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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Forrest Kelley to head Staff of...
 Architectural exhibit to stress...
 Sanford W. Goin F.A.I.A. 1908-...
 The administration of Florida's...
 FAA - 44th Annual Convention
 What they do in Michigan
 Message from the president
 News and notes
 Products and practice
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00052
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: October 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00052
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Forrest Kelley to head Staff of Board of Control
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Architectural exhibit to stress project houses
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Sanford W. Goin F.A.I.A. 1908-1958
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The administration of Florida's school plant affairs
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    FAA - 44th Annual Convention
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    What they do in Michigan
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Message from the president
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    News and notes
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Products and practice
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertisers' index
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















Prncoe"s aCd Pa'rpe4 ...

THE ADMINISTRATION


OF FLORIDA'S


SCHOOL PLANT AFFAIRS





By Dr. CARROLL W. McGUFFEY,
SCHOOL PLANT ADMINISTRATOR,
STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
This article is a matter of important concern to every individual
who is linked in any way to the development of school plants
in Florida. It not only clarifies the principles and purposes
which underlie operation of the School Plant Section, but also
constitutes a statement of the policies which will determine the
day-to-day conduct of the School Plant Administrator's office.






F FAA-1958



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Islands and Jamaica with nothing to do
but enjoy themselves with the friends
they'll make on board . YOU might be
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Convention to claim your prize . Plan
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OCTOBER, 1958


I o]'I 17A







74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


1I 7&V I74se ---


Forrest Kelley to Head Staff of Board of Control .
Architectural Exhibit to Stress Project Houses .
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA 1908 1958 ..
A Memorial by Alfred Browning Parker


The Administration of Florida's School
By Dr. Carrol W. McGuffey
FAA 44th Annual Convention . .
Convention Theme and Purpose
Guest Speakers and Panelists
Convention Information
What They Do in Michigan. . .
MSA Schedule of Minimum Fees
Message From The President . .
By H. Samuel Kruse
News and Notes .........
Products and Practice . . . .
Advertisers' Index . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Krus6, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.


S4
S6
S8

. 11


Plant Affairs


S.15 to 18




. 20

. 23


. . . . . 26
. 29
. 31


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. . Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.


Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN



NUMBER 10

VOLUME 8
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


"AS A MAN THINKETH . "
From A. Eugene Cellar, of Jacksonville, comes a remembered quotation
from SANFORD W. GOIN, FAIA, who was so well-known and well-
loved by architects in every section of the Southeast. It goes: "The price
of intellectual honesty is criticism and suspicion of the uninformed."


t j








































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Forrest Kelley To Head Staff

Of Board of Control


FORREST M. KELLEY, JR., for the
past two years supervising architect
for the Dade County Board of Public
Instruction, has resigned his post to
accept the chief administrative posi-
tion in the architectural office of the
State Board of Control. His vacancy
on the Dade County Board's roster
will be filled by RICHARD L. LEMON.
Kelley will assume his new duties
officially on October 8.
Kelley's new headquarters will be
in the Board of Control's offices in
Tallahassee; and among his new
duties will be that of reorganizing
the Board's architectural office in
line with the new policy of central-
ization outlined in the July issue of
The Florida Architect (Report from
Tallahassee page 17). This means he
will shortly take over fully the respon-
sibilities of Guy FULTON, who as
chief architect for the Board has for
many years conducted the Board's
architectural operations from his own
office in Gainesville. Presumably one
of Kelley's immediate concerns will
be to untangle the financial and
budgetary problems now dogging pro-
gress of the new University of South
Florida at Tampa.
Most of Florida's architects would
probably agree that in Kelley the
Board of Control has found the
logical man for the job of heading up
the program of internal reorganiza-
tion to which the Board has com-
mitted itself. During the nearly eight
years in which he has served as head
of governmental supervising archi-
tects' offices five as the State
School Architect in Tallahassee and
over two with the Dade County
School Board he has demonstrated
his capacity as both a skilled and
conscientious administrator as deft at
dealing with Iolicy and budget com-
mittees as with the many architec-
tural firms and building organizations
with which he has worked.
Kelley has stated that the current
operating policy of the Board of Con-
trol's architectural office will be con-
tinued. That is, the office will be
staffed and run on the basis of supply-


Forrest M. Kelley, Jr. . from Dade
County to the State Board of Control.


Richard L. Lemon . from Broward
to the Dade County School Board.
ing full architectural services for
about 20 to 25 percent of budgeted
work, the remainder being com-
missioned to private firms. In one
particular, however, operation of the
office will be expanded. It will serve
as a planning and technical liaison
between the Board's overall program
and the specific requirements of the
institutions of higher learning which
come under the Board's jurisdiction.
Formerly no such central planning
liaison has existed-a situation which
was the basis for the recent efforts
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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10


**^ _.,






Forrest Kelley . .
(Continued from Page 4)
on the part of university administra-
tors to set up planning and architec-
tural offices at each institution.
For the immediate future, at least,
the Board's architectural office at
Gainesville, headed by GUY FULTON,
will continue operations, but as a
branch office under Kelley's super-
vision as chief architect. The Board
has stated that Mr. Fulton will con-
tinue his connection with it as long
as he may wish. His service to the
Board spans over 30 years, for the
Gainesville office was established by
RUDOLPH WEAVER, with Mr. Fulton
as his associate, in 1926.
The man who will fill Kelley's
vacancy on the Dade County Board
has served in a similar capacity as
school architect for the Broward
County Board for the past two and
one-half years. RICHARD L. LEMON,
37, a native of North Florida, a US
Marines veteran of both World War
II and the Korean conflict, and a
1950 graduate of the College of
Architecture and Fine arts.


His initial architectural experience
was gained in the office of the late
SANFORD W. GOIN, FAIA; and for
the two years prior to his appoint-
ment by the Broward County Board
he was assistant School Architect for
the State Department of Education,


working closely with FORREST M.
KELLEY, JR. His policies of admini-
stration are in close alignment with
those of Kelley.
Lemon is married and the father
of two children. He assumed his
duties October 1.


Architectural Exhibit To

Stress Project Houses


Plans for the exhibit of architects'
work at next month's FAA Conven-
tion indicate this phase of the Con-
vention program will be an important
highlight of the three-day meeting.
In an invitation mailed to all prac-
tising members of the FAA late last
month were outlined the exhibit rules
and regulations governing submis-
sions, judging, awards and deadlines.
It is anticipated that between 60 and
75 presentations will be received.
From these it is planned that a jury
will select a number to form the basis
for another traveling exhibition.
Heading the Mid-Florida Conven-


tion Exhibit Committee is GEORGE
W. BAGLEY, JR., of Orlando. He has
set November 5 as the deadline for
exhibit registration and November 17
as the final date for receipt of exhibit
material at the Dcauville Hotel, Con-
vention headquarters.
This year the scope and content
of the Architectural Exhibit has been
expanded. There will be five general
categories for award judgment--
Industrial, Institutional (to include
buildings designed for commercial
operation and use), Recreational,
Residential and Builder-Residential.
(Continued on Page 31)


