• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Martin-Orlando plant gets national...
 P-A portfolio shows work of Mark...
 Fifty-seven years of growth
 The Clemson architectural...
 Report from Tallahassee
 State board grants registration...
 Message from the president
 News and notes
 Products and practice
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00049
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00049
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Martin-Orlando plant gets national citation
        Page 4
        Page 5
    P-A portfolio shows work of Mark Hampton
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Fifty-seven years of growth
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The Clemson architectural foundation
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Report from Tallahassee
        Page 17
    State board grants registration to 29
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Message from the president
        Page 21
    News and notes
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Products and practice
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Advertisers' index
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




0


FFo F A C I O C
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of th. FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of th* AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


July
1958







Plans Are


On the Way...















As this year's Convention Hosts the
Mid-Florida Chapter is out to break
all records! Plans are now forming
about a theme with national signifi-
cance promising a program of nation-
al interest. . You will see it all
unfold in three action-packed days
at Florida's newest, most complete
ocean-side convention headquarters
the Deauville Hotel.




FAA CONVENTION
)EAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH

















Florida's original "State-Owned Farmers
Market" at Sanford is now its most modern, both
in appearance and planning. The entire building
is designed around prestressed concrete.
More than 11,000 square feet of prestressed
concrete double-tee slabs were utilized in creating
the mezzanine running the entire length of the
building, along with the cold storage rooms, elec-
trical service room, and the second floor of the
office wing.
Over 7,300 lineal feet of 16" prestressed
concrete joists were used for the roof structure.
Completed in the record time of 115 days, the
building is a typical example of the speed of erec-
tion possible with prestressed concrete units.
The Department of Agriculture, under Mr.
Nathan Mayo; Mr. Lee Thompson, of the Com-
missioner's office, and Mr. A. H. Lewis, Director
of State Farmers Markets will get a vote of thanks
from Florida Taxpayers for their foresight in
designing this type of fire-safe and maintenance-
free building.


11--


Here is how the original
Sanford looked the morning
fire of April 4, 1957.


- -

Farmers Market at
after the disastrous


This view of a new building under construction
shows interesting pattern formed by prestressed
concrete joists before roof deck was placed.


Architect: Frank George, Sanford


S- <* -^ .R. I-


LU
It el:4


A .


I3l


FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPAoSIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
JULY 1958 1


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


"ts q. *-'B7'~~~''~B **"s"






74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS




aT 74a Issuae ---

Martin-Orlando Plant Gets National Citation . .. ...
P/A Portfolio Shows Work of Mark Hampton . . .
Fifty-Seven Years of Growth . . . . . .
By Robert C. Broward
The Clemson Architectural Foundation . . .....
Selected as the most outstanding Chapter Activity by the
South Atlantic Region's Chapter Affairs Committee-
John L. R. Grand, Chairman.
Report From Tallahassee . . . . . . .


State Board Grants Registration to 29
Message from The President . .
By H. Samuel Kruse
News and Notes . . . . .
Products and Practice .. . ...
Advertisers' Index . . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 81 1 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
This grouping of "Anhingas", cast in aluminum, heralds a new feature series
which will start in an early issue. This sculpture was modeled by Gustav
Bohland, now a long-time resident of Florida, whose viork and background
will be the first subject in the new series. Purpose of the new feature is to
bring before architects the work of artists and craftsmen in Florida whose
skill and experience justifies their collaboration with architectural designers.


. 18
. 21

. 22


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
.. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Accepted as controlled circulation publi-
cation at Miami, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


VOLUME 81958

NUMBER 7 19

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. 15



































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... the major cause of exposure-damage to wood


Even indoors, absorption of moisture by untreat-
ed wood can cause swelling, warping, surface-
checking and end-splitting each the start of
progressive deterioration . To guard against
such moisture-damage, specify that all woodwork
in any building be WOODLIFED, preferably by dip-
ping or flooding ... WOODLIFE's "anti-wicking"
action prevents moisture seepage; and by pene-
trating the surface with an invisible, water-
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makes protection last and last and last ...


Ingredients in Woodlife also protect wood from
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insects. They act as a poison to render wood
immune from attack by the micro-organisms
and insects which feed on untreated wood.


JULY 1958













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Tampa . Doug LaHayne



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Miami . Ed Henderson


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Jacksonville, Florida


The new missile and electronics
center built by the Martin Company
at Orlando has been named as one
of the ten best plants in the country
built during 1957. Selection of the
top-ranking industrial buildings was
made from nearly 1,000 entries bv
editors of Factory Management and
Maintenance Magazine as the cuhn-
ination of their annual competition
for industrial plant excellence. This is
the first time in the 24-year history
of the competition that a Florida
plant has been named among the win-
ners; and the first time also that
any of the plants selected was de-
signed by a Florida firm.
The $18,500,000 Martin-Orlando
plant was designed by the architect-
engineer firm of Connell, Pierce, Gar-


land and Friedman, of Miami. Lo-
cated on a 6,770-acre site eight miles
southwest of Orlando, the new plant
covers nearly 500,000 square feet and
is the largest industrial structure in
Florida to be completely air-condi-
tioned. Design work was started in
November, 1956; and almost exactly
a year later the Martin Company be-
gan to occupy it.
The design problem was unique in
that the Martin Company planned to
use the plant largely for important
experimental work and maximum op-
crating flexibility was among the chief
requirements. In addition, the design
and equipment had to be such that
it would attract and hold the kind
of young, high-caliber personnel Mar-
tin wanted.


1I -



The Martin-Orlando plant has expandability as well as the "Floridability"
which its owners charged the architects with designing. Its selection as one of
the country's ten best plants was based on its "general interest and significance
for a broad range of plant operating executives in many types of manufacturing
industries and in companies of all sizes."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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JULY 1958









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P-A Portfolio Shows

Work of Mark Hampton


Most recent gesture of national
recognition to Florida architects is
a 16-page illustrated section in the
June Progressive Architecture. It is
headed "Progress Report: The Work
of Mark Hampton" and inaugurates
a new project of P/A editors to
"report on the progress in philosophy
and design of selected firms that, we
feel, are doing exceptionally compe-
tent work . ."
GEORGE A. SANDERSON, author of
the new P/A feature, has this to say
in addition:
"We selected Mark Hampton as
our first guest for a number of reasons.
He is but 34 years of age. His practice
is young-established only six years
ago. And his design accomplishments
in this brief period have appeared in
the pages of newspapers and consumer
and professional magazines and have
won top awards in many quarters.
Though his product is not yet im-
pressive quantitatively, in quality, we
feel, the things he has built have a
refinement and distinction that placo
them in the category of important
architecture."
Ten of the Tampa architect's build-
ings are shown in the section-though
not all as completely as one might


have wished. Accompanying text is
largely informative commentary on
the buildings shown, though it does
include some quotations from Hamp-
ton relative to his design philosophy.
Here are two:
"In general, a simple building is
easier to live with. Materials, I feel,
should be held to a minimum, selected
for their best possible usage and re-
peated as a theme throughout. Color
in building should be kept to a mini-
mum, particularly in Florida, where
our strong sun makes the color of
outside foliage and sky very hard to
compete with."
"I do not necessarily strive for for-
mality, unless it is a program require-
ment. But I feel that a certain for-
mality always results from a studied,
well thought out, modulated struc-
ture."
Mark Hampton is active in affairs
of his community and is a member
of several clubs as well as a past
president of the Tampa Art Asso-
ciation. Professionally, he is a mem-
ber of the Florida Central Chapter,
AIA, and a director of that body. Last
year he was a co-chairman for the
43rd FAA Convention's architectural
exhibit committee.


