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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Committee named for FAA's 44th...
 Message from the president
 The business of the conference
 The point of departure
 Duval county court house and...
 Conference sessions touched many...
 Advertisers' index
 News and notes
 The students' column
 Full legislative committee named...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00047
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: May 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00047
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Committee named for FAA's 44th convention
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Message from the president
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The business of the conference
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The point of departure
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Duval county court house and jail
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Conference sessions touched many professional subjects
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
        Page 23
    News and notes
        Page 24
    The students' column
        Page 25
    Full legislative committee named by Pownall
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text






































T frrrrr rrI rrrrr M rr I rr r r rrr r rrr r M 1r rr r
.111i11 ii r TIMiti i r if fr 111 11111 1i1ti ti
L1 1111 il t lr ll 11 l [[tlIIIli ll 11111 t IIIII





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Plans Are


On the Way...


As this year's Convention Hosts the
Mid-Florida Chapter is out to break
all records! Plans are now forming
about a theme with national signifi-
cance promising a program of nation-
al interest. . .You will see it all
unfold in three action-packed days
at Florida's newest, most complete
ocean-side convention headquarters
- the Deauville Hotel.


FAA CONVENTION
)EAUVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH


I F 0 11. ]-i I 11.1 IF










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74e




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS




ln 74is Is ue---

Committee Named for FAA's 44th Convention . . . . . 4
Message from The President . . . . . . . . 6
By H. Samuel Kruse
The Business of The Conference . . . . . . . . 9
The Point of Departure . . . . . . . . .. 11
Summary address by Philip H. Hiss
Duval County Court House and Jail . . . . . . .. 15
Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Architects and Engineers
Conference Sessions Touched Many Professional Subjects . . .. 20


Advertisers' Index . . . . .
News and Notes ..... ........
The Students' Column . . . . .
By Craig W. Lindelow
Full Legislative Committee Named by Pownall.


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 302 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami 32.

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
This air view of the recently dedicated Duval County Court House and Jail,
suggests how downtown Jacksonville's river front will shortly appear. The
Court House is the first project to be completed in a nihe-block re-develop-
ment program which has already done away with a waterfront industrial slum
and will ultimately provide Jacksonville with a new city hall, municipal audi-
torium and marina.


. 22
. . . 24
. 25


. 26


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished monthly at Rm. 302 Dupont Plaza Cen-
ter, Miami 32, Florida; telephone FR 1-8331.
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Advertising representative is Ray Rickles
& Company, Chamber of Commerce Building,
Miami, FRanklin 1-0376.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


VOLUME 8

NUMBER 5 1958
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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Committee Named For


FAA'S 44th Convention


JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, President of
the Mid-Florida Chapter which will
serve as hosts to the 44th Annual
Convention, has named seven mem-
bers of the Chapter to administer
committee work incident to the Con-
vention. The Host Chapter president
has himself shouldered the responsi-
bility for the Convention program.
For Hospitality he named GEORGE A.
TUTTLE, JR., and RALPH P. LOVE-
LOCK; for Entertainment, JOSEPH CAR-
LISLE; for Professional Exhibits,
GEORGE BAGLEY (architects' work)
and JOHN B. LANGLEY (students'
work); and for Awards and Prizes,
THEODORE G. ANDREW. JOHN T.
HART, Chapter treasurer, will be in
charge of the Convention's Registra-
tion Desk. The Ladies' Program will
be in charge of MRS. ANN R. SHIFALO,
Winter Park, and MRS. ALMA M.
PARISH, St. Petersburg, as co-chair-
men. Mrs. Shifalo is president of
the Mid-Florida Auxiliary and Mrs.
Parish heads the Auxiliary of the
Florida Central Chapter. Arrange-
ments for the Building Products Ex-
hibit are being handled through the
office of the FAA's Executive Di-
rector.
Theme selected for this year's Con-
vention is "Opportunity in An Ex-
panding Era." It was chosen to sug-
gest the vastly increased scope of pos-
sibility which will come into being
as the new age of atomic power and
space conquest progressively develops.
Florida ranks now with Illinois as
the site of one of the two most im-
portant and far-reaching events of
our time. Chicago was the home of
the first atomic reactor; and the rock-
et-launching of a space sattelite at
Cape Canaveral blasted old horizons
into oblivion and signalled the start
of another now phase of our world
and life.
These tremendous events have led
us to the very threshold of a new and
expanding era of opportunity for
completely new accomplishments. In
what ways and to what extent must
architects adjust their thinking and
professional activities to realize such


Joseph M. Shifalo


opportunities? A search for some an-
swers to that question will be the pur-
pose and substance of the 1958 FAA
Convention program.
All concerned with the develop-
ment of that program are determined
to make it as practical and as down-
to-earth as possible-so that every
conventioneer can profit by some
facet of information of specific value
to his own professional situation.
Much of this will be available from
three "Professional Workshop" ses-
sions at which the profession's top-
most figures will contribute practical
advice gleaned from their own spe-
cial experiences.
One of the Workshop sessions will
deal with the ways in which architects
can meet-and are right now meeting
-the competitive challenge of the
"package-dealer." Another will be
concerned with tested methods of
planning for office growth and devel-
opment. A third will explore the
practical pros and cons of the indivi-
dual practice as opposed to the op-
eration of a group organization. Ses-
sions are being planned to stimulate
and encourage audience participation;
and the subject matter of each will
emphasize its adaptability to the solu-
tion of professional problems peculiar
to the practice of architecture in our
State.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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MAY, 1958 5