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Sanford W. Goin


F. A. I. A.


1908-1958




By ALFRED BROWNING PARKER



Rarely has any architect devoted so much of his time through the related organizations
of the A. I. A. and the F. A. A. as did Sanford Coin. Sanford once wrote that his
greatest satisfaction from such service came from creating friendships with a large number
of his fellow architects. Certainly a wonderful reason and a true indicator of his worth.
His was a perfect example of devotion to his profession, a devotion which while
compounded in friendships had its deep roots also in a clear understanding of the
responsibilities of an architect. As a hard-working and effective officer, he served in
virtually every office of the Florida Association of Architects, including two years
as its President. He was equally active in the American Institute of Architects and
at the time of his death held the office of Regional Director in the American Institute
of Architects. His thorough preparation and qualifications for the office of Regional
Director can be surmised from the fact that he attended every South Atlantic Regional
Conference that has been held.
Sanford keenly felt that architects have the same obligations to their communities
as other business and professional people. He paid more than lip service to this ideal and
served as a member of his City Commission, a member of his City Plan Board, a member
of his County Zoning Commission, a member of the Board of Trustees of his County
Hospital, Chairman of the Empty Stocking Fund. He was a Trustee of his Church, and
a Director in his local building and loan association.
Sanford's architectural practice encompassed a wide range of building types. In
these many projects, he exercised skill and care in guiding and counseling his clients
through the complete building process. Some of his finest opportunities were found
in the planning and construction of public schools. Educational plants in many sections
of this State attest to his careful study and supervision.
Sanford followed with integrity in the footsteps of his father, an architect who
established his office in Florida in 1911. While architects leave more tangible records
than most, Sanford's heritage is not alone in the buildings he created, but also in
the esteem and affection which- he held in the hearts of all who knew him. This
number includes virtually every architect in the entire South Atlantic Region, as well as
many friends throughout these United States. I believe I speak for all these men when
I write that we will miss his gentle manner, his restraint and calmness, his humor and
his complete selflessness in every matter wherein his work and life principles were
concerned.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















































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BACKGROUND OF THE AUTHOR-AND THIS ARTICLE


Dr. Carroll W. McGuffey, School Plant Administrator of the State
Department of Education since June 16, this year, was trained as
an educator at the George Peabody College for Teachers at
Nashville and received his doctorate in education at Florida State
University. He assumed his present duties in Tallahassee after a
Stwo-year term as Head of the Office of School Plant Services of
the Georgia State Department of Education, with which he had
been connected since 1950. Though not an architect, Dr. McGuffey
has worked closely with architects in Georgia; and he has been
given administrative authority over the State School Architect's
Office. . Architects who have been accustomed to direct and
authoritative contact in that office with a member of their own
profession have seemed dismayed by the initiation of new admin-
istrative procedures. This article has been prepared toward the end
of clarifying policies and programs which underlie new procedures
hopefully to avoid possible misunderstanding relative to them.





The Administration Of


Florida's School Plant Affairs

By DR. CARROLL W. McGUFFEY
School Plant Administrator, State Department of Education


During recent months, changes in
personnel and procedures connected
with the operation of the School Plant
Section of the State Department of
Education have received much com-
ment. The interest manifested in these
changes is commendable.
The purpose of this presentation is
to make a statement of principle,
purpose and policy regarding the func-
tions of the School Plant Section and
of the program and services designed
to implement those functions. Admin-
istrative policy and procedure are con-
sidered as they relate to the imple-
mentation and conduct of the func-
tions which are being or may be per-
formed by the School Plant Section.

Statement of Purpose
and Principle
Behind any program of magnitude
and consequence are basic philosophic
assumptions and principles. These be-
come the basis for making policy
and for the exercise of administrative
discretion in carrying out adminis-
trative responsibility. The success or
failure of a program will depend
OCTOBER, 1958


largely upon the extent to which
these basic assumptions and principles
are understood and accepted and the
degree to which their intent and pur-
pose are fulfilled in the outcomes of
the program.
PURPOSE: Some assumptions relat-
ing to the purpose of a state school
plant program for Florida are:
1. The ultimate aim of a state pro-
gram of school plant adminis-
tration is to make maximum
contribution to the improvement
of education.
2. The policies and procedures in-
volved in a state school plant
program should be consistent
with accepted principles of dem-
ocratic school administration.
3. The relationship between the
state educational agency and the
local school system should be
based upon a concept of lead-
ership which is consistent with
democratic principles rather than
one of dictatorship and oppressive
regulation.
PRINCIPALS: There are several gen-
erally accepted principles which have


implications for any state program of
school plant services. These are ac-
cepted by the writer as being basic
to the development of an adequate
and effective school plant services pro-
gram for Florida.
The control of education in Florida
has been delegated by statute or con-
stitutional provision to governmental
agencies at both state and local levels.
Although much responsibility and
control has been delegated to local
school systems, education remains the
primary obligation of the state. This
is a well established principle in edu-
cational administration. Consequently,
most state agencies have conceived
of their responsibilities in two broad
categories:
1. Regulatory functions designed to
carry out the intent and purpose
of state laws and regulations; and
2. Leadership functions designed to
effect general improvement of the
state's educational program.
Each general division of work with-
in the state agency, including the
School Plant Section, has to assume
(Continued on Page 12)






Administration of Florida's School Plant Affairs . .
(Continued from Page 11)


its share of both leadership and regu-
latory functions in order that the
state's obligations are properly dis-
charged.
Good administrative practice re-
quires that the internal organization
of state department service programs
be co-ordinated properly and that the
entire department staff work as a
unit to improve education in the
state. Adherence to basic policies and
operational procedures of the Depart-
ment is one means whereby proper
co-ordination and unity of effort in
the total program of services can be
accomplished. The program of school
plant services must be in step with
this principle if its services are to
prove effective and worthwhile.
Florida's policy is to guarantee min-
imum educational opportunities to
every child. The state educational
agency should exercise sufficient con-
trols to see that these opportunities
are provided. The principle of equali-
zation as applied to financial support
is widely accepted. In Florida, this
principle has been extended to include
the provision of satisfactory minimum
school facilities for individual school
programs. This is necessary if a min-
imum of educational opportunity is
to be provided.
Concomitant with the authority of
the state to tax and to allocate money
for school buildings is an obligation
to guarantee the wise and prudent
use of these funds. The resources of
most states and Florida is no ex-
ception are not so abundant as to
afford the careless and wanton waste
of public tax money. Current esti-
mates of school building needs in
Florida indicate that construction
budgets are in for a tighter and tighter
squeeze if the demands for minimum
school facilities alone are to be met.
From a strictly legal point of view,
county school systems are agents of
the state; and the property of the
system is state property, subject to
state control and direction. Conse-
quently, the mere act of delegating
maintenance and operation responsi-
bilities for school plants to local sys-
tems does not relieve the state of its
obligation for seeing that these dele-
gated responsibilities are properly ex-
ecuted. Similarly, the state is not
relieved of its responsibility for seeing


