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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 Advertising
 The expo' in Brussels
 The urban renewal amendment
 Background for the future
 F.A.A. committee reports
 44th annual convention program
 Planning and zoning
 Kay pancoast designs a prize
 FAA convention committee
 Progress on the C.S.I. front
 Committee reports
 The student's column
 Nominations for FAA officers,...
 Resolutions submitted
 News and notes
 4th annual roll call of advertisers...
 Expo' in Brussels (continued from...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00053
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00053
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Advertising
        Page 8a
        Page 8b
        Page 8c
        Page 8d
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The expo' in Brussels
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The urban renewal amendment
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Background for the future
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    F.A.A. committee reports
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    44th annual convention program
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Planning and zoning
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Kay pancoast designs a prize
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    FAA convention committee
        Page 39
    Progress on the C.S.I. front
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Committee reports
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The student's column
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Nominations for FAA officers, 1959
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Resolutions submitted
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    News and notes
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    4th annual roll call of advertisers - 1957-1958
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Expo' in Brussels (continued from page 11)
        Page 62
    Advertisers' index
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



44th Annual FAA

Convention Issue

November, 1958









OCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS










V-A


,1o
6*_


1POMPA 0


CI03STEP TO






The architect is the captain of your building team.
He is the person who draws the plans . specifies
materials . takes bids on the job . supervises
construction and approves payment of the bills.
An architect is an artist a creator a person
with the unique ability to combine art and busi-
ness, inspiration and science, imagination and sound
judgment. To become a qualified architect calls for 10
PBESPEssEO CONCRETE INSTIToTE or more years of intensive study and apprenticeship,
and licensing by the state in which he practices. All
this is to prove an ability to solve whatever type build-
Member ing problem you may have.
Building a home, or any other structure, is one of
the biggest investments most people make in a lifetime.
To protect that investment, consult a professional .
an architect. He is your guide to greatest value
for your building dollar.
R. H. Wright & Son is proud of its friendship with
the architectural profession in this area. As a leading
producer of concrete and concrete products, we con-
stantly strive to produce the materials and render the
services the architect requires for sound, successful
[~ building.


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3640 N. W. 41ST STREET, MIAMI 42. FLORIDA
NOVEMBER, 1958 1







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS



9n 7Ts Issu ---


Letters . . . . . 4
The EXPO' in Brussels. . . . . 11
By Emily V. Obst, AIA
The Urban Renewal Amendment . . .. 17
By J. E. Baril, Florida Development Commission
Background for The Future . . . . 19
By Roger W. Sherman, FAA Executive Director
44th Annual Convention Program .. 29 to 34
Message From the President . . .. .29
By H. Samuel Kruse, AIA
Speakers on the Convention Program 30, 31
Roster of 44th FAA Convention
Product Exhibitors . . . .. .34
FAA Committee Reports:
Chapter Affairs . . . . . 23
By John L. R. Grand
Home Building Construction Industry 23
By John Stetson
Joint Cooperative Committee, FAA-AGC-FES 25
By John Stetson
Education .. . .. ... ... 26
By William B. Eaton
Legislative . . . . . 27
By James K. Pownall


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Krus6, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand. Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Obs Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.
^5-f


Planning and Zoning . .
By William T. Arnett
FAA Convention Committee
By Verner Johnson
Public Relations . . .
By Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Hospitals and Health . .
By R. Daniel Hart
School Buildings . . .
By James E. Garland


. . . 37

. . . 39

. . . 40

. . . 40

. . . 40


Collaboration with Design Professions
By C. Ellis Duncan
Student Loan Fund . . . .
By John L. R. Grand
Nominating Committee . . . .
James L. Deen, Chairman
Kay Pancoast Designs A Prize . . .
Progress on the C.S.I. Front . . .
By Donald G. Smith. AIA
The Student's Column . . . .
By George Chellag
Resolutions Submitted . . . .


. 43

S. 43

S. 45

S. 46
S. 49

S 51

S. 53


News and Notes .............
4th Annual Roll Call of Advertisers-1957-58 60,
Advertisers' Index . . . . . .


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation riot for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers


ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
VERNA M. SHERMAN
FAA Administrative Secretary



VOLUME 1958

NUMBER 11


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































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-Af


Letters


QUERY ON SCHOOL
CONSTRUCTION COSTS

Mr. Roger W. Sherman, Executive
Director. The Florida Asociation of
Architects, Inc.
Suite 302, DuPont Plaza Center'
Miami 32, Florida
Dear Mr. Sherman:
Thank you for yours of August 28
relative to the article in the Septem-
ber issue of The Florida Architect.
While I am in complete accord
with your thinking relative to this
particular matter, I am nonetheless
quite concerned about the present
cost of constructing school facilities
and the need toward which we must
all strive to reduce this cost. When
one is familiar with construction
costs of similar facilities of a private
nature, it is appalling indeed that pub-
lic funds are literally squandered
where public facilities are involved.
Any suggestions you might have in
this regard would be deeply appreci-
ated.
Thanking you for your attention
and with warmest personal regards, I
remain
Sincerely,
TOM ADAMS
Florida State Senate
29th District


... AND A COMMENTARY

The Honorable Tom Adams
Florida State Senate
29th District
Orange Park, Florida
My Dear Senator Adams:
Thanks for your cordial letter of
September 2. I am most happy that
you found the article in the Septem-
ber sweP of The Florida Architect in-
teesig and that you are in accord
with the thoughts which it expressed.
Your sincere concern with the
problem of reducing costs of the con-
struction of public facilities does you
credit. I can assure you that this con-
cern is shared by the architectural
profession in Florida. The vast ma-
jority of architects are intensely inter-
ested in designing for economy as well
as efficiency. An architect's sense of


professional accomplishment is
strengthened when he can produce a
building which meets the technical
and esthetic requirements of his prob-
lem substantially below the budget
set up for it. To any conscientious
architect, this is a justifiable source of
pride.
The point is that we must look
beyond the designers of buildings for
a solution to the construction cost
problem. Part of this problem is made
up of elements over which we, as in-
dividuals, the public bodies charged
with providing facilities and even the
technicians employed to produce
them have virtually no control. Cost
of materials and labor have skyrocket-
ed in our State as others. In addition,
the quality of both labor and many
categories of material has lessened to
effect an increase in both first cost
as concerns labor, and in the cost of
maintaining public facilities relative
to poor performance of materials.
There are, of course, instances of
public funds being squandered with
very little conscience where public
facilities are involved. I know of a
few cases wherein this could refer to
a few school buildings. But the great
majority of schools throughout our
State have been planned, designed
and built to provide unit costs of con-
struction which compare very favor-
ably, not only with private construc-
tion, but with costs of schools in other
parts of the country. For example,
Florida schools average between $8.00
and $10.00 per square foot; a figure
which is substantially under the na-
tional average and one which provides
instructional and community facilities
which are, in general, above the aver-
age. For example, some schools on
Florida's West Coast have been built
for under $8.00 per square foot; and
the new Elementary School illustrat-
ed on the cover of the September is-
sue of The Florida Architect cost ap-
proximately $8.50 per square foot.
The inescapable truth seems to be
that so far as design and construction
are concerned, building professionals
are doing a commendable job of
meeting the construction budgets set
up for individual projects.
What beclouds the whole issue is
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


































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Weldwood Movable Partitions that let you change
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WELDWOOD PANELING makes a pleasant background for eating, is easy to
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NOVEMBER, 1958









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Letters
(Continued from Page 4)


-the fact that the initial construction
cost itself is only a comparatively
small portion of the total educational
budget. Construction figures are large
because the whole educational pro-
gram is large; and it is true that cer-
tain costs for prime construction
have, in certain instances, been high-
er than would have otherwise been
necessary if the factor of continuing
maintenance expenses had not been
taken importantly into consideration.
This part of the overall school cost
problem is often forgotten in an ef-
fort by well-meaning school boards to
reduce cost of original construction.
Yet it has a very important continu-
ing effect on the total school budget.
If I were to offer any suggestions
relative to methods of achieving prac-
tical reductions in school construction
costs, they would refer first to the
budget developed as a result of an ori-
ginal educational survey; and second
to the values which lie in continuing
research on new materials and con-
struction techniques.
As to the first point, this is largely
an educational consideration. We can
all be in sympathetic agreement with
efforts of educators to improve the
standards of instruction and can un-
derstand their desire to provide all
school districts with facilities for
maintaining these standards at top
levels. But you and I both probably
know of areas in which elaborate
schools have been built to serve
sparsely populated or even backward
areas. It may not be fair to question
the judgment of the educators who
recommend such facilities for such
areas; but it would be certainly in
error to blame an architect or a con-
tractor for constructing the educa-
tional facilities programmed for them
by the developers of the educational
survbSfid the county school board.
Does A~ not seem probable that a
more intensive analysis of individual
area needs might prove one practical
step toward reducing or at least
controlling the extent of our over-
all school budget?
The second point technical re-
search is a much more complicated
matter. In the building field new ma-
terials 'and methods of construction


are being constantly proposed by
manufacturers alert to the need of
reducing costs in every category of
construction. Many of these proposals
are increasingly taking the form of
combining elements of construction
and equipment into a series of pre-
fabricated units, the object of which
is to speed construction and reduce
field labor. Time and time again such
technical advances have proved vir-
tually impossible to consider by either
architect or contractor, first because
the new method ran counter to es-
tablished building codes and second,
because they were unacceptable to
labor for one reason or another. In
spite of these very real handicaps,
construction techniques are improv-
ing and architects and contractors
are utilizing them whenever condi-
tions on individual projects will per-
mit.
This is an area in which the State
School Architect's office might well
interest itself to a greater degree than
heretofore. As new construction meth-
ods are developed, this office might
well work with school architects and
county school boards throughout the
State in proving their practicability,
safety and efficiency to local building
officials charged with code admin-
istration. I am certain that such ac-
tivity would be welcomed by archi-
tects throughout the State, and I am
sure that they would offer their ac-
tive cooperation toward it.
I have no immediate formula for
estimating the reductions in expendi-
tures for school plants which might
result from application of these two
suggestions. However, they might
prove to be substantial over a period
of time, not only as a means of con-
trolling budgets for initial construc-
tion but as one means for reducing
the continuing cost of maintenance,
financing and probably insurance.
Thanks much for your interest in
our thoughts on this matter. Let me
assure you of the architectural pro-
fession's interest in your own efforts
in behalf of the public which both
you and this profession serve. With
all good wishes and best personal re-
gards.
Most cordially yours,
ROGER W. SHERMAN
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















































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NOVEMBER, 1958 7






Letters
(Continued from Page 6)


REPRINT REQUEST

DEAR EDITOR:
Very recently in our Architects' of-
fices, we thrilled to the reading of
your excellent article, "Know Your
State Board, Law Enforcement Is a
Two-Way Job," on several pages of
your September, 1957 issue.
This terrific article so perfectly sets
forth the professionalism of your pro-
fession, in parallel comparative needs


of our profession, that it is my wish
to personally supply each and every
licensed Funeral Director and Em-
balmer of Florida with an exact re-
printing of the entire article, even
including the box at your story's be-
ginning, 'This is the first, etc.'
Full and entire credit will be given
to your publication, and highly com-
plimentary statements will give you
due credit for the outstanding coop-
eration of your Florida Association


the first th in-bed, Portland cement compound for dry
insta lat ion of rea I clay, ceramic and glass mosaic tiles.
---r

Architects and tile men agree that
Crest has permitted more use of tile
... in places where tile was once con-
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cuts weight up to 65 per cent, saves
time by eliminating mortar box mix-
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lathing. No wonder Crest Tile-Set is
S1._ being acclaimed and used from mile-
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from dry-as-a-bone Phoenix to humid
Jacksonville. Specify Crest Tile-Set*
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S-* and Crest Supreme Dry Tile-Grout
-- See our display at the Florida Association of
Architects Convention or write for full infor-
mation.


OTHER PRINCIPAL OFFICES IN MIAMI LOS ANGELES CHICAGO PHILADELPHIA


and member Architects with your
State Board.
Trusting that permission will be
granted by you for our helpful use of
this editorial content, and advising
you that we will proceed to our off-
set printing as above, unless specific-
ally informed otherwise, with all ap-
preciation and thanks to you, I am,
W. L. PHILBRICK,
Funeral Director.


DEAR EDITOR:
Thank you for permission to re-
print "Know Your State Board .
LAW ENFORCEMENT IS A
TWO-WAY JOB" of your "Florida
Architect" professional magazine,
about which I recently wrote you.
The enclosed copy of "Brick Bats
by Philbrick" for July-August, 1958
contained exact reproduction of your
story, even to its format and type-set,
by offset printing on our part.
You and your splendid professional
"Florida Association of Architects"
will appreciate and be interested in
knowing how our Florida Funeral Di-
rectors Association membership, all
licensed Funeral Directors and Em-
balmers of Florida, and members of
the State Board of Funeral Directors
and Embalmers of Florida, together
with Presidents of all professional as-
sociations, such as Law, Medicine,
etc., as well as our Governor LeRoy
Collins, and other State officials were
similarly informed by their receipt of
copies of the attached.
Will you kindly advise your Presi-
dent Kruse and your Association
membership of our appreciation and
professional cooperation.
W. L. PHILBRICK
Funeral Director.



Telephone Company
Errs in FAA Listing
In the Miami Telephone Direc-
tory, just issued, listings for the
Florida Association of Architects and
The Florida Architect make it ap-
pear that both Association and maga-
zine are engaged in the practice of
architecture. Due solely to an error
in the Bell Telephone's commercial
office, both listings appear in the
(Continued on Page 40)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






"S 11


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Far left, the Atomium; and right, the European Coal and Steel Community Pavilion.






THE EXPO' in BRUSSELS


By EMILY V. OBST, AIA


"Hang it from sky hooks!" How
many times have we said this in jest
when faced with the problem of how
to support a roof. Yet, this summer,
when I visited the World Expositions
in Brussels, I saw not only the roofs,
but also the walls of., many of the
ExPO' structures actually supported
from cables stretching from the tops
of many of the pavilions, upwards, as
if veritably hung from sky hooks.
This architecture of suspension,
used for almost a century in bridge
construction, is employed profusely
this time in architecture. While these
buildings are of temporary nature, de-
signed for limited occupancy and
mainly for visual effect, still the prin-
ciples employed could also be utilized
for permanent structures as well.
NOVEMBER, 1958


Cables have become a part of this
architecture, structurally and aesthet-
ically. They are not a necessary evil as
tie rods, restraining the thrust of a
vault, to be denied, subdued, or min-
imized. Instead, they are integral
parts of a dynamic whole, vital ele-
ments to be displayed instead of con-
cealed. -^
In mriy inion, one of the finest
structures at Expq' 58 is the Euro-
pean Coal and Community Pavilion.
Its roof is suspended from gigantic
tripod-type frames, silhouetted against
the sky. In turn, the walls are sus-
pended from the roof. Both parts
therefore are in tension, with the
gravitational thrust taken by the dom-
inant frames, towering above the
building itself.


Telexpo', the Belgian postal and
communications building, is a cir-
cular structure, suspended by cables
from a large central mast, like a may-
pole. This antenna rises high above
the roof, with many cables stretching
down from it to support the ceiling.
Again, like the European Coal and
Steel Community Pavilion, the walls
are non-structural and merely curtains
of glass.
The French Pavilion, designed by
M. GUILLAUME GILLET, architect,
and M. J. PROUVE and M. R. SARGER,
engineers, is, in my opinion, the most
ambitious and pretentious structure
of EXPO'. One critic has called it
"roller coaster architecture." This
epithet is rather harsh. Actually, it is
(Continued on Page 18)
































The Civil Engineering Pavilion


The French Pavilion


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































Telexpo' Pavilion


EXPO' in Brussels...
(Continued from Page 11)

a direct descendant of the 1851 Crys-
tal Palace of London, with walls of
plastic on a steel framework. Because
of a street car tunnel beneath the
site, and a somewhat marshy soil, the
points of support are limited to one
immense concrete foundation and
two lesser ones, from which spring a
multiplicity of steel columns support-
ing a double hyperbolic paraboloid,
original in concept and daring in de-
sign, performing admirably its func-
tion of housing one of the most fact-
ual, comprehensive, dignified and im-
personal exhibits of the EXPO'.
Native pride does not prompt the
next statement: namely that I
thought the United States Pavilion
one of the most beautiful of EXPO'.
The good and bad points of its con-
tents itself have been discussed wide-
ly. My only thought is that the ex-
hibit itself is sparse. Much more could
have been shown without crowding
the allotted space. My interest is more
in the architecture than in its displays,
and the pavilion itself is wanting in
no respect. Designed by EDWARD
STONE, it is impressive without evi-
dence of bulky stolidity, graceful with-
NOVEMBER, 1958


out a loss of scale. It is the only for-
eign pavilion of its size with entour-
age and a foreground, which en-
hances its beauty as well as enables
a viewer to comprehend it as a com-
plete unit. The roof has been de-
scribed as a bicycle wheel. The en-
veloping plastic skin wall is 340 feet
in diameter, approximately the size
of the Colosseum in Rome. The dia-
meter of the roof is 381 feet, conse-
quently there is an overhang, shading
a balcony around the circumference
of the building. The roof is supported
from exterior vertical ties around the
circumference, from which horizontal
cables stretch to a central circular
steel ring. The wall covering, of a
meshed transparent plastic, admits
natural light in the daytime, while
at night, illuminated from within, the
whole picture shines .in nocturnal
glory%# H
The walls of the Soviet Pavilion
are .also suspended from its roof,
which in turn is supported by short
cantilever trusses on either side of
the center of the hall, which is roofed
by a plastic vault. An excellent ex-
hibition hall, the Russian Pavilion
lacks the aesthetics, originality, and
ingenuity of either the French or the
United States buildings.


