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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00055
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1959
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00055
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
7k


January, 1959


OFFICIAL JOURNAL of th RIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARC TS of the AMERIAN INSTITUTE OF ARHITETS
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


PRESIDENTS' ISSUE


THE







Is Your Chapter Using


This Newest P/R Tool?


If you're an AIA member or associate interested
in helping the public to learn about what archi-
tects are and how they work, you'll be interested
in the answer to that question. This informative
booklet was prepared by a Special FAA Committee
for your individual use through distribution by
your AIA Chapter. Ask your Chapter officers
about it . .


Architectural
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NI I a .. h 1
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STraini
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Florida Architect

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



Int 7s Ce Ie---


CSI Charter Issued to Greater Miami Chapter . .
A New Concept of Design . . . . . .
By John Noble Richards, FAIA, AIA President
A Course for Action ............. .
By John Stetson, FAA President
FAA By-Laws, Revised November, 1958 . . .
1959 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters . . . .
The Chapter Presidents Speak:
Daytona Beach By Harry M. Griffin . .
Mid-Florida By Ralph P. Lovelock . . .
Florida South By Edward G. Grafton . .
Palm Beach By Kenneth Jacobson . . .
Florida North Central By Albert P. Woodard .
Jacksonville By Taylor Hardwick . . .
Florida Central -By Robert H. Levison . .
Florida North By Lester N. May . . .
Florida Northwest By W. Stewart Morrison .
Broward County By John M. Evans . .
The Student Chapter By Lowell Lotspeich .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1959
John Stetson, President, P.O. Box 2174, Palm Beach
Francis R. Walton, Secretary, 142 Bay Street, Daytona Beach
Joseph M. Shifalo,. Treasurer, Suite 8, Professional Center, Winter Park
William B. Harvard, Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St., North, St. Petersburg
Vernor Johnson, Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Arthur Lee Campbell, 115 So. Main Street, Gainesville

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: H. Samuel Krus6; BROWARD COUNTY:
Robert E. Hall, Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: David A. Leete;
FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Anthony L. Pullara, Robert C.
Wielage; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, M. H. Johnson;
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: James A. Stripling; FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Hugh J. Leitch; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen, Herbert R. Savage, Wahl,
J. Snyder, Jr.; JACKSONVILLE: Robert C. Broward, A. Eugene Cellar;
MID-FLORIDA: Robert B. Murphy, Rhoderic F. Taylor; PALM BEACH:
Donald R. Edge, Frederick W. Kessler.
THE COVER
Opened late in 1958, the Miami Beach Exhibition Hall, for which B. Robert
Swartburg, AIA, was architect, is South Florida's latest bid for bigger and
better national conventions. Covering five and one-half acres of ground, the
new structure is 680 feet long by 500 feet deep and contains 108,000 sq. ft.
of exhibition space, 11 meeting rooms, a 17,000 sq. ft. lobby, two interior,
glass enclosed and landscaped patios, a commissary with three food and
refreshment counters and complete servicing equipment including over
1,200 tons of air conditioning.


. 10

. 12
. 17



. 17
. 18
. 19
. 19
. 19

. 20
. 21
. 23
. 24
. 25


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary


VOLUME 9

NUMBER 11959

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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C.S.I. Charter Issued to


Greater Miami Chapter


On December 1, 1958, some 60
architects and building product rep-
resentatives met for cocktails and din-
ner at the Dupont Plaza Hotel in Mi-
ami. The occasion was the presenta-
tion of the Greater Miami Chapter's
CSI Charter from WILLARD H. BAR-
ROWS, AIA, New York, National Vice
President of CSI. Present as speakers
were H. GRIFFITH EDWARDS, AIA,
Atlanta, president of the Atlanta CSI
Chapter, and CHARLES J. HUCKLE-
BERRY, Decatur, Ga., of Sanymetal
Products Co., a member of the CSI
New Chapter and Development
Committee.
Guests and members were wel-
comed by President DONALD G.
SMITH who turned the meeting over
to EVERETT EIGNUS, of The Edwin T.
Reeder Associates, Miami. As the
first speaker, Mr. Edwards discussed
practical methods for shortening spe-
cifications for cutting out unne-
cessary words and phrases, thus mak-
ing specification documents not only
more economical to prepare and issue,
but also more definite, thus easier to
understand and follow. Mr. Huckle-
berry's comments were largely con-
gratulatory as welcoming into the CSI
Chapter Roster the new group com-
prising Greater Miami.
Vice President Barrows spoke at
some length, prior to presenting the
Charter to Chapter President Smith.
He outlined the background and
growth of the CSI national organ-
ization and then discussed some of
the technical aspects of specification
writing.
The CSI began in 1948 in Wash-
ington, D. C., when a small group
of men began holding regular meet-
ings for the purpose of discussing
their common interest in improving
specification techniques. Since then
the organization has grown to include
nearly 3100 members, distributed
among 32 organized chapters. In Flor-
ida new chapters are now forming in
Jacksonville and Tampa; and Mr.
Barrow's development goal at the end
of the CSI's current fiscal year is a
total of 50 chapters and a member-
ship of 5,000. In view of the fact


Williard H. Barrows, CSI President,
presents the Greater Miami Chapter's
CSI Charter to President Donald G.
Smith, right.
that both membership and chapters
totals were doubled in the last 18
months, the goal, he said, was not
an overly ambitious one for which
to strive.
In describing activities of the Na-
tional CSI, Mr. Barrows outlined the
organization and results of its com-
mittee work. Five national commit-
tees exist, most of which have count-
erparts at the Chapter level. They are:
1...Chapter Affairs; 2...Chapter Pro-
gram; 3...Technical; 4...Specification
Methods; and, 5...Codes and Building
Regulations. The Technical Commit-
tee operates with six groups in-
cluding A...Architectural; B...Civil
Engineering (Heavy Industry); C...
Electrical and Mechanical; D...Gen-
eral Conditions; E...Nomenclature;
and,F...Bibliography.
These committees, at both local
and national levels, form a chain of
technical communication which has
resulted in a growing pool of technical
data and information which can be
tapped and used by both chapters and
members. The CSI vice president em-
phasized that development of this
information pool and membership on
any CSI committee entailed hard and
unremitting work which must be
freely contributed by Chapter mem-
bers for the benefit of all.
The speaker touched on plans now
underway to stimulate Chapter activi-
(Continued on Page 6)
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The Daytona Beach Chapter of
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is looking forward to a year of accom-
plishment-a busy year-a year in
which we hope to improve our local
Chapter activities and to align our-




Mid-Florida

By RALPH P. LOVELOCK
President

The year ahead will hopefully be
one of growth and development. Last
year saw the initiation of a number
of Chapter projects which promise
much for the advancement of the ar-
chitectural profession in our area.
Those projects will be continued dur-
ing the coming year; and the plans
and programs of the past Chapter ad-


C.S.I. Charter . .
(Continued from Page 4)
ties. But he called on the Greater
Miami group to utilize meetings for
debating the "specification problems
and differences of opinion concerning
how and where to specify various ma-
terials that bedevil you and the build-
ing construction industry." Specific-
ally, he suggested the programming of
panel discussions to include an archi-
tect, an engineer, a specification writ-
er, a contractor and a lawyer.


selves more closely with our State
Association and our National Insti-
tute.
This Chapter is numerically one
of the smallest Chapters in the
State, and because of this faces cer-
tain unique problems, one of which
follows. It is impossible to appoint
two Corporate Members and one
Associate to each of the fifteen com-
mittees set up by the by-laws; there-
fore, we are forced to either have a
duplication of members on these
committees or to consolidate two or
three committees into one. The latter
procedure has been our practice in
the past and we will probably follow
this procedure this year also.
When the dues were raised last
year, we lost several of our Associate
members. We are going to make a
determined effort to get these former
Associate members back during this
year.
It appears there will be a great
volume of work in this area during
1959 and as a result the various
offices should be busy. We hope to
be among the first to have our dues
in the hands of our State Treasurer
and to have representatives at all
important meetings.
It is also our hope that we may
be able to bring our members into
a closer relationship with each other.
To this end we recently adopted a
proposed minimum fee schedule.
It is our hope that we may experience
general adherence to this schedule.
We feel that in order for our mem-
bers to give their best service to their
clients and at the same time do
justice to themselves, their employees
and associates, such a schedule should
be followed.