that public interests are safeguarded.
Consequently, a program of school
plant services should promote the
protection of the public's investment
in its school plant.
State laws force parents to send
their children to school. In so doing,
the state does not confer a benefit
upon either the parent or the child,
but is doing that which is required
for the well-being and safety of the
state. Therefore, it seems only reas-
onable that the state ensure that all
school plants meet adequate standards
of safety and healthfulness.
If a program of services is to be
effective, it must have the confidence
of those for whom it is intended.
Without this confidence, the very
best program cannot fully succeed.
The staff which is to provide the
services must be adequate in number
and must have competencies in all
areas in which services are to be pro-
vided. The relationship of those who
are involved should be such that good-
will is created by developing a way
of working which generates confidence
and which emphasizes service rather
than control. If good-will and confi-
dence are promoted, it is reasonable
to expect that those needing assistance
will seek the help of the school plant
services staff.
When groups of children are
brought together, numerous problems
involving their health and safety are
created. Because of this, other state
agencies have become involved in
matters relating to the planning and
construction of school plants. State
laws give some of these agencies re-
sponsibilities which overlap and oc-
casionally conflict with those of the
State Department of Education. Co-
operatively developed programs are
needed in the overlapping areas; and
a co-ordinated program of activities
may be required in other areas to
avoid conflicting practices and to pre-
vent duplication of effort. The pro-
gram of services should provide for
the co-ordination and constructive use
of the efforts of other agencies re-
sponsible for some phase of the plan-
ning and construction of school plants.
The school plant functions, which
are clearly and unequivocally the re-
sponsibility of the state educational
agency, should be administered effic-


iently and performed in a creditable
manner. Obviously, there must be a
continuous evaluation of existing prac-
tices, procedures, and regulations
which govern the activities of the
school plant program if there is to
be efficiency. Outcomes of services
should be studied and evaluated to
determine the program's overall ef-
fectiveness. Objective data are needed
to provide the basis for making in-
telligent decisions about significant
problems involved in the program.
Since the effectiveness of a service
depends largely on the abilities of
staff members, ways of improving
their competencies should be sought
so that the quality of the services
rendered can be improved.

Policies and

Implementing Services
The foregoing statement of purpose
and principles forms the basis for the
routine program of the School Plant
Section. Routine policies and the serv-
ices for implementing these policies
are discussed in the following para-
graphs.
The School Plant Section shall seek
compliance with all statutes and regu-
lations applicable to school construc-
tion in Florida. In the implementation
of this policy, architectural plans will
be reviewed at the preliminary and
final stages of planning, and final
inspections will be made of completed
projects financed from State funds.
All drawings will be considered in
the order of their receipt by the
School Plant Section, with the pos-
sible exception of projects which are
considered as emergencies. Changes
to the contract documents will be
reviewed and approved as required.
"Walk through" checking will be
replaced by a more thorough exam-
ination to make certain that sound
educational, safety, design, and con-
struction practices are satisfied.
Leadership functions shall be per-
formed as directed by the State Sup-
erintendent and as is required to
protect the public interest and to
conform to sound "public policy."
The services required to implement
this policy are primarily advisory and
consultative in nature. It is generally
accepted that school plants should
promote and facilitate the provision
of an adequate school curriculum
and that a comfortable, attractive and


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






functional building is one prerequisite
to the development of a satisfactory
learning environment. The School
Plant Section will assist in the devel-
opment of brochures on the educa-
tional planning of special instruction
facilities. Assistance will be provided
local school systems in the develop-
ment of educational requirements for
school plants in the early stages of
planning. Services will be provided in
planning, executing, and evaluating
local insurance programs. Local insur-
ance surveys, evaluation of insurance
coverages, elimination of fire hazards
and the development of methods and
techniques for reducing insurance
rates illustrate some of the services
to be rendered in this area.
Activities of the School Plant Sec-
tion shall promote the wise and pru-
dent expenditure of public tax money
for school construction. Studies of
costs of construction will be main-
tained so that school costs in Florida
can be readily compared with costs
in other states. The relationship be-
tween quality and costs of construc-
tion will be studied so that valid
comparisons can be made within
Florida. In every school plant that
is constructed, choices are made which
affect both cost and quality. Too
often these choices are made by
persons other than those who are
responsible to the public for the
decisions. The School Plant Section,
because of its position, has an obli-
gation to provide data and informa-
tion which will aid responsible offi-
cials in making choices regarding costs
of school construction. This is an
obligation which follows the alloca-
tion and expenditure of public tax
money.
The services of the School Plant
Section shall promote the protection
of the public's investment in its exist-
ing school plant. Two major areas of
service are involved here. One involves
the development, evaluation and im-
provement of local custodial service
programs. The other is concerned with
local and state activities designed to
preserve school plants in their original
condition or state of repair. Plans have
been advanced to employ a main-
tenance engineer as a member of the
school plant staff. In the meantime,
a state-wide survey of maintenance
conditions and needs will be made
as a basis for planning and imple-
menting a maintenance program.
OCTOBER, 1958


An aggressive and constructive
course of action will be taken to bring
about the co-ordination of activities
involved in programs of joint responsi-
bility with other public agencies. A
number of other agencies, both public
and private, have service programs
which are in some way related to
activities of the School Plant Section.
The Insurance Department, Industrial
Commission, Health Department, and
Florida Inspection and Rating Bureau
are examples. Liaison will be estab-
lished with these agencies, and an
intensive effort will be made to elim-
inate or avoid overlapping responsi-
bilities and areas of conflicting prac-
tices and to facilitate the co-operative
discharge of joint responsibilities.
The services and way of working
should promote good-will toward and
confidence in the School Plant Sec-
tion. Promotional methods will not
be used. Demands for service will be
met when needed. An adequate and
competent staff will be maintained
insofar as budgetary limitations and
Department policy will permit. Serv-
ice rather than control will be empha-
sized, and personal contact with both
superintendents and their architects
will be sought and valued. Processing
of plans will be handled on a fair
and efficient basis. Requests for spe-
cial handling of projects will be con-
sidered in view of the extenuating
circumstances surrounding the par-
ticular cases. The overall effort will
be to provide a continuity of policy
and personnel and a large measure
of stability, which should result in
a fair and efficient administration of
school plant affairs one worthy of
respect and confidence by all involved.
Discretionary action involving ad-
ministrative decision and the formu-
lation of administrative procedures
will be based on results of field tests,
research results, sound public policy
and proven experience where possible.
Statutes and regulations cannot cover
all possible situations involved in the
planning and construction of school
plants. Discretion hys to be exercised
in the interpretation of statutes and'
regulations and in the formulation of
procedures required in their imple-
mentation. Changing educational pro-
grams, the introduction of new con-
struction materials and new develop-
ments in the construction industry
require continuous study and research
to assure that wise and intelligent


decisions arc made. Issues and prob-
lems relating to the activities of the
School Plant Section must be con-
fronted with a positive, sound and
intelligent approach to their reso-
lution.
Outcomes of the program of activ-
ities will be evaluated continuously to
determine the efficiency and effective-
ness of the services rendered by the
School Plant Section. The services to
implement this policy involve eval-
uative type activities, such as relating
the program of educational activities
to the type of facilities provided, mak-
ing illumination and brightness sur-
veys of school lighting conditions and
surveying maintenance conditions re-
sulting from the use of various ma-
terials and equipment in new school
plants. Cost-quality studies designed
to show the effectiveness and dura-
bility of equipment and materials used
in construction will be made. Out-
comes which result from the imple-
mentation of laws and regulations will
be studied to ascertain if such are
costing money unnecessarily, causing
undue hardship on local school sys-
tems, or restricting the provision of
adequate educational services.