Message from

The President

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA



At a recent conclave of architects, with similar units, in this way achieves
I was disturbed to discover that some desired goals.
members of our profession think that I don't mean to say that no indi-
membership in the FAA is the price viduals are capable through fame,
a Florida architect must pay for the fortune and sheer personal magne-
prestige gained from the privilege of tism, to make themselves heard and
placing the initials "AIA" after his to sway the majority to their cause.
name. Architects who espouse such These individuals are very rare. Us-
cynicism of his professional organiza- ually the voice of prestige is the
tions, just have not done any serious voice of prestige because a society,
thinking about their profession, nor or association, or party, or union has
of their places in Society, and this I established that prestige. Through or-
found to be true, for after a five ganization, education can be conduct-
minute chat over a martini or two, ed, and through education the major-
the expressors of the cynical point ity opinion won.
of view were convinced that mem- The architectural profession is
bership in the FAA was of even more small in numbers when compared
value than the initials "AIA" after with other professions and interests,
their names, and well worth the small yet in social development this group
demand of their TnT, Time 'nd influences the shape of history to a
Treasure. greater extent than the general pub-
This discussion was among Cor- lic is aware. A healthy, effective
porate Members, who, at the start organization of architects is a means
of our chat, believed that the dues of establishing a healthy and effective
paid was the price of the privilege, profession for the proper exercise of
privilege to identify themselves among influence for a better social develop-
the elite of the profession by placing ment. In the United States, that sole
a symbol behind their names."What," organization for architects is The
I asked myself, feeling the olive in American Institute of Architects and
my stomach roll with misgivings, "do in Florida, The Florida Association
the Associate Members think their of Architects.
dues are for?" Certainly not for ini- You architects become members
tials. I wonder if they know? of this organization to create the
Just as a precautionary measure, organization, you pay dues to make
it seems appropriate that I explain the organization work.
how the Associate Member's dues to The Associate, being a non-reg-
the FAA work for him. istered member of the profession,
In our present complex society, might feel apart from, rather than
governed by the will of the majority, a part of this glorious undertaking.
the voice of the individual is heard He draws lines or writes specs for
only through the snowballing of the wages, for the time being anyway,
individual with an ever increasing and the fifteen bucks dues could buy
number of adherents until the small him a pair of blue suede shoes. Is
voice of the individual is amplified membership in FAA worth a pair
to a roar that demands to be heard. of shoes? Yes, brother, yes! -and
The individual, working in unison more too!
with like-minded individuals, form a I'll just jot down a few of the
working unit, which in turn works things FA has done and let you


decide for yourself, the value.
1. At the State Legislature, a bill
was proposed to have a state agency
prepare stock plans for schools to be
given free to the various school
boards, along with free supervision.
When the FAA representative ex-
plained to the proponent the results
of such a bill, the bill was not intro-
duced. The FAA dues made it pos-
sible to have an informal representa-
tive at the Legislature to discover the
proposed bill, seek out and dissuade
the proponent.
2. At the same Legislature, a bill
was introduced concerning sales tax.
In the list of activities exempted
from payment of sales tax, a comma
was missing in the series so that the
bill read, "professional insurance," in-
stead of "professional, insurance."
The FAA representative discovered
the missing comma and professions
do not have to pay sales tax.
3. When seemingly astute reporters
and publications made unfounded
statements concerning school archi-
tecture in the United States, causing
widespread confusion in the minds
of laymen, our President Chatelain,
in a speech, put thinking back on
the main track. Mr. Chatelain's
speech was published in FAA's The
Florida Architect and copies of the
issue sent to all the school boards
of Florida. Your dues paid for this.
Tell me, Associate Member, would
you still be working if your office had
no school work? How much would
be left for bonuses after the cost of
collecting sales tax was added to the
office overhead and how many jobs
would "go ahead" with sales tax
added to the clients' bills? What
would happen to the profession and
your job, if misinformed propaganda
discredits architects and no one
answers? And when you become a
registered architect and take your
place at the top, don't you want your
professional organization a strong,
representative group, able to protect
you from attack and silly errors, give
you an opportunity to trade ideas
and experiences among your kind,
and to amplify your voice for others
to heed?
I think I know your answers. But
it does take the TnT of all of us.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























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A4 Reportt s 4ctan---


The Business of The Conference


The organizational purpose of the
Seventh Annual Conference of the
AIA's South Atlantic Region was
called to order by Regional Director
SANFORD W. COIN, FAIA, at 3:30
p.m. Friday afternoon, April 18, 1958.
Though attended by a considerable
number of interested observers, the
real business of the Conference was
conducted by delegates of each of the
Region's 15 Chapters. Those attend-
ing from Florida were: Broward
County (4 votes), ROBERT E. HALL;
Daytona Beach (2 votes), FRANCIS R.
WALTON; Florida Central (6 votes),
ROBERT H. LEVISON; Florida North (3
votes), JOHN L. R. GRAND; Florida
North Central (2 votes), DAVID W.
POTTER; Florida North West (1
vote), HUGH J. LEITCH; Florida South
(9 votes), Miss MARION I. MANLEY;
Jacksonville (6 votes), WALTER B.
SCHULTZ; Mid-Florida (2 votes),
JAMES E. WINDHAM, III, and Palm
Beach (5 votes), JEFFERSON N.
POWELL.
Representation from other Regional
Chapters was: Georgia (13 votes),
MRS. ELLAMAE E. LEAGUE; South
Georgia (3 votes), RALPH S. THOMAS;
North Carolina (13 votes), WILLIAM
R. JAMES, JR. and South Carolina (9
votes), JOHN M. MITCHELL, JR., The
Augusta Chapter was not represented;
and some of the delegates present
were substitutions for those named by
their Chapter originally as published
in the April, 1958 issue of The Flor-
ida Architect. Each, however, was
officially recognized by Director Goin
and listed as a qualified Chapter rep-
resentative by Regional Council Sec-
retary SIDNEY R. WILKINSON.
After a reading and Council ap-
proval of the report of the Secretary
relative to the Council's August 3,
1957, meeting and the report of
Council Treasurer JOHN J. R. GRAND
- excluding the financial statement
of the current Conference operation
- Council Chairman Goin explained
the vacancies to be filled on the Reg-
ional Judicial Board. ALBERT SIMONS,
FAIA (South Carolina), still has one
MAY, 1958