The German group, designed by
architect EGON EIERMAN, SEP RUF,
associate, consists of eight individual
buildings with glass walls, alternating
with black horizontal fasciae, with in-
terior columns supporting roofs and
floors, which in turn support the
walls. Suspended walkways connect
the different buildings, with a bold
and prominent cantilever stairway as a
dominant element. Crispness, simple
elegance, elimination of the superflu-
ous, and scale make this group one
of the most pleasing of the ExPO'.
The pavilion of Solvay and Com-
pany, housed in a building using many
of Solvay's own plastics, is one of the
best of the Belgian sector. Architect
VICTOR PULPAS has made extensive
use of interior landscaping, contrasts
of textures, and subdued lighting, cre-
ating a unique Oriental quality,
human, yet dramatic.
Near the Solvay Pavilion is that of
International Business Machines, an
impressive building, with dominant
clarity of form. It contains one of the
outstanding exhibits of the Fair. This
building, with its glass facade, roof
of thin concrete slab folded planes,
and its clean, crisp interiors, is an
appropriate shell for an exhibit which
(Continued on Page 14)































Philips Lamp Society of Holland Pavilion


German Pavilion


Expo' in Brussels ...
(Continued from Page 13)
challenges the intellect of the visitor.
Like most of the pavilions, there is
a cinema inside, and a part of the
I.B.M. exhibit is an eight minute
documentary produced by CHARLES
EAMES on data processing.
Two other structures of interest
are the Civil Engineering Pavilion, an
inclined cantilevered "arrow," over
100 feet long, restrained by a large
concrete mass at the base. To its right
is the Belgian Urbanism Pavilion,
with displays of housing and com-
munity planning, and a large outdoor
model garden city. Miniature scenes
of the unfortunate and catastrophic
results of a lack of town planning are
on exhibit within.
The Pavilion of Arts of Fire, hous-
ing the Belgian glass and ceramic
industrial displays, is another of the
finer EXPO' buildings. Designed by
architects V. COLS, J. DE ROECK and
Associates, the building itself demon-
strates the uses of glass, terra cotta,
and ceramics. There is a flight of
stairs with open risers and plate glass
treads. The front facade is a curved
mural, behind which are stairs, then
a plate glass facade. Among the indus-
trial displays, there is one consisting
of clay drainage pipe, vertically erect,
with elbows and tees resembling a
forest of stripped tree trunks with
stumps of branches . very sur-real-
istic, and very effective.
An exhibit to avoid is that one loft-
ily titled "Edifices and Habitations."
The casual visitor is duly impressed
with memorial plaques in the entry,
to architects VICTOR HORTA, HENRI
VAN DER VELDE, and P. HARKER. The
first exhibition hall inside contains a
show of drawings of sepia washes,
Beaux Arts technique of 1900, fol-
lowed by displays of building materi-
als. After a plastics exhibit, followed
by that of heating equipment, there
is a display of mediocre lighting fix-
tures, an omen of things to come.
From here on, it goes from bad to
worse. The unfortunate visitor finds
himself in Macy's basement, A la
Vlamand. Belgian kitchen appliances
are on display, each demonstrator
trying to outshout the adjacent
hawker of a competing product.
To make matters worse (if pos-
(Continued on Page 62)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


































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needed Aid fcr Stum nCeawanee




The Urban Renewal Amendment


Last year a House Bill was presented to the State Legislature
by Representative Samuel A. Gibbons proposing a constitu-
tional amendment permitting public bodies to acquire land
under powers of eminent domain for the purpose of slum
clearance and redevelopment by private agencies. The Bill
was killed in Committee. But interest in its objectives has
deepened this year; and it is probable that some similar
measure will be introduced to the Legislature next session.
Here are some comments in support of the measure.

By J. E. BARIL
Manager, Community Planning Division,
Florida Development Commission


The proposed amendment may be
confused with other types of legisla-
tion relating to slum clearance or to
public housing, therefore it is well to
set forth the facts, as clearly as
possible.
The amendment, standing alone,
would not result in the acquisition or
clearance of a single square foot of
slum area. Its purpose is to clear an
existing barrier to effective action re-
garding slums, but it would have to
be followed up by statutory author-
izations adopted by the Legislature.
The Legislature will at all times be
master of the situation and can de-
termine at will where the slum clear-
ance powers shall be exercised, by
whom, and in what manner.
Florida is apparently the only state
where the powers that are sought in
the amendment cannot be exercised
because they have been declared un-
constitutional by the State Supreme
Court. Georgia was in the same po-
sition two years ago, but Georgia has
amended her Constitution and has
enacted follow-up legislation. About
thirty states are now participating in
the Federal urban renewal program.
Slums and blighted areas do exist
in Florida and they are by no means
confined to the three major metro-
politan communities of Miami, Jack-
sonville, and Tampa.
There is abundant evidence that
private enterprise alone and unaided
has not eradicated the slums and ap-
parently it cannot do the job with-
NOVEMBER, 1958


out some measure of public assist-
ance.
In many, if not most cases, a prac-
ticable approach to slum elimination
must be a broad, many-sided ap-
proach. It is not enough to enforce
a housing code, or to undertake a
public housing program, or to build
public works, or to provide play-
grounds and schools, or to condemn
nuisances. The slum area must be re-
planned, as a unit, and many or all
of these measures must be applied.
Such a program must involve a work-
ing partnership between private in-
terests and public agencies, with a
heavy reliance on private investment.
The national urban renewal pro-
gram is such a program. It is the de-
clared policy of the Congress that in
carrying out the program there shall
be a maximum reliance on private en-
terprise. No local urban renewal proj-
ect can be started until and unless
there has been a finding by the
elected local governing body that the
area in question is a blighted or slum
area, tht: the public powers and
funds 4re necessary, that the plan
for renewal conformns to an approved
general community plan, and that the
project is one that affords a maximum
opportunity for private investment.
In this manner are the public in-
terest and private enterprise mutually
protected. Furthermore, to insure a
broad attack on the causes of slums
and blight, there must be a local
"workable program" that includes


building and housing code enforce-
ment, community planning and zon-
ing, neighborhood studies and im-
provement programs, and the like.
Everything possible is being done to
insure that urban renewal shall not
be confined to tearing down slum
areas in order to build public housing
projects.
Urban renewal provides a degree of
flexibility that is required if broad
aspects of the public welfare are to
be served. Thus, a residential slum
area may be replanned and convert-
ed to another kind of use if the area
is not suitable for residence. In this
connection should be mentioned the
opportunity that will arise to coor-
dinate slum clearance with the high-
way program, easing the problems of
acquiring adequate right-of-way in
heavily built city areas, with a saving
to the taxpayers of this State and a
chance to cash in on the land-use po-
tentials arising from improved access.
Similarly, there are blighted areas
that are mainly non-residential, but
which could be replanned and con-
verted into desirable residential loca-
tions. Such benefits can rarely be at-
tained without public action involv-
ing the power to acquire real property
and to sell or lease it for the purposes
of the new plan. This is the power
that the proposed amendment would
give to the Florida Legislature, to be
delegated and exercised as the Legis-
lature may deem to be in the public
interest.
Such powers are necessary and de-
sirable, whether or not Federal urban
renewal assistance is ever obtained
for Florida. The National Association
of Real Estate Boards, best known
and probably the largest represent-
ative of private property interests in
this country, has endorsed this prin-
ciple in supporting the move to es-
tablish urban renewal and conserva-
tion authorities throughout the Unit-
ed States and in drafting a model
statute with appropriate powers.





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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


07exe;iVbit of









Background for The Future...


By ROGER W. SHERMAN
Executive Director, FAA


The FAA's Executive Director outlines six broad objectives for
the Association and suggests four fields of organized professional
activity in which cooperative interest and joint effort can speed
progress of the FAA toward the goals it wishes to reach . .


Whoever it was that first voiced
such sayings as "The past is pro-
logue" and "Today is the yesterday
of tomorrow" provided as apt a basis
for a commentary on the state of
current affairs as any reporter could
wish. Certainly it's true that the be-
ginnings of what is now taking place
were made some time ago. It's just
as true that what we are doing now
will have a direct effect on what we
will be doing in years to come.
There's not too much reason for
dwelling on what we are now doing.,
Those who wish to measure present
accomplishment against the yardstick
of recent FAA history can easily do so.
All they need do is to contrast
present FAA activities in terms of
organization, size or extent of cover-
age, and depth of influence-with
those of a few say five or six -
years ago. As he~inotes the progressive
increase in membership, the widening
scope of contacts and the strength-
ening of that intangible professional
value called "prestige", each can tot
up his own estimate of comparative
growth and progress.
But where do we stand right now
in terms of what lies ahead or, to
put it the other way round, what's
the outlook for FAA's future on the
basis of its current situation? I, for
one, believe it is so bright as to be
almost dazzling.
Here, for example, are some speci-
fic goals, which in all humility we
might expect to reach in years ahead:
I...The FAA can become truly the
authoritative voice of the architec-
tural profession in Florida- heard,
listened to and respected as a pro-
NOVEMBER, 1958


ponent of sound public policy in
every section of our State.
2...The FAA can become a vital
force for leadership in movements to
develop communities of our State
along sound lines of growth and use.
3. The FAA can develop in the
public mind a better understanding
of what constitutes such sound
growth--and with that a clearer
realization of the penetrating values
which competent architectural serv-
ices can create.
4...The FAA can become a head-
quarters source of information for the
building public- as an advisory
agency to assist development of poli-
cies and procedures of governmental
bodies; as a help in determining im-
provement patterns in our communi-
ties, and as a reliable guide to better
construction practices on the part of
individual building owners.
5...The FAA can become a moti-
vating center for coordinating and
rallying the interests and activities of
various elements of Florida's con-
struction industry toward improving
professional and trade practices -
thus meeting one of the architec-
tural profession's highest public
obligationqc
6....A'he1AA can thus become an
important force iq the public affairs
of Florida. As-such it will have a
constant hand in creating and con-
trolling the conditions under which
the architectural profession works-
and in shaping the public's attitude
toward the services which architects
offer and the contributions they can
make toward the progressive improve-
ment of the whole state community.


As it's now organized and oper-
ating, the FAA is a comparative in-
fant. But substantial progress has
already been made along some of the
lines just noted progress which
can be better reported by FAA offi-
cers and the chairmen of its various
committees. So, on the basis of
experience to date, I believe each one
of these goals can be reached.
But how soon and with what speci-
fic individual returns to the FAA
membership are matters over which
any FAA administrative staff has only
a small measure of control. For the
FAA is not a "staff" or an "office"
or an "executive committee" or even
a "board of directors". The FAA is
you the 10 AIA Chapters in Flor-
ida and the entire membership of
those Chapters.
If You wish to reach the goals set
forth, they can be attained.
If You will staff the FAA organiza-
tion with the best brains and ex-
perience ard judgment your Chap-
ter provides, you will provide the
collective leadership needed to reach
those goals.
If You will cooperate with your
selected leaders by meeting promptly
and cheerfully your pro-rated share
of the inevitable operating expenses,
you will provide the means your
leaders need for making the progress
you want.
If You will recognize that FAA
Committee assignments are part of
the mechanics necessary for the FAA
to travel toward the goals you have
set for it--and will dedicate your-
self to producing the results for which
(Continued on Page Sl)






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Background for The Future...


(Continued from Page 19)
a committee was established you
will go far in helping to make your
financial support of your leadership
an investment of high return rather
than a mere out-of-pocket expense.
There is very little point, it seems
to me, for any man or any organiza-
tion setting up any sort of a goal
unless that man or that organization
is willing to spend the time and the
money and the effort to reach it. If
these FAA goals are worth the reach-
ing and I certainly believe they
are -a little progress toward them is
not enough. Here, for example, are
some fields of organized professional
activity which are still virtually un-
cultivated:
1...Professional education and com-
petence: The FAA -like State Asso-
ciations in other regions could well
work more closed with our schools
and colleges; could establish an
Educational Foundation (like North
Carolina); could promote refresher
courses (like Texas); could establish
regular visiting lecture programs for
students; could stimulate recruitment
interests at pre-college levels; could
sponsor educational field tours for
student and practitioner alike.
2...Community development: A
start here has been made -in Jack-
sonville notably and in the activity
of the Mid-Florida Chapter toward
stimulating a multi-county develop-
ment survey and planning program.
But in Kansas City architects de-
veloped "KCSO"--a civic replan-
ning and a guide to urban redevelop-
ment with a 1980 goal which won
tremendous public acclaim and
placed the architectural profession
in the forefront of public recognition
and respect. Much can be done along
these lines throughout our State-
and at governmental levels with the
Development Commission, the Cabi-
net and the State Road Board, as
well as in individual communities.
3...Research: This is a term for a
broad series of FAA activities. It
could embrace continuing activity in
greater depth toward building code
simplification and improvement. It
would cover cooperative programs
with the State Department of Public
Health, the Department of Public
Instruction, the Hotel and Restaurant
NOVEMBER, 1958


Commission, the Development Com-
mission. It could embody initiation
of technical investigations on various
types of new structural systems (such
as prestressed concrete and curtain
walls;) and could also include pro-
grams to test performance, under
local Florida conditions, of various
space enclosures as well as the com-
ponents of their construction and
equipment.
4...Collaborative public relations:
That's a broad field also. It means
working more closely with other ele-'
ments of the construction industry -
realtors, bankers, management, as
well as engineers and builders. In
Texas, for example, the Governor
declares a yearly "Architects' Week"
highlighted by huge all-industry din-
ners in various Texas cities at which
city, county and state officials are
glad to visit with leaders of various
civic, trade business and professional
leaders -with architects as hosts. It
means a more specific interest and
activity) in political policies and
actions-at state as well as local
community levels. And, furthermore,
it means a continuous expression of
public-spirited comment and opinion
on the manifold matters involved in
the growth and developing improve-
ments of our State-state-wide as
well as locally.
These are only a few of the things
which can help the FAA progress
toward whatever goals it sets for it-
self. Thus far the FAA has hardly
scratched the surface of the interests
and activities they represent. And the
real depths of value that lie below
that surface can, of course, never be
reached at all unless the member
Chapters and individuals of the FAA
will make the concerted necessary
effort to reach them.
Realization of the values that are
inherent in FAA activities can never
come fully from even a succession
of administrAti e officers however
dedicated and however clothed with
the authority for accomplishment. It
requires joint interest, joint activity,
joint support. Given these, a far-
reaching FAA program can be organ-
ized. Given these continuously, the
FAA's most ambitious goals will be
easy to reach.


Yes...Two





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of wilton carpeting. ..
Downs wiltons are woven of
100 percent wool, the soft,
warm, tough natural fiber
that feels "so wonderful
underfoot." . Because of
its deep, lush pile, Downs
wilton carpeting can be tex-
tured in almost endless
variety and with Jacquard
looming an infinity of color
and pattern is yours for the
asking .. .


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WILTONS


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Whatever the specifica-
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durability, resiliency, high-
fashion or bed-rock utility
-there's a Robbins floor
product to meet it . For
long wearing vinyl, soft,
warm cork or practical, low-
cost rubber, a Robbins spec-
ification provides top values
in wearability and good
looks. . You can't do
better.

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I


GLAZETTES . small, hard-glazed tile with a tough, vitreous
ceramic body fused with a crystalline surface rugged enough
for hard use on walls, floors or counters indoors or out . .
Twenty deep glowing colors, mounted in standard or custom
patterns of 2"x2", T"x1" and l"xl", 1/4-in. thick.


See our booth #38 at the 44th Annual Convention
Stylon 4'/4' "i bright or matt-glazed wall tiles and crystal-
glazed floor tiles are made with Stylon "Sure-Space" lugs which
project on all four sides. These projections make proper setting
and true alignment automatic, thus assure uniform joints for
grouting . Stylon's Florida distributors invite you to see the
complete Stylon line -tiles which can be specified with con-
fidence and which suggest unlimited new areas of design for
architects ..