ministration will, in 1959, be carried
through as energetically as possible.
Specifically, we will continue the
building craftsmen award program
initiated last year. Cooperative con-
tacts with the AGC and other pro-
fessional and trade groups in the con-
struction industry will certainly be
continued and will be expanded and
strengthened whenever and however
possible.
Similar efforts will be made rela-
tive to community affairs within the
area of our Chapter operation. In
(Continued on Page 21)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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The New Concept




of Design




By JOHN NOBLE RICHARDS, FAIA
President
American Institute of Architects


1958 has been another amazing
year.
Every 71/2 seconds a new American
was born. Just think how many new
schools and how much new housing
these nearly three million babies will
need before long.
An atomic submarine traveled
under the top of the earth and high
flying jets crossed continents and
oceans in a few hours. But the earth's
surface in and around our sprawling
cities is getting so congested it takes
many people longer to get to work
than ever before.
Cars got even bigger. Yet, we still
don't have remotely enough parking
space where we need it to accommo-
date the old-fashioned small ones.
The number of urban renewal pro-
grams doubled compared to the year
before. The idea that the entire con-
cept of the city needs re-thinking is
spreading. But so are the slums, the
congestion, the ugliness.
We pretty nearly made it to the
moon. But as we are on the verge of
soaring into outer space we realize
how much there is still to explore
about inner space the workings of
man's mind and motivations, the
proper design of the space we live,
work and worship in, the creation of
an environment suitable for twentieth
century man.
We can be proud of the progress
made in just one year. But we must


also realize that while 1958 cars,
space rockets, and atomic submarines
will most likely become obsolete in
1959, the 1958 problems won't. In
fact, the new challenges will just pile
on top of those which have been with
us since we entered this latest tech-
nological age.
Many of these problems and chal-
lecnges concern other professions and
vocations. But a good many of our
present-day problems certainly
more than ever before concern the
architect.
The creation of the new environ-
ment we must build to deal with
jet planes and juvenile delinquency,
with population growth and mental
health, and numerous other things -
is not just a matter for the political
authorities, the engineers, the in-
vestors, and the planners.
It is a matter of channeling the
efforts of all these people, and those
of the artist and contractor as well,
towards bringing dignity and culture
and beauty into modern life.
It is essentially, then, a problem of
design. A challenge to the architect.
There is no one else to do it but
that unique combination of artist and
businessman, engineer and designer,
sociologist and building supervisor. In
short, the "master builder".
To make this new concept of de-
sign effective, to live up to the all but
forgotten designation "master build-


er", we architects must have the
courage to broaden the scope of our
studies, our ambitions, and our office
practice.
WTe must assume the responsibili-
ties of leadership in planning and
building.
No individual architect, to be sure,
can or should venture out that far by
himself. This is a matter of joining
our efforts and of moving as a pro-
fession organized in The American
Institute of Architects.
AIA's purposes are, of course, to
increase architectural competence, to
maintain our high standards of profes-
sional conduct and ethics, and to se-
cure a favorable public climate for
our work. But all these efforts, I
believe, must culminate in the aim
of assuming the leadership in all
building and planning.. This is not
a matter of vainglory or satisfying our
ego. It is the only way by which we
can put our training and our calling
at the full and much-needed service to
society.
To realize this aim requires the
constant, dynamic growth and in-
creased strength of our organization
such as is evidenced by the fact that
in mid-1959 we will welcome the new
Florida District in our ranks.
But most of all this new concept
of total design requires the active
participation of all members and their
will to realize it.


JANUARY, 1959














A COURSE FOR ACTION


No great scientific or geographic
discovery was ever made without
leadership and a plan. Still more rare-
ly-even in the field of science-has
success been achieved by one indi-
vidual working alone. With the com-
ing of age of the Florida Association
of Architects, we are embarking on
a discovery expedition. We have the
tools and equipment; we have every
incentive to achieve complete success.
But, where are we going?
Until now we have been faced with
the complex problems of organiza-
tion. We have sought to build up
our membership, to protect that
which we have gained through legis-
lation-and have achieved success in
those goals we have set for ourselves.
Only a few years ago our conventions
attracted less than fifty members.
Years after the end of World War II
our budget became a frightening issue
to some when it reached the $7,500
per year mark. When we sought to
establish an Executive Director and
decided to add a $10,000 item to
the budget each year, rumblings of
secession individually and collectively
were heard through the land. Now
the combined gross business of the
FAA and The Florida Architect
rapidly is reaching the $75,000 mark.
Just over a hundred years ago a
few farsighted architects formed the
American Institute of Architects. The
success of the organization, its sta-
ture, its integrity, and its continuing
impact on the cultural and business
world are unquestioned. From the


national organization sprouted the
local chapters. For many years these
isolated outposts served the profession
admirably. However, the lines of com-
munication were long and not firmly
established. The local problem too
often went unresolved due to the
manpower shortage and little or no
public relations. The individual, not
certain of his position or lacking the
incentive to go it alone, usually fell
back and waited for something good
to happen. Some enjoyed isolation-
ism, even fighting to maintain the
right to remain an aloof and separate
segment of the profession. From these
weaknesses grew the FAA.
For thousands of years architects
have led mankind on a continuing
program of design and structural
achievement. We here in Florida
have one of the greatest opportunities
ever afforded any profession. All
predictions point to an ever-increas-
ing, statewide construction program.
Already Florida's biggest industry,


construction, during the coming years
is very definitely slated to attain new
heights. We are not providing the
leadership the industry expects from
us, and neither are we receiving our
fair share of the construction dollar.
But we will never obtain legislative
action to provide these things. It is
up to us, individually and collectively.
On every hand we see the evidences
of organized effort. Apparently no
goal is impossible for organized labor;
but to us simple problems seem un-
surmountable. Here lies our course
for action.
You have elected officers to run the
affairs of the FAA for the coming
year. You have local chapters per-
fectly capable of handling local
problems and promoting the best
interests of the profession in your
area. Use them. If you don't like
something, say so. Your officers stand
to serve. Your greatest liability is to
pay dues to an organization from
which you receive nothing. The old


D THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. . We have the tools and equipment; we have every incen-
tive to achieve complete success . Before you complain
take a close look at what you have contributed . Cheap,
incomplete services are worse than none at all. Let us
strive to improve our professional practice standards before
we expect too much confidence from others . Tell us -
then help us .. Join us in achieving success together . .











By JOHN STETSON

President
Florida Association of Architects


saying, "You get from anything just
exactly what you put into it," will
forever apply except where money is
expected to go it alone. The support-
ing crutch of service is an absolute
necessity if your dollar is ever to
accomplish anything. Before you com-
plain, take a close look at what you
have contributed.
This year our Association becomes
an integral part of the Institute.
With this more important position
we must necessarily assume a greater
responsibility. We have the oppor-
tunity to do many things. The State
needs a unified construction industry,
a new lien law, a construction in-
dustry responsibility law, a statewide
building code, a contractor licensing
law-and a general clean-up of many
segments of both the planning and
building phases of the industry. The
architects are convinced they are the
forgotten profession. Why are we
forgotten? Can we actually show a
unified front? No, not quite, but it's
coming. You, the individual practi-
tioner, hold the key to the ultimate
success of the organization and the
profession. We, the officers, were
elected to serve you, but our efforts
will be successful only if you do your
part.
Let's start by thinking big. We
complain about dues-yet ours are
the lowest of any professional group
and only a fraction of what the
mechanic pays the union. We fail to
even attend meetings-though in
some professional and most labor