year of a three-year term to serve.
For a two-year term the Council
unanimously approved the nomina-
tion (by Mrs. Ellamae League) of
DAVID H. BODIN of the Georgia Chap-
ter; and the remaining three-year term
vacancy was filled by the nomination
of THOMAS LARRICK of Florida North
(by Robert E. Hall). Mr. Larrick
has already served one year on the
Committee, having been appointed
last year to fill the vacancy caused
by the death of J. WARREN ARMIS-
TEAD, JR., FAIA.
Chairman Goin then reported that
the Council's August 3, 1957, author-
ization to incorporate had been re-
viewed by legal counsel who advised
against the proposal. Reason was
that the Council is a duly authorized
sub-division of an organization (the
AIA) which is already incorporated.
A resolution was then introduced
by WILLIAM R. JAMES, JR., of North
Carolina, relative to the establishment
of new AIA Regions as follows:
WHEREAS, The American Insti-
tute of Architects has grown to a
point at which a new, forward and
decisive step toward a wider diversi-
fication of active representation on the
Institute Board is urgently needed;
and
WHEREAS, direct representation
on the Board from each state which
has a strong, effective statewide orga-
nization will have the advantage of
providing the Institute with a more
sensitive and direct contact with
chapter groups welded into regions
through a natural and political com-
munity of interests; and
WHEREAS, there will thus accrue
to the Institute the added strength
of a wider diversity of counsel and
experience to guide decisions of pro-
f ssional and administrative policy;
and
WHERAS, both action and re-
action will be facilitated by such a
step and AIA programs will be enor-
mously buttressed through shorter,
therefore more efficient channels of
authority; ind


WHEREAS, it is imperative that
action be taken to eliminate the
present expensive and inefficient dup-
lication of programs, meetings, and
functions which exist in states with
a strong statewide organization and
which at the same time are a part
of a larger region, such as the current
situation in Florida; and
WHEREAS, the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects, AIA, has peti-
tioned the Institute to take appro-
priate action as soon as reasonably
possible to establish the State of
Florida as an AIA District; and
WHEREAS, The Florida Associa-
tion of Architects, AIA, is a strong,
effective statewide organization which
has distinguished itself through the
years by the completeness of its serv-
ice to its members and the citizens
of the State, by its support of AIA
expansion through formation of new,
active chapters, by the establishment
of a well-staffed central office with
a full time Executive Director, by the
publication of a monthly magazine,
The Florida Architect;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, that the South Atlantic
District, AIA, in conference assembled
this 18th day of April, 1958, does
hereby petition the American Insti-
tute of Architects to take appropriate
action as soon as reasonably possible
to expand the Board of Directors of
the Institute to include direct repre-
sentation thereon from each state of
the United States which has a strong,
effective statewide organization; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the petition of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects to be established
as a District of the American Institute
of Architects is hereby strongly en-
dorsed and supported.
James moved the adoption of this
resolution; and his motion was sec-
onded by JOHN M. MITCHELL, JR.,
of South Carolina. There was some
discussion of the proposal, both by
Chapter delegates and by observers
(Continued on Page 27)








































FARMS THAT "GROW" CONCRETE

TO BUILD A STRONGER AMERICA


Two of the strangest farms in America "grow" con-
crete in northern Illinois and central Georgia. They
are the Portland Cement Association experimental
farms, where scientists study the effects of weathering
on concrete in northern and southern climates.

"Growing" here are better pavements for defense
highways, stronger runways to resist the impact of
huge commercial and military planes and the terrific
heat of jets, walls with greater resistance to the
elements for factories, schools, hospitals, homes,
hangars, warehouses, stores and public buildings.

"Plantings" made on farms, starting in 1940, con-
sist of rows of concrete slabs, posts and boxes which
simulate pavements, structural columns and walls.
Specimens contain different proportions and com-
binations of materials used in making concrete.


Research like this is a continuing and expanding
activity of the Portland Cement Association. Out of
this research comes technical information on the best
concrete mixtures and the best construction practices
for building structures exposed to all conditions of
service and weather.

Such information is made public immediately and
freely through the Association's field engineering
service and its educational and promotional program
which is made possible by the voluntary financial
support of its 68 member companies.

Thus the knowledge gained in the laboratory and
in field tests can be used quickly by architects, engi-
neers and contractors in designing and building more
durable and lower-annual-cost facilities needed for
our general economy and the defense program.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 NORTH MAIN STREET, ORLANDO, FLORIDA
A notional organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete through scientific research and engineering field work
10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







The Point of Departure...


By PHILIP H. HISS


The difficult assignment of summarizing the overall content of
the Regional Conference and attempting some conclusion rela-
tive to its significance was handled with both candor and con-
fidence at the wind-up luncheon on Saturday, April 19. Here
is the substance of the Conference Summary as presented by
Mr. Philip H. Hiss, Chairman of the Sarasota County Board of
Public Instruction. Though not an architect, Mr. Hiss has enjoyed
a life-long interest in architecture and to a remarkable degree
understands it both as an art and as a profession. With a varied
background as explorer, photographer, designer, builder, writer,
State Department official and most recently an improvement-
minded servant of his community, Mr. Hiss voiced observations
and opinions which are as well directed to the architectural
profession as a whole as they were cogent to the immediate
subject of his talk.