Hampton's office contains three registered architects beside himself Lea
Wells, Frank Alfano and Gene Thompson. Left to right above are: Miss Wells,
Hampton, Thompson, Gene Bovard, Don Bouterse and Alfano. Hampton
recently moved his office from the attic of Tampa's Professional Building
to its easily-accessible first floor.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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Dupont Plaza Center, John E. Petersen (1903-1957),
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contractors, was faced with Florida Oolite Limestone by Kermit V. Miller


It's quarried on Key Largo- this beautifully figured stone that's as well suited to
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JULY 1958


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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Fifty-Seven Years Of Growth



This is an account, by ROBERT C. BROWARD, AIA, of an eye-opening
exhibit of Jacksonville's architectural growth and development since the fire
of 1901 which almost wiped the city off the Florida map. As such it out-
lines both a program and a technique which architectural groups in other
areas might well adopt in scope and purpose at least, if not in detail


If any were needed, the exhibit described
in this article is further proof
that Jacksonville architects have become
well-recognized for the role they
are playing in the development of their
community and are rapidly
becoming an influential force in
helping to mold and channel the
attitude of its citizens toward its
sound future improvement. The
manner in which this exhibit was
handled and the resulting publicity
that it generated is an example
of professional public relations at its
best . Both Jacksonville newspapers
carried excellently-done and profusely-
illustrated stories about the exhibit
itself. And each paper felt it
important enough to the overall welfare
of the city to comment editorially
about it . As one editor put it about
architects "They are in closer
contact than most of the rest of us
with the fields where the need
for planning is most clearly seen; and
they are taking this method of passing
on their ideas on the subject
to us. Their objectives deserve our
serious thought." No better reason exists
for an exhibit of architecture than
to generate a comment like this. And
no better results from an exhibit
could be wished for than the
understanding and interest which was
the generating force behind
the comment itself.


The exhibition "57 Years Of Sig-
nificant Architecture in Jacksonville"
opened at the Jacksonville Art Mu-
seum on Sunday, June 1, and ran
through June 14. Sponsored, de-
signed, and installed by members of
the Jacksonville Chapter AIA, the
exhibit was viewed by some 400 per-
sons between one and six o'clock of
the opening day. It proved to be so
provocative and enlightening that it
will again be shown in October of
this year at Jacksonville's first annual
arts festival where an estimated
15,000 persons will view the many
facets of the city's growing cultural
renaissance.
It was quite gratifying to all con-
cerned with the Jacksonville exhibit
to hear comments to the effect that
architects are imaginative and sensi-
tive people-not merely members of
committees and businessmen like the
fellow next door with little or no
concern with the ever-changing river
of life. The true purpose of this
exhibit was not primarily to further
public relations, though it served in
that capacity beyond expectations.
Rather, it was to bring before the
citizens of Jacksonville a series of
vignette-like glimpses of the very best
that the physical environment of the
city has to offer. The great, sweeping
waves of mediocre buildings have all
but engulfed those few independent
and sincere efforts which have in
them something of the highest qual-
ity of man.
Since the devastating fire of 1901,
Jacksonville has grown from a city of
approximately 30,000 persons to a
metropolis approaching 400,000.
Within the framework of confusion,
misguided and misapplied taste and
the everpresent persistence of the
expert layman a rather typical Ameri-
can city has risen on a site that is


anything but typical. Few cities can
lay claim to such a natural site on
a broad, flowing river of the size and
quality of the St. John's-a river
which affords for all time a great,
open space through which to view the
many and changing moods of a large
city. When Mr. Russell Hicken,
Director of the Jacksonville Art Mu-
seum, invited the Jacksonville Chap-
ter to exhibit some of its work, the
architects involved in the exhibit felt
that the opportunity at hand was one
of great possibilities-one which
afforded a wonderful medium through
which to awaken the citizens to the
best architecture in the city. The
waterfront redevelopment program
had already revitalized civic pride in
Jacksonville. Now, here was the
chance to lift all of those buildings
regarded as creative architecture out
of the remaining chaos of mediocrity
and place them in a conspicuous
location to be viewed and assimilated.
We found that hidden away in the
downtown area as well as in the far-
flung suburbs of the city were some
rather wonderful buildings. Efforts
were directed toward one goal that
only buildings which were repre-
sentative of a continuing creative
development would be exhibited. Of
the forty buildings shown, only two
were of traditional or academic de-
sign, one designed in 1906, the other
in 1928.
The work of Architect H. J.
KLUTHO, now 85 years of age, con-
stituted the bulk of the early build-
ings exhibited, beginning with his
own residence of 1908 designed in
the spirit of FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT'S
early prairie houses, and concluding
with the Criminal Court Building of
1914, when his creative work abruptly
stopped for reasons not yet fully
(Continued on Page 10)


JULY 1958









































* I.'~--


*N. fcllmu L.St
2LAA&I
.0 rA_


57 Years Of Growth ...
(Continued from Page 9)
known. All of these early designs
before World War I were very
Wrightian and Sullivanesque in
flavor. Klutho's work dominated the
Jacksonville skyline for years as he
received practically every major com-
misison during the heydey of his prac-
tice. Outstanding among those build-
ings exhibited were the Florida Na-
tional Bank Annex Tower, done in
1911-a tall, thin slab with broad
Chicago windows filling the full height
of its narrow facade, a truly tall build-
ing adequately expressed as such-and
the St. James Building (Cohen Broth-
ers Department Store) which orig-
inally boasted a 75-foot diameter glass-
filled dome. The exterior treatment of
deep-cut windows and efflorescent orn-
ament has become one the truly indi-
genous local landmarks. Many of us
feel that Mr. Klutho's work is a
branch from the root system of the
Richardson-Sullivan-Wright thread of
continuity in American architecture
which has never been placed in its
proper perspective especially when
it appeared and was so widely
accepted in a city of the Deep South
where it solved problems of a local
nature much better than the many
affectations being designed at the
time. This work was actually the
mainspring of the exhibit . a begin-
ning which lost its way until after
World War II.
From the period terminating in
1914 until after World War II, little
could be found that adequately fitted
into the framework of requirements
for "significant architecture". It is
mainly work that has appeared in the
city since the end of the war that is


Work exhibited included, on this
page, top to bottom: Model of award-
winning house by Robert C. Broward;
Office of Willis L. Stephens; Office
building by George R. Fisher; and the
Swisher Library for Jacksonville Uni-
versity, J. Brooks Haas, architect . .
On the opposite page, bottom, is
illustrated an eight-classroom ele-
mentary school for the Holy Rosary
Parish which won a national award
last year. Architects were Boardman,
Ewart and Meehan.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


---~--;r---
I
...;..-...'~X
























Among the contemp-
orary buildings shown
at the Jacksonville
exhibit was this 1661
Medical Building
completed this year,
for which Hardwick
and Lee were the
architects.


of importance in this respect. This
is not to say that some outstanding
buildings were not built in the 20's,
30's and 40's. But they do not qualify
fully as architecture which has con-
tributed to a definite expression of
the new materials, methods, and phi-
losophies which are now more ade-
quately expressing life in our city.
Some so-called "modern" structures
were omitted because of lack of true
purpose being evident in their overall
design.
This being the case, it is quite
astounding to realize what has hap-
pened in Jacksonville within the past
decade. Almost overnight, the water-
front of the city has been cleared of
maritime ghosts and is in the process
of nearly complete rehabilitation. Each
new project seems to act as a catalyst
for further development-the true


remaining need being a comprehensive
approach to city planning. In the
many suburbs are numerous resi-
dences, small offices, medical build-
ings and schools which as creative
architecture are having a real impact
upon the esthetic taste and awareness
of the community. It was from these
sources in the suburbs plus the down-
town riverfront re-development that
the remainder of the exhibit was
formed.
The opening feature consisted of
a twenty-foot mural four feet high
of the burned city as photographed
in 1901, shortly after the fire. The
mural was installed in a curve to
create a cyclorama-the effect being
that of actually becoming part of the
scene of destruction. The total impact
of the burned-out city with smoke
still rising from the rubble was com-


plctely unexpected. PHILIP KAFKA, lo-
cal photographer, lent the use of his
enlarging studios and donated his serv-
ices to make a negative of a small
panoramic photograph obtained by
Architect TAYLOR HARDWICK. As the
enlarged print emerged from the bath,
the total tragedy of the Jacksonville
fire was evident. At one point a figure
could be seen poking about the ruins,
at another a horse and wagon was
on an errand known only to the driver.
The impact of human misery, shock,
and total destruction, could best be
imagined by observing a photograph
of Hiroshima or Nagasaki in 1945. To
the best of our knowledge, this was
the first time since the photograph
was taken in May, 1901, that it had
ever been enlarged to dimensions that
afford such close study. We have had
(Continued on Page 12)