STYLON OF MIAMI 1400 N. W. 54th Street, Miami
SSTYLON OF TAMPA 3813 Grand Central Avenue, Tampa
STYLON TILES 815 N. W. 8th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports



Chapter Affairs

By JOHN L. R. GRAND
Chairman


DUTIES:
To unify the efforts and objectives
of all Chapters; to encourage an
interchange of information on Chap-
ter affairs and problems. In 1958 to
continue the study and promote the
recommendation of the 1957 Com-
mittee on Chapter Coordination and
Committee on Committees.
DIRECTIVE:
Submit to The Florida Architect
for publication a description of the
Chapter Affair of the Quarter
selected by the Committee after a
study of the activities of the various
Chapters.
At the F.A.A.'s Clearwater Conven-
tion Chapter Affairs breakfast, BERYL
PRICE emphasized chapter P/R pro-
grams, professional performance, and
continuous personal contact in com-
munity affairs as being of top impor-
tance. Any review of the last year's
issues of The Florida Architect will
show that achievement has been high
in all of these areas. The record of
F.A.A., Chapter, and individual ac-
complishment fills the predominant
number of the more than four hun-
dred pages contained in the twelve
issues, November 1957 to October
1958 inclusive. Obviously so rich a
record cannot be condensed in so
brief a report as this.
Recognition should be given to the
great strides made in chapter and
committee coordination and organi-
zation during the year. While this
activity was delegated to the Chapter
Affairs Committee, credit for progress
belongs rightfully to the President,
the officers, and the Board of Direc-
tors. Prompt committee appoint-
ments, clear administrative directives,
and systematic follow-up and report-
ing have been the foundations upon
which this progress was built.
National recognition was given at
the A.I.A. Convention in Cleveland
when the Institute recognized that
Florida was organized and ready to
become a District, and the Commit-
tee on Chapter Affairs read its cita-
tion "To the Florida Association of
NOVEMBER, 1958


Architects who through their annual
conventions, their magazine The Flor-
ida Architect and their many activities
are furthering the work of the Com-
mittee on Chapter Affairs, and who
have initiated in their state an award
for the Chapter-Affair-of-the-Year."
That The Florida Architect has re-
ceived such recognition is important,
but more important has been the
function it performs as a forum for
exchanging ideas and .reporting ac-
complishment. Most informative is
the new practice of publishing the
Presidents' programs for the year in
the January issue a veritable guide-
book to effective action in Chapter
Affairs.
Following its meeting at the Reg-


ional Conference in Sarasota, the
committee recommended a Chapter-
Affair-of-the-Year be instituted in
place of the Chapter-Affair-of-the-
Quarter, after concluding that a quar-
ter is too small a segment of the year
to contain representative activities
from a substantial number of chap-
ters. During the weeks prior to the
convention the committee will be
engaged in selecting the first Chap-
ter-Affair-of-the-Year. The procedure
consists of the cross circulation of
reports among the committee mem-
bers in the several chapters, taking
the poll, and the report of the award.
The F.A.A. and its members can
take credit for a year of real achieve-
ment.


Home Building--


Construction Industry

By JOHN STETSON
Chairman


This committee as a whole did not
function this year, its first in the As-
sociation. Failure to produce any in-
structive program was partly brought
about by the application of the Flor-
ida Home Builders Association for
membership in the Joint Cooperative
Coinmittee, of which the chairman
of this committee also heads. Faced
with the probability that the structure
of the new Joint Cooperative Com-
mitte l include a sub-committee
for cooperation between the architects
and the home builders, your chairman
withheld any active program for this
committee this year.
The recommended structure of the
Joint Cooperative Committee is such
that the sub-committees will become
the liaison groups between the archi-
tects and the various component parts
of the Cooperative Committee. Your
chairman therefore recommends that


the President of the FAA appoint a
much smaller Home Building and
Construction Industry Committee
next year, to serve as a sub-commit-
tee to the Joint Cooperative Com-
mittee.
A closer cooperation of effort with
the home builders is very necessary
since their membership includes firms
now producing a great percentage of
the building being done each year in
Florida. The architects have failed to
participate in this large program in
too many cases. Part of this is our
lack of interest in designing small
houses, part in our failure to produce
a better house than the average drafts-
man could accomplish, and failure on
the part of the home builders to seek
out a better service and to include
in their budget a fee sufficient for
the architect to become interested
therein.









































Mo-Sai lightweight, precast panels 8'-4" square and 4" thick
formed the facing for the original Jordan Marsh building in
Miami, pictured above, and for the two-story addition, now virtually
completed, below. Panels are surfaced with quartz chips embedded
in white cement mixed with buff-colored sand with about 85
percent of the aggregate exposed. The architect was Weed,
Russell, Johnson, Associates; the builder, Frank J. Rooney, Inc.





Now, more than ever, Florida architects
can make full design of the wide color
range, the versatility and the sound
structural values of Mo-Sai precast
facings . A new, thoroughly modern
concrete products plant is now in operation
in Miami where experienced
engineers and plant technicians are ready-
to help solve any architectural problem -
and to work with designers in the
development of special Mo-Sai finishes
in a variety of textures and a virtually THE M AD lELL COM PANY
unlimited range or combinations of THE MABIE
colors . Visit our Display at Exhibit GREENSBORO, N. C.
Booth No. 3 during the FAA Convention. P. O. Box 47546 N. W. Branch, Miami 47, Florida
24 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports




Joint Cooperative Committee, FAA-AGC-FES

By JOHN STETSON
Chairman


The Joint Cooperative Committee
adopted one major segment of its
1958 program which has consumed
much of the time and effort of the
committee for the year. This is the
expansion of the committee to include
the Florida Home Builders Associa-
tion and the Florida Building Indus-
try Council. In addition to this, cer-
tain "beefs" that annually occupy the
agenda continued to make themselves
manifest. This report will serve as an
explanation of the reasoning behind
the expanded committee recommen-
dations and a brief look at the com-
plaints of the present membership
groups.
The Joint Cooperative Committee
originally stemmed from the idea that
the architect and the general con-
tractor should meet on common
ground to work out ways and means
of producing a more harmonious re-
lationship and to produce better
buildings for clients. The engineers
joined us primarily as a means of
settling disputes over design juris-
diction and to also reach a closer
association with the general contrac-
tors. The success of the committee
over the years has justified its exist-
ence. We have achieved much in pro-
ducing a more harmonious co-exist-
ence of the three major bodies in the
building picture.
While we were occupied with
this worthy endeavor, a new and very
well organized group arrived on the
building scene, the Home Builders
Association. This group, actually com-
posed of a larger membership state-
wide than any of the three members
of the Joint Cooperative Committee
at the present, has become so power-
ful nationally that this year for the
first time the Florida Association of
Architects has had a committee to
work exclusively with this group, as
was recommended by the National.
The writer some years ago served on
the A.I.A. Committee on the Build-
ing Industry. During this time I
NOVEMBER, 1958


gained firsthand knowledge of this
group and learned to respect their
fine organization.
This year the Joint Cooperative
Committee was approached by the.
Florida Home Builders Association to
ascertain what was required of them
to enable their participation in our
already organized committee. In the
discussions that followed it seemed
evident that in order to have a satis-
factory committee encompassing the
Florida Building Industry, we needed
their assistance and cooperation in our
continued efforts to provide "watch
dog legislation" in Tallahassee and
to improve building codes, etc., at the
local level. The experience of the
Palm Beach County Joint Coopera-
tive Committee in which the Home
Builders were members provided a
tabloid of the results to be gained
from a thoroughly cooperative effort
by all segments of the Industry.
About the time the Home Builders
were being considered for membership
in our Joint Cooperative Committee,
the Florida Building Industry Coun-
cil, composed of electricians, roofers,
plumbers, etc., also asked to join our
committee structure. The first re-
action of many of us was that our
committee would be top-heavy if we
took in too large a group. In dis-
cussions regarding this it was sug-
gested that rather we were being pro-
vided with a wonderful opportunity
to achieve a long-sought goal of a
unified building industry aimed at
producing the best solutions to the
prob i o f the individual groups.
Rather tian the continued fights of
one side of the industry against
another such as has occurred in the
past, architects, contractors, engineers
and home builders would have an
opportunity to solve their problems
amicably for the benefit of all.
In order to keep this unwieldy
group down to a workable size, it is
recommended that no more than
three members of each of the five


groups serve on the top committee,
but that sub-committees of this orga-
nization be instituted to work out the
differences of the individual com-
ponents; that is, an architect-engineer
sub- committee, an architect- home
builders sub-committee, etc. These
committees should also be kept small
and flexible, and rather than a meet-
ing held as we have in the past with
some thirty committee members pres-
ent, with the ensuing long-winded dis-
cussions over trivial matters, we could
look forward to a well-organized sub-
committee structure feeding the more
important items to the master com-
mittee, who, in turn, armed with the
ammunition needed, could put over
almost any action desired by the com-
mittee. To this writer, this is the most
important step that the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects can make not
only to better its own position state-
wide, but also to improve the stand-
ards of the entire building industry
in Florida.
With the aforementioned momen-
tous report, the trivialities of some of
our "beefs" became almost humorous.
The engineer complains that the arch-
itect either does not use an engineer
or pays too low a fee. This is gen-
erally quite true, but is produced by
the vicious circle in which we find
ourselves enmeshed. The engineer
wants higher fees while working with
the architect. On the other hand, we
find engineers practicing architecture
at fees so low that we are forced
into a competitive fee schedule, mak-
ing it impossible to hire any outside
technical help. The net result is that
many architects have added engineers
to their organization, others have at-
tempted to do their own engineering
or have left the engineering up to
product manufacturers. We thought
we had an agreement specifically list-
ing the work which each profession
would consider its justifiable right to
accomplish. We had a letter from the
(Continued on Page 26)






Committee Reports




Joint Cooperative Committee, FAA-AGC-FES

By JOHN STETSON
Chairman


The Joint Cooperative Committee
adopted one major segment of its
1958 program which has consumed
much of the time and effort of the
committee for the year. This is the
expansion of the committee to include
the Florida Home Builders Associa-
tion and the Florida Building Indus-
try Council. In addition to this, cer-
tain "beefs" that annually occupy the
agenda continued to make themselves
manifest. This report will serve as an
explanation of the reasoning behind
the expanded committee recommen-
dations and a brief look at the com-
plaints of the present membership
groups.
The Joint Cooperative Committee
originally stemmed from the idea that
the architect and the general con-
tractor should meet on common
ground to work out ways and means
of producing a more harmonious re-
lationship and to produce better
buildings for clients. The engineers
joined us primarily as a means of
settling disputes over design juris-
diction and to also reach a closer
association with the general contrac-
tors. The success of the committee
over the years has justified its exist-
ence. We have achieved much in pro-
ducing a more harmonious co-exist-
ence of the three major bodies in the
building picture.
While we were occupied with
this worthy endeavor, a new and very
well organized group arrived on the
building scene, the Home Builders
Association. This group, actually com-
posed of a larger membership state-
wide than any of the three members
of the Joint Cooperative Committee
at the present, has become so power-
ful nationally that this year for the
first time the Florida Association of
Architects has had a committee to
work exclusively with this group, as
was recommended by the National.
The writer some years ago served on
the A.I.A. Committee on the Build-
ing Industry. During this time I
NOVEMBER, 1958


gained firsthand knowledge of this
group and learned to respect their
fine organization.
This year the Joint Cooperative
Committee was approached by the
Florida Home Builders Association to
ascertain what was required of them
to enable their participation in our
already organized committee. In the
discussions that followed it seemed
evident that in order to have a satis-
factory committee encompassing the
Florida Building Industry, we needed
their assistance and cooperation in our
continued efforts to provide "watch
dog legislation" in Tallahassee and
to improve building codes, etc., at the
local level. The experience of the
Palm Beach County Joint Coopera-
tive Committee in which the Home
Builders were members provided a
tabloid of the results to be gained
from a thoroughly cooperative effort
by all segments of the Industry.
About the time the Home Builders
were being considered for membership
in our Joint Cooperative Committee,
the Florida Building Industry Coun-
cil, composed of electricians, roofers,
plumbers, etc., also asked to join our
committee structure. The first re-
action of many of us was that our
committee would be top-heavy if we
took in too large a group. In dis-
cussions regarding this it was sug-
gested that rather we were being pro-
vided with a wonderful opportunity
to achieve a long-sought goal of a
unified building industry aimed at
producing the best solutions to the
probA-pf the individual groups.
Rather tlan the continued fights of
one side of the industry against
another such as has occurred in the
past, architects, contractors, engineers
and home builders would have an
opportunity to solve their problems
amicably for the benefit of all.
In order to keep this unwieldy
group down to a workable size, it is
recommended that no more than
three members of each of the five


groups serve on the top committee,
but that sub-committees of this orga-
nization be instituted to work out the
differences of the individual com-
ponents; that is, an architect-engineer
sub committee, an architect home
builders sub-committee, etc. These
committees should also be kept small
and flexible, and rather than a meet-
ing held as we have in the past with
some thirty committee members pres-
ent, with the ensuing long-winded dis-
cussions over trivial matters, we could
look forward to a well-organized sub-
committee structure feeding the more
important items to the master com-
mittee, who, in turn, armed with the
ammunition needed, could put over
almost any action desired by the com-
mittee. To this writer, this is the most
important step that the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects can make not
only to better its own position state-
wide, but also to improve the stand-
ards of the entire building industry
in Florida.
With the aforementioned momen-
tous report, the trivialities of some of
our "beefs" became almost humorous.
The engineer complains that the arch-
itect either does not use an engineer
or pays too low a fee. This is gen-
erally quite true, but is produced by
the vicious circle in which we find
ourselves enmeshed. The engineer
wants higher fees while working with
the architect. On the other hand, we
find engineers practicing architecture
at fees so low that we are forced
into a competitive fee schedule, mak-
ing it impossible to hire any outside
technical help. The net result is that
many architects have added engineers
to their organization, others have at-
tempted to do their own engineering
or have left the engineering up to
product manufacturers. We thought
we had an agreement specifically list-
ing the work which each profession
would consider its justifiable right to
accomplish. We had a letter from the
(Continued on Page 26)






Committee reports
(Continued from Page 26)


Architecture in Gainesville with ar-
rangements for having copies made of
them for each Chapter that wished to
make use of them. These slides would
form a nucleus for use in presentation
to High School Student groups and
could be supplemented by any addi-
tional slides of local architectural
work.
2. The assembling of information
from the National A.I.A. Headquar-
ters concerning any available pub-
lished literature of particular interest
to prospective students of Architecture
with costs of same.
3. Information from National A.I.A.
Headquarters as to rental/or purchase
of sound film "Architecture U.S.A."
for use by Chapters. Also suggested
method of scheduling its use by
Chapters expressly for High School
Student presentations.


4. Assembling of complete infor-
mation concerning tuition costs, liv-
ing costs, available scholarship aid,
available Student Loan funds, and any
other necessary cost information from
all of our nearby Schools of Archi-
tecture.
All of these assignments are being
pursued at the date of this writing.
The final organization of this material
and its presentation in useable form
to each of the Chapters will, it is
hoped be accomplished by the time
of our Annual Convention in No-
vember.
A meeting of all of the Members
of the Committee is being called at
the Convention at which time we
expect to be able to present the final
stage of this report together with addi-
tional supplementary recommenda-
tions to the Board of Directors.


Planned Program 1957-58. Due
to off-season legislature this year, a
"grass roots" campaign was proposed
to develop better relationship be-
tween the Arch. profession and mem-
bers of State Legislature and State
Boards & Committees by following:
(1) Chapter information program
to better advise all members of FAA
on legislative processes and to stimu-
late maximum individual efforts at
local level towards above goal.
(2) Direct Board, Committee and
Legislator contact program, headed
by Executive Director.
Under (1) above, each chapter was
requested to designate one meeting
as a "Legislative" meeting to be at-
tended by the Executive Director as
moderator, and local State Legislature
members as guests. To date three
chapters -Florida South, Daytona
Beach & Florida North have complied
and such meetings were accom-
plished. The effectiveness can only be
gauged by quantity and quality of
future "individual" activity. Other
NOVEMBER, 1958


such meetings have been scheduled by
some chapters the requested pro-
gram ignored by others.
A series of articles in The Florida
Architect have provided rather thor-
ough coverage of activities under (2)
above. This includes principally, a
series of meetings with the State
Legislature's Interim Committee on
Education wherein the committee
was, effectively we believe, informed
as lto the fallacies of Stock School
Plans, which was a major item of
consideration for policy recommend-
ation on the agenda of said commit-
tee. S elementary to the meeting
disd ssid a thorough written analysis
of the subject was forwarded to each
member of said committee by the
Executive Director. In addition other
Board, Committee and Legislator
contacts have been accomplished.
Although well publicized to date,
this report must include mention of
"Construction Industries Commit-
tee," known as the Florida Mechan-
ic's Lien Law Revision Committee


Legislative

By JAMES K. POWNALL
Chairman


BY-LAW CHANGES
A number of important changes
to the FAA By-Laws have been
prepared for discussion and ratifi-
cation at the 44th FAA Conven-
tion. Since the By-Laws Commit-
tee, of which Walter B. Schultz,
of Jacksonville, is chairman, had
not completed work on the
changes in time for publication
last month, copies of all revisions
proposed were mailed to all FAA
members during the week of Oc-
tober 13 to provide the 30-day
notice prior to the Convention's
opening which the FAA By-Laws
currently require.
FAA members entitled to vote
on matters for Convention con-
sideration should study the By-
Law changes proposed and be
prepared to approve them or to
offer amendments to them during
the Convention.



formed to study, prepare and subse-
quently submit to the State Legisla-
ture a thorough revision to the Mech-
anic's Lien Law. The FAA is repre-
sented on this committee by the Ex-
ecutive Director. Specific chapter rec-
ommendations on such revisions have
been solicited, but have not been
forthcoming. When a draft of the
new proposal has been completed, it
is planned to submit it to each chap-
ter for review and recommendations
which will establish the FAA policy
as regards the final draft of the pro-
posed new law.
The size and wide geographic dis-
tribution of the FAA Legislative
Committee is such that meetings are
not feasible other than at times of
convention. However, each member
has been kept well informed as to
committee activities in process or
contemplated and each has been so-
licited for opinions on such through
the office of the Executive Director.
There remain several matters to be
included in this report including a
1958-59 budget request which, in the
opinion of this chairman of the Legis-
lative Committee, should be referred
to the Committee in its called meet-
ing during the forthcoming conven-
tion. Should circumstances warrant
it, a supplementary report will be pre-
sented prior to adjournment of the
convention.






