I expect you could say that I am
an idealist and a perfectionist by
nature, but my natural desire to
believe in the perfectability of man-
architects included has been con-
siderably tempered over the years by
practical experience in such diverse
fields as art, architecture, politics,
business, and a good many others.
An idealist is a person who learns
everything the hard way, and this
description fits me exactly. But per-
haps this is the only way anyone
really ever learns anything. At least
it has equipped me with a number
of opinions which I will defend to
the death.
It also has taught me patience.
And at the risk of disappointing the
romanticists who would like to believe
that everything can be solved by
either the sword or the pen, I sug-
gest that patience may be of more
value than genius in solving the
multitudinous problems posed by
"total environment." I do not mean
the resigned patience of the long-
suffering, but a positive quality based
on a determination to understand the
other person's point of view. The
ways of democracy may at times
appear obscure and unwieldy, and
the temptation to shortcut them can
be great. But no system of govern-
ment holds greater potential if it
is properly understood and properly
used.
What I am saying--what has
been said many times during this
conference is this: Architects are
MAY, 1958


not going to solve all the problems
of the world by themselves. And it
may be well to keep in mind that
where the layman (in the field of
architecture) may seem slow in under-
standing some ideas that appear basic
to one with this specialized training,
the shoe often is on the other foot
when it comes to an understanding of
economics, politics, or related sub-
jects equally important to the goal
of civic betterment.
Mr. Richard Neutra expressed him-
self quite forcefully on this subject
when he said, "We (architects)
should understand much more about
human motivation and the effects of
environment. If I am to design a
cage for a polar bear, I must really
understand polar bears, or it will not
be successful."
This is the sort of statement most
laymen distrust, because they have a
feeling it is made to impress them
or confuse them. But Mr. Neutra
is really saying that an architect must
be much more than a student of
architecture at least as taught in
most architectural schools. He must
be much more than an efficient
arranger of plumbing, heating, air
conditioning and electrical conduits,
or an opportunistic researcher in
Sweets, as he sometimes has been
called. He must be a truly cultured
person of wide interests and far-
ranging knowledge of other subjects.
The architectural and engineering
schools at last are discovering, or
at last are admitting, that too much


specialism defeats its own purpose:
it may pay off immediately in quick
commercial success, but it places un-
reasonable limitations on a person.
Lacking depth and magnitude, he
is able to go only so far.
Another Neutra quote which merits
consideration: "Nobody is allowed to
laugh at clients in our office." This
is something basic. Mr. Neutra ob-
viously did not mean in front of
the client. He made it clear that
he meant while the client's problems
were being discussed in the office.
Most of us have been guilty of vio-
lating this precept at one time or
another. But if real understanding
is to be reached, derision is not the
best way of reaching it. This habit
of mind may well carry over into
the architect-client relationship-and
may encourage a similar reaction on
the part of the client.
A personal experience may serve as
an introduction to some of the prob-
lems that face us. I had been at the
AIA Convention in Washington, and
decided to return to Sarasota by way
of Asheville along the Skyline Drive
and the Blue Ridge Parkway-a glor-
ious stretch of mountain road, almost
unspoiled, which stretches for several
hundred miles along the ridges and
flanks of the mountains of Virginia
and North Carolina as a happy relief
from the crowded parkways and thru-
ways. The day was beautiful, the
traffic was almost non-existent, the
farms in the valleys appeared in
(Continued on Page 12)






The Point of Departure...

(Continued from Page 11)


miniature, the traffic far below held
none of the usual threat of the grind-
ing production lines of Detroit and
the steel mills of Pittsburgh. Then,
precipitantly, the road dropped into
"the man-made slum which is Ashe-
ville."
Perhaps this part of Asheville is
no worse than our own Sarasota slum
area stretching south from Bee Ridge
Road on the Tamiami Trail, or many
other slum areas we can all name in
our own localities. Yet this affront
to all human sensibilities, this assault
on the ears and eyes, this blight on
a naturally beautiful landscape, is the
worse when one has left it if only
for a few hours. We grow accus-
tomed to these things: our only
defense is not to see them.
I used to feel the same shock thirty
years ago in the Amazon jungle when
we would come around a bend in the
river and find a cluster of corrugated
iron shacks in a small clearing like
a sore festering on the green flank
of the river. But one could reflect
that a few months after man deserted
this clearing, the sore would have
healed. No trace would be left of his
passing. Today, for the first time,
man, with his huge earth-moving ma-
chinery, has the power to flatten
mountains or to create them where
they did not hertofore exist and
he has gained the power to destroy
so much natural beauty in the world
that Paradise may never again be
regained.
But man also has the opportunity,
the intellect, and the God-given abil-
ity to create beauty as well as chaos.
He has exercised this creativity mag-
nificently in cities like Venice. Why
then has he allowed himself to stifle
in vast slum areas, especially in this
country?
The problem is terribly complex.
Much is blamed on the automobile;
but what is meant is that we have
not learned to handle the problem
of the automobile, not that cars are
bad as such. I believe the automobile
is only one facet of the problem. As
Mr. Neutra has pointed out, we are
assaulted from the moment of our
birth, with all sorts of external stim-
uli; and the human mechanism has
not been able to adjust to it. Never-


theless, stimulation or more cor-
rectly over-stimulation is a part of
our environment; and though it makes
us ill, we seem unable to do without
it. We indulge in motion for the
sake of motion, sound for the sake
of sound. Recent experiments have
proved that the average person is un-
able to cope for more than a few
hours with a completely monotonous
environment one similar to the ex-
perience in the womb, where there
is no sensation of temperature, sound,
or other outside stimuli. In a very
short time the subject exhibits all the
symptoms of the typical schizophre-
nic. But it is scarcely necessary to
prove that we are overstimulated: the
tremendous sales of tranquillizers
prove that rather conclusively. I won-
der how many of you have experi-
enced, as I have, the rather desperate
sensation that there never was enough
time to really think any problem
through, nor sufficient facts on which
to act and yet that some action
was mandatory. We must find time
to think. Action without thought can
end only in chaos.
We must find time for travel and


study too. How else can we gain
perspective? We must constantly
broaden ourselves. With a little less
personal pride, we can learn a lot
from others.
Overheard at a cocktail party: "Es-
thetics! That's a dirty word." The
speaker went on to explain that
esthetics are merely a matter of opin-
ion . we've all heard that before-
but I would rather not hear it from
an architect. This is pulling the rug
out from under the profession. Archi-
tects are supposed to be trained in
these matters. Too many people in
this country confuse their inalienable
right to an opinion with an imagined
right to have that opinion considered
important. Yet it is possible to study
form, color, space, light and shadow,
and many other things. But the in-
ference is that everyone, regardless of
background and training has an equal
right to have his opinion on esthetics
considered important. This same per-
son probably would not consider him-
self an expert in the field of law; but
I have known many people to think
of themselves as writers merely be-
cause they had learned basic English
in school. Apparently some subjects
appear deceptively easy to the untu-
tored mind. You cannot reduce
esthetics to a formula, which is prob-