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Jacksonville's Waterfront Development . .
As might be expected, a substantial part of the "Fifty-seven Years .
exhibit was concerned with present improvements along the riverfront in
downtown Jacksonville -and the possibilities of a southside park between
the Alsop and Acosta bridges. The latter was presented as a student study
project; but it served admirably to stress the need of orderly and long-range
planning for Jacksonville and was the basis for comment along these lines
by both papers. As a pertinent and present example of what planning could
mean to Jacksonville's future, the exhibit included a visualization of the
buildings projected for the nine-block riverfront downtown area. At the top
of the page is a birds-eye view of the City Hall which will be immediately
adjacent to the Duval County Court House which was published in these
pages last month. Reynolds, Smith and Hills are the architects and engineers
for both projects. Above is the office building now under construction for
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. Included also was a design for the Proposed
Civic Auditorium. Kemp Bunch and Jackson are architects for both buildings
which also form part of waterfront improvement program.


57 Years Of Growth ...
(Continued from Page 11)
numerous requests from both public
and private agencies for the use of it.
To further dramatize the fire, the
background of the mural was kept in
darkness and floodlights played upon
its surface. Immediately following the
mural was the foreword to the exhibit:
"On May 3, 1901, the City of Jack-
sonville was destroyed by one of the
most devastating fires in history. The
extent of the destruction can be seen
in the panoramic photograph to your
left, taken while the ruins still smould-
ered. Immediately after the fire, Jack-
sonville began to rebuild. The scope
of this exhibit covers the fifty-seven
years that have passed since, in terms
of significant architecture that has
risen from the ashes. By 'significant'
is meant buildings that are considered
creative works rising above the com-
monplace. Architecture is not mere
building, nor is it the bizarre or the
curious. Architecture is a manifesta-
tion of the highest level of creativity
in man. It is of the spirit and of the
intellect. It is poetry if it is worthy
of the name of architecture at all.
Within this exhibit are spaced panels
with thoughts on architecture from
some of the great American architects
who have prophesied the innate beauty
which is ours but for the asking. These
thoughts should not be taken lightly,
for the road to truthful expression is
long and arduous."
The exhibited work following
World War II consisted primarily
of buildings by the younger architects.
In this group were included some of
Jacksonville's first skyscrapers since
boom days, residences that helped
break the local tradition of non-
commitment, schools that have helped
set a high standard in the county
and the state.
Midway through the exhibit was
placed a glass case containing many
fine books on contemporary archi-
tecture so that the public would know
where to search further into the realm
of ideas that form the oft-misunder-
stood foundation of the present di-
versities in the philosophy of archi-
tectural design.
At the terminus of the exhibit a
room was devoted exclusively to the
Jacksonville of today as compared to
the eroded landscape that met the
(Continued on Page 30)
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


LOTj OV







The Clemson Architectural Foundation


The Story of an idea which became both a crusade and a program


The story of the Clemson Archi-
tectural Foundation is much more
than a mere account of a collabora-
tive effort to aid architectural educa-
tion. True, the Foundation was started
in 1955 with that idea as the central
core of its existence. And in about
three years it has proved the worth
of that idea in many ways. But as
it has developed, the Foundation pro-
gram has also proved a means of weld-
ing the building industry of South
Carolina into closer contact. It has
provided the various facets of that
industry with a common cause; and
in doing so has provided the South
Carolina Chapter with one of the
soundest tools for improving its pub-
lic relations which could have pos-
sibly been devised.
What is the Clemson Architectural
Foundation? It was founded as and
continues to be a means for pro-
viding multi-phased programs in edu-
cation and research which could not,
and cannot now, be financed from
Clemson College sources. Because
such programs cost money, the Foun-
dation has been set up primarily as
a source of funds. But in organization
and administration it is of such a
character that the influence of its
operation has gone far beyond the
mere disbursement of funds. As one
direct result of the Foundation's dem-
onstrated and promised support, the
Clemson Department of Architecture
will, this fall, become a School of
Architecture, headed by a Dean equal
in status to Deans of other schools.
Formerly it had been operating under
the administration of the Clemson
Engineering Department.
It should be emphasized that the
Foundation's continuing program does
not involve any attempt to mold or
control the formal curriculum of the
Clemson School of Architecture,
though heads of that school work
closely with members of the South
Carolina Chapter in planning for
Foundation activities. Chiefly it works
to supplement the School's educa-
tional coverage of subjects and thus
JULY 1958


acts to broaden both the scope and
content of the school for faculty and
students alike. A brief listing of Foun-
dation activities from a recent report
will illustrate the extent of its purpose
and work.
1 ... Visiting Lecturers Program-
During the Foundation's first year,
1955-56, ten visitors attended Clem-
son for periods of from one to ten
days. Some came to lecture-in such
varied subjects as city planning, civic
design, history and theory of archi-
tecture, contemporary design, land-
scape architecture. Some acted as
critics and visiting consultants; and
the tendency has been to involve each
visitor with closer and closer contact
with student work and problems.
2 ... Visiting Exhibitions-After a
modest start in its first year, the Foun-
dation sponsored during the past
academic year eight travelling exhibits
ranging from an international display
of student architectural work through
such subjects as drawings by Robert
Beaven and modern French litho-
graphs, to San Francisco Bay archi-
tecture and the work of the impres-
sionists and post impressionists. In
the two past years much has been
done to perfect exhibition techniques
and to measure student response to
both the displays and their subject
matter. With the School of Archi-
tecture now in new quarters an ex-
hibition hall of about 3200 square
feet of well-lighted space has become
available. It will provide a focal point
for a continued exhibit program as
one Foundation-sponsored means for
bringing to architectural education a
new and higher stature.
3... Scholarships-This phase of
the Foundation's program is still in
its infancy, though already three schol-
arships have been established for
Foundation administration. One, the
LYLES, BISSETT, CARLISLE andWoLFF
Scholarship, in the amount of $1200,
was established in 1956 for graduate
study in architecture. Another is the
RAMSEUR GRANT of $500 of which
$400 is to be used as a student schol-


John M. Mitchell, Jr., President of the
So. Carolina Chapter which sponsored
the Clemson Architectural Foundation
and thereby wrote a new page in the
book of architectural public relations.

arship. Late last year another yearly
grant of $500 was made to the Foun-
dation, half of which was stipulated
by the donor-the TAYLOR-COLQUITT
COMPANY-as a scholarship for "an
architectural student with outstanding
scholastic ability, and showing quali-
ties of leadership."
4 ... Prizes-An annual award of
$1,000 established by the CAROLINA
SOLITE COMPANY was originally used
for prizes in a student design compe-
tition. Now, however, it is employed
as a prize bursary for the outstanding
Fifth Year thesis in architecture. The
ILLUMINATING ENGINEERING SOCIETY
has also established, through the Foun-
dation, prizes for design excellence-a
first award of $45, two others of $30.
5... Educational Loans-As one
means for assisting students who are
in real financial need, a portion of
the Foundation's general fund is made
available for time loans. During the
first year of this phase of its operation,
the Foundation disbursed $1,150, to
be repaid with 5 percent interest.
6... Staff Grants-As a continuing
part of its program the Foundation
donates limited sums to School of
Architecture faculty members to en-
courage participation in professional
affairs and meetings which they other-
wise might not be able to attend.
7... Library and Visual Aids-The
broadening and expansion of the
(Continued on Page 16)