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Florida Association of Architects Convention
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F. Graham Williams Distributor
Represented in Florida by LEUDEMAN and TERRY, Coral Gables
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








th Annual Convention

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS




CONVENTION MESSAGE FROM THE FAA PRESIDENT

Recent events have shown us again that we of the 20th Century live
in an era of potential disaster-or unlimited possibilities for human
growth in a better environment. The theme of this 44th FAA Conven-
tion-Opportunity in an Expanding Era-illustrates the optimism with
which architects of Florida view the future. We, the architects of Florida,
want to understand fully the dimensions of both the challenge and the
possibilities. With our optimism tempered by an understanding of the
new dimension, we will prepare, collectively as well as individually, out
profession and ourselves to shape exploding change into human happiness
and dignity in a materially and spiritually happy environment.
How well we meet the challenge of new dimensions is a reflection of
our ability to foresee the need for expanding the breadth and depth of
our professional service for meeting the challenge, and to solve the number
of problems our expanding era presents.
In the January issue of The Florida Architect, I noted in the forecast
for 1958 the apparent feeling that men of good will, dedicated to service
to society, organized for a high degree of integrated effort, will shape an
exciting and beautiful future for the Florida Community. I further noted
that FAA has the strength, the organization and the prestige to shape the
future and that now is the time to solidify ideas into programs, translate
programs into real benefits for our community, our profession and our
individual interests.
The program for 1958 was tri-parte: (1) to direct the activities of
our new vertical and standing committee organization toward productive
results; (2) to broaden the scope of our professional activity and public
influence through regional status in the AIA; and (3) to organize our new
operational arrangement into an effective and efficient representation of
the FAA.
All parts of the 1958 program are going. Committees are working on
assigned programs; only the orderly change-over details remain for Florida's
regional status; and the Executive Director's administrative and operational
organization is accomplished. However, these accomplishments can be
considered only as a preliminary phase to the high degree of integrated
effort required for real effectiveness.
At this 44th FAA Convention we shall translate the recommended
committee programs into action; we shall discharge the remaining details
;g'iired to make Florida a functioning District of the Institute; and we
shill give direction for the continuing program to meet the ever increasing
number of professional problems confronting our profession.
I appeal to you to attack our problems with imagination and vigor, so
that our solutions are timely, sound, effective approaches to our high
goals. These goals are your goals. The FAA is each of you in collective
H. Samuel Kruse, AIA action; FAA's success in achieving its goals is in direct proportion to co-
President, FAA ordinated individual effort. Let us meet the challenge fully; let us get
to work.



NOVEMBER, 1958 29







SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE...

Events and inventions have led us to the very threshold of the new age of Space. What
lies behind the door -what new ways of working and living, what new materials and
structures, what new opportunities for accomplishment? These three men have, through
training and experience, more authority than most to probe possibilities for answers.


DR. J. PAUL WALSH
Trained as an Engineer, Dr.
Walsh has been connected with
the Naval Research Laboratory
since 1943; and since 1955 has
been a top member of the "Pro-
ject Vanguard" team. As one
who has researched some of the
problems of Space, he recognizes
the possibilities which its con-
quest will bring.


RALPH DELAHAYE PAINE, JR. CHARLES A. BLANEY, JR.


As Publisher of Fortune and Ar-
chitectural Forum, as a vice
president of Time, Inc. and as a
writer and editor he is one of
the best-informed men in the
country on how current develop-
ments are shaping the pattern
of our future. He will discuss the
emerging trend of architectural
activity.


An Engineer whose background
is the aircraft industry, the pres-
ent Director of Procurement for
the Martin Orlando Co. is con-
cerned with the down-to-earth
job of helping to build the var-
ious guided missiles that are
forerunners of space-age car-
rirers. He will discuss trends in
materials and construction.


NEW PROFESSIONAL HORIZONS...

As the basic ingredient of living is change, so the architectural profession must adapt its
outlook, its philosophy, perhaps even its pattern of activity, to the demands of a new
andcexpanding era. The Institute must point the way to that goal. Who are better qualified
to discuss the signs along the road than leaders of the profession which will follow it?


JOHN N. RICHARDS, FAIA
The President of the AIA has
been active in professional affairs
since 1935, serving at local, reg-
ional and national levels on many
important committees. Equally
active as a civic leader, he is
especially qualified to clarify
trends of professional growth in
terms of current organizational
needs.


PHILIP WILL, JR., FAIA
A top designer whose work has
had a major influence in the pub-
lic school field, the Institute's
first Vice President is also known
for his ability in the field of
professional organization. His
talents have shown not only in
his own firm, but in direction of
many civic activities and on im-
portant AIA committees.


* WALTER A. TAYLOR, FAIA
As architect, educator, editor,
researcher and administrator, the
Director of the AIA's Department
of Education and Research is
uniquely able to highlight the
increasing need for professional
research and to relate this need
to practical methods for satisfy-
ing it. He will sketch a perspec-
tive of trends in this area.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








TWO IMPORTANT "WORKSHOPS"

P blic R I ti Greater understanding and acceptance of professional ac-
Pub c Relations--tivity is now generally regarded as essential. But the tech-
niques of generating it are not so widely understood. Here, then, is specialized knowledge
to clarify ways in which our public relations can be strengthened and improved.


ROBERT E. DENNY
As Public Relations Direc-
tor of Henry J. Kaufman
& Associates, he works
closely as P/R counsel
with the Octagon and
with AIA Committees.
He will discuss P/R poli-
cies and programs par-
ticularly applicable to the
local needs of Florida AIA
Chapters and members.


RALPH RENICK
Nationally recognized for
his outstanding develop-
ment of TV news report-
ing, this Vice President
of WTVJ-TV will discuss
TV's role in a P/R pro-
gram, some of its techni-
cal requirements and the
manner in which it can
best be used in a P/R
program for architects.


FREDERIC SHERMAN
As a working newspaper-
man with varied experi-
ence in both reporting
and feature assignments,
he will discuss what
makes news in architec-
ture and how to report
it. As Editor of the Miami
Herald's Real Estate sec-
tion, he will outline
mechanics of meeting
editorial needs.


EDWARD G. GRAFTON
Moderator of this P/R
workshop panel is active
in the Florida South
Chapter and is now serv-
ing as a member of the
national AIA P/R Com-
mittee. As a former
Chapter secretary and
FAA Director, he is a
vigorous advocate of a
coordinated P/R program.


The Widening Scope of Service--

Is the challenge of the building-package operator a sign that the architectural profession
must re-evaluate its traditional field of service and, perhaps, widen its range of pro-
fessional concern? Thoughtful leaders are seeking an answer to that question. These three,
in particular, have studied the matter and will discuss their findings in practical terms.


VINCENT G. KLING, AIA
Heading his own office since
1946, this perennial award-win-
ner has coupled an outstanding
ability in design with penetrating
understanding of the social aid
economic forces that are shaping
new and broader areas for pro-
fessional service. He is an able
advocate of adjusting professional
service to economic demands.
NOVEMBER, 1958


GRAYSON GILL, AIA
As both an architect and an
engineer with a background
which emphasizes the technical
phases of architectural practice,
he has evolved a pattern of pro-
fessional operation which is prov-
ing to be a successful answer to
the challenge of the package-
building operator. He will relate
his experience to this problem.


HERBERT C. MILLKEY, AIA
Through various AIA activities,
particularly as chairman of the
Package Deal Committee, he
brings an experienced approach
to his assignment as moderator
of this workshop panel. His de-
tailed knowledge of current con-
ditions is both a background and
a guide to considering means for
extending professional service.







Program -


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIA

DEAUVILLI

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19

8:00 A. M. Installation of Products Exhib
and Architectural Exhibit.
9:00 A. M. Registration for Chapter Merr
to bers, Students, Guests and Exhibitc
12:30 P. M. personnel, Upper Exhibit Lobb!
Identifying badges will be required for ac
mission to all FAA business sessions an
other scheduled Convention affairs.
12:30 P. M. Luncheon Meeting, Joint CooperE
tive Committee, FAA-AGC-FES, Charle
magne Room, John Stetson, W. W. Arnolc
co-chairmen.
7:00 P.M. FAA Board of Directors Dinne
Meeting, Casanova Room, President -
Samuel Kruse presiding.
8:00 P. M. Open Board Meeting, FAA, Casa
nova Room. FAA members are invited ti
attend and participate.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20

9:00 A.M. -Registration Continues, Uppe
to Exhibit Lobby.
12:30 P.M.
9:00 A.M. -Opening Ceremony, Building Pro
ducts and Materials Exhibit, Napoleoi
Room. H. Samuel Kruse, President FAA
Joseph M. Shifalo, President, Mid-Florid.
Chapter, Robert B. Murphy, Co-Chairmar
FAA Convention and Judge Kenneth Oka
Mayor of Miami Beach, officiating.
Architects' and Students' Exhibit opens
Peacock Alley.
10:00 A. M. First Business Session, 44th FA/
Convention, Casanova Room, FAA Presiden
H. Samuel Kruse, presiding.
Report of Nominating Committee.
Nominations from the floor.
Reports of FAA officers.
Reports of FAA Committees.
11:30 P. M. Visit Products Exhibit.
12:30 P.M.-Luncheon Meeting, Napoleor
Room, Third Section, President H. Samue
Kruse, presiding.
Address, "You and the AIA" by John Noble
Richards, FAIA, President, AIA.
2:00 P.M. Election Polls open, Registratior
to Desk, Upper Exhibit Lobby. Only AIA Cor
5:00 P.M. porate Members duly registered a
the Convention are eligible to ballot.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






th Annual Convention
ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
MIAMI BEACH NOVEMBER 20, 21, 22, 1958










..... 'SATURDAY NOVEMBER 22

FRIDAY, NOVEmER 21





* . . s TIO. .


," '.. -' -' CONVENTION NOTES:

,..., .-, :::1-.; .- .






7 764 Wm Sacato- 4c ...


The 1958 Building Products Exhibit




T I a 4. 1 9 1 8 0 I 0 12 113114

70 To become eligible for

d -any of the top-quality
APCIec"T5 is 1< exhibit attendance
INING Rom t 47 4 4 prizes, visit every
SNIboth yourself and be
7I L0o v sure that your Product
1 1 z Exhibit Card, available
1415attheregistrationdesk,
3 3394 1is properly stamped...
74 But prize or not, this
fine exhibit can be re-
7! 1 51 1 5ol2 t ?AZ-3warding in itself. Here
S. you will find data and
samples of an amazing
variety of building
products-all displayed
by firms who know
their business and a
goodly bit of yours.
They're eager to help
you--so let them!


1...Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
2...Benjamin Moore & Co.
3...The Mabie-Bell Co.
4...Cement Enamel of The
Caribbean, Inc.
5...Ruby-Philite Corp.
6...Rotolite Distributor
7...Lift Slab of Florida, Inc.
8...NuTone, Inc.
9...Miami Window Corp.
10...Miami Window Corp.
11...Jay Wholesale Corp.
12...Sierra Electric Corp.
13...The Mosaic Tile Co.
14...Electrend Distributing
Co. of Florida
15...Briggs Manufacturing Co.
16...Libbey, Owens, Ford
Glass Co.
17...Florida Home Heating
Institute
18...Florida Home Heating
Institute
19...Florida Home Heating
Institute
20...Kaiser Aluminum &
Chemical Sales, Inc.
21...Florida Power & Light Co.
22...Florida Power'&` ight Co.
23...Crane Compan.
24...Pro-Tect-U Jalousie Corp.
25...Ben Thomson, Inc.
26...Arketex Ceramic Corp.


27...Cellular Concrete Corp.
28...Formica Corp.
29...Lambert Corp. of Florida
30...General Electric Textolite
31...Ware Laboratories, Inc.
32...Owens-Corning Fiberglas
Corp.
33...American Olean Tile Co.
34...Giffen Industries
35...United States Rubber Co.
36...Kaiser Manufacturing Co.
37...Farrey's Wholesale
Hardware Co., Inc.
38...Stylon of Miami
Sunshine State Tiles
39...Bird & Son, Inc..
40...Wilcox-Woolford Corp.
41...Bond-Howell Lumber Co.
42...Miller Brothers Co.
43...Hotpoint Appliance Sales Co.
44...Fl ingo Wholesale
,i't;iibutors, Inc.
45...Flamingo Wholesale
4 Distributors, Inc.
46...American-Marietta Co.
47...Rohm & Haas Co.
48...Rohm & Haas Co.
49...Independent Nail & Packing
Co.
50...Russell & Erwin Division,
American Hardware Corp.
51...Tiffany Mfg. Co.


52...Lotspeich Flooring Co.
53...United States Plywood Corp.
54...Ther-Mo-Roof Corp.
55...Rilco Laminated Products,
Inc.
56...Schlage Lock Co.
57...No. Miami Hardware &
Builders Supply Co.
58...Malone Millworks
59...Wenczel Tile Co.
60...Mosaic Plasti-Glass Corp.
61...Harris Standard Paint
Co., Inc.
62...Aluminum Co. of America
63...Hillyard Chemical Sales
Company (Eastern)
64...Pittsburg Plate Glass Co.
65...Prestressed Concrete
Institute
66...Prestressed Concrete
Institute
67...L & M Tile Products
68...Fred L. McCord,
Romany-Spartan Tiles
69...Norman Ascher & Assoc.,
Inc.
70...Arcadia Metal Products
71...Perlite Incorporated
72...Southern Tile-Lite, Inc.
73...Tiffany Tile Corp.
74...T-Square Miami Blueprint
Co., Inc.
75...Jones-Sylar Supply Co., Inc.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















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November 20, 21, 22


NOVEMBER, 1958






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36 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports


Planning and Zoning


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT
Chairman


What is the status of planning and
community development programs in
Florida today? What part are archi-
tects and AIA chapters taking in such
programs? What is being done to
stimulate public interest and under-
standing? These questions have en-
gaged the attention of the FAA Com-
mittee on Community Development
this year.
The duties of the Committee are
listed in the March, 1958, issue of
The Florida Architect and, as the
name indicates, the Committee is
concerned with problems of urban
planning, development and renewal
in Florida.
Status of Planning and
Development
In Florida, as elsewhere, planning
is fast becoming an accepted re-
sponsibility of local government. This
is neither new nor novel, for cities
from time immemorial have engaged
in planning as a jasis for intelligent
governmental action.
A recent survey indicates that 68
percent of the communities in the
country in the same population
bracket as Sarasota have official plan-
ning agencies. 70 percent in the same
bracket as Gainesville have, 83 per-
cent in the same bracket as Orlando
have, 89 percent in the same bracket
as Jacksonville have and 100 percent
in the same bracket as Atlanta have.
Among these same communities, 10
percent in the lowest population
bracket have full-time planning di-
rectors, 24 percent in the next. 57
percent in the next, and 100 percent
in the next.
Few architects claim to know all
about planning and development, but
no architect can afford to remain
ignorant of what planning and devel-
opment is all about. Here are the
highlights of what is happening
around Florida.
BROWARD: The Broward County
League of Municipalities is pushing
a County-wide planning board to pro-
NOVEMBER, 1958


vide a general approach to the plan-
ning problems of that area. Each city
or community of any size has a plan-
ning or zoning commission, but the
Chapter chairman reports the need
for competent professional guidance
in many planning departments. Pom-
pano Beach has an approved "work-
able program" designed to eliminate
slums and blight, prevent their recur-
rence, and guide future growth and
development.
DAYTONA BEACH: A planning con-
sultant has been secured and a slum
analysis program is under way, accord-
ing to a report from the Chapter
chairman.
FLORIDA CENTRAL: St. Petersburg,
with a substantial planning staff and
consultant assistance, has completed
a new text for its zoning ordinance,
is in the final stages of preparing a
new schedule of district regulations,
and is well underway on preparations
of a new zoning map. An off-street
parking ordinance requires owners of
new buildings to provide a specified
amount of off-street parking. Clear-
water is organizing a planning pro-
gram and a consultant has been se-
cured. Lakeland has a new planning
director and is pushing forward with
a small staff and consultant assistance
to prepare elements of a comprehen-
sive plan. Lake Placid has completed
preparation of its first zoning ordi-
nance and is about to adopt it. Brad-
enton, Plant City, Sarasota and
Tampa have approved "workable pro-
grams." Sarasota County has decided
that time staff is necessary and
has inpf yed a professional planning
director.
FLORIDA NORTH: In Gainesville,
planning has taken on new signifi-
cance. An annexation study has been
completed and agencies concerned
with development are beginning to
co-ordinate their efforts. With the
assistance of a professional consultant,
a comprehensive revision of the zon-
ing ordinance has been adopted. An


unsafe building ordinance has been
adopted and a "workable program"
has been approved. Ocala has secured
the services of a planning consultant
to carry on the work begun by the
late Arthur McVoy. Fernandina
Beach has an approved "workable
program."
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Talla-
hassee has employed a full-time plan-
ner and is exploring an urban renewal
project. The following have approved
"workable programs": Cottondale,
Cross City, Greenwood, Jasper, Live
Oak, Panama City, Springfield and
Tallahassee.
FLORIDA NORTH WEST: The Chap-
ter chairman reports that problems
resulting from uncontrolled growth in
the Pensacola area are producing in-
creased interest on the part of com-
munity and county leaders in a long-
term planning program to guide
future development. Apalachicola has
employed a planning consultant, has
adopted a "workable program," and
is moving forward with a number of
planning studies.
FLORIDA SOUTH: The Chapter com-
mittee is active in the field of slum
clearance which has become a major
issue in the Miami metropolitan
area.
JACKSONVILLE: The Chapter chair-
man reports that there is no compre-
hensive metropolitan planning in the
Jacksonville area, but that architects
face a wonderful opportunity to in-
fluence planning there. The nearing
.completion of the expressway has
shown that even limited planning
betters certain facets of community
living. He expresses great interest in
the result of a coordinated planning
effort looking to the future as well
as the present. Jacksonville Beach has
an approved "workable program."
MID- FLORIDA: Professional plan-
ning consultants have been secured
in Orlando, Winter Garden and
Winter Park and planning programs
(Continued on Page 38)






Committee Reports
(Continued from Page 37)


are under way. The Chapter has been
instrumental in the establishment of
county-wide planning and zoning in
Orange, Seminole and Brevard Coun-
ties. A Chapter committee is working
with city officials in Orlando on a
plan for a civic center. Cocoa has an
approved "workable program."