Three of the Conference Seminar speakers with William Zimmerman, Program
Chairman, and Sanford W. Goin, FAIA, Regional Director. Left to right are
John T. Egan, Zimmerman, Philip H. Hiss, Douglas Haske!l and Director Goin.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





ably why so many people have trouble
with it.
What specifically can we do about
this? Well, we can travel more in
our own country and abroad and
by this I do not mean that we should
merely put ourselves into motion. We
do enough of that already. We should
read more, and our professional so-
cieties should see that all the im-
portant works and research in other
languages is made available in this
country and translated whenever pos-
sible. We should certainly listen
more to the outstanding people in
our midst.
One more thing: I have always felt
that architectural magazines should
publish more real criticism of archi-
tecture. We have art critics and music
critics and drama critics, but by and
large we have very few critics of
architecture. Most buildings are pho-
tographed only in their most favorable
aspects; little or nothing is said about
the plans that don't work, the curtain
walls that leak, or the materials that
look shabby a few months after these
buildings are completed. Too fre-
quently the building is lifted com-
pletely out of its environment, which
is like quoting out of context. And
the impression often is given that a
building is a success when in reality
it is a dismal failure -albeit with
a few photogenic angles. This is
particularly hard on architectural stu-
dents and copyists. But I suppose
one can argue that the copyists get
what is coming to them. I have heard
most of the arguments as to why
architectural criticism is not more in
evidence, but I believe it would be
of value in educating the public as
well as the architect, and that it
would generate respect for the pro-
fession.
We have heard rather a lot during
this conference about the necessity
to educate the public in the need for
architects to plan our communities.
This is a very real need. I am not
sure that I agree with Mr. Neutra
that cooperative planning is the most
important thing in an architect's
office, since I have a number of reser-
vations about the value of brainstorm-
ing. Neither am I convinced that a
dozen architects together can do a
better job than the individual genius.
But we can agree that cooperation
is necessary between client and archi-
tect, and builder, and lending agency,
MAY, 1958


and the city or county, and very often
the national government. If you have
not read "Building, U. S. A." by the
editors of Architectural Forum, you
would do well to do so. The contents
lists the following person or agencies
concerned with building: the real
estate operator, the lender, the con-
tractor, the labor force, the manu-
facturer, the engineer, the corporate
client, the public, and finally the
architect.
My personal feeling is that the
problem can best be attacked through
the large corporate client-the builder
of thousands of filling stations or hun-
dreds of chain stores, rather than
through the individual homebuilder.
It is virtually a hopeless job to try
to educate every individual, but it
certainly is worthwhile to try to influ-
ence the developer, the merchant-
builder, and those who control mort-
gage money. Recent Congressional
action on billboards is a hopeful sign
and proof that this is not a lost cause.
Huge corporations are hiring top de-
signers to style their products. They
have employed the best architects to
design their offices and research cen-
ters. Perhaps this will mean that the
management and the employees will
eventually move into a well designed
house. Perhaps Detroit some day will
even stop making juke boxes on
wheels!
If I had only one quarrel with con-
ferences, whether they be architec-
tural or other, it would be that people
who already think alike get together
to reinforce their prejudices and in-
crease their intake of martinis and go
away thinking' just as they did when
they came in. They are generally
careful not to hurt one another's feel-
ings or to damage each other's repu-
tation in the eyes of the uninitiated
-the public. What we need is more
intelligent and informed discussion
and not so much "Togetherness"!
And now a question: If you are
interested in "educating" (perhaps
a better word would be "informing")
the public, why isn't the public, more
particularly that segment of the pub-
lic vitally concerned with government
and finance, invited to participate?
What we should have is the bankers,
and the brokers, and the builders,
and the government officials, and
everyone else who is in a position
to influence the growth of the com-
munity. Sarasota is a pretty enlighted


place, architecturally speaking. But
there are a lot of groups even here
that have a lot to learn from one
another.
Jack Egan has had some things
to say about the influence of gov-
ernment in architecture, and Rex
Anderson discussed the role of the
Federal Government in the highway
program. Some surprise was expressed
that the people didn't speak up when
they had the chance, if they didn't
like what was being done. That's
probably because most bouts with the
Federal Government leave one with
one of two feelings; either that he
has been hit by a steamroller or left
talking to himself. FHA and VA have
had a greater effect on architecture
than almost anything else in recent
years and most of it has been
adverse. So far as government-subsi-
dized urban renewal is concerned,
local or Federal, there may be some
spectacularly successful examples-but
there are also too many which form
the basis for new slums. We do not
have far to look.
Most highway programs have come
advertised as a gift from someone,
and most have been presented on a
take-it-or-leave-it basis. This is enough
to frighten the average citizen who
is not an attorney and feels that he
shouldn't have to hire one to protect
his rights in such cases. Nevertheless,
we nearly had the two parts of Sara-
sota separated by a toll bridge, like it
or not, and the only reason this didn't
transpire was because they couldn't
sell the bonds. I personally have
never found the person who could
explain the plan in detail. Presum-
ably someone knows. But who? The
Federal Government is too remote
and complicated for the average citi-
zen to understand-or so he believes,
and that is the same thing so far as
any practical purposes are concerned.
Admittedly, the public should be bet-
ter informed and should take a more
active interest in affairs that inti-
mately concern it. But the point is
this: Most people feel that they don't
know their way around in government
and that only an attorney or a poli-
tician, can get anywhere with it.
I am convinced of one thing: archi-
tects arc never going to get anywhere
trying to sell themselves with talk.
Someone said yesterday, "We hear
the same speeches every year, but no
(Continued on Page 18)
















































































Detail of brick piers along the waterfront (south)
side of the Court House which buttress the two-
level bridge between the Court House and Jail.
Each contains two brick-sculptured placques, exe-
cuted by Earl LaPan. Facing of the wall above is
white cast stone.
14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Sir !IK

HWW~b~ftP ROOP-11111! I


Ultimately, bulkheading and fill will provide foundations for a park along the waterfront side, shown here.