Issues and Problems
There are a number of problems
and issues involved in the adminis-
tration of Florida's school plant pro-
gram. Some which are of immediate
concern to the School Plant Section
are discussed in the following para-
graphs.
Editorial and feature writers in
numerous popular magazines have
criticized the "lack of economy in
school construction." While there
may be cause for criticism in a few
isolated cases, it is widely known
that the majority of schools have
been constructed with economy well
in mind. The concern of the School
Plant Section is that unjust criticism
should not be allowed to interfere
and thwart efforts to meet the grow-
ing needs for school facilities and
to satisfy the requirements of expand-
ing educational programs. A fund of
objective information must be readily
available for use by the School Plant
Section in dealing with this issue.
Architects and county superintendents
will be called upon to assist in this
endeavor.
Proposals for economy in school
(Continued on Page 21)







































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14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















44th ANNUAL CONVENTION


"OPPORTUNITY IN

AN EXPANDING ERA"

Florida is the site of one of the most significant and far-reaching developments
of our time. At Cape Canaveral a rocket launched the first U.S. Space Satellite.
And at Cape Canaveral our old horizons disappeared. A new phase of our world
and its life was blasted into existence.
Like it or not, we are all involved. The roaring flames that signalled our initial
contact with space have lighted new trends of thought, of purpose, of objective
developments. Their influence may be felt soon or later. But it is inevitable that
it will be felt. Projects, plans and programs even now under way will touch everyone.
Let us make no mistake. The orbiting of a satellite signalled the threshold of
a new and expanding era an era to which architects especially must adjust their
thinking, temper their understanding, measure and match their professional growth.
How . .? To what extent ..? In what ways . .?
These facts and these questions have furnished the theme for this 1958 FAA
Convention. It is presumptions to think that any Convention program could furnish
a guide to the future or a timetable for action. But contact with some of those who
have had a hand in shaping the foundations of our new world can be both pro-
vocative and productive.
So this Convention offers you significant food for thought as well as fellowship.
Not all of it is geared to the space-conquestcd future or to entertainment of
the moment. But all of it is geared to progress and improvement. And in at least
some of its several phases, each visitor should find a true value for himself.
It will be a Convention of Challenge rather than Reassurance. Above all, we
believe, it will be interesting. As Convention Hosts, the Mid-Florida Chapter, AIA,
joins with the FAA Convention Committee in a cordial invitation to attend.


OCTOBER, 1958








SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE...

Events and inventions have led us to the very threshold of the new age of Space. What
lies behind the door--what new ways of working and living, what new materials and
structures, what new opportunities for accomplishment? These three men have, through
training and experience, more authority than most to probe possibilities for answers.


DR. J. PAUL WALSH
Trained as an Engineer, Dr.
Walsh has been connected with
the Naval Research Laboratory
since 1943; and since 1955 has
been a top member of the "Pro-
ject Vanguard" team. As one
who has researched some of the
problems of Space, he recognizes
the possibilities which its con-
quest will bring.


RALPH DELAHAYE PAINE, JR.
As Publisher of Fortune and Ar-
chitectural Forum, as a vice
president of Time, Inc. and as a
writer and editor he is one of
the best-informed men in the
country on how current develop-
ments are shaping the pattern
of our future. He will discuss the
emerging trend of architectural
activity.


CHARLES A. BLANEY, JR.
An Engineer whose background
is the aircraft industry, the pres-
ent Director of Procurement for
the Martin Orlando Co. is con-
cerned with the down-to-earth
job of helping to build the var-
ious guided missiles that are
forerunners of space-age car-
rirers. He will discuss trends in
materials and construction.


NEW PROFESSIONAL HORIZONS


S..


As the basic ingredient of living is change, so the architectural profession must adapt its
outlook, its philosophy, perhaps even its pattern of activity, to the demands of a new
and expanding era. The Institute must point the way to that goal. Who are better qualified
to discuss the signs along the road than leaders of the profession which will follow it?


JOHN N. RICHARDS, FAIA
The President of the AIA has
been active in professional affairs
since 1935, serving at local, reg-
ional and national levels on many
important committees. Equally
active as a civic leader, he is
especially qualified to clarify
trends of professional growth in
terms of current organizational
needs.


A top designer whose work has
had a major influence in the pub-
lic school field, the Institute's
first Vice President is also known
for his ability in the field of
professional organization. His
talents have shown not only in
his own firm, but in direction of
many civic activities and on im-
portant AIA committees.


WALTER A. TAYLOR, FAIA
As architect, educator, editor,
researcher and administrator, the
Director of the AIA's Department
of Education and Research is
uniquely able to highlight the
increasing need for professional
research and to relate this need
to practical methods for satisfy-
ing it. He will sketch a perspec-
tive of trends in this area.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








TWO IMPORTANT "WORKSHOPS"


blic Reations-- Greater understanding and acceptance of professional ac-
SPublic Relations- tivity is now generally regarded as essential. But the tech-
niques of generating it are not so widely understood. Here, then, is specialized knowledge
to clarify ways in which our public relations can be strengthened and improved.


ROBERT E. DENNY
As Public Relations Direc-
tor of Henry J. Kaufman
& Associates, he works
closely as P/R counsel
with the Octagon and
with AIA Committees.
He will discuss P/R poli-
cies and programs par-
ticularly applicable to the
local needs of Florida AIA
Chapters and members.


RALPH RENICK
Nationally recognized for
his outstanding develop-
ment of TV news report-
ing, this Vice President
of WTVJ-TV will discuss
TV's role in a P/R pro-
gram, some of its techni-
cal requirements and the
manner in which it can
best be used in a P/R
program for architects.


FREDERIC SHERMAN
As a working newspaper-
man with varied experi-
ence in both reporting
and feature assignments,
he will discuss what
makes news in architec-
ture and how to report
it. As Editor of the Miami
Herald's Real Estate sec-
tion, he will outline
mechanics of meeting
editorial needs.


EDWARD G. GRAFTON
Moderator of this P/R
workshop panel is active
in the Florida South
Chapter and is now serv-
ing as a member of the
national AIA P/R Com-
mittee. As a former
Chapter secretary and
FAA Director, he is a
vigorous advocate of a
coordinated P/R program.


The Widening Scope of Service--

Is the challenge of the building-package operator a sign that the architectural profession
must re-evaluate its traditional field of service -and, perhaps, widen its range of pro-
fessional concern? Thoughtful leaders are seeking an answer to that question. These three,
in particular, have studied the matter and will discuss their findings in practical terms.


VINCENT G. KLING, AIA
Heading his own office since
1946, this perennial award-win-
ner has coupled an outstanding
ability in design with penetrating
understanding of the social and
economic forces that are shaping
new and broader areas for pro-
fessional service. He is an able
advocate of adjusting professional
service to economic demands.
OCTOBER, 1958


GRAYSON GILL, AIA
As both an architect and an
engineer with a background
which emphasizes the technical
phases of architectural practice,
he has evolved a pattern of pro-
fessional operation which is prov-
ing to be a successful answer to
the challenge of the package-
building operator. He will relate
his experience to this problem.


HERBERT C. MILLKEY, AIA
Through various AIA activities,
particularly as chairman of the
Package Deal Committee, he
brings an experienced approach
to his assignment as moderator
of this workshop panel. His de-
tailed knowledge of current con-
ditions is both a background and
a guide to considering means for
extending professional service.