Participation of Architects
Whether he likes it or not, every
architect whose practice takes him
into something larger than a single
structure on a single lot, finds him-
self enmeshed in a tangle of city
planning. In self-defense, if for no
other reason, he must have some
understanding of why the tangle
exists, and what can be done to help
unsnarl it. Here is a quick look at
what Florida architects are doing.
BROWARD: Architects are members
of three planning and zoning com-
missions: W. G. CRAWFORD in Fort
Lauderdale, CEDRIC START in Holly-
wood and JOSEPH T. ROMANO in
Pompano Beach.
FLORIDA CENTRAL: In Clearwater,
ROBERT H. LEVISON is vice-chairman
of the City Planning and Zoning
Board and HORACE HAMLIN is chair-
man of the Zoning Board- of Appeals.
In Sarasota, WILLIAM B. ZIMMER-
MAN is a member of the Zoning Board
of Adjustment, ERWIN GREMLI is a
member of the Appeals to the Build-
ing Code Board, and EDGAR C. HANE-
BUTH is a member of the Housing
Board. In Tampa, FRANKLIN O.
ADAMS is a member of the Planning
and Zoning Board, and WILLIAM B.
EATON is a member of the Citizens
Advisory Committee for Urban Re-
newal.
FLORIDA NORTH: MYRL HANES is
mayor-commissioner of Gainesville,
LESTER N. MAY is chairman of the
Citizens Committee on Annexation
and a member of the Board of Ad-
justment, and WILLIAM T. ARNETT
is chairman of the City Plan Board.
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: In Tal-
lahassee, ERNEST DAFFIN is a member
of the City Planning Board, PRENTISS
HUDDLESTON is a member of the
Chamber of Commerce Committee
on Planning and Development, and
FORREST COXEN is a member of the
Junior Chamber of Commerce Action
for a Better Community Committee.


FLORIDA SOUTH: Architects are
represented on the majority of the
zoning and planning boards of the
27 municipalities incorporated in
Dade County.
MID-FLORIDA: In Orlando, L. ALEX
HATTON is a member of the Planning
Board, the Zoning Board, and the
Board of Adjustment for the Build-
ing Code. In Winter Park, JOSEPH
SHIFALO is a member of the Planning
and Zoning Board. An architect is a
member of the long-range planning
committees for Sanford and Orlando,
and a member of the Planning and
Zoning Board in Sanford.
PALM BEACH: In Delray Beach,
KENNETH JACOBSON is a member of
the County Zoning Board and presi-
dent of the Florida Planning and
Zoning Association. In West Palm
Beach, FREDERICK W. KESSLER is a
member of the Planning Board, HAR-
OLD A. OBST is a member of the
Building Board of Appeals, and ROB-
ERT M. NEVINS is a member of the
Contractors Licensing Board. In Lake
Worth, HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR., is a
member of the Civic Affairs Com-
mittee of the Chamber of Commerce
and of the Contractors Examining
Board.

Stimulation of Interest
From Chapter reports, it seems
obvious that the need for sound plan-
ning often exceeds the ability to plan.
For example, Florida is one of the
three or four states without a general
permissive enabling act to allow cities
and counties to guide their growth
and development. And Florida is one
of the few states unable to participate
in urban renewal programs, even
though our tax money helps under-
gird such programs elsewhere. Here
are a few of the activities aimed at
stimulating interest and understand-
ing el-'7
RO O RD: The Chapter has offered
aid and individual service to planning
boards in Fort Lauderdale, Holly-
wood, Pompano Beach and elsewhere.
DAYTONA BEACH: A Chapter com-
mittee is set up to advise the city
commission on planning matters.
FLORIDA NORTH: Chapter mem-
bers will present a series of programs,
"Planning Means You," when the
new University of Florida educational


TV network begins operation. Spon-
sor is the College of Architecture and
Fine Arts.
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL: Chapter
members are working toward a com-
mon goal of establishing an active
planning program and of qualifying
Tallahassee for an urban renewal pro-
ject.
FLORIDA NORTH WEST: Pensacola
has been considering the establish-
ment of a metropolitan planning com-
mission. The Chapter would like per-
tinent information.
FLORIDA SOUTH: The Chapter has
started a program of public education
in urban renewal. Actual organization
of an urban renewal program must
await State constitutional revision.
JACKSONVILLE: The Chapter has
stimulated interest in planning, and
through speeches and panels has
achieved much in the realm of cata-
lytic action. The goal is a county-wide
metropolitan planning commission
with a professional planning director.
MID-FLORIDA: The Chapter recog-
nizes the need for a five-county area
study and has met with county com-
missioners in Orange, Seminole, Bre-
vard, Lake and Osceola counties to
discuss the matter. The Chapter hopes
that the coming session of the Florida
Legislature will make it possible to
secure Federal assistance.
Among other groups working to
stimulate interest in the problems of
growth and development, two deserve
mention. They are the Florida Plan-
ning and Zoning Association, now in
its ninth year, and the Florida Com-
mittee for ACTION, newest of the
state-wide organizations.
KENNETH JACOBSON (Palm Beach)
has been serving effectively as Presi-
dent of the FPZA during the past
two years and H. SAMUEL KRUSE
(Florida South) has been newly ap-
pointed as a member of the Board
of Directors of the Florida Commit-
tee for ACTION, an agency of the
American Council to Improve Our
Neighborhoods.

Individual and Chapter
Activity
At the first meeting of the Com-
mittee in Sarasota last April, deep
and moving interest was expressed in
the problems brought about by growth
and development. At the national
level, that interest has been expressed
in a recent action of the Board of
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Telephone Co. Errs...
(Continued from Page 8)
Classified Directory under Architects.
From the standpoint of the FAA's
administrative office, this seems like
an almost inexcusable error on the
company's part. When the FAA
offices moved into their Dupont
Plaza Center quarters, two telephone
lines were ordered. One FRanklin
1-8253--was ordered in the name
of the FAA; the other FRanklin
1-8331 -in the name of its publica-
tion. The orders specified that the
phones were to be listed under these
names in the new general directory.
This was done.
But in the classified directory, for
which a free listing is available for
each business telephone, listing for
the FAA was specified to be under
the classification of Associations; and
that for The Florida Architect under
the classification of Publishers. That
word "architect" must have done it!
And the trouble is, nothing can be
done to correct the mistake until the
next directory is issued in September,
1959!


Kay Pancoast Designs A

Besides the wonderful 10-day Carrib-
bean Cruise announced in last month's
Florida Architect, the FAA Conven-
tion Prize Award list will include a
panel of hand-crafted tiles designed
and executed by Kay Pancoast of
Miami, one of the country's foremost
ceramic designers. This panel, which
will measure two by three feet, is,
of course, a one-of-a-kind original; and
the FAA corporate member lucky


From her home studio on
Miami Beach, Ceramist
Kay Pancoast has pio-
neered the difficult art
of architectural ceramics
with such success that
the products of her skill
in design and craftsman-
ship now enjoy a nation-
wide demand. Trained as
an architect and the wife
of Russell T. Pancoast,
FAIA, Kay Pancoast is
designing an architectural
tile panel to be used as
an FAA Convention award.

Prize

enough to become its owner will be
justified in treasuring it as an exam-
ple of ceramic art that represents the
very finest in design quality and
craftsmanship. Mrs. Pancoast is now
working on the panel,
There will be several other prizes,
of course. This year the prize awards
will be given in three categories of
FAA membership Corporate, Asso-
ciate and Student.


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ARCHITECT: David Reaves
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46 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Maintenance will be Low and Easy


Inside This Fine New School


Desco Vitro-Glaze will be extensively
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hard use interior
surfaces make it
ideal as a decorative
finish for curtain
wall panels. Its vit-
reous-hard glaze
isn't affected by
wind, weather or
even corrosive at-
mospheres. It won't harbor mold or
mildew; and Vitro-Glaze itself is in-
combustible. It's virtually self-cleaning
during a rain; and all of the Vitro-Glaze
colors have been proven, by colorometer
test to be highly resistant to fading.


DESCO VITRO-GLAZE is a vitreous-hard, glazed wall finish that
is attractive, sanitary, washable, colorful, waterproof and
economical. It is skillfully mottled and textured in many
beautiful colors that are permanent and non-fading.
The marble hard surface, ease of cleaning, sanitary finish due
to elimination of joints and economical installation cost make
DESCO VITRO-GLAZE an ideal material for use on the interior
walls of schools, hospitals, churches and all public and commer-
cial buildings.
DESCO VITRO-GLAZE is not merely a surface covering, but
actually becomes a permanent part of the wall itself. The
enduring qualities of DESCO VITRO-GLAZE coupled with the
minimum of maintenance it requires, reduces its cost to an
insignificant amount per square foot per year of service given.
DESCO VITRO-GLAZE can be applied to any type of wall
surface which is solid and rigid and in which there is a
negligible amount of expansion and contraction. Walls con-
structed with Cement and Cinder Block, Brick, Concrete,
Plaster, Masonry and Asbestos Building Boards provide an
ideaLsurface for the application of DESCO.
-^~ ^


f4edtfUved isriorsut4:

STEWARD-MELLON CO.,
OF JACKSONVILLE
945 Liberty Street, Jacksonville Phone: ELgin 3-6231

NOVEMBER, 1958


an


rim







From Fireproofing to Finish


. .


FLORILITE


PERLITE


a


The Seville Hotel at Miami Beach was
designed by Melvin Grossman, architect.
Mllone Plastering Co. did the plastering;
and Stewart Tile Co., the tile work.


'ecaace ,.

1 ... It's Lightweight
Perlite plaster is 60 per cent
lighter than sanded gypsym,
saves 2,000 pounds deadload per
100 square yards of plaster
surface.
2... It's Easy to Handle
Perlite's bagged conveniently,
thus can be easily stored and
mixed at point of use. As an
aggregate in cement or plaster
it's 1/12 the weight of sand.
3 ... It's Insulating
Perlite has four times the heat
insulation value of sanded plas-
ter. That means a lower initial
capacity for air-conditioning in-
stallations --- and a perpetual
saving in operating costs.


In the Seville Hotel at Miami Beach,
Florida Perlite helps provide safety, comfort
and beauty for Convention guests .
As fire-proofing for steel it gives a 4-hour rating
with as little as a one-inch thickness . In
plaster it makes possible smooth, sound-absorb-
ing, heat-insulating surfaces . And,
indoors and out, all ceramic.tile are set in easy-
to-handle, resilient Florida Perlite tile mortar.


/f' Your guide to
SASTM quality
N lightweight
aggregate is
this certificate

4#44"",o


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


V.


bdL






Committee Reports
"(Continued from Page 38)


the AIA in adopting four resolutions
on community development as Insti-
tute policy. In substance, they are:
1. That individual architects and
local chapters assume leadership in
their communities in initiating dy-
namic programs to improve cities.
2. That advance planning for
public works be assured through
appropriate legislation setting aside
a proper percentage of funds on all


public works programs for such
planning, and for advance planning
for such programs as urban re-
newal, highways and housing.
3. That legislation be enacted at
state and community levels to co-
ordinate, implement and provide
continuity for nation-wide construc-
tion programs designed to improve
environment.
4. That, following support given


FAA Convention Committee


By VERNER JOHNSON
Chairman


The Convention Committee of the
FAA has endeavored to carry out dur-
ing this first full year of operation the
policies presented in report to the
1957 Convention. Namely, to select
convention sites completely suited to
the needs of the FAA Conventions,
irrespective of location; to select host
chapters willing jo carry out the full
responsibilities of program planning
and execution, together with details
of entertainment and architectural ex-
hibits; to work with and assist the
Executive Director and Secretary in
the preparation of the convention
budget, contracts, promotion, exhibit
space, and the detailed financial
arrangements of the convention.
At meetings in Miami, Sarasota
and Winter Park, concurrent with
FAA Board meetings, this commit-
tee selected the Deauville Hotel in
Miami Beach for 1958, the Robert
Meyer Hotel in Jacksonville for 1959,
and established dates and contracts
through the Executive Director. The
Mid-Florida Chapter graciously accep-
ted the offer to be host to this, the
1958 Florida convention, and, the
Jacksonville Chapter has accepted the
position of host to the 1959 conven-
tion. Investigation of the Diplomat
Hotel in Hallandale is now underway
in anticipation of the 1960 conven-
tion. Budget and policy problems
NOVEMBER, 1958


were resolved with the Executive
Director and Secretary.
This committee has functioned ef-
fectively this year through the very
diligent and conscientious study, re-
search, analysis, and hard work of the
Executive Director and Secretary.
This excellent job insured the suc-
cess of this convention and will be
invaluable to the FAA in future con-
ventions.
The Mid Florida Chapter ac-
cepted the challenge, first introduced
this year, to be host at a convention
assembled outside the chapter area.
This chapter has met this challenge,
executed all programs and entertain.
ment arrangements, and proved that a


FUTURE
CONVENTIONS
Because of the growth of FAA
iatittions, it is desirable that
each convention site and host
chapter be determined at least
two years in advance . The
Jacksonville Chapter will sponsor
the 1959 Convention at the
Robert Meyer Hotel in Jackson-
ville. The Convention Committee
would like expressions, during the
Convention, as to the site and
sponsorship of those for 1960
and' 1961.
em mm'. mamaam I


chapter, though small in numbers,
can effectively give to the FAA Con-
vention the most valuable contribu-
tion, an outstanding program.
The Jacksonville Chapter has al-
ready begun to study program themes
for 1959 to assure the FAA of an-
other fine convention.
To assure continuity of policy, ex-
perience, and successful conventions,
this committee recommends that its
present three man membership be re-
tained; that a host chapter and com-
mittee member from that chapter be
selected two years in advance to
serve three years and as Chairman
during the second year; that the host
chapter begin active program studies
at least 18 months before a conven-
tion to insure speaker and guest ar-
rangements; that the host chapter
assist, whenever possible, the Execu-
tive Director in his duties, especially
the promotion of manufacturers' ex-
hibit space; and that this committee
shall coordinate its work with the
Budget Committee of the FAA in the
preparation of the convention budget.
It is the sincere hope that this com-
mittee can strengthen and insure suc-
cessful FAA and, shortly, Florida Re-
gional Conventions, and make pos-
sible active participation by any and
all chapters in the most vital element
of any convention, the program.


by the Board to the Federal bill-
board control amendment for new
limited-access highways, members
be alerted to the urgent need for
state legislation to follow up Con-
gressional action to control highway
advertising.
A second meeting of the Commit-
tee on Community Development will
be held in Lakeland early in Novem-
ber. At this meeting, it is hoped that
a definite program of action can be
worked out for presentation to the
FAA Convention.