Clemson Foundation ...
(Continued from Page 15)
School's library facilities has devel-
oped into an important part of the
Foundation's work. It involves sub-
scriptions to domestic and foreign
professional journals and the acquisi-
tion of various visual aids, including
recordings and slide films.
8... Field Trips Foundation-
aided trips for students are scheduled
to permit close coordination with the
School's studio and classroom work.
They form a continuing part of the
program and have made excursions
available to all undergraduate classes.
9 ... Publications-This is a long-
range and continuing Foundation ac-
tivity planned to include a variety of
phases. As one illustration, a publica-
tion titled "A Career in Architecture"
was successfully issued to explain the
profession of architecture to high
school students-and to outline the
facilities available for architectural
education at Clemson.
10... Promotion and Public In-
formation-In addition to activities
directly supporting the educational


and research program of the School
of Architecture, the Foundation has
joined with the South Carolina Chap-
ter in a joint public relations venture.
This has the purpose of informing the
public, on a state-wide basis, on mat-
ters relating to architecture and archi-
tectural education.
All this adds up to a substantial
program-in work as well as money.
The Foundation is administered by a
Board of Trustees containing nine
members, of which the Dean of the
School of Architecture acts as Sec-
retary-Treasurer. Included currently
are: W. E. FREEMAN, W. G. LYLES,
Louis WOLFF and ROBERT I. UPSHUR,
architects; JAMES H. SAMS, Dean,
School of Engineering; HARLAN Mc-
CLURE, Dean, School of Architecture;
WALTER T. Cox, Dean of Students,
and FRANK MORRIS and DON QuIS-
ENBERRY, contractors. Operating ex-
penses of the Foundation are mini-
mum, since the secretarial and book-
keeping load is borne by personnel of
the School of Architecture. All con-
cerned with the Foundation serve
without compensation with the excep-
tion of the public relations firm which


the Foundation employes for a modest
fee.
Financially, in the three years of
the Foundation's existence more than
$50,500 has been contributed for its
program; and nearly $32,000 has been
disbursed. The 1958 budget contem-
plates an expenditure of nearly $17,-
000-with $4,500 allocated for visit-
ing lecturers and critics, $4,000 for
scholarships, prizes and loans, and
$1,650 for student field trips.
Foundation funds are raised through
the cooperative effort of all phases of
South Carolina's building industry.
Originally the Foundation was begun
by architects-and through a mem-
ber-prorated assessment in 1955, a
starting fund of $10,000 was raised.
Participation covered almost 100 per-
cent of the South Carolina Chapter's
membership -with many members
contributing more than their stated
share. With this accomplished, the
Chapter staged a cocktail and dinner
party at Columbia to which contrac-
tors, sub- contractors, manufacturers
representatives and material suppliers
of the area were invited. Here they
(Continued on Page 24)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







REPORT FROM TALLAHASSEE ...



News of impending reorganizations in the Supervising Architect's
offices of both the Florida State Board of Control and the Department
of Public Instruction is cause for concern to architects in every sec-
tion of the State. Late last month the FAA Executive Director inter-
viewed heads of these two state organizations- to learn their policies
at first hand, to sift fact from rumor and to clarify situations in both
offices for the benefit of all. Here is a report of his findings .


Among the various commissions,
boards and departments of the State
Government with which architects
have professional contact are two in
which, recently, some organizational
changes have been developed. These
are the Board of Control and the
State Department of Public Instruc-
tion. The supervising architect's office
of each organization constitutes the
working contact of the profession with
each. And since the changes noted
have taken place-or will shortly take
place-in the architect's offices in-
volved, the implications of these
changes are of first importance to every
practicing architect in Florida.
Some inkling of these changes has
already filtered through to some indi-
viduals and to AIA chapters. But a
lack of complete information and the
presence of rumors and garbled half-
truths have served to cloud the real
facts of the situations and have given
rise to certain fears in certain quarters
of professional activity.
It can now be reported that these
fears seem groundless. Most of them
centered around the supposition that
both Governmental organizations had
somehow reversed their former policies
and were now embarking on a pro-
gram of internal expansion looking
forward to the development of a full-
fledged "architectural bureaucracy."
This is not true. That statement is
based on a recent intensive investi-
gation of both situations by the Exe-
cutive Director of the FAA, which
involved, among other moves, a trip
to Tallahassee and pointed interviews
with the responsible heads of both the
Board of Control and the Depart-
ment of Public Instruction. Here is a
report of those interviews and a sur-
vey of the significance of changes now
underway or contemplated in both
organization offices.
JULY 1958


Florida State
Board of Control

All architects may not know exactly
how this unit of the State Govern-
ment works to provide needed struc-
tural facilities for the institutions
under its charge. In general the Board
of Control is charged with the devel-
opment and operation of institutions
of higher learning-the state colleges
and universities and lately, the Ring-
ling Museum of Art in Sarasota. For
many years it has operated an archi-
tectural office as part of its activities
toward these ends. This has been
located in Gainesville and has been
in charge of GUY FULTON, AIA, as
Supervising Architect for the Board
of Control.
Mr. Fulton's title is somewhat of
a misnomer, since the office he heads
works in a unique fashion. It has been
set up as a completely staffed archi-
tectural office which performs a
double function. On one hand it
selects firms in private practice to
plan and design institutional build-
ings; but on the other hand, it takes
certain projects unto itself and pro-
vides full architectural service on
them. Supervision of all construction
for the Board of Control-whether
designed in Mr. Fulton's office or by
firms in private practice-is carried
on by this office. This is a practice
of long standing, developed, appar-
ently, from the desire of a conscien-
tious chief architect to make certain
that every design was carried through
construction phases in a fashion to
produce the best possible results.
Of long standing, also, is the prac-
tice of Mr. Fulton's office of pro-
viding complete architectural service
for from 20 to 25 percent of the Board
of Control's yearly building program.


For this work, the Board of Control
pays an "architectural fee" of six per-
cent. And for all work of supervising
the construction of other projects-
comprising the 75 to 80 percent of the
Board's construction volume assigned
to private-practice firms-the Board
pays Mr. Fulton's office two percent.
Percentages refer, of course, to esti-
mated costs of construction. Arbitrary
as it may seem, the Board has a reason
for this arrangement. Through this
method the Board can operate its
supervising architect's office as virtu-
ally a self-liquidating activity without
the need for legislative appropriation
or even as a budgetary expense.
Strictly speaking, this arrangement
puts the Board of Control in the archi-
tectural business. The Board employs
all the people who staff its architec-
tural office; and even its chief archi-
tect is compensated by a fixed salary
rather than on the basis of professional
fees. But the arrangement has worked
to the general satisfaction of most
people concerned with it for many
years. The Board is convinced of its
basic soundness; and although within
the overall setup is contained the germ
of bureaucratic expansion, the Board
has, over the course of many years,
set its policy firmly against such a
possible development.
The foregoing was clarified by DR.
J. BROWARD CULPEPPER, Executive
Secretary of the Board of Control,
during an interview late last month.
Dr. Culpepper firmly stated at that
time that no change in policy was
contemplated-even though operation
of the architectural office was slated
to undergo some reorganization in the
near future. According to Dr. Cul-
pepper's fuller explanation, this is
what will take place.
(Continued on Page 18)






Report from"Tallahassee...
(Continued from Page 17)
Administrative headquarters of the
Board's architectural office will be
moved to Tallahassee from Gaines-
ville. This will serve to streamline its
operations since the Board's own exe-
cutive offices are located there and
top-level decisions involving financing,
planning and policy are customarily
made there.
As may be required by construction
operations for development of insti-
tutions under the Board's charge,
branch, or field, offices may be opened
at various construction sites. This
would cover continued, though re-
duced, activities in Mr. Fulton's pres-
ent office at Gainesville and would
entail the opening of another office
in Tampa as the building program
of the new University of South Flor-
ida gets underway. But there will not
be, Dr. Culpepper emphasized, any
substantial expansions of the Board's
own architectural activities; and the
present proportion of private firm
work will be maintained-or even
increased if the work load of the
Board's office can be relatively les-
sened as a result of a contemplated
increase in the efficiency of its opera-
tion.
"The present character and pattern
of our work with architects will con-
tinue," Dr. Culpepper said. "The
architectural profession need have no
concern that this Board will expand
its architectural offices beyond any
point necessary to permit efficient
and economical operation."