CONVENTION SITE


ROOM RESERVATIONS






PRE-CONVENTION
MEETINGS












REGISTRATION
SCHEDULE & FEES










TICKET PURCHASES


Site of the 1958 FAA Convention will be the Deauville Hotel, 6701 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach. The Registration and Headquarters desk will be located in
the South Lobby adjacent to the entrance of the Napoleon Room which will house
both the Exhibit of Building Products and the Convention's Banquet Room.
Architects' and Students' work will be exhibited in Peacock Alley, adjacent to the
Napoleon Room and overlooking the hotel pool and the ocean.
Forms for room reservations and Convention pre-registration, as well as a
detailed Convention program, will be mailed to reach individuals early this month.
Reservations should be made as soon as possible after forms are received, since the
number of rooms available for Convention use in the Deauville is necessarily
limited. However, space at nearby hotels will be available and will be assigned
as may become necessary.
The State Board of Architecture will hold its Fall meeting in the Normandy
Room from Monday, November 17, to Wednesday, November 19.
A meeting of the Joint Cooperative Committee, FAA-AGC-FES will be held
November 19, in the Charlemagne Room beginning with a 12:30 luncheon.
Business will include full discussion of the work now in progress of changing the
Charter to include Florida Home Builders and The Florida Building Industries
Council; and the naming of sub-committees to work closely with allied groups
and the Joint Committee. Reservations should be sent to Paul Hinds, Secretary,
South Florida Chapter, AGC, Congress Building, Miami.
The pre-Convention meeting of the FAA Board of Directors will start with
a dinner in the Charlemagne Room at 6:30 PM, November 19. The Board's
business session will begin at 8:00 and will be open to all FAA members who
care to attend, in the Casanova Room.
Registration for FAA members, visitors, guests, students and exhibitor personnel
will start at 11 AM, Wednesday, November 19, at the South Lobby and will
continue until 9 PM, Wednesday night. On Thursday, November 20, and Friday,
November 21, the registration desk will be open from 9 AM to 12:30 PM and
from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM. Registrations for the Convention will close at
5:00 PM Friday.
Registration fees are as follows:
Corporate members, AIA------ $ 5.00 Extra Exhibitor personnel .- $ 5.00
Associate members, AIA -------- 5.00 Non-exhibiting representatives 50.00
Guests of Members ___ 10.00 Associates of representatives -- 25.00
Non-professional visitors 10.00 Students and Ladies --- Free
Tickets for scheduled meals and events should be purchased at the time of
registration to assure accommodation. It is desirable that pre-registration, including
ticket purchases, be made via mail as early as possible after receipt of material.
This will save time for those planning to attend the Convention and will ease the
burden of detail from the Convention staff.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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What They Do in Michigan ...

This fee schedule, as published recently in the Bulletin of the Michigan Society, should
be of interest to Florida architects as a comparative study of compensation rates and
also because of its approval, for use on a state wide basis, by AIA architects practicing
in various sections of Michigan ...


THIS SCHEDULE OF RECOMMENDED
MINIMUM FEES FOR ARCHITECTS in
Michigan has been approved by the
three chapters of The American Institute
of Architects in Michigan and ratified by
the Michigan Society of Architects.
It is subject to variation with each
project, depending upon its complexity
and nature. In instances wherein pro-
jects do not clearly fall within the cate-
gories mentioned they are subject to
special consideration. No such schedule
can be all-inclusive, therefore, judge-
ment is required in determining the ap-
propriate category and its corresponding
fee.
The chart indicates projects costing
from $100,000 (.1 million) to $3,000,000
Projects costing more than $3,000,000 are
indicated in the table.
Methods of making payments to the
architects-for schematics, preliminaries,
working drawings and specifications,
and for supervision-are to be in accord-
ance with the Standard Form of Contract
between Owner and Architect.
This Schedule will be included in the
Society's new publication, entitled "Own-
ers Manuel," soon to be published. In
the meantime, it is hoped that this pub-
lication will prove useful to architects of
Michigan. Additional copies are avail-
able at the Bulletin office.


Types of Buildings:
Type A: Warehouses, storage garages,
maintenance buildings, barns
and other similar structures
containing a minimum of sim-
ple interior finish, mechanical
and electrical work.
Type B: Housing, apartments, college
buildings (except as provided
hereafter under C), schools,
dormitories, detention or custo-
dial buildings, recreation build-
ings, hotels, theatres, auditor-
iums, libraries, food service
buildings, laundries, offices of
administrative buildings; build-
ings for manufacturing and
processing; armories and other
structures having a similar
amount of interior finish and
mechanical or electrical work.
Type C: Hospitals, health clinics, power
plants, laboratories; buildings
for research, the teaching of
medicine, dentistry, veteranary
medicine, chemistry or other
sciences requiring a compara-
tively large amount of scientific
equipment, and other equally
complex structures with a com-
parable amount of mechanical
and electrical work.
Type D: Churches
Type E: Residences


U


MICHIGAN SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTS
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM BASIC RATE SCHEDULE FOR COMPLETE
SARCNITECTURAL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SERVICES
BASED ON A PERCENTAGE OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS
ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS ARE SUBJECT TO SPECIAL
CIDNS.DE NATION


TOTAL PROJECT COSTS IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS
4 it F--t- {c 1-1 _-fI
0. I .S A .3 6 7 10 )J 2 A .* 4
Note: Each Vertical Division above represents $100,000


Schedule of Recommended Minimum
CONSTRUCTION COST A
0-100,000 5.5
200,000 5.45
300,000 5.325
400,000 5.2
500,000 5.075
750,000 4.85
1,000,000 4.7
1,250,000 4.575
1,500,000 4.45
1,750,000 4.35
2,000,000 4.25
2,250,000 4.16
2,500,000 4.10
2,750,000 4.03
3,000,000 4.00
4,000,000 3.8
5,000,000 3.7
6,000,000 3.65
7,000,000 3.6
8,000,000 3.55
9,000,000 3.50


OTHER METHODS OF
DETERMINING FEES
1. FIXED FEE: The architect is reim-
bursed the total of his direct expenses
and an appropriate amount of over-
head plus either an agreed percent-
age of these total production costs or
an agreed fixed sum for the archi-
tect's services (usually not less than
25% of the applicable percentage
rate as determined by the "Schedule
of Recommended Minimum Fees.")
2. PAYROLL BASIS: The charge is the
actual payroll of the architect's em-
ployees engaged on the project plus


Fees
B
6.5
6.45
6.325
6.2
6.075
5.85
5.7
5.575
5.45
5.35
5.25
5.16
5.10
5.03
5.00
4.8
4.7
4.65
4.6
4.55
4.50


C
7.5
7.45
7.325
7.2
7.075
6.85
6.7
6.575
6.45
6.35
6.25
6.16
6.10
6.03
6.00
5.8
5.7
5.65
5.6
5.55
5.50


-
- -----
---T--7-^-
I- I I !~


2 .4 A .e R So


D
8.5
8.45
8.325
8.2
8.075
7.85
8.7
7.575
7.45
7.35
7.25
7.16
7.10
7.03
7.00
6.8
6.7
6.65
6.6
6.55
6.50


a percentage of the payroll cost for
overhead and profit. This percentage
normally is between 100% and 150%.
3. LUMP SUM: The fee is a sum not
subject to change because of varia-
tions in cost. This form is equitable
only when both the extent of the pro-
ject and scope of services can be
definitely established.
4. PER DIEM RATE: Charges for con-
sultations, opinions, and reports may
vary from $50.00 per day upward,
travel time included. Travel costs
and other similar expenses are
proper additional charges.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