Progress On




The C.S.I. Front



By DONALD G. SMITH
President Greater Miami Chapter, CSI


I would like to keep you informed
as to what we are doing in the local
Construction Specification Institute.
At the last meeting -Monday,
October 6--the Chapter adopted a
set of By-Laws to govern activities of
the Chapter, based upon National
C.S.I. By-Laws, officially designated
the local chapter as the GREATER MI-
AMI CHAPTER OF THE C.S.I. and
elected permanent officers.
I am enclosing herein the "Code
of Ethics" of the C.S.I. This code,
better than any other words, expresses
the purpose of the C.S.I.
As of this date the Greater Miami
Chapter has 32 members of which 22
are active and the remaining 10 are
Associate members. All are charter
members.
At our next scheduled regular
meeting Monday, November 3 -
we hope to have present WILLARD
H. BARROWS, AIA, Chairman, New
Chapter and Development Commit-
tee of New York; J. STEWART STEIN,
National President of V.C.I. of Wash-
ington; C. J. HUCKELBERRY, V.S.I. of
Sanymetal Products, Decatur, Georgia
and J. GRIFFITH EDWARDS, AIA, of
Atlanta, Georgia, Past President of
the Georgia Chapter and organizer
and President of Atlanta C.S.I.
Mr. EVERETT EIGNUS of Edwin T.
Reeder and Associates has been ap-
pointed Chairman of the Program
Committee and he is arranging for a
very interesting and informative pro-
gram entitled "Complaints on Speci-
fications by Contractors." He will in-
vite two general contractors, one elec-
trical contractor and one mechanical
NOVEMBER, 1958


contractor as guest speakers. Each will
be allowed about 12 minutes to ana-
lyze their complaints and perhaps en-
lighten the members and their guests
as to "Pitfalls" in specification writ-
ing. Following their discussion, there


1. Each member shall discharge his
duties and responsibilities to his
clients or employers in such a man-
ner as to inspire respect and con-
fidence.
2. Each member. shall cooperate in
extending the effectiveness of the
profession and the Institute by the
interchange of information and ex-
perience with his fellow members
as the opportunity presents itself.
3. Each member shall endeavor to
write specifications which will
permit and encourage fair and
equable competition.
4. Eaf 'i ember shall endeavor to
write specifications that are thor-
ough, clear, ani concise, and to re-
frain from the use of loose, am-
biguous or unenforceable, unfair
requirements.
5. Each member shall specify mate-
rials, equipment, services and con-


will be a question and answer period.
All will be tape recorded- for fu-
ture reference and publication. I be-
lieve this will be good.
In attendance we are also inviting
(Continued on Page 50)


struction methods only on merit,
without consideration for, or ex-
pectation of, personal gain or fa-
vors other than from his employer
or his client.
6. Each member shall refrain from
disclosing the interest or business
affairs of any client or employer
without his knowledge and con-
sent.
7. Each member shall uphold the
principle of appropriate and ade-
quate compensation to those en-
gaged in specification writing and
refuse to knowingly compete on
basis of compensation.
8. Associate members shall pledge
themselves never to misrepresent
their products in any manner,
either as to composition, quality
or use, and to assist their fellow
members in maintaining the high
standards of service set forth in
this Code of Ethics.


CODE OF ETHICS

CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATION INSTITUTE


W EM








OFFICE FURNITURE


10,000 pacIe at
AGLER ST. MIAMI, FLORIDA PHONE FR


Progress on C.S.I....
(Continued from Page 49)
representatives of all local architectur-
al and engineering societies, contract-
ors organizations, building trades and
building material representatives.
This program falls in line with the
present activities of the Specifications
Methods Committee, of which JOHN
GRIMSHAW is Chairman. We are now
busy studying a complete specifica-
tion index and before we get too far
along would like to hear from some
of the interested members of the
construction industry who have to
read, interpret and work with our spe-
cifications.
As of date we have a tentative in-
dex formulated and are now deter-
mining a check list of what is includ-
ed in each section. It is our aim to
ultimately arrive at a form of specifi-
cation that is not ambiguous and that
mentions a trade only once. By sep-
arating out from each trade section
those particular items that are quoted
separately, a double set of "overhead
and profit" is avoided. When our in-
dex is completely studied, it will be
submitted to local trade unions for
approval and then forwarded to Na-
tional C.S.I. Technical Committee
for review. Ultimately we hope to
have an index that can be used on a
National basis and one that all con-
tractors will recognize and be able to
pattern their estimate and take off
sheets to this index.
This is not a one man job and our
entire organization is helping. Each
section of the index is given to a
different committee for study. This
committee makes a careful analysis
of their subject and then makes a re-
port back to the committee. This
report is then studied, corrected
and/or revised at one of our regular
meetings.
I have contacted Huckleberry and
Barrows relative to interesting Jack-
sonville Chapter to go along with the
Miami Chapter in using The Florida
Architect as the official voice of the
C.S.I. They wholeheartedly approve
and state that chapters are in the pro-
cess of being formed in Tampa and
St. Petersburg. We can make this a
big item in our state construction in-
dustry and believe that The Florida
Architect is the best means of selling
the C.S.I.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports



Public Relations

By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
Chairman


"Assignment: Submit to the Board
at its 3 May Meeting a practical plan
for sampling public reaction to pres-
ent Public Relations programs of the
various Chapters."
Committee Budget: No funds have
been appropriated for this committee.
Meetings: The Committee has held
one meeting during the year. This
was 12:30, April 12, 1958 at Morris-
sons' Imperial House, Daytona Beach
and has been rather fully reported to
the Board under a communication
titled: "Informative Data Concern-
ing Activities of the Committee on
Public Relations and dated, April 20,
1958."
Subject: Briefly, the purpose of this
meeting was to explore the Public
Relations problem in an effort to pro-
pose a definite plan for sampling Pub-
lic Opinion as directed by the Execu-
tive Committee.
Mr. Wm. H. Wahl, Research Con-
sultant was invited to meet with the
Committee and outlined a proposed
research program, The scope of Public


Relations problems and possibly the
newness of some of the ideas injected
resulted in the meeting being ad-
journed at 5:30 p. m. without having
resolved a definite conclusion. It was
agreed to hold the next meeting in
Orlando, probably in July or August.
This meeting was not held.
Mr. Wahl subsequently prepared
an impressive Brochure on Motivation
Research and supplied 35 copies
which were distributed along with the
Committee Interim report, to all
Committee members, Executive Com-
mittee members, National Committee
member and the Octagon.
Recommendations: Due to the im-
portance of the research program
being studied, it is suggested that Mr.
Wm. H. Wahl be invited to discuss
objectives and mechanics of Motiva-
tion Research in a joint meeting of
the Executive Committee and the
Committee of Public Relations, to be
held at the convenience and invitation
of the Executive Committee at the
November Convention.


Committee Directive: To cooperate
with state agencies engaged in pro-
grams affecting hospitalization and
public health; to cooperate with pri-
vate agencies likewise engaged for the
purpose of establishing procedures and
design criteria of mutual value.
This committee has not met in a
body during the year. It has, how-
ever, been canvassed by the Chair-
man and suggestions made and here-
with is an abstract of the opinions
gained:
1. The State Board of Health and
the State School Architect have been
notified in writing (copies of letters
are available) of the desire of this


committee to be of any help what-
soever in meeting with them to work
out any differences that are occurring
in the enforcing of their regulations
and to help to make suggestions
towajdle formulation of clear and
mori concise rules and regulations.
2. The newtsanitary standards
which have been set up for public
schools by the State Department of
Education in Tallahassee have been
under observation and it is thought
that during the coming Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects' year a meeting
with this department will be bene-
ficial to the profession throughout
Florida.


This report is being submitted to
the Executive Director with the re-
quest that he read same on the floor
of the Convention, due to the fact
that the Chairman will probably be
on vacation in another part of the
country at the time the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects Convention
meets.



School


Buildings

By JAMES E. GARLAND
Chairman
Report of The Committee on
School Buildings:
There has been much activity and
change on the school front during the
past year:
1. GEORGE MEGGINSON resigned as
State School architect to accept a
planning position with the Broward
County School Board.
2. DR. CARROL W. MCGUFFEY
was appointed School Plant Admin-
istrator.
3. FORREST R. COXEN was appoint-
ed State School Architect.
4. FORREST KELLEY resigned as
architect to the Board of Public In-
struction of Dade County to accept
the appointment as architect to the
State Board of Control with offices
in Tallahassee.
5. RICHARD LEMON was appointed
as architect to the Board of Public
Instruction of Dade County.
6. ROBERT B. MURPHY was named
as coordinator for the school building
program in Orange County.
There has been much concern and
speculation about the policy on stock
plans. ROGER SHERMAN effectively
represented the architects as well as
the public's best interest when he
spoke before the Legislative Interim
Committee on Education, listing the
tremendous advantages accruing to
the public as taxpayers as well as to
the actual users which result from the
serious study of the individual build-
ing problems.
The activities on the several phases
of the school activity published in
The Florida Architect were in each
case sent to all the County Superin-
tendents in the State.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Hospitals and Health

By R. DANIEL HART
Chairman






































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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






committeee Reports


Collaboration With


Design Professions

By C. ELLIS DUNCAN
Chairman


Assigned duties: "To cooperate on
problems of mutual interest to the
design professions and other groups
dealing with basic elements of design
and site planning" and "the chairman
will represent FAA on the state AGC-
FES Joint Cooperative Committee."
The Committee is composed of
eleven members spread from Miami
to Jacksonville, across to Sarasota and
out to Pensacola. With this geo-
graphic separation we have had few
conferences together and have not had
a specific instance of general interest
to the profession sufficient to inspire
a state meeting. Members along the
East Coast have conferred on occa-
sions, but with no action at state level.
In the Palm Beach area the active
Joint Cooperative Committee, com-
posed of representatives of A.I.A.,
NSPE, AGC, HBA, ASCE and the


National Association of Real Estate
Boards, has met regularly on a
monthly basis at a luncheon and has.
accomplished a great deal. Projects
and subjects covered include: taxes
and tax investigation; national hous-
ing bill S 4035; freight traffic bureau;
jet airport project; building codes; li-
censing laws; municipal auditorium;
and conservation.
The Florida South Chapter,
through the efforts of EDWIN T.
REEDER and his committee, has ar-
ranged "for the 'Design Derby' to be
held in the Architects' Institute of
Building Products beginning the latter
part of October. This design derby
is a collaborative effort between The
American Institute of Architects, the
American Institute of Decorators, the
Designers and Decorators Guild, and
other design organizations in the area.


It is a nationally advertised display of
design products and attracts national
attention." They also have an ar-
rangement with the American Insti-
tute of Decorators to help with their
design program for student competi-
tion during the coming year.
Contact has been made with PRESI-
DENT HAROLD D. BRILEY of the FES
for a Collaboration Committee at
state level, however the appointment
of such a committee has been delayed
due to several activities in the FES
including waiting for the activities of
the Joint Committee to materialize.
A suggestion has come from John
Crowell that the Director of the Ring-
ling Museum would probably offer
the use of the Museum for forwarding
the purposes of this committee.
Your committee chairman has at-
tended the meeting of the state Joint
Cooperative Committee in Winter
Park in September and also attended
a special sub-committee meeting in
Palm Beach, later, to consider recom-
mendations for enlarging the scope of
the Joint Cooperative Committee
These items I am sure will be report-
ed under the FAA-AGC-FES Com-
mitttee.


For several years, the F.A.A. loan
fund had not been active. In an earlier
report this was attributed to new
opportunities made available in the
form of scholarship grants by A.I.A.
chapters, this association, and other
friends of the College, and to the fact
that the fund was somewhat less
attractive due to a higher interest
rate than most other funds available
at the University. The latter detri-
ment was removed by action of the
1956 Convention lowering the interest
rate. At the beginning of the year,
the Board of Trustees decided to con-
duct a campaign to advise worthy
students in architecture of the avail-
ability of the fund. The success of
NOVEMBER, 1958


the campaign is attested by the fact
that the fund is now almost com-
pletely depleted.*
Because of this it is again appropri-
ate to urge the membership to make
contributions (tax deductible) to the
F.A.Av... fund. While the fund
has doubf!d since it was instituted
32 years ago, the need has been
multiplied many fold. It has been esti-
mated that in 1926 an average stu-
dent might have completed the four
year profesisonal curriculum in archi-
tecture for $1,200, while it would cost
his son $6,500 to complete the five
year curriculum today.
It should be added that the Uni-
versity of Florida is one of a very few


State-supported institutions where a
professional education in architecture
could be obtained for so low a figure.
At the same time enrollment has
sky-rocketed. In 1926 when there
were 1,968 students at the University,
39 were enrolled in the School of
Architecture. The latest statistics list
the enrollment of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts at 319,
and University enrollment at 12,304;
an increase in architecture of about
800%. The obvious deduction from
the two sets of figures is, that the
fund ought to be 20 times what it
is in order to be on the same forward
looking plane it stood upon 32 years
ago.
Renewed support of the student
loan fund is again a challenge to the
F.A.A.
*A detailed account of the fund has
been arranged in tabular balance sheet
form. Interested members are invited to
consult copies which have been made
available to FAA officers and members of
the Board of Directors.


Student Loan Fund

By JOHN L. R. GRAND
Chairman, Board of Trustees


F -1







The Students' Column .

By GEORGE CHELLAG


Homecoming alumni have annu-
ally rallied at the University of Flor-
ida in great numbers. Their activities
have consisted, and will probably con-
tinue to do so, of meanderings
amongst ivy halls and cheering the
Fightin' Gators to victory on the
home field. This year a modification
has been incorporated and the stu-
dent architect, with his creativity and
ingenuity, has played an important
role in the development of Home-
coming 1958.
Under the auspices of the Student
Government a movement was put
forth to study this alumni affair and
if possible, make necessary adjust.
merits. It was found that the mass of
people attending participated in scat-
tered meetings and more often did
nothing more than "wander" through
the campus. The general problem was
located and a tentative solution was
proposed: "That an area should be
developed where all colleges may
meet with their respective alumni."
At this stage the "lay" student called
on the more* informed students of
the Department of Architecture, a
group which has studied the problems
of physical controls and aids to mass
gatherings. Through the Student


jig



Rendering by Charles Pattillo, III

A.I.A. a volunteer committee was
formed to study and solve the prob-
lem.
Under the chairmanship of
CHARLES PATTILLO, III, graduate stu-
dent in architecture, three assistants
worked: DONALD PECK, DAVID GOD-
SCHALK and RONALD GARMAN, stu-
dents all. The problem was further
scrutinized and a definition of the
situation resulted: "To develop a uni-
fying Rallying Ground for the massing
of alumni." The most likely loca-


a


..


DuPont Plaza Selects McKinley Products!
The beautiful new DuPont Plaza Center. Miami, Florida, chose McKinley Ventilated Sun Cornices for pro-
tection against sun's glare and heat, and for attractive appearance.
Architects: Frank A. Shuflin, AIA; John E. Petersen, AIA. :' For details, con-
tact your Mc-
SKinley Represent-

.Sweet's Architec.
tural File 19e/Mc.


engineered and manufactured by the a.. M C KIN LEY CO., inc.
Indianapolis 5, Indiana

LOCAL McKINLEY REPRESENTATION: CLEARWATER, PHONE 35-7094 .
NOVEMBER, 1958 51


I


tion for such a "ground' was chosen:
the Plaza of the Americas, an area
350' by 450' of scattered pines and
oaks nestled in the heart of the cam-
pus within the shadows of the aca-
demic buildings. Finances were then
studied with the net expenditure of
$10.00 resulting. Ingenuity indeed
was to be called for.
The solution was proposed over
cups of coffee (probably sketched on
a napkin), the use of scaffolding and
plywood panels (donations most def-
initely) to create a "theme structure"
or focal point uniting the area. The
theme structure upon erection Octo-
ber 16 towered 40' above the plaza.
This tower form was arrived at,
amongst other considerations, due to
the many trees in the vicinity with
which it would have to counter-play.
Attached to the network of vertically-
stacked construction scaffolding will
be intermittent paneling of plywood,
lettered and colored symbolically to
represent the various schools and col-
leges of the University. With foot-
ings of sunken pipe sections and
braced by guy wires, it will set off
the area as a rallying ground. Sub-
sidiary plywood triangular markers
will dot the area to form the inde-
pendent college rallying points.
Only when the alumni have com-
pleted the picture will the area truly
become a festivious and living home-
coming, for this mass of people will
create a circus of tones united by
the various architectural forms.






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by Joseph N. Smith, III, AIA, of a building designed by Miami 32, Florida FRanklin 9-4501
architect Charles F. McKlrahan, AIA, of Ft. Lauderdale. SEE OUR BOOTH NO. 74 ATITHE FAA CONVENTION
SEE OUR BOOTH NO. 74 AT THE FAA CONVENTION

SQUARE MIAMIM & 6., o/B.
52 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


TEITo SiACUE N. iSO
STUD rta... 'ca... ,rP. i-s. ,
MEWD PATESC Tflt 1P 4 AllP ug 0.


a I it Sam3
011119GRTED LMP CLANI







Nominations for FAA Officers, 1959


For Secretary


Institute membership dates
from 1953. . Has held
Chapter positions as Secretary-
Treasurer (1954) and Secre-
tary (1955). Was an FAA
SDirector for two years (1956-
57) and is currently serving
as FAA Secretary. . Service
on FAA Committees includes:
Resolutions (1957); Conven-
tion, 1957, as chairman, and
1958; and currently as chair-
man of Committee on Dues.
S. Service on AIA Commit-
tees includes: Hurricane Re-
sistance, 1957; and Disaster
Control, 1958.


ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II
Florida Central Chapter


Institute membership dates
from 1946. . .Has held
Chapter positions as Secretary,
Vice President and President
(for three years). Was FAA
Director from his Chapter in
1947-48, 1951, 1953-54,
1957-58.... FAA Secretary-
Treasurer, 1952. Ch., Com-
mittee on FAA Exec. Secy.,
1952; FAA Convention Ch.,
1949, 1955; Served on these
FAA committees: Legislative,
1957; Joint Cooperative,
1957; Convention, 1957;
Public Relations, 1957-58;
Ethical Practice, 1958.


FRANCIS R. WALTON
Daytona Beach Chapter


Institute membership dates
from 1947 .... Was Secre-
tary-Treasurer of his Chapter
for five years; president for
two. Has also served two
years as FAA Director from
his Chapter. . Since 1955
to date has served as FAA
Treasurer. . FAA Commit-
tee memberships include Joint
Architect-Engineer; Member-
ship and Chapter Affairs . .
Was a member of AIA Office
Practice and Accounting Com-
mittee for one year (circa
1950).