organizations attendance is manda-
tory. We still think the individual
is more important than the group.
Here, no doubt, is the answer to
every problem our profession faces.
A dues structure ten times what it
is today would be a bargain if it
enabled you to double your net in-
come and remove half of the problems
confronting you daily. Everything is
relative. If you are completely satis-
fied with things as they are, you don't
need the FAA-and definitely the
FAA doesn't need you.
Our most certain method of achiev-
ing professional success is to be will-
ing and able to assume responsibility.
This applies to the activities of the
association as well as to our private
practice. Too often failure to provide
proper architectural services has given
the profession a bad name. The finest
public relations program is wasted if
the individual members of the organ-
ization fail to maintain public con-
fidence. Fee schedules are worth
absolutely nothing unless used by all.
Cheap, incomplete services are worse
than none at all. They injure the
reputation of the architect and the
contractor. In almost every case the
owner's pocketbook is the loser. Time
and materials are wasted. And almost
always, the result is poor architecture.
Let us strive to improve our own
professional practice standards before
we expect too much confidence from
others.
Much emphasis has been placed on
vertical committees. This work is


very necessary. So is the valuable
work carried on by special commit-
tees. Pronouncements of work to be
accomplished by the committees
should come from the chairmen.
These will be for the most part
officers and directors of the FAA.
Reports will be expected from each
of them at each Board meeting. The
work of the committees should be
understood by the entire Board and
most of the membership. Annual
reports hastily written at the end of
the year, carefully worded to indicate
accomplishments not actually realized,
prove nothing. We need action. To
get action we need programs and will-
ing workers; we need the help of all
of vou. To achieve the successes you
desire for the organization you must
contribute of yourself. We, the offi-
cers, are going to set up a plan. It
will be the responsibility of the mem-
bership to carry it out. This plan will
contain just what you signify it
should contain. Tell us-then help us.
It is our plan this year to stream-
line some operations and further de-
velop others. Your Board will meet
three times before the next conven-
tion. Each meeting will start on a
Friday night, with the local Chapter
hosting a "get acquainted party".
Saturday will be devoted to business
from 9:30 a.m. through lunch. Every
architect in the area is invited to
attend your Board meeting and is
urged to do so. Join us in achieving
success together. Don't fight the only
organization capable of helping you.


JANUARY, 1959 11












BY-LAWS

(As revised and approved November, 1958)



FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


ARTICLE I.-NAME OF SOCIETY
SECTION 1
(A) The NAME of this organization shall be the
"FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS," herein-
after referred to as the "Association," which is a non-
profit incorporated State organization duly chartered
by the American Institute of Architects and the State
of Florida.
(B) Application of terms. All reference in the
By-Laws to "Association," "board," "committee," "offic-
er," "members," "meeting," or other similar designations
shall pertain or refer to the Florida Association of
Architects of The American Institute of Architects.

ARTICLE II.-THE OBJECTS OF THE
ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
SECTION 1
(A) To unite the Architectural profession within
the State of Florida to promote and forward the objects
of the American Institute of Architects.
(B) To stimulate and encourage continual improve-
ment within the profession, cooperate with other pro-
fessions, promote and participate in the matters of gen-
eral public welfare, and represent and act for the
architectural profession in the State.
(C) To promote educational and public relation
programs for the advancement of the profession.

ARTICLE III.-ORGANIZATION
SECTION I
The Association shall be a non-profit organization
composed of members of classifications and with quali-
fications, dues, and privileges as set forth in these
Articles.
ARTICLE IV.-MEMBERSHIP
SECTION 1
(A) The Association shall consist of all corporate
members and all associate members of all Florida Chap-
ters of The American Institute of Architects. Every
registered architect in the State of Florida is assigned
to the jurisdiction of the Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects which covers the area in which
he practices or resides.
(B) A corporate member shall be defined for use
throughout this document to be a bonafide member in
good standing of the American Institute of Architects.
A corporate member shall have all of the rights, privi-
leges and obligations embodied in full membership in-
cluding the right to vote, hold office and represent the
Association as a delegate or otherwise.
An Associate member shall be defined for use
throughout these By-Laws as any other classification of
Chapter membership recognized by the Institute, includ-
ing Unassigned Corporate members, members Emeritus,
Associates.


Student Associates shall consist of under graduate
and graduate students in Architecture in Colleges and
Schools of Architecture in the State of Florida who are
members of a Student Chapter of the American Institute
of Architects.
(C) The Association may sponsor Student Asso-
ciate Branches in Colleges and Schools of Architecture
in the State of Florida as may be recognized by the
Association.
Student Associate Branches may function under
the sponsorship of Chapters or under the direct spon-
sorship of the Association. When they function under
Chapters, their relationship to the Association shall be
through the sponsoring Chapter. When they function
directly under the Association, their relationship shall
be directly with the Board of Directors of the Association
who shall be authorized to approve the Constitution and
By-Laws under which the Student Associate Branch
operates.
RETIRED MEMBERS
(D) A member who ceases to practice architecture
as a gainful occupation and further ceases all other
gainful occupation shall be eligible for "Retired
Membership."
OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIP
(E) Other types of memberships may be created as
the necessity arises in accordance with American Insti-
tute of Architects chapter By-Laws.
SECTION 2
Corporate and Associate members of the Chapters in
North Florida shall constitute the North Florida District
of the Association, those in Central Florida shall consti-
tute the Central Florida District, and those in South
Florida shall constitute the South Florida District.
Student members of the Student Chapters shall constitute
the Student District of the Association.
The Districts shall include the counties in the State
of Florida as follows:
North Florida District: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Oka-
loosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Cal-
houn, Gulf, Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla,
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee, La-
fayette, Dixie, Columbia, Gilchrist, Levy, Baker, Union,
Bradford, Alachua, Marion, Putnam, Clay, Duval, Nas-
sau, St. Johns.
Central Florida District: Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Pinellas, Hillsboro, Manatee, Sarasota, Sumter, Polk,
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands, Lake, Volusia, Seminole,
Orange, Osceola, Brevard, Flagler, Lee, Charlotte.
South Florida District: Indian River, Okeechobee,
St. Lucie, Martin, Glades, Hendry, Palm Beach, Brow-
ard, Dade, Monroe, Collier.
SECTION 3
Each year the Association shall promote Corporate
or Associate membership in The American Institute of
Architects for all Registered Architects in Florida who
are not then Corporate or Associate Members. Applica-
tions, as received, shall be referred for action to the
respective Chapter to which the applicant would be
assigned.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










SECTION 4
HONORARY MEMBERSHIP: Any person of good
character who is in sympathy with the objects of this
Association and who has rendered meritorious service
to it or the profession of architecture or its allied arts,
shall be eligible for Honorary Membership, without the
right to vote.
SECTION 5
The Secretary of each Florida Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects shall file with the
Secretary of the Association the names of all corporate
members and associate members in good standing at
the beginning of each year and shall keep said list
up-to-date at all times. The Association shall issue to
all persons, who have been thus certified, cards indicat-
ing their membership in the Association.
SECTION 6
The grant to and the exercise and use by a member
of each and every right and privilege granted by the
Charter and By-Laws shall be conditioned upon the
professional conduct and by payment of Association and
Chapter dues of the member in his Chapter.
ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION I
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a
President; Vice-Presidents, one from each District; a
Secretary and a Treasurer. The immediate Past Presi-
dent automatically becomes a member of the Board of
Directors, which is not an elective office. All elective
officers shall be corporate members of the Institute.
Officers shall be elected at the annual meeting of the
Association by a majority vote of the Corporate members
present at said meeting.
(B) All Officers with the exception of the Vice-
Presidents shall be elected for terms of one year. No
officer shall be eligible for re-election to succeed himself
more than once, except the Secretary or Treasurer, who
may not hold office longer than two consecutive years,
unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at the annual
Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be
elected for a term of one year, one for a term of
two years, and one for a term of three years. There-
after, one Vice-President shall be elected each year
for a term of three years. The Vice-Presidents, one from
each district shall be designated First Vice-President,
Second Vice-President and Third Vice-President, as such
relative to seniority of service, by ballot at the Annual
Meeting.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or
members of the Board for at least one year shall be
eligible for the office of President.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until
their successors have been elected and qualified. If a
vacancy occurs in any office of the Association, other
than the expiration of the term of office, then such
vacancy shall be filled for the unexpired term by the
Board of Directors.
(F) Officers of the Association shall take office'
at the beginning of the fiscal year.
SECTION 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and of the Board, shall exercise general
supervision of its affairs, and shall perform all the
usual duties that are required to be performed by him
by law and by the Charter and By-Laws, incidental to
his office.
SECTION 3
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of the affairs
of his District. The Vice-Presidents in their order of
election shall, in the absence of the President, preside
and perform all the duties imposed upon the President.