IlalUIUIUllllaUBIIUUIIIIUIIIUIIIUIUIIIUW


11111111111111111111IIIIIIIAlllllllillll


7-






School Plant Affairs ...
(Continued from Page 13)
planning are offered from many quar-
ters. The use of "stock plans" has
been advocated as one panacea to
effect economy in school construction.
The advocates would eliminate archi-
tect's fees which are considered an
unnecessary expense involved in school
planning. The School Plant Section
has taken the position that stock plans
are neither practical nor desirable,
and that one of the best ways to safe-
guard public funds is to prescribe
minimum regulations governing the
use of tax funds and to employ well
qualified and experienced architects
to prepare the plans and specifications
for new buildings.
Most everyone involved in school
planning recognizes the desirability
and need for a statement of educa-
tional requirements to guide the archi-
tect in making adequate provision for
the educational program in his plan-
ning. However, because too little time
has been allowed for planning schools,
this important step in the planning
process frequently has been disre-
garded. The School Plant Section


takes the position that a complete
statement of educational needs is an
essential to good planning. Further,
to fail to provide this statement as
a prerequisite to the development of
architectural drawings is to invite
mistakes and errors which may be
costly and may adversely affect the
school's educational program. There-
fore, adequate time must be allowed
for the proper planning of new schools
so that maximum economy and
desired educational functions are satis-
fied.
To many people, school lighting is
a matter of providing a given number
of footcandles at task level in the
classroom. Little attention is given to
high brightness contrasts and the ef-
fects which these brightnesses have
on seeing conditions. Concerted ef-
forts will be made to change the
emphasis now given to quantity to a
full consideration of all the factors
required to achieve a good seeing en-
vironment in instructional areas.
Numerous other problems and is-
sues relating to school planning and
construction are much in evidence.
Examples are: increasing taxes for
school construction, the reuse of arch-


itectural plans, the fee schedule of
architects, school sanitation require-
ments, heating requirements at the
various latitudes in the State and the
types of materials used for finished
floors in classroom areas. The list is
extensive. The School Plant Section
will give study to those which are
properly within its sphere of respon-
sibility, and courses of action will be
planned to seek their proper resolu-
tion.

In Conclusion
The School Plant Section seeks the
full co-operation of all who are vitally
concerned with improving the quality
of the State's educational plant. Sug-
gestions and constructive criticisms are
invited; and due consideration is guar-
anteed every comment which is made
in good faith without bias. The pro-
motion of higher educational planning
standards, better planning and design
techniques and more efficient proce-
dures involving technical matters are
the specific aims of the School Plant
Section. The accomplishment of these
should make a most valuable contribu-
tion to the improvement of education
for our people.


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Will bend flat on itself without fracture at 70. Easily
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Conklin Tin Plate
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Ahrens Materials,
Inc., West Palm
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Eagle Roofing &
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Tampa, Fla.


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Jacksonville, Miami, &r
Orlando, Fla.,Atlanta &
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> THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Message from

The President

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA


This is being written as I sit in
the quiet park of the Thomas Hotel
in Gainesville awaiting the tolling of
the bells over SANFORD WV. COIN,
FAIA. Possessing no talent for writing
eulogies, I attempt none. God took
Sanford from us. Why, He, in His
infinite wisdom, alone knows. Those
who were close to Sanford have lost
a witty and congenial friend; the
profession, a wise and energetic serv-
ant; and I, a very dear friend and
confidant.
A memorial scholarship is being
prepared for use in the Department
of Architecture, University of Florida
in memory of Sanford. I am sure
every architect will want to participate
in this memorial. Details concerning
the way you can participate in the
scholarship will be announced in a
later issue of The Florida Architect.
The Board of the Institute will be
Florida's guests at Clearwater during
the second week in November. The
Central Chapter is shaking out the
wrinkles and airing the smell of moth
balls from their red jackets, for the
boys of the Florida Central Chapter
Hunt Club ride again. Your Executive
Committee is busy trying to remedy
the interruption of the coordinated


action by Board, Region and our Asso-
ciation toward creating the Florida
District which Sanford Goin managed
so well. The Board of the Institute
undoubtedly will have on its agenda,
items of special interest to Florida.
Although the FAA does not offi-
cially participate in the program for
the Board meeting, the FAA is giving
a dinner for the Board members and
their ladies on one of the evenings
in Clearwater. As many FAA officials
and directors as possible will attend
so our guests shall feel "to home."
It might be possible that the holding
of Institute Board meetings in Florida
can become a regular and frequent
affair.
The Dues Committee, with ERNEST
T. H. BOWEN, II as the Chairman, is
preparing a method by which it is
possible for FAA to pay for its activ-
ities and at the same time permit
Chapter autonomy in assessing dues
on its membership in the way the
membership elects. It is believed that
such a method will allow wide vari-
ation in the assessing and collecting
of dues in the Chapters without con-
fusing the financial situation on the
State level. On the surface the pro-
posed change seems a simple under-


taking. But when dues are tied to
the budget, budget to program, pro-
gram to the needs, and the whole
to the ability of individual members
to pay (psychologically and financi-
ally), the Committee's work takes on
the complexity of an international
situation. It is believed a realistic pro-
cedure will be ready for membership
approval at the 1958 Convention.
G. CLINTON GAMBLE, 1407 E. Las
Olas Boulevard, Ft. Lauderdalc, is
Chairman of the Resolutions Com-
mittee for the Convention. Please
send your resolutions to him well in
advance of the Convention so that
his committee can collate, rewrite or
formulate resolutions to be introduced
to the Convention. RICHARD E. JESSEN
of Tampa and IVAN H. SMITH of Jack-
sonville are the other members of the
Resolutions Committee.
A meeting was held 17 September
in Jacksonville for the purpose of
organizing a Florida Committee for
ACTION, a national organization for
the improvement of neighborhoods.
The FAA was represented by WIL-
LIAM T. ARNETT and ROBERT C.
BROWARD. I invited the temporary
chairman for the meeting to make
full use of our Committee on Com-
munity Development since the Com-
mittee's activities embrace the same
goals as that of ACTION. ACTION
is our opportunity to give our Com-
munity Development program a broad
base. We mustn't muff it. Give it
the leadership we can give and our
own program will develop along with
ACTION'S.


CHROMASTATS Photo Copies in Full Color


Direct color prints by Chromastat, provide
sharp, clear definition, brilliant depths and
highlights, color accuracy to match the orig-
inal. In only 3 days plant time you can get
them in sizes from 8" x 10" to 20" x 30"
at surprisingly low cost. Price of an 8" x 10",
for example, is little more than that of a
standard black and white photo.


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Phone: FRanklin 9-4501


Chromastats in 8" x 10" were made of this rendering,
by Joseph N. Smith, Ill, AIA, of the Dade Federal
Savings Cr Loan building, Miami,, Edwin T. Reeder
Associates, architects. Size of original was 18" x 24".


