Inc. 28
Steward-Mellon Co. of
Jacksonville . . 30
Tamco Supply Corp. . 7
Tiffany Tile Corp. . . 5
T-Square Miami Blueprint Co. 8
F. Graham Williams Co. . 31


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







FAA Board Meeting ...
(Continued from Page 9)
technical and professional matters-
now the substance of an experimental
program by the Florida South Chap-
ter-at regular intervals throughout
the year. He also outlined a sug-
gestion for developing "workshop pro-
grams" to be held in conjunction with
FAA Board meetings. The subject was
not concluded, but was referred to the
Board's Executive Committee for fur-
ther analysis during that Committee's
February meeting.
Of the few FAA Committee chair-
men present, Roy POOLEY, for the
P/R Committee, reported on an inter-
professional meeting recently held in
Jacksonville and sponsored by the
Florida Medical Association to which
the FAA had been invited to send
representatives. Purpose was to obtain
support for legislation to be intro-
duced at Tallahassee seeking to amend
Florida's insurance statutes so that
group insurance rates now covering
certain classifications of memberships
might be extended to cover profes-
sional associations. The Board referred
the matter to the Legislative Com-
mittee for action.
The FAA P/R Chairman also put
before the Board a resolution from
the Jacksonville Chapter recommend-
ing that the FAA Legislative Com-
mittee be directed to study and
prepare drafts of new legislation for
presentation at the 1961 Legislature.
This would constitute what was de-
scribed as a "sound, progressive, strong
architectural statute". President STET-
SON received the resolution and stated
that it would become a matter for
discussion at the February meeting
of the Board's Executive Committee.
There was evidence of much inter-
est in the Board's consideration and
action on matters before it beyond
official limits of the Board itself.
Except for Daytona Beach Chapter,
all Florida's Chapters were represented
by either regular directors or alter-
nates. Five Chapter presidents at-
tended from Florida Central, Flor-
ida North, Florida Northwest, Florida
South and Jacksonville and eight
Corporate members and one Associate
from the Jacksonville Chapter. The
FAA Executive Director and Admin-
istrative Secretary were present, as
was BENMONT TENCH, JR, attorney,
who attended at the request of Pres-
ident STETSON.
MARCH, 1959


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.





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BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1-5154








/ "Vickie and Paula didn't even \
I
know it was cold outside!"

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This talkative dog, "Pretty," lives at the Garzo home, 3208 Washing-
ton Rd., West Palm Beach. Pretty is talking about Paula Garzo,
right, and Vickie Minton, a neighbor, shown as they appeared, warm
and happy in the Garzo living room on one of those chilly January
evenings. Paula's mother, Mrs. Zonola Garzo, explains: "The deter-
mining factor in the purchase of our house two years ago was a
built-in fuel-type heating system. We were wonderfully comfortable
both winters. The thermostat kept the whole house at a pleasant
720 the girls could study and play anywhere, even on the floor.
And the fuel bills were amazingly low."


Let's face it -
the GARZOS did!


Mr. Architect: The only kind of home
heating that makes sense in Florida is
permanently-installed fuel-type fur-
naces. They do the job better, cost less
to operate and come in full price range.
Best of all, they're now universally
accepted as the right answer to Florida's
home heating problem. If you need any
information on fuel-type equipment,
please consult us at any time.


tr's fiac -FLORIDA HOMES
NEED BETTER HEATING!



Install your FUEL-TYPE
"Florida furnace" NOW!


FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th Street, Miami
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













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Concrete, Imagination

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and Know- How...

BRICK


Specialists in Decorative Masonry Materials
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC., Miami, Florida Phone TU 7-1525


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CU RTAI NWALL

BY


miam


How to Make Certain of High
Curtain Wall Performance

Curtain Wall specifications are com-
plicated because of all the elements they
must cover. A curtain wall isn't just a
product. It's a certain type of design, a
particular system of construction, a spe-
cial method of job erection. In design
and engineering it involves material
characteristics, thermal values, weight
factors, expansion tolerances. There are
installation matters to consider, too -
as types of anchorage, size of units,
solution of joint and drainage problems.
Also, projects vary widely. So there's
no single set of "best" standards to
write from. With curtain walls, too, the
"or equal" clause means nothing for
brilliant performance on one job might
mean costly failure on another.
Then what is the answer to this speci-
fication problem? It is simply this: First
determine performance standards-the
various technical values needed to satisfy
requirements of a specific project.


Second, see that every detail of the cur-
tain wall design is properly engineered
to meet these established standards.
Third, make certain that these details q
can be integrated with particular job
conditions through quality-controlled 4
fabrication, properly serviced delivery
schedules and a program of skillful
installation.
Yes, it is complicated. And that's
where we come in.
We live with curtain walls. It's our
job to know every technical fact relative
to their possibilities both the pitfalls
and the potentials. So, we can aid you
in setting up basic performance stand-
ards which will be adequate for any
specific job. Through engineering we
can help solve the many technical prob-
lems involved in detailing, fabrication
and assembly. And we can assure you
of field installation which combines the
skill, experience and service needed to
guarantee the curtain wall performance
which your specification was written
to produce.


40 ft ft ft0
mecom wenaw carpautma
I __


NO. 2 OF A SERIES
These advertisements have been
developed as suggestive guides
to more economical and eicient
contemporary construction.
Others deal with engineering,
design and installation factors
of curtain walls. Please call us
for answers to any technical
questions on curtain wall con-
struction or for any engineering
data you might find helpful on
cty aspect o curtain wall design.



0 Wim




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