Department of
Public Instruction

Since announcement was made rela-
tive to a change in the office of the
State School Architect (The Florida
Architect, June, 1958, page 4) con-
cern has been expressed from various
architectural quarters relative to the
supposed abandonment of the po-
sition of State School Architect. In
the absence of any official statement
to the contrary, it had been generally
supposed that the department's new
appointee, DR. CARROLL W. Mc-
GUFFEY, would be assigned the full
range of technical responsibilities for-
merly discharged by the registered
architect in charge. Architects through-
out the state visioned a mounting
series of misunderstandings and com-


plications arising from the need to
clear programs, plans and procedures
through an educator rather than an
experienced building technician.
Statements made to the FAA's
Executive Director by both Super-
intendent of Public Instruction THOM-
AS D. BAILEY and Dr. McGuffey indi-
cate that these fears, too, are more
imaginary than real. The position of
State School Architect will not be
abolished as first assumed; but it will
be incorporated into a somewhat ex-
panded school plant office which,
when fully staffed, will include a
Coordinator of School Plant services
(Dr. McGuffey); a State School
Architect (yet to be named after the
resignation of George M. Megginson
last month); an Insurance Analyst to
work with County school boards as
well as with personnel of the office;
and a Maintenance Engineer whose
function and duties will be similarly
split.
This setup was outlined in detail
by Superintendent Bailey who indi-
cated it had been under consideration
for some time by him and JAMES L.
GRAHAM, head of the Department's
office of Finance and Administration.



State Board Grants
Registration for Florida
Practice to 29
The number of Florida's registered
architects has been increased by 29
according to Morton T. Ironmonger,
Secretary of the State Board of Archi-
tecture. Of the total registrations
granted in June, the State Board reg-
istered four by exemption, two by
re-instatement, two by NCARB reg-
istration and two by Senior Examina-
tion. The remaining 19 new regis-
trants were listed as having passed
the Junior Examination held by the
Board June 9-12, 1958. Successful
examinees were:

Delray Beach
RoY MICHAEL SIMON
Ft. Lauderdale
THOR AMLIE
WILLIAM P. PLUMB
Jacksonville
DUANE W. LEUTHOLD
JAMES D. LOGAN
LEWIS C. MEDLIN
ALLEN H. SMITH


Mr. Bailey pointed out, in further
explanation of the office reorganiza-
tion, that the present state of Florida's
educational plant development called
for the services of an educator to work
as a kind of interpretive liaison be-
tween building technicians and edu-
cational groups. Educational stand-
ards and teaching requirements are
changing rapidly; and in Dr. McGuf-
fey, Mr. Bailey felt his department
had obtained the experienced skill
and outlook needed to step up the
pace of Florida's educational facilities
to keep them abreast of contemporary
needs and practices.
Translation of those needs and
practices into well-organized, smoothly
functioning and economical school
plants is recognized by all three De-
partment officials Bailey, Graham
and McGuffey-as a job for archi-
tects. Thus, the indicated policy of
the newly expanded office will be, as
formerly, to work with architects in
private practice through contact with
a State School Architect.
Procedures may be somewhat dif-
ferent than formerly, however. As
time goes on Dr. McGuffey will avow-
(Continued on Page 29)



Miami
EDWARD I. CAMNER
JUST GORDO
OTTO H. OPPENHEIMER
PHILIP PEARLMAN
PAUL J. PILLAU
Orlando
JOHN P. DELOE
NILS M. SCHWEIZER
Pompano Beach
MARVIN GELATT
FRITZ WOEHLE
Sarasota
ROBERT L. SHAW
Claymont, Delaware
ROBERT L. EVANS
New York, New York
JOHN L. RUSEAU
Registration by exemption was
granted to: T. F. Bellany, LeRoy
Werner, Josef Balis and W. A. Faust,
Jr. E. J. Baker and C. D. Faulkner
were registered by reinstatement.
Registration on the basis of NCARB
certificates were granted to W. W.
Bond, Jr. and C. L. Churchill. Joseph
M. Brocato and Alexander Kulhavy
were granted registration by Senior
Examinations.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








































WOOD
ALUMINUM I


FEND FOR CATALOGUE M-58
BURGH 13, PENNSYLVANIA







































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Developing information for making even more
durable and lower-annual-cost concrete is the job
to which the Portland Cement Association is dedi-
cated. Towards this goal scores of scientists and
engineers are at work on field projects from coast
to coast and in the Association's laboratories near
Chicago. Knowledge gained is made available to
cement users quickly and freely through the PCA's
broad program of education and technical service.
All of these activities are made possible by the
voluntary financial support of PCA's 69 member
companies. These companies make a large part of
the portland cement used in the U. S. and Canada.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 NORTH MAIN STREET, ORLANDO, FLORIDA
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete through scientific research and engineering field work
20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Message from The President


By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA


Since we are now at the mid-year,
it seems appropriate to take an inven-
tory, to evaluate the progress we have
made toward the goals set for us this
year back in January.
Perhaps we should start our review
with the Committee on Florida-Reg-
ion of the AIA, since their progress
has been phenomenal. At this writing
only the passage of By-Law changes
at the Cleveland Convention needs
to be done and the dream becomes a
fact-Florida, a regional District of
the Institute. We owe much to
various leaders in the Institute, in-
cluding many in the South Atlantic
District, the South Atlantic District
Director, as well as the work of the
Committee. The progress in this ac-
tivity is an ideal example of what
can be accomplished by committee
work supported by vigorous chapter
cooperation.
Although this is a non-legislative
year, our Legislative Committee has
been active in preparing for 1959. The
FAA is represented on a Lien Law
Revision Committee composed of
representatives of State organizations
interested in the Lien Law. We
have taken initiative in giving di-
rection to the Committee and are
hopeful that a workable bill will be
ready in time for proper introduction
to the State Legislature. The FAA has
participated in conferences studying
the legislation necessary to make it
possible for Florida communities to
participate in the National Urban Re-
newal Program. A program is inaug-
urated to discuss politics and legis-
lative matters with chapter members
at a chapter meeting to which their
legislators are invited to attend and
participate. Along with this activity,
our Executive Director keeps close
contact with Legislators and State
agencies to offer our assistance and
to learn developments. Between the


Legislative Committee and the Exe-
cutive Director, the FAA activities
concerned with Legislation is in good
hands.
The Chapter Affairs Committee is
an active one, which has made prog-
ress in selecting outstanding chapter
activities and having them published
in The Florida Architect. One ap-
pears in this issue and it is the desire
of the Committee that this will
encourage the interchange of infor-
mation between chapters concerning
Chapter Affairs and stimulate a wider
scope of activity by the Chapters. This
Committee is well on the way to
achieving this goal.
The Public Relations Committee
has taken its first step toward its goal
of determining a workable plan for
measuring public reaction to our pub-
lic relations efforts. Its interim report
to the May Board Meeting indicated
a plan was surely taking shape.
Committees on Community Devel-
opment, Education, By-Laws, and the
Special Committee on Dues are all
up to their ears in work, assembling,
evaluating and studying information,
developing plans to recommend.
Considering that this is the first
year for our new committee on struc-
ture, I am encouraged by the progress
made in committee work at this mid-
year mark.
Our greatest progress has been made
in organization. In January the whole
administrative organization of the
FAA was begun on a basis entirely
new with the FAA. Although there
was a vague concept held by previous
officers and directors as to how the
various functional operations of the
FAA could be organized in separate
departments, yet serve the FAA as a
central operating unit, no studied
plan, or directive was given. Nor was
there a policy or set of policies estab-
lished to guide the organization of the


'.. *








Executive Director's office. In spite
of this deficiency in pre-planning, the
work of organizing the Executive Di-
rector's office has been done with
such skill and dispatch that, I believe,
no member, with the possible excep-
tion of those on the Executive Com-
mittee, is aware of the radical change-
over in administration procedure tak-
ing place.
Already this reorganization has
proved its soundness. Our convention
planning proceeds vigorously without
confusion; a great percent of the
exhibition space is already reserved by
producers. The Mid-Florida Chapter,
relieved with routine administrative
tasks, has been able to devote time
to preparing for an exceptionally good
program for the convention. The
Florida Architect continues to main-
tain its high quality and, as of this
issue, has promise of even greater
goals since the postal limitations of
former years have been changed. Our
relationships with others and with
ourselves has developed at an ever
increasing degree with the resulting
understanding of professional prob-
lems and increase in prestige in our
State.
I must recognize our Executive
Director and Administrative Secre-
tary, Roger and Verna Sherman, as
the chief architects of this successful
undertaking. In large measure they
are responsible for progress made-as
I see it at this mid-year evaluation.