I I SQUARE MIAMI& 3,-tf d 6oc/.
OCTOBER, 1958 23






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e For Joists, Beams or Trusses. a Sized for any lumber, from 2" x 6" to 4" x 12".
e Rugged to withstand hurricane conditions. Available in single or double style. Adapted to
any size beam and to block or masonry walls.


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Manufacturers of Specialty Building Products


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Architects: Frank A. Shuflin, AIA; John E. Petersen, AIA. .. for details, con-
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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New Lien Law Bill
Slated for Legislature
Work on the drafting of a new
Mechanic's Lien Law as a bill de-
signed for introduction to next year's
State Legislature is now well under
way. Headed by MELBOURNE L.
MARTIN, Miami attorney representing
the Florida Land Title Association,
a five-man drafting committee has
been engaged, since August 12, in
assembling and studying technical
background material as a basis for
the task of drawing up a new statute.
Included in the committee are: PAUL
H. HINDS, Manager, South Florida
Chapter, AGC; JOHN S. Duss, Real
Property Section of the Florida Bar
Association; FRANK ROCHE, organized
labor representative; and LON WORTH
CROW, JR., Mortgage Bankers Assoc.
of Florida.
This committee is part of a larger
group representing virtually all inter-
ests in Florida's Construction in-
dustry which last April met for
preliminary discussion at Winter
Park and formed the Mechanic's
Lien Law Revision Committee. The
group's sole object is the perfecting
of new lien legislation which will do
away with the ambiguity and inequi-
ties of the present statute and which
will guarantee fair and adequate pro-
tection to the rights of owners, pro-
fessional people and contractors as
well as suppliers of material and
labor. Lawyers charged with the task
of interpreting various clauses in the
present lien law have called it
"atrocious", "abominable" and "im-
possible to work with".
Aside from the fact that they have
found the law to be a hardship for
clients in many instances, architects
have a direct stake in possible provi-
sions in the new law now being
developed. At present, compensation
for architectural services performed,
but abandoned or repudiated prior
to the actual start of a building
project cannot be protected under
the existing statute. The proposed
new lien law should be drawn to
furnish such protection, according to
the drafting committee members.
Architects will have ample time to
study and criticize the draft of the
new law prior to its submission to
the legislature according to present
plans of the drafting committee.
OCTOBER, 1958


FLORILITE PERLITE



%^



t6e Heat



Outside,,,

A poured roof deck or fill of Perlite Insulating Con-
crete is one of the most efficient and inexpensive means
you can specify for reducing interior heat loads. For
example, "U" factors of a 1:6 mix ratio range from .200
to .098 depending on the type of construction and the
thickness of roof fill used.

This high insulating effectiveness makes possible a
substantial reduction in air-conditioning costs. With les-
sened heat loads, smaller units, less tonnage and power are
required and economies like these are often greater
than the costs of the Florilite Perlite insulating fills that
produced them.

In addition . .Perlite concrete is lightweight about
one-fifth the weight of standard concrete. So its use
makes possible construction economies, too thus still
further reducing the cost of using one of the most versatile
and effective materials in building . .







News & Notes


Required Procedures on
Resolutions and By-Laws
Last year's October issue of The
Florida Architect carried two pieces
of information important to those
attending the 1957 Convention as
delegates from their Chapters. One
was a series of resolutions slated for
Convention action. The other was
a number of By-Law changes pro-
posed for adoption at the Convention.
This issue of the FAA's magazine
contains nothing of a similar charac-
ter. As to resolutions which will be
presented to next month's Conven-
tion for action, none have been re-
reived at the FAA Executive Direc-
tor's office for October publication
according to the routine method
adopted at the 1956 Convention.
This provided that submission of any
resolution for Convention considera-
tion which had not been forwarded
to the Executive Director's office
for Resolutions Committee considcra-


tion two months prior to the Annual
Convention would require approval
by a two-thirds vote of Convention
delegates.
Presumably, therefore all resolu-
tions, from either individuals or
Chapters, prepared for action at next
month's Convention must be so ap-
proved as to their submission to the
Convention by the Resolutions Com-
mittee. Chairman of this Committcce
is CLINTON GAMBLE, 1407 East Las
Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdalc. Members
are IVAN SMIrTH, Jacksonville, and
RICHARD JESSEN of Tampa.
As to By-Law changes, a number
of important proposals are in the
making, but the Committee, chair-
manned by WALTER SCHULTZ, of
Jacksonville, had not completed work
on them in sufficient time for their
publication in this issue of The
Florida Architect. The FAA By-Laws
require that all proposed changes to
them must be submitted to the FAA
membership at least 30 days prior to


I


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26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


the annual convention. This means
that the proposed changes will be
processed and mailed to reach FAA
members by October 20. Serving as
members of the By-Laws Committee
are JAMES DEEN, A. WYNN HOWELL
and JEFFERSON N. POWELL.

ACTION Starts in Florida
In 1954 an organization was
launched in Washington, D. C.,
called American Council to Improve
Our Neighborhoods -ACTION, for
short. By last month the purposes,
policies and programs of the organ-
ization had filtered down to Florida
where a Florida Committee for
ACTION had been formed with
BROWN WHATLEY, President of
Stockton, Whatlcy, Davin and Com-
pany, of Jacksonville, acting as Chair-
man and J. E. BARIL, Manager of
the Planning and Community Ser-
vices Department of the Florida De-
velopment Commission, as Executive
Secretary.
On September 17 the Florida
(Continued on Page 28)








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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 26)
Committee held an all-state meet-
ing to which went, as FAA repre-
sentatives, WILLIAM T. ARNETT, and
ROBERT C. BROWARD who had this
to say about the meeting:
"My reaction to the meeting is
that it represented the sincere inter-
est and will of the people of Florida.
The problems of the downtown urban
areas as well as the great peripheral
suburbs have begun to create a defi-
nite reaction in the minds of the
people from many walks of life. I
believe that the formation of this
group is a vote of confidence for
comprehensive planning, zoning and
the need for public awareness of the
importance of a physical environment
that takes the nature of man into
account.
"With ACTION spearheading an
educational program throughout the
State, the architects who are aware
of the possibilities for total design
in a community will most certainly
find a more receptive audience. This
has happened none too soon; and I,
for one, feel that it is probably one
of the most significant steps yet
taken to breach the gulf between the
architect's and planner's vision and
the public at large."

New FAA Committee
FRANCIS R. WALTON, of Daytona
Beach, has been named chairman of
a new FAA Committee on Ethical
Practice with HUGH J. LEITCH,
Pensacola, and ANTHONY L. PULLARA,
Tampa, as members. Purpose of the
new committee is to study methods
for assuring ethical practices among
Florida Architects.