SECTION 4-THE SECRETARY
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall act as its recording
and its corresponding secretary and as secretary of
meetings of this Association and of the Board of Di-
rectors. He shall have custody of and shall safeguard
and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge
of the Treasurer. He shall issue all notices of this
Association, keep its membership rolls, sign all instru-
ments and matters that require the attest or approval of
this Association, except as otherwise provided in these
By-Laws; keep its seal, and affix it on such instru-
ments as require it, prepare the reports of the Board of
Directors and this Association, in collaboration with the
President, have charge of all matters pertaining to the
meetings of this Association and perform all duties usual
and incidental to his office.
(B) The .Secretary may delegate to an assistant
secretary the actual performance of any or all of his
duties as recording or as corresponding secretary, but he
shall not delegate his responsibility for the property of
this Association, or the affixing of the seal of this Associ-
ation, or the making of any attestation or certification
required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
SECTION 5-THE TREASURER
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall have charge and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs
and keep the records and books of account thereof. He
shall assist the Budget Committee to prepare the budget,
collect amounts due this Association, and receipt for and
have the custody of its funds and monies and make all
disbursements thereof. He shall have custody of its
securities and of its instruments and papers involving
finances and financial commitments. He shall conduct
the correspondence relating to his office and perform
all duties usual and incidental to his office.
(B) The Treasurer shall make a written report to
each annual meeting of this Association and a written
report at each meeting of the Board of Directors. Each
of said reports shall set forth the financial condition
of this Association, the state of its budget and appropria-
tions at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures for the period of the report, and the
treasurer's recommendations on matters relating to the
finances and general welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person
to sign any order, statement, agreement, check or other
financial instrument of this Association that requires
his signature, unless such delegation is expressly per-
mitted in these By-Laws.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring
treasurer shall turn over to his successor a copy of the
closing financial statement and audit of the treasury,
all the records and books of account, and all monies,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belong-
ing to this Association that are in his custody and posses-
sion. The incoming treasurer shall check the same, and
if found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer
his receipt therefore and a complete release of the
retiring treasurer from any liability thereafter with
respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer, personally, shall not be liable
for any loss of money or funds of this Association or
for any decrease in the capital, surplus, income or
reserve of any fund or account resulting from any
of his acts performed in good faith in conducting the
usual business of his office.

ARTICLE VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SECTION 1-MEMBERSHIP OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS
(A) The membership of the Board of Directors
shall consist of the same officers, with the same terms


JANUARY, 1959







BY-LAWS


of office, as of the Association, the immediate past
President of the Association, and one or more Directors
elected from each Florida Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects as provided in these articles.
Directors shall be Corporate Members of The American
Institute of Architects. The Regional Director of the
Florida Region A.I.A. shall be ex-officio Director.
(B) The Directors, one or more from each cor-
porate Chapter as provided in Article VI, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting. An
Alternate Director, one for each Director, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting to
function for the Director in case of his inability to
serve. Each Chapter having up to 19 Institute mem-
bers shall have one Director; each chapter having from
20 to 59 Institute members shall have two Directors;
and each chapter having 60 or more Institute members
shall have three Directors. Institute membership shall be
determined by the current membership roster of the
Institute.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall
be represented on the Board by a Student Representative
whose duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the
Association and the Student Chapter.
(D) Upon the effective date Florida becomes a
regional district of the Institute, the office of regional
director for the Florida regional district shall be created
and the regional director shall take office in accordance
with the provisions set forth in the Institute By-Laws
of the American Institute of Architects then in effect.
SECTION 2-AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD
The Board shall be vested with the authority to
manage, direct, control, conduct and administer the
property, affairs and business of the Association, and
in the interim between Annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directions and instructions adopted at a meeting
of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems
expedient, and shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations, supplementing but not in conflict with the
Charter and these By-Laws, to govern the use of the
property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of the Asso-
ciation, to govern the affairs and business of the Associa-
tion. Each director (and alternate director in the absence
of the director) shall convey to the Chapter which he
represents all decisions and actions of the Board and
shall convey to the Board the actions and requests of the
Chapter he represents.
SECTION 3-VACANCIES ON THE BOARD
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled
by the Chapter so affected.
SECTION 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall
hold at least four regular meetings each year and shall
fix the time and place of its meetings. One meeting
shall be held immediately prior to the opening of the
Annual Convention of the Association and one meeting
within thirty days after the beginning of the fiscal
year following the adjournment of said convention.
Ten members of the Board shall constitute a quorum,
and all decisions shall be rendered by concurring vote
of not less than the majority of its total membership
present, unless otherwise required by these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meet-
ing of the Board may be called by the President, or
on the written request of a majority of the Officers
of the Association, or of six members of the Board,
at time and place so designated by Party or Parties who
called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting
of the Board shall be sent in writing by the Secretary
to each member of the Board not less than five days
before the date fixed for the meeting. Minutes of the


meetings of the Board shall be recorded by the Secretary
and approved by the Board in its succeeding meeting.
SECTION 5-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
(A) Executive Officer: The administrative and
executive offices shall be in charge of an executive
officer, who shall be known as the Executive Director.
The Executive Director shall be employed by and shall
report to the Board.
Upon appointment by the Board the Executive
Director shall act as Assistant Treasurer.
(B) Duties of Executive Director: The Executive
Director shall be and act as the chief executive officer
of the Association and as such shall have general man-
agement of the administration of its affairs, subject to
the general direction and control of the Board and the
supervision of the administrative officers of the Asso-
ciation.
The Executive Director shall have general oversight
of all of the departments of the Association, and in
general shall be the interpreter of the directives of the
Board.
He shall be the officer in whom the Board shall
place the responsibility for carrying out its general
policies.
He shall be charged with the duty of stimulating
the programs under the various departments and shall
check the coordination of all inter-departmental affairs.
He shall maintain contacts with other professional
societies particularly those in the fields allied to archi-
tecture and with trade associations in the construction
industry so that he may be constantly informed as to
activities in those fields, extending the cooperation of
the Association as circumstances may warrant.
(C) Assistant to Executive Director and Duties:
The Board may employ assistants to the Executive
Director to perform such duties as may be assigned to
him by the Board and by the Executive Director, includ-
ing the details of the administrative work of the Asso-
ciation.
ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
SECTION I-CLASSES OF COMMITTEES
There shall be standing committees and special com-
mittees. Standing committees shall be vertical and non-
vertical; vertical standing committees shall be those
designated by the Institute and non-vertical committees
those necessary to the administrative operations of the
Association. 'Special committees may be established by
the Board of Directors or the President.
SECTION 2-COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
(A) The vertical standing committees shall be com-
posed of a chairman and of the chairmen of the chapter
committees performing the same functions as the Associ-
ation committee. Whenever functions are combined at
chapter level, the chairman of the chapter committee
will serve as a member of each of the Association Com-
mittees he represents functionally at the Chapter level.
Committee chairmen shall be appointed by the President
with the advice of the Board of Directors for three year
terms.
(B) Every special committee shall expire with the
fiscal year, but any thereof may be recreated. Members
of special committees shall be appointed by the Presi-
dent and their terms of office shall expire with the com-
mittee.
(C) Regional F.A.A. A.I.A. Committees: These
committees shall serve in the Florida Region A.I.A. and
parallel national committees. The Chairmen of these com-
mittees will be appointed by the Board of Directors
A.I.A. The membership of these Committees shall consist
of one member from each of the chapters in the region
and be appointed by the Board of Directors, F.A.A. These
Committees shall be those national committees designat-
ed by the Board of Directors, A.I.A. to be organized on
the regional and chapter levels.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