Duval County Court House




Jacksonville's newest public building is the opening
gun in an all-out re-development battle to replace
waterfront blight with an integrated civic center
program stretching nine blocks along the river.


Architects and Engineers:
Reynolds, Smith
and Hills,
Jacksonville



Contractor:
The Auchter Company
Jacksonville


The newest addition to Jackson-
ville's growing skyline is the first unit
to be completed in a river-front im-
provement program which ultimately
will accomplish a sort of benign revo-
lution for downtown Jacksonville. For
many years much of the central-city
river-front lay corroding in the creep-
ing acid of urban blight. The nine
block area of which the new Duval
County Court House and Jail is the
eastern terminus was a mass of rotting
piers, abandoned, crumbling ware-
houses, rusting trackage -a sore on
the face of civic consciousness and a
shocking introduction to downtown
for all approaching the city's heart
across St. John's River on the south-
bound bridges.
The general condition, unfortun-
ately, is common enough. But Jack-
sonville is .now vigorously on its way


to doing something about it; and the
building shown here is part of a re-
development program which will
shortly accomplish a studied miracle
of transformation. When projects
now under construction or in the final
stages of planning are completed, the
Jacksonville river-front will embody a
new City Hall, a Municipal Auditori-
um, a new office building for the ACL
Railroad, a Municipal Marina, a
waterfront park and a parking lot ac-
commodating 2000 cars.
It would be pleasant to say that all
this is being accomplished in line
with a well-considered, overall city-
planning program. But Jacksonville
does not have such a plan though
this nine-block clean-up might well
prove the spark needed to generate
action toward it. The transformation
(Continued on Page 17)


MAY, 1958


'.~~:-:~ ` .r

: ~;


















































I .... l


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







has been brought about largely by the -
pressure of public opinion, spearhead-
ed by the driving interest of civic
groups including, notably, the
Jacksonville Chapter, AIA and the
all-too-rare foresight of some energetic
and public-spirited city officials. This,
plus the force of the city's growth and
the rock-solid condition of the city's
economy, has done the job. It was
not, of course, done without crossing
the swords of opinion or without
some breathless moments when the
whole project appeared to be rush-
ing headlong down the road of poor
judgment or mired in short-sighted '. F
politics. But the wise heads won; and :.
their pooled efforts have culminated
in what now appears to have been an
integrated effort. In any case, the
whole project is now under way so
firmly that the influence of its near-
future completion is already being felt
along Bay and Market streets, the
most dramatic evidence being the
Sears Roebuck plans for a mammoth,
two-square-block retail outlet on Bay
(Continued on Page 18)





county group showing jail
and the two-level bridge
over Liberty Street con-
necting the second and
third floors with the sher-
iff's office and criminal
court portions of the
Court House. Above, the
Bay Street front of the
Court House from the
west.








Left, Lobby, looking to-
ward Bay Street. Floor is
dark, blue-green Vene-
tian terrazzo, walls are
faced with golden-veined
marble. The map, on the
west wall, is executed in
colored anodized alumi-
num and is one of three
decorative designs in
metal. The east wall con-
tains an inscription in
aluminum letters; and on
the surface facing the
entrance doors is a mural
by Sheldon Bryan, cast
in bronze and symboliz-
'" ing the balance between
liberty and law.
MAY, 1958 1

































County Court House ...
(Continued from Page 17)
Street flanking the Municipal Audito-
rium.
Though bulkheading and filling for
all units of the nine-block renewal
project is now well along, the Duval
County Court House and Jail is the
first structure actually to be built.
Court House and Jail are connected
by a two-level bridge and represent,
with furnishings for each, a total out-
lay of slightly less than $8,250,000.
Minus the equipment, construction
cost was $18.25 per square foot or
a total of $7,036,185 for the 423,700
square feet in the combined struc-
tures.
Though actually two buildings -
requirements of circulation, admin-
istration and functional operation
were the factors which decided both
planning and structural characteristics
- Jail and Court House were treated
architecturally as a unit. Thus, though
they "read" as two structures, they
have been designed to suggest the in-
tegration that the specialized, but
inter-dependent character of each in-
volves. End walls of both buildings
and a portion of the Court House
walls facing the river, are of face
brick. Base courses of both buildings
are of black polished granite, with red
granite introduced at entrances and
at certain other points where archi-
tectural accents were desirable. Other-
18


wise the buildings are faced with cast
stone. Mostly this is white, though
on the Bay Street facade of the Court
House, the spandrels between the sun-
control fins are of dark gray.
In space facilities and equipment
both buildings are about as modernly
complete as research and ingenuity
can make them. The jail portion of
the complete plant is devoted entirely
to security provisions, with the ad-
ministrative functions the sheriff's
department and two criminal court
rooms occupying the east end of the
Court House. This building houses
a total of seven court rooms, with
space for two additional as future
needs may require. Included is a sep-
arate room for the Grand Jury and a
large law library.
The fourth floor contains full fa-
cilities for both Home Demonstration
Agent and the County Agricultural
Agent; and the fifth floor is devoted
entirely to the needs of the Duval
County Board of Public Instruction.
On the sixth is a substantial amount
of unfinished space for future expan-
sion.
Both buildings are completely air-
conditioned. The 1,200-ton system is
the second-largest in the city. They
were built under general contract by
the George D. Auchter Company.
Ground breaking was in October,
1955, and dedication in February of
this year.