People and Offices
HOWARD M. DUNN, AIA, and
MILTON C. HARRY have joined to
form the new architectural firm of
Dunn-Harry Associates, Architects,
with offices at 2968 Coral Way,
Miami.
In Daytona Beach, WILLIAM P.
GREENING, AIA and JOEL W. SAYERS,
JR., AIA, have announced formation
of a partnership to be known as
Greening and Sayers, Architects, with
new offices at 200 Seabreeze Boule-
vard, Daytona Beach.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







PRODUCTS

& PRACTICE


I : -' s i J


The Mobile Mirror
Is Really a Door
Why some designer hasn't used
mirror for doors before this may
never be known. The Carolina Mirror
Corporation has done it and the
company's new line of Signet Mobile
Mirrors attests to the fact that the
idea is practical and can be developed
in more than one way.
These mobile mirrors have been
designed as by-pass closures which are
more or less conventional types of
sliding doors. But the Carolina people
have also perfected the design of a
unit which actually becomes a slid-
ing wall of mirror, as pictured above.
It is a floor-to-ceiling installation
which is top-hung and slides on nylon
rollers into a wall pocket. It is now
being used primarily as a closure for
closets and other storage areas -
although it could probably be faced
with mirror on both sides and utilized
as a space-divider, embodying the
double advantages of flexibility and
reflectivity.
The new mobile mirror units can
be furnished with clear plate glass
or with "Glasswich", the Carolina
company's new glass-plastic sandwich
that embodies a variety of decorative
motifs. The plastic sheet core is avail-
able in a wide range of patterns and
colors subject to many combinations.
(Continued on Page 30)
OCTOBER, 1958


BEHIND


THIS DOOR




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plywood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
both sides. Only non-shrinking, craze-re-
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Products and Practice..

(Continued from Page 29)


Bedside Control Panel
A new electronic robot control
that puts command of a dozen
comfort-type services at a hospital
patient's fingertips has been developed
by Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator
Company in collaboration with hospi-
tal officials. The new unit was de-
signed to permit patients to help
themselves, thus cutting down the
costs of patient care through freeing
nurses from many bedside tasks.
By merely adjusting the knob and
dials of the control center a patient
can: Adjust both heights and con-
tours of a motorized bed; open and
close motorized window drapes; turn
bedside lights on or off; adjust
room air-conditioning; operate both a
closed-circuit TV setup permitting
room-to-lobby communication with
visitors and the hospital radio cir-
cuits; control commercial TV pro-
grams from a pillow speaker; operate
a two-way intercom with the nurses'
station. The control setup also in-
cludes a new-type automatic tele-
phone.
The new control center is said to
be the first completely integrated
system to apply, by mechanical
means, the "self-help" concept to
patient care. The unit is mounted on
a bedside table equipped with ball-
bearing casters so it may be moved
easily to serve "situp" or ambulatory
patients.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Ph. HE 6-3400
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Architectural Exhibit ...
(Continued from Page 6)
The last is an addition to classifica-
tions established in past years.
Heretofore Florida architects have
made little effort to display, at least
in the form of exhibited work, the
results of their design activities in the
project-house field. Elsewhere, notably
in California, this phase of archi-
tectural practice has been widely
publicized to the benefit of all con-
cerned. As code requirements and
planning and zoning restrictions have
tightened in most sections of the
state, architects have become more
and more involved with the special
problems involved in the design of
small, project homes. Thus, it is the
Exhibit Committee's conviction that
work in this field should be publi-
cized. For this reason the new exhibit
category was established; and the
Committee hopes it will prove to be
one of the most important in the
November Convention show.


ADVERTISER'S INDEX
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 24
American Olean Tiles
of Miami, Inc . . .... 14
Associated Elevator
& Supply Co.. . . . 4
Bird & Son, Inc . . ... .22
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . . 9
A. R. Cogswell . . ... 30
Dwoskin, Inc . . . ... .21
Electrend Distributing Co.
of Florida . . . .. 30
Evershield Liquid Tile Co.. .. 7
Florida Foundry
& Pattern Works ...... .30
Florida Home Heating Institute 32
Florida Power & Light Co. . 27
Florida Steel Corporation . 28
Florida Tile Industries, Inc. 1
George C. Griffin Company 28
Hamilton Plywood . . . 6
Ludman Corporation 3rd Cover
O. O. McKinley Company,
Inc. . . . . ... 24
Matthiessen & Hegeler
Zinc Co .......... 22
Miami Window Corp.. 4th Cover
Mutschler Brothers Co. ... 5
Perlite, Inc.. . . . . 25
A. H. Ramsey
& Sons, Inc......... 3
T-Square Miami
Blueprint Co Inc. . . 23
Thompson Door Co ....... .29
Tiffany Tile Co . . .... 10
Tropix Weve Products ... ..19
Unit Structures, Inc .. . 26
F. Graham Williams Co ..... 31

OCTOBER, 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


A riT A 1VTrlI A


TRINITY 6-1084 i. I ..
LONG DISTANCE 470







FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


LIK 11. 1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
. OFFICES AND YARD







STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
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ALUMINUM WINDOWS

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AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.





Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1-5154


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... ARCHITECTS dO!


V i Donald G. Smith says:


I seldom plan a house or other structure without central

heating. Practically all of my clients ask for it; and I know

that most of those who don't will want to put it in later on.

In my opinion, central heating is of even more

importance than central air conditioning.




DONALD G. SMITH, ARCHITECT, A.I.A.


After last winter's record-breaking chills and
ills, you will rarely encounter any client-
resistance to your recommendations of central
fuel-type home heating equipment in Florida.
Unprecedented thousands of these units were
installed in both new and existing houses during
the summer throughout the state.


In a concentrated fall advertising campaign
Floridians are telling their neighbors why fuel-
type heating is a "must" in Florida.
We hope this "testimonial" advertising will
erase any vestige of doubt in your clients'
minds that central heating will assure happier,
more comfortable homes for their families dur-
ing our Florida cold snaps.


FLORIDA HOME i9 HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th STREET. MIAMI
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


LeI/'s face it ...







*


*
U'

U8


C.. ***
*


-I'


t 1 p. -T -


Dade County Medical Association Build-
ing, Curtain Wall by Ludman. Robert
M. Little, A.I.A., Miami, Fla., Architect.



Performance Is The Test of Leadership


In architecture, creative effort, independent thinking,
constructive innovation are all marks of the professional leader.
But the real test of that leadership is the overall performance
of the structure which the designer's skill and imagination has
developed. The building must satisfy fully the practical require-
ments of today. But it must also meet in both concept and
conformation -the dynamic challenge of tomorrow.

That's as true in manufacturing as in architecture. We
at Ludman are fully aware of this. As a pioneer in the production
of aluminum building products, we are keeping pace with the
expanding scope of architectural design. Ludman products have
been tested in countless instances and in thousands of buildings
the country over. And their high performance under all con-
ditions of use has been the measure of our company's< success
and leadership in its field.

Today, more than ever, we stand ready to help Amer-
ica's architects reach new heights of design achievement. Today
we have a whole "family of products" an expanding group
of building units engineered for lasting quality and well adapted
for economical use in any type of building. Tomorrow there
will be others. For, with architects, we recognize both the
challenge and the opportunities of the future.


S. with ^lCudmaa'sa


Family o Prdcts

AUTO-LOK WINDOWS
CURTAIN WALLS
SLIDING GLASS DOORS
SLIDING WINDOWS
JALOUSIE WINDOWS
PROJECTED WINDOWS


fs.1'
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Specs Memo ... The Miami Window operator guaranteed for the life of the window.

It's based on top materials, precisely engineered design, quality-controlled manufacture. It's developed
through double-checked shop detailing, factory-supervised field installation. The end result is life-of-
the-building economy -the true measure of trouble-free, dependable performance of windows in any
type of structure...
Miami Window operation is unaffected by extremes of climate or use. Data on request. _s.

mniami window corporation
P.O. BOX 877, INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI 48, FLORIDA