BY-LAWS


(D) Regional Judiciary Committee:
Duties: The duties of the Regional Judiciary Com-
mittee shall be to conduct initial hearings on charges of
unprofessional conduct against a Corporate Member of
the Association which have been referred to it by the In-
stitute. All such initial hearings and procedures shall be
in strict accordance with the By-Laws of the Institute and
the Rules of the Board.
Composition: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall
be composed of three Corporate Members and one alter-
nate, normally serving staggered three year terms, and
the alternate a one year term. Members and alternate
shall be members in good standing in the Institute and
shall each be from different chapters in the District. The
Regional Director and the officers of the Institute shall
not be eligible for service on the Regional Judiciary Com-
mittee.
During the initial year of the Regional Judiciary
Committee, three members shall be elected to serve one,
two and three year terms, respectively. The one receiv-
ing the highest number of votes shall be elected to the
three year term, next highest the two year term, third
highest one year term and the fourth highest shall be des-
ignated as alternate.
Chairman: During the initial year of the Regional
Judiciary Committee, the member serving the one year
term shall be Chairman. Thereafter, the senior member
shall be Chairman during his last year of service.
Meetings: The Regional Judiciary Committee shall
normally hold meetings to conduct hearings one day in
advance of the convention and meetings one day in ad-
vance of the spring meeting of the Executive Board, pro-
viding it has cases before it referred to it by the Institute.
Expenses of the committee members attending the
meetings shall be reimbursed by the Institute in the man-
ner and in the amount as prescribed by the Treasurer of
the Institute.
SECTION 3-NOMINATING COMMITTEE
(A) The President, at least thirty (30) days before
the annual Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Com-
mittee, composed of a Chairman and a member from
each District, whose duty it shall be to nominate mem-
bers qualified to hold office in the Association for each
of the Offices about to be vacated.
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by
the Nominating Committee, other Nominations for any
or all of the offices about to become vacant may be
made from the floor in the Convention. Elections may
proceed by acclamation or ballot at the will of the Con-
vention.
SECTION 4-OPERATIONS
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with the right to request and receive all information
in possession of the Association and all records necessary
to discharge the duties imposed upon them.
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the
Chairman and/or the members of the various committees
of their committee assignments, and furnish them the
names and addresses of all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member
of all committees, and the secretary may act as secretary
for the committee if so selected by the committee. The
majority of members of the committee shall constitute
a quorum. Committees shall report their findings,
recommendations and actions to the body which created
it. Decisions, recommendations and other actions of
the Committee shall be made in accordance with the
concurring vote of the majority of members present or
by a majority vote of a letter ballot.
(D) Appropriations: The chairman of any com-
mittee requiring appropriations shall submit written re-
quest to the Board for the amount required and the
reasons thereof, and if granted, file with the final report
of the Committee a detailed statement of all monies,
if any expended.


(E) When their terms expire, committee chairmen
and members will transmit to their successors all records
necessary to the continuing work of the committee.
SECTION 5-REORGANIZATION
The President may, at any time, discontinue a com-
mittee, alter its classification, or make any changes in
its personnel without regard to the terms of appointment
of the committee members.

ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
SECTION 1-FISCAL YEAR
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on
the first day of January and end on the thirty-first
day of December of the same calendar year.
SECTION 2-COLLECTION OF DUES
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually
from each corporate member and associate member
assigned to that chapter, and shall remit promptly to
the Treasurer of the Association, an amount for the
succeeding year, to be determined by the Association
at its Annual Convention which shall be contributed
by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expense of
every kind of the Association.

SECTION 3-CONTRIBUTIONS
The Board,a atny regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate
the privileges and rights of any member.
SECTION 4-DEPOSITS AND WITHDRAWALS OF
MONEY AND SECURITIES
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all
monies of this Association in the name of this Associa-
tion, when, as, and in the original form received by
him, in one or more depositories designated by the
Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Every disbursement of money
of this Association, except from the petty cash, shall
be by check of this Association, signed by the Treasurer
and countersigned by another officer designated by the
Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall
establish petty cash accounts as authorized by the Board
which may be disbursed for the usual petty cash pur-
poses by the person designated in said authorization
of the Board. No such petty cash account shall exceed
$25.00 at any time and statements of the petty cash
expenditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and
the expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the
cash is replenished.
SECTION 5-ANNUAL BUDGET
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual
budget, by the concurring vote of not less than two-
thirds of its membership present, showing in detail the
anticipated income and expenditures of the Association
for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial
liability of the Association and every expenditure of
money of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or persons properly authorized to incur the expense,
liability or expenditure, except a petty cash item as per
paragraph (c) of Section 4, Article VIII.


JANUARY, 1959






BY-LAWS


(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed
to do so at an annual Convention or Special Meeting
of the Association, the Board shall not adopt any
budget, make any appropriations, or authorize any ex-
penditures or in any way obligate or incur obligation
for the Association, which, in the aggregate of any
fiscal year, exceeds the estimated net income of the
Association for such year.

SECTION 6-AUDITS
The Board shall authorize the Treasurer to employ
a Certified Public Accountant to audit the books and
accounts of the Treasurer for report at the annual
Convention.


ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1-ANNUAL MEETINGS
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold
an Annual Meeting, herein called the Annual Conven-
tion; the time and place shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors if not fixed by the preceding Annual Con-
vention.
(B) Reports: The President, the Secretary and
the Treasurer of the Association shall each make an
annual report in writing to the Annual Convention.
(C) Election of Officers: New Officers for the
ensuing year shall be elected to succeed those whose
terms of office are about to expire.

SECTION 2-SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a
meeting of the Association or is voted by the Board
upon the concurring vote of two-thirds of the Board,
or is voted by not less than one-half of the Florida
Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of the respective govern-
ing boards thereof, or by a written petition to the
Board, signed by not less than twenty-five percent of
the total number of members in good standing of the
Association.

SECTION 3-NOTICE OF MEETINGS
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association, by letter or in official publication
of the Association, stating time and place of meeting
thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention shall be
served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less
than fifteen (15) days before such meetings.

SECTION 4-VOTES
A concurring vote of the majority of the members
qualified to cast a vote or a ballot shall decide the
question unless otherwise required by these By-Laws.
A vote by ballot not being requested the voting shall
proceed accordingly. NOTE: Only corporate members
shall vote on matters relating to the American Institute
of Architects.
SECTION 5-PROXIES AND LETTER BALLOTS
(A) Proxies: There shall be no voting by proxy
at a meeting of this Association.
(B) Letter Ballots: No vote of the membership
shall be taken by letter ballot.
SECTION 6-DELEGATES TO AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS CONVENTION
The Association shall have delegate representation
at Annual American Institute of Architects Convention


in accordance with American Institute of Architects
By-Laws relating to State organizations.

SECTION 7-SUSPENSION OF BY-LAWS
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting,
for the transaction of any special business by a two-
thirds vote of the members present. When the special
business has been disposed of, the By-Laws shall im-
mediately be in force again.

SECTION 8-RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any
vote or statement of its officers or members nor be
pledged or bound in any manner except by the approval
of the Board, in conformity with these By-Laws.

SECTION 9-RULES OF ORDER
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance
with Robert's Rules of Order.



ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS

SECTION 1-AMENDMENTS BY MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION
(A) These By-Laws may be amended at any meet-
ing of this Association, provided that a notice stating the
purpose of each proposed amendment and the reason
therefore and a copy of the proposed amendment is sent
to every member and associate not less than thirty (30)
days prior to the date of the meeting at which the pro-
posed amendment is to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the total number of corporate
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend a By-Law relating to Institute affairs.
(C) It shall require a roll call concurring vote
of not less than two-thirds of the total number of
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend a By-Law that does not relate to Institute affairs.
(D) Every resolution of this Association amend-
ing these By-Laws shall state that the amendment will be-
come effective only if and when it is approved by the
Institute. Immediately following the adoption of such a
resolution, the Secretary shall submit a copy of the
amendment and the adopting resolution to the Secretary
of the Institute for such approval. Upon receipt of said
approval the amendment shall become effective and the
Secretary shall enter the amendment and the approval
at the proper place in these By-Laws, with the date of the
amendment and approval.