JULY 1958







News & Notes


Jacksonville Ladies Form
Third AIA Auxiliary
Wives of Jacksonville Chapter
members last month held the first
formal meeting for the election of
officers of the Jacksonville AIA Aux-
iliary. The meeting was held at the
River Club and 27 charter members
attended the June 19th session. Elec-
tion results were: President, MRS.
IVAN H. SMITH; Vice President, MRS.
THOMAS E. EWART, JR.; Secretary,
MRS. ROBERT E. BOARDMAN; Treas-
urer, MRS. FREDERICK W. BUCKY.
Elected as Directors of the new orga-
nization were: MRS. FRANKLIN S.
BUNCH, MRS. A. EUGENE CELLER and
MRS. H. F. SAXELBYE.
The first official action of the group
was to elect an honorary member in
the person of MRS. MELLEN C. GREE-
LEY. As a result of a general discussion
it was decided that meetings will be
held bi-monthly as daytime "coffees."
The next regular meeting, therefore,
will be in August; and it has been


scheduled for August 1st, in the Jack-
sonville Art Museum. This will be a
detailed organizational meeting during
which committees will be named and
plans formulated for the group's fu-
ture activities.
Though formal organization of the
Auxiliary was just recently accom-
plished, the ladies of Jacksonville
architects have been active as a group
prior to this time. Their most recent
interest was sponsorship of a hostess
tea at the opening of the Chapter's
exhibit of "Fifty-Seven Years of Sig-
nificant Architecture in Jacksonville"
-a full report of which begins on
page 9 of this issue.

New AIA "Fact" Book
Any architect who has not yet seen
and read the AIA's newest P/R
medium, "Facts About Your Archi-
tect and His Work" should make
haste to do so. It is both a striking
and informative booklet which, prop-
erly used, could be of great benefit
to the architectural profession in this


State. It should be in the hands of
every Mayor and City Manager in
Florida. It should be sent to members
of county school boards, city engi-
neers, building committee chairmen
of hospital, church and institutional
boards.
Copies for just such distribution
are available from the Octagon. AIA
Headquarters has priced them at 35
cents apiece with a special price of
25 cents for quantities of 25 or more.

Architects Story on TV
An estimated 20-million people will
learn something about the role of the
architect in American life July 9, at
10 p.m. over the CBS TV network.
That's the time and station for the
"Armstrong Circle Theatre." As a fore-
word to the Armstrong program, the
company is planning to "acknowledge
the nation's debt to the American
architect for his constant leadership
in creating better buildings in which
to live and work."
The Armstrong Cork Company's



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DUVAL COUNTY

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The tcstom-designed interior
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in Florida wcre created b\ our '
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For Information If rite:


GEORGE DORO
FIXTURE COMPANY
P. 0. Box 1836
102-28 Florida A.enue
Jack.onn ille. Florida


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






special TV presentation will stress the
role of the architect in shaping the
world of the future.

Weed on P-C Award Panel
ROBERT LAW WEED of Miami, was
one of five prominent architects serv-
ing as judges for the 10th Annual
Producers Council literature and ad-
vertising award competition. Organi-
zations which will receive Certificates
of Exceptional Merit for their entries
are: Kawneer Co., Perlite Institute,
Armstrong Cork Company, U. S. Steel
Corp., Fenestra, Inc., and Aluminum
Co. of America.

Crusade for Freedom
Again this year the Crusade for
Freedom organization is seeking
funds. This is the group which sup-
ports Radio Free Europe, a privately
sponsored effort to publicize truth
and the American viewpoint on the
other side of the Iron Curtain. July
4th will mark the eighth year that
RFE has been broadcasting. Heading
the fund-raising campaign for the
Crusade for Freedom in Florida is
Governor LEROY COLLINS as Hon-


FAA president H. Samuel
Kruse and Florida South
Chapter president Irvin S.
Korach exchange pleas-
antries for the benefit of
the camera man with
Governor LeRoy Collins.
The occasion was the
Junior Achievement
Award meeting at the
McAllister Hotel in Miami
last month. The three
VIP's are posing before
a series of mural sketches
done by the Misses Ayer
and Tattersfield to depict
the historical background
of South Florida archi-
tecture. The murals were
designed for use in the
public rooms of the Mc-
Allister.


orary Chairman, with Commisisoner
J. EDWARD LARSON as Campaign Di-
rector.
The FAA has been asked to solicit
its membership directly for contribu-
tions for this year's Crusade of Free-
dom fund-raising campaign. Though
the cause is good, policy of the FAA
prevents its officers or its adminis-
trative office to grant this request.


However, any FAA member who
would like to make a private contri-
bution to the Crusade for Freedom
may do so by sending his check to
MR. HARRY G. RETALICK, Executive
Vice President, First National Bank
of Miami, 101 E. Flagler Street,
Miami. Mr. Retalick is the State
treasurer for the Crusade for Freedom
in Florida.


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JULY 1958 23



























AWARD WINNER . This design
and model for a precast concrete sun
screen by Milton LeGate, U/F archi-
tectural student, won the $150 first
prize in a student design competition
sponsored by the Fla. Concrete &
Products Assoc. The $75 second
prize went to R. H. Hofstetter of the
U/F; and third prize, $50, was taken
by Gail Baldwin of Univ. of Miami.
Judges in the competition were:
H. Samuel Kruse, FAA president;
Joseph M. Shifalo, Mid-Fla. Chapter
president, John B. Langley and Robert
Peacock.


Clemson Foundation ...
(Continued from Page 16)
"heard the story" of the Foundation
and its plans; and as one tangible
result, the Foundation's resources were
increased by about $13,000.
These dinner parties have since
become a traditional part of the Foun-
dation's fund-raising campaign. They
have been held in various areas of the
State at Spartanburg, Greenville,
Charleston, Florence and Sumter. And
though each has been instrumental in
assuring the Foundation of capital
adequate to its yearly budget-which
involves a yearly donation from Chap-
ter members-the intangible benefits
are certainly equal in both character
and significance.
Foundation activity has noticeably
improved the status of the architectur-
al profession through South Carolina.
It has forged a common cause to which
every element of the building industry
can-and does-rally its cooperative
support. It has generated "a tremen-
dous amount of enthusiasm" among
the School of Architecture faculty-
which, in turn has done much to


stimulate the thinking and actions of
both teachers and students. And it
has without doubt provided a tangible
evidence of professional support upon
which the Clemson Board of Trustees
is obviously leaning in the develop-
ment of the School of Architecture-
evidenced by the latest step toward
making the School an independent
entity of the College organization.
Finally, the Clemson Architectural
Foundation is proving a sound and
solid peg upon which to hang the
hat of professional public relations. In
its basic purpose, its cooperative man-
agement, its program organization-
and most especially in the positive
results which are being achieved-the
Foundation is a channel of public
good-will and works. Along it cannot
help but flow the ideals and ideas of
the architectural profession to the vast
benefit of all concerned.
The record does not state who first
conceived the notion of the Founda-
tion. But to that individual the Chap-
ter membership, the entire building
industry of its state-even architects
everywhere-owe personal congratu-
la.tions and sincere professional thanks.


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ARCHITECT: David Reaves
Gainesville, Florida


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mortar, weathers to a pleasing gray. Suitable for
marine atmosphere conditions.

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FLORIDA SALES AGENT: D. W. Lansing, Southern Sales, P. O. Box 1993, Ormand Beach, Florida


DISTRIBUTORS Conklin Tin Plate & Metal Co.
DISTRIBUTORS Atlanta, Ga.