MORTON T. IRONMONGER,
Broward County Chapter


Institute membership dates
from 1953. . Served as
Secretary of Mid-Florida Chap-
ter, 1955-56; and as Presi-
dent, 1956-57 and 1957-58.
. . Has served as Chairman
of FAA Uniform Codes Com-
mittee. . FAA Convention
Chairman, 1958.


JOSEPH M. SHIFALO,
Mid-Florida Chapter


Institute membership dates
from 1947. ., . Served on
these Chapter committees:
Civic Design, 1947; Practice,
1954; Hospital & Health
(chairman), 1955; Centen-
nial Observance, 1956. . .
Was Chapter Ut urer in
1955, Secretl i 1956,
President in 195 .. FAA
Committee service includes:
Election, 1948; Advisory Com.
for Student Chapter, 1950;
Legislative, 1957. He was
alternate FAA director from
his Chapter in 1949 .. Cur-
rently is FAA vice president,
elected in 1957 to fill vacancy
created by resignation.


ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL
Florida North Chapter


Institute membership dates
from 1944.... Served Florida
North Chapter as Director,
1947-48, Vice President,
1949, and President, 1951;
and as Director of the Jack-
sonville Chapter in 1956-57-
58. . Served as an FAA
Director from Florida North
Chapter in 1947-48; and
from Jacksonville Chapter in
1956 and 1958. Was FAA
Vice-President in 1952. ...
Service on FAA committees
includes: Architect-Engineer
Relations, 1952-53 (as co-
chairman) -54-55; By-Laws
in 1957 and 1958 (currently
chairman); Convention, 1958.


WALTER B. SCHULTZ
Jacksonville Chapter


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


For Treasurer


For Third Vice President







Report of The Nominating Committee...


The FAA Nominating Committee,
chairmanned by JAMES L. DEEN,
Florida South, and including W.
STEWART MORRISON, Florida North
West, and ROBERT L. LEVISON, Flor-
ida Central have presented the fol-
lowing names as candidates for
election of officers.
For President: H. SAMUEL KRUSE,
Florida South; and JOHN STETSON,
Palm Beach.
For Secretary: ERNEST T. H.
BOWEN, II, Florida Central; and
FRANCIS R. WALTON, Daytona Beach.
For Treasurer: MORTON T. IRON-
MONGER, Broward County; and


JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Mid-Florida.
For Vice-President: ARTHUR LEE
CAMPBELL, Florida North; and WAL-
TER B. SCHULTZ, Jacksonville.
Terms of all offices are for one year
except that of the Vice President.
Election to this office is for a three-
year term; and the successful candi-
date will be designated, under FAA
By-Laws, as Third Vice President
during his first year of office, advanc-
ing to second and first vice president,
during succeeding years.
Nominations will be presented by
the Committee at the Convention's
first business session, Thursday,


November 20, to be followed by
nominations from the floor. As ruled
by Convention action last year, voting
will be by ballot; and polls will be
open at the Registration Desk during
hours noted on the program schedule
on pages 32 and 33. Election results
will be announced at the Annual
Banquet, Friday evening.
According to current FAA By-
Laws, only Corporate members of
Florida's 10 AIA Chapters are en-
titled to vote for FAA officers; and
election will be by majority of those
qualified to vote and registered at,
and attending, the Convention.


For President...


H. SAMUEL KRUSE JOHN STETSON
Florida South Chapter Palm Beach Chapter


His Institute membership dates from 1949 . .
He was named Vice-President of MChapter in
1954 and served as its Presidtc ing 1955.
Subsequently he served as a director of the
Chapter for three years, in 1956, 1957 mnd
1958. . He has served on two FAA Com-
mittees the Publication Committee for two
years, 1956 and 1957, serving as chairman
during 1957; and on the Convention Commit-
tee during 1956.... He was elected Secretary
of the FAA in 1957 and has served as FAA
President during 1958. .. He was appointed
to the Advisory Panel, the AIA Committee on
Building Products Registration, in 1957 and is
currently a member. He has also been a Chap-
ter Representative to the Department of Edu-
cation and Research of the Octagon Staff since
1955 and its currently acting as such.


His Institute membership dates from 1947 . .
He was a Director of his Chapter in 1952-53
and' from 1955 to date; served as Chapter
Treasurer in 1952; as Vice-President in 1953
and as President in 1955 . Has served on
the FAA Joint Cooperative Committee since
1954 and as its chairman from 1955 to date;
and on the FAA Home Building Construction
Industry Committee as chairman, 1958. Served
as FAA Director from his Chapter from 1951
to 1955; and as FAA Vice-President in 1956
and 1957. . Was a member of the AIA
Committee on Home Building Industry from
1953 to 1955; and the Hurricane Resistance
Committee in 1957 and 1958. . Was U. S.
Delegate to Pan-American Congress of Archi-
tects in 1951 and 1953 and an AIA Delegate
to RIBA Convention in England, 1954.


NOVEMBER, 1958







Resolutions Submitted...

Received from sources as noted for pre-Convention publication


Salary of the
State School Architect
Received from the Jacksonville
Chapter as proposed by A. Robert
Broadfoot of the Chapter:
WHEREAS, the position and office
of the State School Architect has ex-
isted over the past 15 or 20 years;
and,
WHEREAS, over this period of time
the office has proved its worth to the
State of Florida by assisting all
County School Boards and their ar-
chitects in raising the quality of
school construction and at the same
time getting more for the school con-
struction dollar; and,
WHEREAS, this position and of-
fice has existed longer than equiva-
lent architectural positions in State
Governments; and,


WHEREAS, this position and office
has a more direct connection with the
laws of the State of Florida as set
forth in Chapter 235, Florida Stat-
utes; and,
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: The Jacksonville Chapter of
the American Institute of Architects
realizing the importance of the office
and position of State School Archi-
tect feel the position should be equal
to that of other Supervising Archi-"
tects in the employ of the State, here-
by endorse the equalizing of the sal-
ary of the State School Architect with
that of other equivalent positions and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That a
copy of this resolution be sent to the
Convention of the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects to be held in
Miami this November urging their
adoption and support.


Memorial to
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA

Received from the Florida Central
Chapter as proposed by A. Wynn
Howell of that Chapter:
WHEREAS, God in his infinite
wisdom has taken from this earth
SANFORD W. GOIN, Fellow of the
'American Institute of Architects; and,
WHEREAS, he was a past officer in
the Florida Association of Architects,
and at the time of his death, a Re-
gional Director in The American In-
stitute of Architects; and,
WHEREAS, he was a friend to scores
of his fellow architects, other profes-
sional people, lay people and others;
and,
WHEREAS, he affirmed again and
again the responsibility of the archi-
tect to his community; and,
WHEREAS, he always affirmed his
conviction that a measure of any
man's success come from a Divine
Source; and,
(Continued on Page 55)


IT'S NEW! IT'S GREAT!


WALL PANELING


NOVEMBER, 1958






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derful ease of built-in electrical equipment . and you'll give
your clients leisure they will praise you for through the years.
Built-in electric appliances save so much time and work they're
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the first choice of Florida home buyers.

The trend is overwhelming to Electric Living!


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1948


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I '




I






Resolutions...
(Continued from Page 53)
WHEREAS, he was a devoted father
and husband, ever faithful to family,
Church, Nation and Community,
holding malice toward none;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: that
the Florida Association of Architects
does mourn the loss of this member
and miss him from among its ranks;
and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: that a
copy of this resolution be sent to the
surviving members of the family and
spread upon the minutes.

New Procedure for
Electing FAA Officers
Received from the Florida Central
Chapter as proposed by Richard E.
lessen of that Chapter:
WHEREAS, The American Institute
of Architects has authorized the
formation of a new Region for the
State of Florida, comprised of the
Florida Association of Architects and
the 10 Chapters of the American
Institute of Architects; and,
WHEREAS, this transition is a result
of recognition of the size and import-
ance of the Florida Association in the
National organization; and,
WHEREAS, the existing procedure
for the election of ,Officers to the
Florida Association of Architects is
similar to that of most Chapters in
this State; and,
WHEREAS, this procedure does not
adequately meet the needs of this
widely distributed geographic area to
insure equal representation of the vot-
ing membership of all Chapters;
Now, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED: that the By-Laws of the Flor-
ida Association of Architects be re-
vised to be more nearly parallel those
of the National Institute with regard
to election of Officers by duly au-
thorized Chapter delegates.
Be it further resolved that this Res-
olution be forwarded to the Execu-
tive Director of the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects with a request that
it be published in The Florida Archi-
tect,
And that it be placed on the
Agenda for presentation to the mem-
bership of the Florida Association of
Architects during the coming Annual
Convention in the year 1958.
NOVEMBER, 1958


Beachland Elementary School (project
C), Vero Beach, Florida. Architects
David V. Robison, Vero Beach, Florida.
Contractor: Clutter Const. Corp., Miami
Springs, Florida.
Rilco pitched beams, 36', 40', 56' long,
spaced 10' o.c. Rilco western red Cedar
Deck serves as ceiling, decoration and
insulation.

"FINISHED COST

IS SURPRISING-

ECONOMICAL"

Contractor says: "Final appearance of these Rilco trusses gives
the warm natural appearance of wood. We were very well
satisfied with this method of construction. If you consider the
finished product the cost is surprising ... economical
for such a finished product."
Architect agrees: "It has long been my thought that schools
are too 'cold' and impersonal. Wood produces a warmth
that reduces that feeling and lends itself to homier atmospheres.
Rilco laminated beams and deck answered the problems
and also permitted quick erection. They lend themselves
to both beauty and function along with dollar savings.
The results are satisfying."
Beauty plus function plus dollar savings Rilco offers these
and more. You complete the job faster with Rilco, for every
memberr is precision-fabricated at the factory. Your regular
crews erect Rilco trusses, arches, beams fast, saving you
time and money. Clients like Rilco too, for these members are
fire-safe, cannot corrode or rust, withstand temporary
s. oad or impact without damage.

YEANDLE & FOX
LAMINATED PRODUCTS
702 E. BROWARD BLVD.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA.
PHONE: JACKSON 3-0291
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS INC. P. o. BOX 1715
155 WASHINGTON STREET CLEARWATER, FLA.
NEWARK-2, NEW JERSEY PHONE: 38-6751
SEt OUR EXHIBIT #55 AT THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS CONVENTION









Custom-Cast Plaques


We can fill all your design n
size or shape of cast bror
plaques, name panels or dec


LORIDA FOUNDRY

--&. PATTERN WORKS


Mel Banks, Inc.
ST. PETERSBURG
Ph. HE 6-3400
.TAMPA
Ph. 2-0871
CLEARWATER
Ph. 3-5911

Electrend East
Coast Co., Inc.
BOCA RATON
Ph. 5101
LAKE WORTH
VERO BEACH.
FT. PIERCE
Call Collect -
Boca Raton 5101
FT. LAUDERDALE
Ph. JA 3-6464

Electrend
Sales 6 Servce
ORLANDO
Ph. GA 2-7166

Electrend Sales
6 Service Co.
SARASOTA
Ph. RI 7-3380

Mitch's Electrend
Sales 6 Service
PENSACOLA
Ph. HE 8-4363

Carlos M. Hope
Electrical Contactor
GAINESVILLE
Ph. FR 2-9867

Milky Way
Building & Heatlni
EUSTIS
Ph. EL 7-2367


eeds for any type,
nze or aluminum
orative bas-reliefs.


3737 N. W. 43rd Street
Miami, Florida


,I,. S


I I t|r m d electric Circulating
Air Heating System
Clean, comfortable, convenient electric heat at a
low cost never before possible. See the revolu-
tionary new Electrend and all its advantages
today or just call us, we'll be glad to demon-
strate its many features.
S lt DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
4550 37th Street No.
St. Petersburg 14, Florida
I tRM Telephone HEmlock 6-8420
WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER.


News & Notes-

Appreciation...
The following note, which belongs
to all members of the FAA, was re-
ceived last month at the Executive
Director's office from Mrs. SANFORD
WILLIAMS GOIN, of Gainesville:
"The family and I sincerely appre-
ciate the loving sympathy of The
Florida Association of Architects as
expressed by the flowers, the wires
and letters and the wonderful tribute
in The Florida Architect.-Affec-
tionately, Mama."

New Firm at Palm Beach
Recently announced was the forma-
tion of a new firm of Architects-
Engineers-Surveyors in Palm Beach.
The new organization, O'NEAL, OBST
& BRADY, includes HAROLD A. and
EMILY V. OBST, who will continue
to operate the office at 289 Hibiscus
Avenue. The new firm's other office
is at 214 Royal Palm Way. Engin-
eering partners include DAVID H.
BRADY, BEN F..O'NEAL and THOMAS
W. CAREY.


Worth Quoting and
Worth Thinking About...
The following has been lifted,
with appreciation, from the News of
the Georgia Chapter, AIA, edited by
WILLIAM E. WILLNER. It is espe-
cially timely, since one of the FAA's
1958 Convention "workshops" will
discuss ways and means for meeting
the competition of the "package
dealer".
"Much has been said lately about
communication which is, after all,
just another word for talking. But it
will take more than talking to insure
the survival of architecture as a pro-
fession in this epoch of package deals,
company architects and competitive
bidding for the business of those
shrewd clients who price architecture
as they price grain or fish.
"Since he became Chapter Presi-
dent, CLEM FORD has heard a good
deal about unethical competition.
Not wishing to run a complaint
bureau, yet concerned over symptoms
of professional hara-kiri, he thinks it
is time we developed better ways for
(Continued on Page 59)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







TROPIX-UEUEV
TRADS MARK M0OISTSEO


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Use Tropix-Weve Doors for:
SSpace Dividers Wardrobes
SStorage Closets Screens
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iiI.


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effects at minimum cost ... Available
in Shoji, Panel and Woven Wood
*designs. All standard and custom
sizes . Also produced in accordion
doors, window shutters, etc ....
Woven Wood

TROPIX-WEVE PRODUCTS, Inc. -* 3590 N. W. 52nd St., Miami NE 4-1749

NOVEMBER, 1958 57


m .et


































Heavy builders'
felt contains
100% more Diel-
drin than specific.
by U.S. Dept. of
Agriculture for termite-treat-
ment of ground areas.
The film of plyethylene plastic
meets the vapor permeability
requirements of Federal Spe-
cification UU-P-147b.


STOP TERMITES DEAD...and

SEAL OUT MOISTURE with


-BIRD)

TERM IBAR*
One easily-installed product now can solve two of Florida's most
pressing construction problems . BIRD TERMIBAR actually kills
Installation of wet-wood termites while acting as an effective vapor barrier. It's a
section of house membrane combining a 4 M film of polyethylene plastic with a layer
ith slab founda- of felt impregnated with Dieldrin, one of the most lethal and stable
ion and brick ve-
ieer wall. F/- insecticides known .. The plastic keeps moisture out; the Dieldrin
4 kills the bugs and TERMIBAR meets U.S. Govt. specs on both
important counts. For complete termite protection specify that
I TERlUBAR CAULK be used to seal all openings around pipes and
structural members . Full data on how to use and specify
TERMIBAR is yours for the asking . .
VISIT OUR BOOTH #39


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P. O. Box 4336, Charleston Heights, S. C.


58 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


EMENEWE


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November 20, 21 and 22

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TILE LITE Adhesive

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News & Notes
S(Continued from Page 56)
getting business. For there are better
ways than those that inspire some
of the complaints- viz., offering to
do the work cheaper; furnishing free
sketches; or taking part in informal
competitions without rules of any
kind or competent juries to judge the
results, so that the best man will win
only by a miracle.
"The most recent competition of
this sort involved parties who ought
to be especially sensitive to nice
ethical questions. The object of
struggle, that is to say, was the com-
mission to design a church. And
'struggle' is the word! For the four
architects were asked to make two
designs apiece, one in a traditional
style, the other as modern as they
pleased. And for all this, they were
to be paid an honorarium that might
possibly cover the cost of one day's
real study.
"Contrast this with the approach
of the usual package dealer, who may
not be any great shakes at design, but
who is, and has to be, a half-way
intelligent business man. Does he
begin by going into a frantic charette
to produce beautiful perspectives? In-
deed not; he knows his limitations.
He concentrates instead on the kind
of thing most business men under-
stand. He attempts to find out what
kind of building the client needs-
sometimes before the client knows he
needs a building. He hunts up a
suitable piece of property, goes into
costs, taxes, insurance, transportation,
labor supply--all the factors that
determine whether or not the project
is feasible. Then he hires a draftsman
to doll it up.
"We don't think much of the
average result achieved by this
method; but at least it is a method
that works. The so-called "unethical"
methods cited above do not work.
That is the real objection to them.
If we expect to survive as an in-
dependent profession, we had better
study the campaigns of our successful
competitors, adopting their good
ideas and discarding their bad ones.
That seems more likely to improve
matters than just wringing our hands
over the bad boys who come in at
the wrong end of a job and offer
cut rates."


HOWN ABOVE are the Portland Cement Association's new re-
search and development laboratories near Chicago. They rep-
resent a $3,000,000 investment by member companies of the Asso-
ciation. The research carried on in these laboratories will benefit
every American citizen because it will result in longer service life
and lower annual cost of concrete construction.