Point of Departure . .
(Continued from Page 13)

one does anything. When they do,
the results are fantastic." This has
been demonstrated many times. It is
perfectly possible for one person to
accomplish a very great deal. A group,
such as this can do almost anything.
Specifically, the architect, like every
other professional, should take his
rightful place in the community. He
should not expect to get paid for
everything he does, either in money
or in patronage. If he sits on a plan-
ning or zoning board, it must be clear
to the public that no considerations
of personal profit enter into his de-
cisions. He must demonstrate over
a period of years that he is capable
of designing sound buildings, that are
beautiful to look at and reasonable
in cost. They must be planned as
a part of the community. In short,
he must prove that he is worth his
fee and that he is not the impractical
dreamer he is so often accused of
being.
All of this can be wrapped up
into one word; integrity. Integrity
cannot be demonstrated by words. It
can be recognized only through action.
The profession would do well to police
its own ranks, for there is a very real
danger that those who are in the
business of architecture, as opposed
to the profession of architecture, may
well turn public opinion in the wrong
direction. That the profession is held
in such high esteem in Sarasota speaks
well for it. That Sarasota architects
are held in equal esteem elsewhere
says even more.
I would make a plea for greater
tolerance and understanding among
the diverse groups which will decide
the fate of our cities and change the
face of our country. Name calling will
accomplish nothing. We all need to
educate ourselves and to practice pa-
tience. We must put aside selfish
interests and work together. If this
explosive population increase, which
it is estimated will bring the popu-
lation of our globe to 3,000,000,000
in 1975, is not terminated by an
equally explosive decrease caused by
fission or fusion, we are face to face
with one of the greatest challenges
in the history of mankind. Our re-
sponse will shape the world we live
in for many years to come.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


A typical Circuit Court Room. This is paneled in quartered and plain sliced
walnut. All major rooms in the building are paneled all with American
woods.


















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Conference Seminars Touched


on Many Professional Subjects


An absence of verbal bombshells
and only a comparatively few sputter-
ing fuses marked the seminar and
luncheon sessions of the three-day
Seventh Annual S.A. Regional Con-
ference. The livest fuse was lighted
during the Friday noon meeting when
DOUGLAS HASKELL, editor of Archi-
tectural Forum who had been the
Conference's keynote speaker the pre-
ceding day, delivered an unihibited
comment on the activities of the
Federal Highway Commission now in
the midst of a project which is dam-
aging Sarasota's bayfront in the inter-
ests of improvement. The occasion
was a panel discourse on "Putting the
Highway on the Right Road," mod-
erated by REX ANDERSON, U. S. High-
way Engineer.
Haskell called the Sarasota devel-
opment, a million-dollar circular drive


along Sarasota's waterfront, "a filthy,
dirty crime."
"It's unforgivable and idiotic, cut-
ting off the community from where
five years ago people could go to
the pier and enjoy fishing and the
bay," said the obviously incensed
editor. "This highway is nothing
more than a subsidy for the auto-
mobile makers, cutting off the busi-
ness section from the waterfront. We
are told that common sense can be
had only by special effort and that
the highway program is in the hands
of competent engineers.
"I declare that gorillas, chimpan-
zees, dogs, monkeys and jackasses
could do no worse than they have
done in Sarasota."
Fuel to the fuse was added by
others in the audience. FRANCIS R.
WALTON called the project "murder."


"I have tried to fight such things
and have failed," he declared. "The
State Road Department allocates such
projects, says to a city 'You do it this
way or you get nothing' and if the
city tries to say how it will be done,
nothing is given. It's just plain mur-
der."
And JOHN T. EGAN, former U.S.
Commissioner of Housing, told the
meeting that architects should "get
in there and pitch in and fight" and
to "be objective and force others to
be objective"- though most of his
commentary was an overall defense
of federal and state projects. PAUL
RUDOLPH had already phrased his
comment on the subject during the
morning seminar on "Building New
Communities," of which he was mod-
erator and chief speaker. Most of his
talk had been a discussion with slides
of what was wrong with our modern
communities. Of the Conference
headquarters city he said, "Instead
of destroying the waterfront, Sara-
sota should be made a sort of Italian
Venice, up to date."
But, aside from a few other sharply


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20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





emphatic remarks by Haskell during
his keynote speech and by RICHARD
J. NEUTRA, FAIA, during his panel
discussion of Thursday afternoon on
"Revitalizing the Existing Commun-
ity," Conference sessions were gen-
erally decorous with only desultory
participation from audiences. At the
keynote luncheon Haskell warned that
urban populations are expanding
along with travel so rapidly that open
spaces and greenery areas are faced
with virtual disappearance. He proph-
esied that Florida beaches would van-
ish from public use if care is not
taken by local governments to save
them for community use; and he
cited as one instance the haphazard
growth in the Miami area where most
of the sand has been preempted for
use by guests of the oceanfront hotels.
"Architects must be concerned
with all this," he declared, "but
there's a minimum of time to learn
how to do things. The contest is
now between glory and extermination.
Everything is accelerating except self-
management."
He commented on the forecast by


MILEs L. COI.EAN, FAIA, that the
next decade would see construction
zoom to the $600-billion level and
suggested that in approaching that
level the scope and character of
architecture would necessarily under-
go substantial change with city re-
development now the problem and
"architecture the issue."
"We still have to learn what makes
a city tick," Haskell said with evident
conviction. "Since Bartholomew in-
vented zoning in the twenties, it's
gone to sleep. There's no imagination
being used with it. And auto trans-
portation has changed its application.
We need new patterns, new thinking
on urban development. Gruen's Ft.
Worth project is still only a start;
and the architect is needed more than
ever to develop further progress pat-
terns and to show our people better
ways of life."
He called on architects to give
more than lip service to recognizing
the economic and political problems
which he said "are well known to
bankers and vendors and are the
opening door to beautiful buildings."