Ahrens Materials, Inc.
West Palm Beach, Fla.


Easle Roofins &
Art Metal Works
Tampa, Fla.


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Jacksonville, Miami, &
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74 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








PRODUCTS & PRACTICE


Adaptability Marks New,
Low-cost Partition System
A new system for dividing space
through use of standard metal framing
members was announced last month
by the Unistrut Products Company of
Chicago. Called "ColorLine," the new
partitioning system has been designed
to make available low-cost, re-usable
partitions which can be permanent
or moveable and which can be erected
without the need for involved layout
and without drilling, welding or riv-
eting.
According to George W. Butler,
Unistrut president, the metal framing
unit is "the secret behind the versa-
tility and adaptability of the system."
Basically it consists of a metal chan-
nel with a continuous open slot down
the middle of one side, a special
spring-held clamping nut and framing
fittings for attachments.
This framing is said to be quickly
and easily erected in any desired ar-
rangement. It is designed to accom-
modate panelling material from one-
eighth to one-half inch thickness.
Doors and windows can be fitted into
the framing; and panels can be of
almost any type within the thickness
tolerances of the framing members.
Wood, plywood, plastic, solid and per-
forated hardboard, various types of
wallboards, cement asbestos, expanded
metal or glass can all be used satis-
factorily, according to the manufac-
turer. Butler stressed the fact that


the new framing system resulted in a
partition which cauld be "erected, dis-
mantled and re-erected with a mini-
mum time and labor and with com-
plete salvage of materials."

Cordless Venetian Blinds
A new type of Venetian blind
operating with concealed controls has
been developed by Lovelor Lorent-
zen, Inc., especially for use in various
types of security buildings. The new
blind is installed between a restrain-
ing screen and the window. Opera-
tion, which is without cords or other
controls which could be used or tam-
pered with by occupants, is by means
of a control recessed into the window
casing. Through this recessed knob
slats of the blinds can be tilted to
provide complete light control.

Snap-on Assembly
for Interior Locksets
Sargent & Company has announced
a new three-piece snap-on assembly
for interior locksets in theirAlignaLock
line of residential hardware. Designed
to cut installation time, the inside
knob, rose and back-plate, and the
outside knob and rose are pre-as-
sembled. Non loosening through
screws are pre-set so that units are
merely placed into the latch assembly,
snapped together and tightened-an
operation which the manufacturer
claims should take less than 25 sec-
onds.


A wide variety of paneling material can be utilized for
JULY 1958


-4


Manually-Operated
Aluminum Doors
A counter-balanced, double-folding
aluminum door for commercial and
indutsrial installations has recently
been developed by the Tilt-A-Door
Corporation, of Detroit and West
Palm Beach, to provide virtually hur-
ricane-proof closures for openings up
to 40 feet in width. Called the "Bi-
Fold Door," the new units are entirely
of aluminum, utilizing an aircraft type
of construction in order to combine
strength with lightness. All are man-
ually operated-even up to the 40-
foot width though they may be
motor-operated if remote control is
desired. The large unit has a self-
locking device which is designed to
resist both interior and exterior wind-
pressures up to hurricane force. De-
veloped originally for the aircraft T-
hangar, the wide units are adaptable
for use in garages, factories, ware-
houses, service stations.


Color-copy Process
Full-color renderings of sketches can
now be reproduced in full color at
comparatively low unit costs, accord-
ing to an announcement by the T-
Square Miami Blue Print Co., of
Miami. The process, which requires
three days in the T-Square company's
plant, is a photographic one which is
said to retain the true color values
of the original. The reproduction
prints are called "Chromostats" and
are available in varying print sizes
up to 20 by 30 inches.
25







Products and Practice ..

(Continued from Page 25)

Under-floor Wire Service
for Web-Joist Floor System
The advantage of under-floor elec-
trification and the economy of open-
web steel joists are combined in a new
product of the CECO STEEL PRODUCTS
CORPORATION. Designed particularly
for use in low-budget buildings, the
new product is essentially a short-span,
open-web steel joist with the usual
top chord replaced by a hollow duct
which serves both as a structural ele-
ment and an enclosed channel for
carrying electric wires or light cables.
The top chord of the joist can be
tapped at any point where an electric-
al outlet may be needed, thus follow-
ing procedure familiar to builders who
have installed sheet-metal floors car-
rying under-floor electric service lines.
Electrical-Channel joists have the
same structural characteristics as
standard open web joists, and are
available in the same sizes. Thus they
may be placed side-by-side on the
same job or in locations determined
by the electrical requirements of the
building. The reinforced concrete re-
quired for the slab over the E/C
Joists is the same as for standard
open-web steel joist construction. The
E/C Joist floor is said to weigh about
one-half as much as a sheet-metal
steel floor.


The US Plywood Com-
pany has announced a
new prefinished plywood
as part of their interior
paneling line. It is clear
birch, fabricated with V-
grooves to simulate ran-
dom-width planking and
embodying all the color-
ful range of color and
figuring for which birch
is noted. Illustrated is
a typical residential in-
stallation of the new
paneling unts.

Flexible Tubing Insulation
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. has
announced availability of a new flex-
ible tubing insulation made of
foamed plastic material and designed
for installation on liquid cooling and
heating lines to prevent condensation.
The product, identified as O-C Flex-
ible Tubing Insulation, is primarily
for use on short run-out lines to air-
conditioning equipment in commer-
cial buildings. The product is supplied
in six-foot sections and wall thick-
nesses of /8, 1/2 and 4 inches. Sizes
are 3-inch I.D. to 3-inches I.P.S.
They are supplied in one piece for
slipping over tubing. But for existing
pipe runs sections can be slit and
snapped on the pipe.


Emergency Power Plants
Three new emergency generating
plants have been announced by D.
W. Onan & Sons, Inc., to meet the
increasing need for auxiliary power
in institutional and industrial build-
ings where standby power facilities
are necessary. The new units are com-
plete generating plants with gasoline
engine, alternator, exciter and control
panel assembled into a single compact
unit. Rated capacities are 100KW,
125KW and 150KW. The engine is
direct-connected to the generator in
each model; and stable generating
conditions are said to be established
within two seconds following any
sudden change in load.


DuPont Plaza Selects McKinley Products!
The beautiful new DuPont Plaza Center, Miami, Florida, chose McKinley Ventilated Sun Cornices for pro.
section against sun's glare and heat, and for attractive appearance.
Architects: Frank A. Shuflin, AIA: John E. Petersen, AIA. -' For details, con-
S- "tact your Mc-
'' Kinley Represent-
"Ln ative-seee


engineered and manufactured by the 0. .M cK I N LEY co., inc.
Indianapolis 5, Indiana

LOCAL McKINLEY REPRESENTATION: CLEARWATER, PHONE 35-7094
26


... and other metal products

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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JULY 1958

































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Products and Practice..

(Continued from Page 27)

Sheet-mounting for Tile
To make installation of ceramic
wall tile faster and easier-thus less
costly-the Cambridge Tile Manu-
facturing Company has developed a
mesh backing on which 12 41x44-
inch tiles are mounted. The 12-tile
sheets, designated by the trade name
"Set-fast" are available in the 16 most
popular glazes of the manufacturer's
Suntile line.
The mesh backing speeds installa-
tion by adjusting to minor surface
imperfections and remains imbedded
in the mortar or adhesive like ribs
of reinforced concrete, according to
the manufacturer. Also, it is claimed
that the concealed mesh unifies the
tiles and provides an improved tile-
to-wall bond as an increased safety
factor for vibration, structural shifts
and temperature changes. Tiles are
precisely spaced for grouting and re-
quire no soaking.

"Shoji" Folding Doors
Newest item in the Tropix-Weve
line of Slide-A-Fold doors is the
"Shoji" illustrated below. Made of
redwood and designed, like other Tro-
pix-Weve models, to operate along an
overhead aluminum track, the new
design is finished in black lacquer.
Panels are white, angel-hair fiberglas,
although any type or color of plastic
laminate may be used. Door sections
are 9-inches wide, and heights fit all
standard openings.