PCA has conducted an ever-expanding research and educational
program since it was established with headquarters in Chicago in
1916. Out of this program have come many new uses for and sig-
nificant improvements in cement and concrete. One of these is air-
entrained concrete, a new kind of concrete which adds years to the
life of concrete pavements wherever they are subjected to severe
freezing and the action of-chemicals used for ice and snow removal.
Another is tilt-up construction, an economical method of casting
walls flat and literally tilting them up into position. Still another
is the development of firesafe, watertight, long-lasting, stormproof
concrete construction for homes, hospitals, schools, farm structures
and improvements and public buildings.

AP6i s new laboratories will make possible an even more inten-
sified research and development program. In these laboratories
research engineers and chemists have the finest facilities available
anywhere for cement and concrete research. As in the past, results
of this research will be freely dedicated to the people of America.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 NORTH MAIN STREET, ORLANDO, FLORIDA
A national 'organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and
concrete ... through scientific research and engineering field work


NOVEMBER, 1958











4th Annual Roll-Call---1957-1958


Listed here are the firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA
grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they
make or sell are of a quality to merit specification., They seek your approval
of what they offer; and in giving it you serve the interests of all concerned.


ADOR SALES, INC.
Fullerton, California
Gibert Viola, 610 Biscayne Bldg., Miami
Aluminum sliding glass doors.
Agency Boylhart, Lovett & Dean,
Inc., 135 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles
ADVANCE METAL PRODUCTS, INC.
2445 N. W. 76th St., Miami
Mfgrs. specialty building products.
ALPHA STUDIOS, INC.
640 Minnesota Bldg., St. Paul, Minn.
Designers stained glass, mosaic glass
and marble, statuary, religious art.
ALUMINUM INSULATING CO., INC.
1050 E. 15th St., Hialeah
Distributor Alumiseal reflective and
vapor barrier materials.
AMERICAN OLEAN TILES OF MIAMI
INC.
1150 So. Miami Avenue, Miami
Ceramic Tile
Agency-Arndt-Preston-Chapin-
Lamb & Keen, Inc., 160 No. 15th St.,
Phila., Penna.
ARKETEX CERAMIC CORPORATION
6 No. Walnut St., Brazil, Indiana
Ceramic glazed structural building tile.
Agency-Caldwell, Larkin & Sidener-
Van Riper, Inc., Merchants Bank Bldg.,
Indianapolis, Indiana.
ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR & SUPPLY CO.
501 N. W. 54th Street, Miami
Pneumatic tube systems, access panels.
ATLAS ENAMELING CO., INC.
2030 No. Broadway, St.. Louis, Missouri
Porcelain enamel building panels.
Agency-Flavin Advertising Agency
4 No. 8th St., St. Louis, Mo.
BIRD & SON, INC.
Box 4336, Charleston Heights, S. C.
Termibar, termite and moisture resist-
ant vapor barrier.
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Aluminum railings, wood trimmed
aluminum railing posts.
BOURNE MANUFACTURING CO.
1573 E. Lamed St., Detroit, Mich.
Plastic laminate faced doors.
Agency-Sales & Merchandise Coun-
sellors, 1010 Boubien., Detroit, Mich.
BRIGGS MANUFACTURING CO.
Warren, Michigan
Plumbing fixtures for residential, com-
mercial and industrial use.
Agency-McManus, John & Adams,
Inc., Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
A. R. COGSWELL
433 West Bay Street, Jacksonville
Architects' supplies and Reproduction
service.
COQUINA CORAL, INC.
No. 1 Lincoln Rd. Bldg., Miami Beach
Coral limestone.


DAY-BRITE LIGHTING, INC.
6288 No. Broadway, St. Louis, Mo.
Lighting equipment
GEORGE DORO FIXTURE COMPANY
102-28 Florida Avenue, Jacksonville
Custom-designed interiors and fixtures.
Agency--Bacon, Hartman & Voll-
brecht, Inc., Exchange Bank Bldg., St.
Augustine
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th St., Hialeah
Decorative masonry materials.
Burr-Southern barbecue units.
DWOSKIN, INC.
Atlanta, Georgia and
4029 No. Miami Avenue, Miami
Wallpaper and wallcoverings.
Agency-Bearden-Thompson Frankel,
Inc., & Eastman-Scott, 22 8th St., At-
lanta, Ga.
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
of Florida
4550 37th St., North, St. Petersburg
Electric heating systems.
EVERSHIELD LIQUID TILE OF FLORIDA
1111 N. E. 7th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Finishing material.
FLAMINGO WHOLESALE DISTRIBU-
TORS, INC.
1002 East 27th St., Hialeah
205 North 11th St., Tampa
Robbins floor products.
Downs carpeting.
FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN WKS.
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami
Ornamental castings.
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th St., Miami
Oil and gas heating.
Agency-Bevis Associates, Inc., Ingra-
ham Bldg., Miami.
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT DIV.
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa
Manufacturers of cement.
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Asso., Inc.,
S206 S. Franklin St., Tampa
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT CO.
Miami, Florida
Electric utility.
Agency-Grant Advertising, Inc.,
201 S. W. 13th St., Miami
FLQRi STEEL CORPORATION
2i'S.Rome Avenue, Tampa
Reinforcing steel and accessories.
FLORIDA TILE"INDUSTRIES, INC.-
608 Prospect St., Lakeland
Manufacturers of glazed wall tile and
trimmers.
Agency-Henry Quednau, Inc.,
404 Thirteenth St., Tampa
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN CO.
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
"B" & "G" Aluminum windows and
window walls. Mirawall panels.


HAMILTON PLYWOOD
Orlando, St. Petersburg, Ft. Lauderdale
Cabinet and paneling plywoods.
Agency-Travis Messer, Advertising.
P. O. Box 7368, Orlando, Florida
HOLLOSTONE COMPANY OF MIAMI
480 Ali Baba Avenue, Opa-Locka
Precast concrete products.
INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Bridgewater, Massachusetts
Fastenings.
Agency-Warner Alden Morse,
P. O. Box 720, Brockton, Mas.
INTERSTATE MARBLE & TILE CO.
4000 No. Miami Avenue, Miami
Marble and ceramic tile.
KAISER MANUFACTURING, INC.
2000 Harrington, Houston, Texas
Crest tile set.
Agency-Max H. Jacobs
3323 Yoakum St., Houston, Texas
KEUFFEL & ESSER CO.
Adam & Third Sts, Hoboken, N. J.
Architectural & Engineers material.
LEAP CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland, Florida
Prestressed concrete units.
LIFT SLAB OF FLORIDA, INC.
410 E. Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Method of ,construction.
LUDMAN CORPORATION
North Miami
Aluminum windows. Curtain walls.
MABIE-BELL COMPANY, THE
Greensboro, North Carolina
Mo-Sai precast facings.
MASTER BRONZE POWDER CO., INC.
Box 2429, Sarasota
Rust preventative coatings.
MATTHIESSEN & HEGELER ZINC CO.
LaSalle, Illinois
Flashings
Agency-Kenneth B. Butler & Asso.
700 14th Ave., Mendota, IIl.
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC.
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Concrete and building products
Agency-R. K. Heady Advertising, Inc.
561 N. E. 79th St., Miami
O. O. McKINLEY COMPANY
Indianapolis, Indiana
Metal building products, canopies,
cornices and sun shades
Agency-Jim Bradford, Advertising
K of P Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind.
MIAMI WINDOW CORP.
5200 N. W. 37th Ave., Miami
Aluminum awning windows
Agency-E. J. Schaeffer & Associates
1101 N. E. 79th St., Miami
MR. FOSTER'S STORE
835 W. Flagler St., Miami
Office furniture, equipment, supplies
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc.
503 Ainsley Bldg., Mami


60 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








BENJAMIN MOORE & COMPANY
511 Canal St., New York City
Paints and paint products
Agency-Monroe F. Dreher, Inc.
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City
MOSAIC TILE COMPANY, THE
Zanesville, Ohio
Manufacturers, ceramic tile.
Agency-Farson, Huff & Northlich, Inc.
Terrace Hilton Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio.
MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace, Oakland Park
Design original kitchens.
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd at Harrison Sts., Elkhart, Ind.
PERLITE INC.
1050 S. E. 5th St., Hialeah
Lightweight aggregate.
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 No. Main St., Orlando
Portland cement and products.
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.
410 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.
PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CO.
Berkeley, Calif., Neshaminy, Penna.
Lighting fixtures.
Agency-John O'Rourke Advertising
Flood Bldg., San Francisco, Calif.
A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N.W. 11th Terrace, Miami
Architectural woodwork and supplies.
Woodlife.
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS INC.
155 Washington St., Newark, N.J.
Designers, fabricators wood products
Agency-E. T. Holmgren, Inc.
National Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minn.


SHAFFER SIGN SERVICE, INC.
500 Datura St., West Palm Beach
Porcelain enameling. Mfgrs. sighs.
SOUTHERN TILE-LITE, INC.
1108 Sligh Blvd., Orlando
Thinset mortars.
AgencyA. P. Phillips, Co.
1045 Legion Place, Orlando.
STERLING EQUIPMENT MFG. CO.
2301 No. Miami Avenue, Miami
Food service equipment fabricators.
Agency-Harris & Company Adv. Inc.
DuPont Plaza Center, Miami.
STEWARD-MELLON COMPANY
945 Liberty St., Jacksonville
2210 Alden Road, Orlando
Tile, marble, terrazzo,
composition floors.
STYLON
1400 N. W. 54th St., Miami
3813 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
815 N. W. 8th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Ceramic tile.
THOMPSON DOOR COMPANY, INC.
5663 N. W. 36th Ave., Miami
Fine quality doors.
TIFFANY MANUFACTURING CO.
3640 N. W. 41st St., Miami
Bathroom cabinets.
Agency-Louis K. Steiner & Assoc., Inc.
1415 S. W. Flagler Terrace, Miami.
TIFFANY TILE CORP.
500 N. W. Shore Drive, Port Tampa
Ceramic Tile Manufacturers.
Agency-Bill Simpson, Jr., Adv., Inc.
2306 Gray St., Tampa


TROPIX-WEVE PRODUCTS, INC.
3590 N. W. 52nd St., Miami
Manufacturers woven wood, "Shoji"
and louver panel doors.
T-SQUARE MIAMI BLUEPRINT CO,
INC.
635 S. W. 1st Ave., Miami
Photo copies-chromastats and
architectural-engineering supplies.
UNIT STRUCTURES, INC.
Peshtigo, Wisconsin
Glued laminated timbers.
Agency-Williams Advertising, 213 S.
Washington St., Green Bay, Wisc.
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th St., New York City
Interior and Exterior plywood.
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Ave., New York City
VERMICULITE ROOF DECK
APPLICATORS ASSOCIATION
Atlanta, Georgia
Roof decks and insulation.
F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
1690 Boulevard, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, products.
WOODCO CORP.
600 Fields Ave., Jacksonville
Wood awning windows.
Agency-risp & Harrison
502 O'Reily Bldg., Jacksonville
R. H. WRIGHT & SONS
1050 N. E. 5th Terr., Ft. Lauderdale
Precast, prestressed concrete products
Agency-Peter Larkin
3132 N. E. 9th St., Ft. Lauderdale


Sfpecif 1our Product?


If they CAN if you offer Quality to give the
Service architects demand they want to know about it.
And the best place to tell them is in THEFR VERY
OWN MAGAZINE.
That's THE FLORIDA ARCH ITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal .
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes mopthly to every architect reg-
istered in the State . .
0 014


Florida


Architect


302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32


FR 1-8331


Owned, read and used

by the men who speci.

fy products


NOVEMBER, 1958 61


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Jacksonville, Fla.


EXPO' in Brussels ...
(Continued from Page 14)
sible), to reach the only exit, one
must struggle through a labyrinth of
booth-after-booth, ad nauseam. (In-
adequate means of egress are noted in
several of the larger pavilions, partic-
ularly in the multi-storied Holy See
restaurant, Civitas Dei.)
Among the small buildings, that of
the Phillips Lamp Society of Holland,
designed by LE CORBUSIER, is most
interesting. It resembles the shell of
a prehistoric crustacean, or, several
wigwams side by side. The strange
framework is covered with precast
concrete slabs, warped to the con-
tours of the hyperbolic paraboloid ex-
terior surface. It houses an eight min-
ute show entitled "Light and Sound,
an Electronic Poem." I thought the
building ugly, static, and not repre-
sentative of good Le Corbusian archi-
tecture.
Of course, it is impossible to de-
scribe each building, let alone visit
all the pavilions in only five days at
Brussels. There are many other
structures of interest, such as the
Atomium, designed by A. WATER-
KEYN and architects A. and J. POLAK.
A permanent structure, it is impres-
sive, effective, and well detailed. The
planning of the Fair is excellent,
though an often heard criticism is
that it is too compact and crowded.
While this is true in part, the clarity
of the plan and its very compactness
make for ease of circulation. Always,
too, there-is a different vista, a unique
detail, a grand panorama, and always
people, people, people, walking, eat-
ing, resting, or sightseeing, to lend
scale to these creations, which, al-
though they may seem to be fantastic
abstractions of prehistoric monsters,
are really shapes resulting from mid-
twentieth imagination and research.
As an architectural student at Colum-
bia ULiersity at the time of the New
YoA World Fair of 1939-1940, one
of our design critics remarked that the
buildings at the New York World
Fair would make architecture in the
immediate years following that expo-
sition seem dull and static; further-
more, that exposition architecture
might be as much as 20 years ahead
of its time.
Certainly this can be true of
EXPO' 58.


TRUE


AS


A


RIGHT


ANGLE


Benjamin A

Moorept
BENJAMIN MOORE & CO.
New York Los Angeles Toronto
Chicago Jacksonville Montreal
St. Louis Cleveland Vancouver
Denver Carteret Houston
Newark



DO WE HAVE
YOUR CORRECT
MAIL ADDRESS?

If you are not receiving
your copies of this FAA
magazine, it is probably
because your address in
our stencil files is incor-
rect . . We try hard to
keep abreast of all address
changes. You can help us
do so by following these
suggestions:
1...If you change jobs
or move your home to
another location, get a
change-of-address card
from your local Post Office
and mail it to us.
2...If you join an AIA
Chapter, tell us about it,
listing your current ad-
dress. Busy Chapter secre-
taries sometimes forget to
file changes promptly.
Don't let yourself be-
come an "unknown", a
"moved", or a "wrong
address".....

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~ps~~ass
dE





ADVERTISER'S INDEX

Advance Metal Products, Inc.
Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc.
American Olean Tiles of Miami .
Arketex Ceramic Corporation

Bird and Son, Inc. .....
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh .
Briggs Manufacturing Co.


A. R. Cogswell .

Dunan Brick Yards .

Electrend Distributing Co.


S. 62

3rd cover

. . 56


Florida Foundry & Pattern Works 56
Flamingo Wholesale Distributors,
Inc. .. . .. .20 and 21
Florida Home Heating Institute . 64
Florida Portland Cement .. 42
Florida Power & Light Co. . 54
Florida Steel Corporation . . 6


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. k Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






STABLISHED Ir91


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1054
LONG DISTANCE 470


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


George C. Griffin Co . . .

Hamilton Plywood . . .
Hollostone of Miami . . .

Independent Nail & Packing Co.
Intertsate Marble & Tile Co. .

Kaiser Manufacturing Co.

O .O. McKinley Company, Inc..
Mabie-Bell Company, Inc. . .
Mattheissen & Hegeler Zinc Co.
Maule . . . .
Miami Window Corporation 4th
Mr. Foster's Store . . .
Mosaic Tile Co., The . . .
Benjamin Moore & Co. ...

Perlite, Inc. . . .
Portland Cement Assoc. . .
Prescolite . . . .

A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc..
Rilco Corp . . . .

Southern Tile-Lite, Inc ....
Steward Mellon Co. . . .
Stylon . . . .

T-Square Miami Blueprint Co.
Tiffany Manufacturing Co..


16

53
18

9
7

8

51
24
46
35
cover
50
4
62

48
59
62

15
55

58
47
22

52
1


Tiffany Tile Corp. . opposite page 8
Tropix Weve Products . . 57

United States Plywood . . 5

F. Graham Williams Co. ... .63
R. H. Wright . ... .2nd cover
NOVEMBER, 1958


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
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PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
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BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
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We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COIECT for
conr te information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street
Coral Gables, Florida Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1-5154











Let's face it..


'...the EVANSES did!


"OK, cowboys-start ridin'!"


These three boys live at 1064 N. Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach. Their mother, Mrs. John H. Evans tells
how they fared during the chilly weather last winter:
"Last fall we installed a central fuel-type heating sys-
tem. During the winter's extended cold s .. e boys
were able to enjoy TV and play on the floor because
our thermostatically controlled furnace maintained aft
even temperature all through the house. Our central
heating system insured the health and comfort of the
whole family."


Now all over Florida . in newspapers and
magazines . on TV and radio ..
NEIGHBORS ARE TELLING NEIGHBORS WHY
CENTRAL FUEL-TYPE HOME HEATING IS A
"MUST" \N FLOR\DA HOMES.


This concentrated fall advertising campaign will help
to assure acceptance of your recommendations for
central home heating.


PLORIDA HOME Wi'HEATIN INSTITUTE
1827 5. W. 8th STREET, MIAMI
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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BRICK


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DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC., Miami, Florida -
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