SECTION 2-AMENDMENTS BY THE INSTITUTE
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may
amend any provision of these By-Laws that the Associa-
tion fails to amend after due notice so to do from the
Institute. Each amendment made by said Board shall
have the same force and effect as if made by this Asso-
ciation in the manner hereinabove provided, and shall be
effective immediately on receipt of the notice of the
Secretary of The Institute containing the amendment,
and the Secretary shall enter the amendment at the
proper place in these By-Laws with the date it was made.

SECTION 3-TITLE AND NUMBERING
From time to time and without further action of
the Association, the Secretary may rearrange, retitle,
renumber or correct obvious errors in the various
articles, sections and paragraphs of these By-Laws as be-
comes necessary.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Florida South

By EDWARD G. GRAFTON
President


The Florida South Chapter has be-
fore it for 1959 a boundless selection
of interests and activities. To be effec-
tive, the Chapter must rely on each
individual member to assume respon-
sibility for individual action as well
as cooperation with the professional
group. The type of inspirational
thinking which is basic to architects
and the art of Architecture must be
brought to bear on the community's
problems.
The setting up of the new Metro-
politan Planning Department presents
architects here with an unusual oppor-
tunity. Many architects, by training
and experience, are qualified and
anxious to serve in advisory ways to
the planning department. Some of our
members have had practical experi-
ence in city planning. Others have
served and are serving on Planning
Boards and Committees.


Architects as a group arc strongly
aware of the need for area-wide plan-
ning. The South Florida Chapter
supported Metropolitan Government
from the beginning. The Chapter
voted twice in open meeting in favor
of Metropolitan Government; once
at the inception and again to defeat
the amendment, because the Florida
South Chapter wants area-wide plan-
ning. It is the Chapter's wish that
some of its members be selected by
the Metropolitan Government to
serve on the planning Board and also
on the various other committees
which are set up to carry out the
tremendous task ahead. There will
also be a Chapter Committee on
Metropolitan Planning, and it will be
the task of this Committee to assist
the Dade County Planning Admini-
strators and report to the Chapter
on area-wide planning effort.


This year will be the first time the
Florida South Chapter is to have an
Executive Secretary. This will mean
that the Administration of the Florida
South Chapter will be centralized and
coordinated. The bookkeeping, roster,
meeting notices, records, and com-
munication with National AIA, FAA,
and The Florida Architect, will be
some of the duties assigned to the
(Continued on Page 27)


1959 Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters


BROWARD COUNTY:
President - Jo,-hn M E,.ar-. :
\ ice Preideit _Jack W .' -miner
cr 3r, '_ .,ll;am H Peck.:
Treasurer ._ -L:,, W olff

DAYTONA BEACH:
Pre.identii _- Harr,, M- Griffhr-,
\ .:e President __ Da\id A Leere
Secretar-, ..Carl Gerl..eni
Trea:Lirer _. Walter K< Sm.th

FLORIDA CENTRAL:
Presider-t _Robert H LeE i':n
Since Presijdenr A -, A \V I,r- H.'.Aell
Secretary W illiam .1 RuppP
Trea:iurer _. Jack McCakdl s

FLORIDA NORTH:
Pre:.,dent_ .. Lerter N Ma',
\ ice Presdenr Da.id P Rea'.es II
Secretary Jos-eph Wikes
Treasurer Gordon S Jch1-rn'c
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL:
President .... Albert P Wo\odard
\ ice President __ Forrect r Ccxeni
SecrEtar. -TreaZurer___ Lav.rence B E ranc


FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
Prs.dert ._ d_. / W Ste',arr M.:.rrio.r-n
\'c:e Pre:.idenr EBarnard VW Harmrn-a Jr
eretar_. ._ .Saam el \V marshalll
Trea-uLrer __ ... Thonmas H Darniels
FLORIDA SOUTH:
Pre:ride,-ar Edvard G Gratton
\ .ce Presid-ent ._C Robert Abele
Se.:retar', _. John 0 Grimshav.
Tr-eaurer .. Wa,rne F SecsicO--i
JACKSONVILLE:


President
\.e PreJdent
Se.: re tar.. _ .
Treasurer
MID-FLORIDA:
President ___ _
\ ,ce Pres.:ident _
se,: re tar _..._ _
Trea.sure r
PALM BEACH:
Pres-dent _
\ ,ce Presidein _
3'ecretar,
Treasurer .


Ta, lo:.r Hard\\ ick
W Stanie', Gordon
Frederick W. EL: uck', .Ir
JJohn R Gra\ele,,

Ralph P Lo.:.elock
. _John T Hart
James E Wir-dham III
-.. George A TLittle Jr

Kenneth Jacobscn
Donald R Edge
.Harold A\ Obsr
C Ellis DLincari


JANUARY, 1959







Palm Beach

By KENNETH JACOBSON
President


At the beginning of my year as
President of the Palm Beach Chapter
of the A.I.A., I am thinking of the
great heritage handed down to us by
the American Institute of Architects.
Some of us were privileged to attend
the 100th Anniversary of our organ-
ization in Washington, D. C. two


years ago and had a chance to study
its history. Few of us realize that the
A.I.A. started the first two schools
of Architecture in this country.
This tends to make one realize
that the profession of architecture has
been here much longer than we have;
and its standards and performance
have been created by dedicated men
that were willing to give of themselves
for the advancement of the pro-
fcssion. Arc we going to sit still and
enjoy the fruits of their labors? Or
should we realize our responsibility
by giving something of ourselves
towards the betterment of our pro-
fcssion? If I could have but one wish
as President this year, it would be to
increase attendance at our Chapter
meetings. Through this medium our
group could look forward to a most


enriching year. Besides the fellowship
that we enjoy in our committee work,
we would have the additional fellow-
ship of our Chapter meetings.
One of the nicest things that has
happened to me in our small com-
munity of Delray Beach is the joint
effort of the local architects for the
architectural services of our new hos-
pital. Through this joint effort we
have enjoyed a local fellowship that
has brought us closer together and
has made us more aware and more
understanding of our local problems.
We cannot enjoy Chapter fellow-
ship without your presence at our
meetings. VWe will make every effort
to plan meetings which are interesting
and worthwhile. WVon't you reserve
one evening a month for your
Chapter?


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18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Florida North Central

By ALBERT P. WOODARD
President


We feel that here in Tallahassee,
the year 1959 offers many opportuni-
tics to the architects in this area-
not only for better planning, but for
closer cooperation between the Chap-
ter members themselves as well as a
better understanding between the
Chapter, the A.G.C. and the public
as a whole. To this end we are plan-
ning programs which will be not only


informative, but interesting, and to
which we expect to invite City and
County officials, so as to give
them a better understanding of the
problems confronting the practicing
architect.
Practicing in Tallahassec does not
give the inside track. But it does place
us in a position to render invaluable
assistance to the F.A.A. Legislative
committee; and it is hoped that our
Chapter will be apprized of all pend-
ing legislation pertaining to the pro-
fession, so we may render assistance
whenever possible.
Some progress has been made
toward urban planning, but it is the
considered opinion of most architects
that this has not been carried far
enough. Therefore, the Chapter hopes
to sponsor such a program in 1959.
Although it is realized by many of
us that quality of work turned out


of an architect's office is more im-
portant than the fee charged, yet a
standard fee for certain classes of
work does permit an architect to em-
ploy men capable of doing work
which the public demands. An honest
effort will be made during 1959
toward some standardization of fees.
The Tallahassee area, as all other
areas of our State, is plagued with the
illegal practice of architecture. Some
progress has been made toward curb-
ing it, but until we architects con-
vince the public that our services pay
dividends in years to come, nothing
real can be accomplished. We hope
to have every member of our Chapter
working to this end not only in 1959
but in years to come.
It will be our purpose to make the
North Central Florida Chapter, al-
though small, one of the more active
Chapters in the State.