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ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Alpha Studios Inc. .. 28
American Olean Tiles
of Miami, Inc . 8
Atlas Enameling Co. Inc. 14
Blumcraft of Pittsburg . 19
Briggs Mfg. Co .. 13
Coquina Coral Inc. . . 7
A. R. Cogswell . . 28
George Doro Fixture Co. . 22
Dunan Brick Yards 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 30
Florida Foundry & Pattern
Works . . 30
Florida Home Heating
Institute . . 32
Florida Portland Cement Co. 1
Florida Power & Light . 27
Florida Steel Corporation 6
George C. Griffin . 4
Hamilton Plywood 15
0. O. McKinley Co. Inc. . 25
Matthiessin & Hegler Zinc Co. 24
Miami Window Corp 4th cover
Mr. Fosters' Store . 29
Perlite . . 5
Portland Cement Association 20
Prescolite Mfg. Co . .. 28
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 3
Unit Structures, Inc.. 23
F. Graham Williams .31

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Foam Rubber Tackboard
Development of a new tackboard
material with foam rubber cushioning
for easy tack removal has been an-
nounced by the ARMSTRONG CORK
COMPANY. Made of a patented syn-
thetic rubber and fiber composition,
the material is highly resilient and has
three times the sound-absorbing effi-
ciency of conventional tackboards, ac-
cording to test by the manufacturer
over a range of 250 to 2000 cycles per
second. The new material is also un-
usually flexible, making it easy to in-
stall and eliminating the possibility
of its cracking or breaking or uneven
or curved surfaces. It can be mounted
with cement to any solid wall or to a
rigid backing for a panel installation.
Called "CUSHION-EZE" the new
tackboard material is available in
three colors, Coppertone Tan, Drift-
wood Gray and Mint Green and is
manufactured in continuous rolls of
48 and 72-inch widths.


Report from Tallahassee...
(Continued from Page 18)
edly place more emphasis on prelim-
inary planning activities toward the
end of developing improved facilities
more adequate to expanding educa-
tional needs. Checking of finished
plans will also be more rigid probably
-the object being to make certain
that all educational as well as archi-
tectural and structural requirements
have been met. Thus it seems prob-
able that the "walk-through" check-
ing now given most plans will be
replaced by a much more thorough
examination on the basis of education,
insurance and maintenance factors as
well as those relating primarily to
design and construction.
During these interviews at Talla-
hassee both Mr. Bailey and Dr. Mc-
Guffey voiced their desire to improve
not only the operation of their office,
but also its contact with Florida's
educators and practicing architects
in terms of higher educational stand-
ards, better planning and design tech-
niques and more efficient routines
relative to technical procedures. Such
objectives are undeniably good; and
with a full measure of cooperation on
the part of all concerned they could
well be achieved quickly and with
widespread benefits to all.
JULY 1958


OFFICE FURNITURE


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57 Years Of Growth ...
(Continued from Page 12)

viewer at the beginning of the display.
Huge aerial photographs were placed
and spotlighted showing not only the
fine waterfront improvements but the
desperate urban and suburban sprawl
yet to be adequately coped with. It
was at this point that, as architects,
we attempted to focus on city plan-
ning as a logical extension of the
thinking evident in the design of the
individual buildings. From comments
at the exhibit it was quite evident
that people react to the condition of
their environment if it is presented
to them in the proper perspective.
Models and photographs of the
waterfront rehabilitation program were
part of this display, including the re-
cently completed Duval County
Courthouse, proposed 15-story city
hall, waterfront parking facilities, pro-
posed civic auditorium, the proposed
Atlantic Coast Line Home Office
skyscraper, and the 13,000 seat sports
coliseum.


o. A main feature of this portion of
orida the exhibit looking into future devel-
-8420
FOLDER. opment of the waterfront across the
river from the present series of pro-
jects, was a downtown riverfront park,
designed by students in the College of
ho Architecture and Fine Arts at the
S University of Florida. This student
problem was sponsored, written, and
coordinated by the Jacksonville Chap-
of ter. Architect ROBERT BOARDMAN
da acted as liaison between the chapter
re and the Junior class in design under
he Professor JOHN L. R. GRAND. The
A intent of the student participation
a. was to stimulate local thinking about
the riverfront park development in an
imaginative manner. Included in the
program requirements was a helioport,
memorial fountain, exhibition build-
ing with restaurant, dockage for water
taxis, concert shell, and in general,
S a well-organized green area and park-
ing.


The final impact of the exhibit was
en enlarged photograph of a rocket
launching with the caption: "The fu-
ture is what we make it." This, we
hoped, would be thought-provoking.
At the end of the exhibit, signs
led to the rear patio of the museum
where refreshments were served by
the newly-formed Ladies' Auxiliary
of the Chapter. This event was of
(Continued on facing page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


WHEN YOU CHANGE ADDRESSES...

It is essential that your mailing address be correct in the files of those wl
serve you. This is particularly important if you are a registered architect-
for it affects your proper listing in the roster of registered architects issue
annually by the Florida State Board of Architecture. It also affects listings
your AIA Chapter and the mailing files of the FAA and The Florii
Architect . So if you change your home or office address, be su
then to notify the secretaries of the State Board, your Chapter and tl
FAA. And be sure to file your new address in the office of the FA
Executive Director, Suite 302, Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 43, Florid


RICHEY ELEMENTARY SCHO
ERECTED 1958
BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
k 51, M, C ABE ( H A I R '5A 'I
EDCAR H.KIRKLAND kl(T, CHAIRMAN
MkRGARETTA C.W11 T 11 f MBF -
ARL E. HATCHER
HAS. F. IOUCHION J, NBER
SUPERINTENDI: NT OF PUBLK INSTRUCT
CHI-1114R W, I %) LOR, J,,
ATTORNEY PRIM I PAL
(EORGE C.DAY10% i lZU) K. MARC H11,
ARCHITLCTS & LNGINIAIRS
PULILARA. BO1', I IAIION
CONTRACTOR
ROY A-ICIOMPSON k






extreme importance, for the reception
was the first official venture of the
organization since its inception several
weeks prior. The presence and help
of the ladies made the exhibit a com-
plete success. Those responsible for
the creation of the exhibit were TAY-
LOR HARDWICK, BOB BOARDMAN, JIM
MEEHAN, GEORGE FISHER, BILL MAR-
SHALL, STAN GORDON, CALEB KELLY,
DICK GOODMAN, LAMAR DRAKE, and
PHIL KAFKA, photographer. To all of
these architects and to those whose
work was exhibited goes credit for
furthering the cause of good design
and creative thinking in a particular
community.
Action by architects, when the op-
portunity presents itself, is far more
valuable than lament for their lost
positions as leaders in the community.
Architects are not regarded as leaders
in their communities as a whole be-
cause, quite frankly, that leadership
has not been available-or if available,
has not been offered in a sincere
manner. We cannot long continue to
expect public relations committees to
build up prestige unless that prestige
has roots which are realistic. Perhaps
if we gave up one hour of watching
television each week and reflected a
bit on some of the intangibles in life,
we would again begin to be received
as leaders. Perhaps what FRANK LLOYD
WRIGHT has said about the A.I.A
is quite in order. Perhaps we think
too much about architects and not
enough about architecture.
One thing is certain. We can never
expect much in the way of inspired
architecture if there is no underlying
basic philosophy-basic belief in prin-
ciple which can be passed on to the
people in their total environment.
There can be no leader who is re-
spected in a community unless he
knows and understands and is known
and understood. Architects enjoy a
gift that is somewhat ironic in its
implications. Being sensitive to what
delights or fails to delight the eye,
the architect must live with the medi-
ocre virtually engulfing him, knowing
that perhaps he could improve the
situation if only given the chance. The
exhibit in Jacksonville has shown that
the public, the press, the community
as a whole is interested in who archi-
tects are and what they can do. It
only remains for the architects to
express their deep convictions in the
most convincing manner.
JULY 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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