Jacksonville

By TAYLOR HARDWICK
President


Many years of local anonymity
and poor public relations left the new
Jacksonville Chapter facing a cold
audience three years ago when it rose
on its feet to speak to our community.
Having always belonged to the Flor-
ida North Chapter along with those
from the other areas, Jacksonville
architects were not known by their
public as a local group. Their efforts
for participation in local activities
were unpopular with Chapter mcm-
bers from the other areas and so
dwindled further into a condition of
static apathy.
When given individual Chapter
Status in 1956, there quickly de-
veloped a spirit of "clean-slate" vigor.
In only a small group at first, this
feeling became contagious as the op-
portunities for direct local action were
recognized. It has currently grown to
embrace about half of the present 58
JANUARY, 1959


members. Unfortunately, most of
these are younger men who one
would think least able to devote their
time. Much was done by these men
during 1958 to enhance this spirit.
Past President Ewart adopted a "no-
nonsense" program for conducting his
weekly executive committee meetings
and monthly chapter meetings. The
resulting accomplishment and in-
creased efficiency of effort created
new fellowship and generated a grow-
ing feeling of self-respect and pride
among the membership. I hope to
continue this.
Selective membership was properly
recognized by our leaders as the one
practical way to make A.I.A. Stand-
ards known not only to architects but
to laymen. It is now recognized by
the community that admission to
A.I.A. is not an automatic process of
buying a vague endorsement. Morale


of existing members has increased as
has esteem for us with prospective
members. To maintain this elevated
stature will be one of our main efforts
during 1959.
The development of our own
Schedule of Minimum Recommended
Fees is a specific project I hope to
see completed this year. It has been
under development for three years
and should be published by next July.
(Continued on Page 20)







Florida


Central

By ROBERT H. LEVISON
President

Florida Central is looking forward
with keen interest to a new year-
one in which we will strive for more
progress towards Florida Central's
aims of assisting our area in its rapid
growth.
This rapid growth will be reflected
in the strides forward that Florida
Central will attempt by means of
continued betterment of its member-
ship, public relations and service to
the various communities of our area.
We will strive to assist our com-
munities through active member par-
ticipation in planning and zoning at
all levels of government, building
code committees and any other muni-
cipal or civic endeavors. We will
continue our cooperation with the
construction industry by close liaison
with all groups engaged in building.
We will continue our present policy
of informative and educational Chap-
ter meetings.
With the advent of industry in
addition to tourism in our area, more
and more people are becoming aware
of the architect and his ability to de-
sign for all of their needs. Our
Auxiliary with its highly interesting
program continues to assist and in-


spire the Chapter members making
our meetings more interesting to both
the architects and their wives.
Each year has brought all of Flor-
ida's Chapters increasing responsibil-
ity; 1959 will present its problems and
we of Florida Central will share any
portion that may be assigned to us.

Jacksonville . .
(Continued from Page 19)
The establishment and use of a
special committee for disciplinary
action will be another project, as will
the streamlining of other committee
activities.
An effort will be made to better
acquaint Chapter members with
F.A.A. activities and hence establish
some feeling of kinship and common
direction between the two.


A more immediate goal is to help
produce a convention here in Jackson-
ville that will be primarily for archi-
tects. We hope to develop a program
that will attract architects interested
in the new vistas open to us as design-
ers. Opportunity for exchange of ideas
will be stressed and a move towards
independence from commercial inter-
ests introduced.
Another specific aim is to increase
our efforts to engage in and support
community cultural projects. Our par-
ticipation in the Fall Festival of The
Arts here did much to present archi-
tects and architecture to numerous
closely-related creative groups and
with them pool energies to produce
a most effective show for laymen.
Attendance was 10,000 in the seven
hour time it was open. Our "57 Years
of Significant Architecture in Jackson-
ville" exhibit drew more visitors to
the Jacksonville Art Museum during
its two-week term than any exhibi-
tion ever held there. Every opportun-
ity for such participation will be ex-
plored next year.
The number of and need for both
cultural and civic activities continues
growing as our City stretches from
adolescence. The need for building
and rebuilding grows with it, and too,
the need for thinking men. To
awaken the public to the need for
good planning requires first that the
architect be aware that he is capable
of leadership and obligated to assume
this role. The place to start is through
our own Chapter.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Mid Florida . .
(Continued from Page 6)
both civic and professional fields
there is much yet to be accomplished
to the benefit of all concerned. Our
general plans are to use every prac-
tical means to stimulate and expand
the interest and individual activity of
Chapter members along these lines.
The past success of the Chapter-
sponsored school for candidates seek-
ing registration cannot be denied.
The school will be continued; and it
is hoped that it will be as ably staffed
and as well attended as in the past.
This educational activity could well
be expanded to include refresher
projects for registered architects as
well as unregistered candidates. It is
one of the most worthwhile of Chap-
ter activities.
The program of Mid-Florida for
1959 is not a new one. But it is a
sound one. And by building on the
foundations which have been laid by
others, the Chapter's 1959 admin-
istration anticipates a successful and
productive year.


Florida


North

By LESTER N. MAY
President

The Florida North Chapter looks
forward to 1959 with an enthusiastic
membership dedicated to greater


service to the profession. The mem-
ory of the late Sanford Goin and his
zealous efforts for furthering the role
of the Architect will long inspire these
persons who knew him so well.
Under the able leadership of Past
President McMillan IH. Johnson this
Chapter during 1958 was successful
in having first-rate programs and
meetings attended by a large majority
of the members. Participation in
Chapter affairs has been whole-
hearted. In spite of transfers to other
locales, membership has continued to
grow.
The election of officers and direc-
tors for 1959 followed a traditional
practice of prompting individuals who
are new to the administrative work-
ings of the Chapter to serve in these
capacities. Continuing this idea, the
committee assignments for the com-
ing y.ar will be directed at new mem-
bers as well as old.
Meetings of the Chapter during
the next 12 months will be fewer and
spaced to allow James T. Lendrum,
Program Chairman, to secure inter-
csting speakers who may be within
(Continued on Page 22)


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WHEN YOU CHANGE ADDRESSES...
It is essential that your mailing address be correct in the files of those who
serve you. This is particularly important if you are a registered architect -
for it affects your proper listing in the roster of registered architects issued
annually by the Floida State Board of Architecture. It also affects listings of
your AIA Chapter and the mailing files of the FAA and The Florida
Architect . So if you change your home or office address, be sure
then to notify the secretaries of the State Board, your Chapter and the
FAA. And be sure to file your new address in the office of the FAA
Executive Director, Suite 302, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 43, Florida.


Florida North . .


(Continued from Page 21)
the area or the state during the spring
and fall months. The executive com-
mittee only will meet during the
summer months. One or two joint
meetings may be on the agenda. An
opportunity to meet with the Student
Chapter of the University of Florida
is anticipated; also a joint meeting
with the local builders and contrac-
tors may be arranged. Following an
idea initiated in 1958 the end of the
year meeting in December will be
strictly social.
Again in 1959 consideration will be
given to awards of merit for indi-
viduals who are not in the profession,
but deserve recognition for their
craftsmanship, community service or
other attainments which have been
outstanding.
Closer contact with and better
understanding of the workings of the
Florida Association of Architects will
be brought about during the coming
months through Chapter member and
FAA 3rd Vice-President, Arthur Lee
Campbell. His reports back to the
Chapter and to the North Florida
Area will be informative and timely.
Members will be encouraged to at-
tend all FAA Board of Directors
Meetings and particularly those held
in the northern portion of the state.
The promise of an enlightening
year of service within the profession
awaits us. Combined effort will pro-
vide the way.


CHROMASTATS have a Brand New Home


Chromastats in the 8" x 10" size were made of this rendering
by Joseph N. Smith, 111, AIA, of a building designed by
architect Charles F. McKirahan, AIA, of Ft. Lauderdale.


Direct color prints by Chromastat-low-cost
photo reproductions in clear, brilliant detail
and tone-will soon be processed from a larger,
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SQUARE M IAMIYa t L R, ce.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Florida

Northwest
By W. STEWART MORRISON
President


V


During the greater part of the past
year the Florida Northwest Chapter
has been actively engaged with the
Quadricentennial Commission of
Pensacola in preparing architectural
designs and research for the Restora-
tion of the Old City of Pensacola,
dating back to 1700. In preparing the
drawings, the Architects' designs were
based on an old engraving of the City
of Pensacola published in a London,
England magazine around 1743. Ex-
tensive research was made relative to
construction methods and materials.
We are still in search of additional in-
formation regarding construction de-
tails during this period.
Along with the preparation of the
drawings for the Old City, for which
the Architects arc being reimbursed
with Revenue Certificates, the Quad-
ricentennial Commission is construct-
ing an Exhibition Building that two
of the Architects within the Chapter
were selected by the Chapter to re-
ceive the commission, which is on a
cash basis. In accepting their com-
mission through the Chapter, the
Architects for the Exhibition Build-
ing agreed to pay a percentage of their
fee to the Chapter Treasurer. This
joint activity on the part of the Chap-
ter has brought all of our members
closer together and the Chapter meet-
ings have taken on additional import-
ance to the individual.
(Continued on Page 24)
JANUARY, 1959


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Florida Northwest ...
(Continued from Page 23)
Again for the coming year, it is
our desire to take a more active inter-
est in Florida Association Affairs.
With our joint project nearly com-
plete, it is my desire that the Archi-
tects of our Chapter may be able to
come up with a solution to the small-
house-package-deal situation. It is my
belief that through proper coordina-
tion of all the Chapter Architects a
step can be made forward to regain-


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Last year's activity within this
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Chapter affairs, but has gained pub-
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has been impossible to attain in the
past. This might indicate that archi-
tecture may be better presented to the
public through a joint effort rather
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Broward County

By JOHN M. EVANS
President

Chapter activities are the well-
springs of the A.I.A. And like a spring
the need of replenishment is always a
vital one. Enthusiasm is a hard prod-
uct to manufacture synthetically, but
always seems to exist naturally in a
project that has organic roots.
I always feel that in a Chapter
project one must have goals that serve
the architect or that need vitally his
professional talents. While this might
exclude automatically uniforms for
the local little league or a grant-in-aid
to the community chowder and
marching society, it at least permits
us to concentrate on those things
that have relevance to our profession.
I think that the Architect is unique
in his milieu; and it is less than in-
spiring to see Architects become char-
ter members in the beer, bowling,
and Howard Johnson sets. If it seems
that I am rooting for non-conformity,
you have not missed my point. In
speaking of non-conformity I am not
speaking of the beatniks, Zen Bhud-
dism, limp wrists and long bears-or
Jack Kerouac.
My soap box is that the Architect
is unique and should act unique. He
is an arbiter of taste and is remiss if
he allows sloppy thinking, sloppy de-
sign, sloppy politics to go unchastised.
He is not Mr. Average American, is
not engaged in winning popularity
contests, is not afraid to fight city
hall if this becomes necessary.
Lest it be said that these are the
hallmarks of any good man, I shall
say that they are, above all, the at-
tributes of a good architect. May we,
God willing, have many of them in
1959.



William H. Peck, Chapter secre-
tary, reports three major programs un-
der discussion by the Chapter. The
first is Slum Clearance.
The Chapter is spearheading a
movement to arouse the public to its
responsibilities for eliminating slum
conditions in the outlying areas of
Broward County. This requires a pro-
gram of thorough study by architect-
ural groups, in conjunction with civic
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ONE-MAN PANEL






committees. A recommendation for
proper legislation is the next step. The
Chapter will work with a committee
from the Board of Realtors, with the
City Planning Consultant, and with
the legal department of the City of
Fort Lauderdale toward this end.
Our second program is Better Pub-
lie Relations. In line with this we are
seeking to have the local architects re-
ceive proper credit for outstanding
work in the community. A series of
guest articles by local architects in
the newspapers is one objective. The
A.I.A. film "A School for Johhny"
will be shown to various Parent-
Teacher Association groups. The
Chapter also intends to work with the
local builders and real estate organ-
izations on committee projects, wher-
ever possible.
The third program is Rehabilita-
tion of Downtown Fort Lauderdale.
This is in the "early talking" stage
and no concrete plan has yet been de-
vised or submitted. But several of our
architects have been asked to com-
ment in the local newspapers on the
situation and to make preliminary
recommendations. \Vorking with the
Downtown Merchants Association an
attempt will be made to present an
outline plan.
...i. ... ..

The Student

Chapter

By LOWELL LOTSPEICH
President
Student Chapter
It has been a wonderful experience
for me this year to have had the op-
portunity to work with the A.I.A.,
both here at school and in the various
activities in which we have partici-
pated. I believe the Student Chap-
ter's prime purpose is to introduce the
students of aerchitcture to the A.I.A.,
the organization which is responsible
for the high standing and quality of
the profession today.
It is through activities like the
F.A.A. Convention that we begin to
see the great scope and potential of
such an organization. It is a vital
part of our education, I believe, to
work and talk with those who arc
practicing the profession which we
hope to enter. This has been a great
source of encouragement and inspira-
(Continued on Page 26)
JANUARY, 1959


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Student Chapter . .
(Continued from Page 25)

tion to us, who sometimes become so
involved in school that we can't see
any further than graduation day.
I was very fortunate in being Flor-
ida's delegate to the annual Student
Forum held November 24 at the
Octagon in Washington. There were
68 schools of architecture represented
there for the purpose of familiarizing
each Student Chapter with the activi-
ties of the A.I.A. and communicating
ideas between the various schools,
I was overwhelmed at the active in-
terest that is being shown by Student
Chapters all across the country. Prob-
lems of common interest were dis-
cussed and activities on the National
level were planned. In all, it was a
very exciting and stimulating experi-
ence. The A.I.A. is to be congratu-
lated for sponsoring such an activity.
Certainly, if the spirit of enthusiasm
and cooperation shown there is any
indication, the A.I.A. will continue
to grow in size and prestige and to
further serve the needs of architecture
and our society.





ADVERTISER'S INDEX

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A. R. Cogswell . 26
Dunan Brick Yards . 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co. . 26
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 22
Florida Home Heating Institute 28
Florida Portland Cement Co. 8
Florida Power & Light Co. . 7
Florida Steel Corporation . 4
Florida Tile Industries . 1
George C. Griffin . 6
Hamilton Plywood . 18
Homasote Company . 24
0. 0. McKinley Company, Inc. 20
Mr. Foster's Store . 23
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Perlite Inc. . 5
Prescolite Mfg. Co. . 26
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 3
Southern Water
Conditioning Co. Inc. 22
T-Square Miami Blueprint Co. 22
Unit Structures, Inc. . 21
F. Graham Williams . . 27


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A. R. COGSWELL

"SINCE 1921"





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Florida South . .
(Continued from Page 17)
Executive Secretary. The officers in
1959 will have more time to attend
to the activities of the Chapter. The
Chapter will be more effective.
Some of the other areas of interest
in 1959 will be:
1. Assisting in coordinating the many
and varied elements of the Dade
County Construction Industry into a
cooperating group where mutual
problems can be recognized and
solved. Much headway was made in
this, and the production of the South
Florida code is a good example of
industry-wide cooperation. The Chap-
ter shall continue to work to strength-
en this code.
2. Continuing the Chapter represen-
tation through the Florida Association
of Architects at the State Legislature,
when the Chapter shall be interested
in new laws or amending old ones
which will improve the service the
Construction Industry renders to the
general public.
3. Opposing unnecessary increase of
State, Local or National Government
competition with private enterprise in
the Construction Industry.
4. Increasing the Chapter's coopera-
tion with the various architectural
education efforts within the State. It
is hoped that, by the end of 1959,
individual members will have a better
understanding of the problems and
plans of the educators. The Chapter
will support the effort to build a new
building to house the State College
of Architecture and Allied Arts. Indi-
vidual members will be encouraged to
attend seminars and to offer them-
selves as speakers and critics at the
various educational centers. Admini-
strators and professors of the various
schools and colleges will be invited
to speak to the Chapter.
5. Increasing the understanding of
the public regarding architectural
services through an active Public
Relations Program in 1959. The Na-
tional A.I.A. has produced many a
good public relations tool to assist
in this effort.
6. Continuing to assist the School
Board with the problems of housing
Dade County's ever increasing pupil
population through the Chapter's
Committee on School Buildings.
7. Active seeking of qualified mem-
bers through the Membership Com-
mittee.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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