He urged more attention to the va-
rious technical backgrounds of archi-
tecture, particularly research, and said
that lack of research and leadership
had been chiefly responsible for the
growth of the reprehensible road-
towns of suburban and rural Amer-
ica. He said also that this "research
thinking" by architects should be
paid for at triple the present rate
of professional compensation which
brought an obvious stir of approval
from his audience.
Haskell was as firm in his declara-
tion that the profession's opportuntiy
is greater than ever as he was that
the progressive blight in cities had
now reached the dimensions of a
social and economic crisis.
"For the next 30 years," declared
the Forum's editor, "our chief con-
cern must be the character and pat-
tern of our cities. The planners
are not providing that concern, so
architects must.
"The U. S. is with you to an
astonishing degree. Not since 1905
has the concern of this country been
(Continued on Page 22)


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MAY, 1958






Conference Subjects ...
(Continued from Page 21)
so much with the future. The despair
of downtown in cities is one cause.
Architects must get busy and develop
the new kind of planning and build-
ing culture that is needed."
Though all four seminars were well
attended, that led by RICHARD J. NEU-
TRA seemed to generate more concrete
suggestions relative to architectural
practice. Neutra approached the sub-
ject "Revitalizing Existing Com-
munities" from a philosophical angle.
"The human being has really not
changed very much in the last 100,000
years," the California architect de-
clared. "He cannot take any more
than he has been designed by nature
to take. So you can't change a town
completely. The 'new' is not auto-
matically good just because it is new.
Old cities, even the booming old
cities, have something which should be
preserved."
The core of the problem, Neutra in-
dicated, was knowing what should be
changed and what should be preserved.
Our lack of knowledge is the basis, he


Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, President of AIA, presenting the Council's awards
of merit for architectural excellence to, left to right, Mark Hampton, Victor
A. Lundy and Edward J. Seibert, all of Florida. James N. Pease, Charlotte,
N. C., right, won an honorable mention . Hampton received his award for
the Galloway store; Lundy for his tourist center at Silver Springs and Seibert for
the Thyne and Swain house. Pease received honorable mention for the Home
Finance Building; and Alfred Browning Parker was also given an honorable
mention for the M. R. Kitchen residence. Mentions were given to F. Carter
Williams, M. S. Smith and T. G. Williams of Raleigh, N. C., for a First Na-
tional Bank drive-in; Edwin T. Reeder Associates of Miami for the Dade
Federal Savings & Loan building; Harry Burns and George Fsher, Jacksonville,
for the Normandy School; Ralph Twitchell and Jack West, associated, of
Sarasota, for the Dennis House; Stefan H. Zachar of Miami for a TV Studio;
and Morris Lapidus, Miami, for the Americana Hotel. Mentions for student
work went to R. C. Goodwin, Thomas Dole and R. J. Skrzytkowski, all of the
University of Florida . Judging was done by Igor B. Polevitzky, FAIA,
Miami, Heyward Singley, FAIA, Columbus, S. C., and William T. Arnett.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~trs ~iic





said, for our present difficulties in
urban re-development. More, and
more exact, knowledge of people and
the cities they form is needed.
"Congestion and confusion are auto-
matic unless we learn first how indi-
viduals and cities go to pot and
then learn how the process can be
prevented," Neutra said. "Growing
up is change, in cities as in people.
The best planning is based on a con-
cept that change is constant. So the
more we understand how things and
events affect people and the cities they
live in, the better able we are to fore-
see and plan for the changes which
will come about."
The panel moderator was emphatic
in his conviction that the situation
calls for greater responsibility and act-
ivity on the part of the architect as a
planner and as a coordinator of the
many factors involved. His attitude
was shared by other members of the
panel.
In commenting on the need for
such new architectural leadership, ED-
WARD N. FEARNEY said,
"Now that we find our cities be-
coming dirty, broken and obsolete, we
must clean them up, mend them and
replace them. But when we build
anew, let's be careful not to build in
the slums."
FRANCIS R. WALTON brought the
discussion to architectural practice.
"Everyone seems to believe that ar-
chitecture is needed by people. Well,
architecture needs people, too. Our
present form of practice may not be
suitable for meeting new requirements
of the future."
He also voiced the opinion that
architects are now paid too little for
services rendered. And he suggested
that an investigation should be made
to find new ways of providing archi-
tectural services as well as new and
better methods of paying for them.
CECIL ALEXANDER, a member of
the Atlanta Citizens' Committee for
Urban Renewal, urged that architects
fight for legislation relative to urban
renewal.
"Architects should be in the front
rank of that fight and play their parts
in original planning," he said. "Do
something to your city before it's done
to you. Let's get out of our ivory
towers and off our drawing boards to
see what is going to be left for us to
design."
MAY, 1958


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23






News & Notes


8th Regional Council to be
at Charleston, So. Carolina
Host of next year's South Atlantic
Regional Council meeting will be the
South Carolina Chapter as a result
of unanimous approval by Council
delegates at the business meeting
Friday, April 18, 1958, at Sarasota.
Offer of the South Carolina Chap-
ter was made through its president,
JAMES MI. MITCHELL, JR. No definite
time was set for the Conference,
though Mitchell indicated the last
of April, 1959, as a probable date
area. Nor was any specific site de-
cided upon, although Charleston was
named as the most probable one.
Both date and site will presumably
be announced after consideration by
the South Carolina Chapter.

AIA's Centennial Stamp Is
Still Available to Collectors
The AIA's Centennial Commem-
orative stamp, issued last year has
been withdrawn from over-the-count-
er general sale. But it still can be
bought through the Philatelic Sales
Agency of the Post Office Depart-
ment. From BRUCE SMITH of St.
Petersburg, who is a stamp collector
as well as an architect, comes the
suggestion that these stamps be used
by architects as long as the supply


lasts. It's a good suggestion, for use
of a special stamp by architects has
value from the public relations angle.
Stamps should be ordered from the
Philatelic Sales Agency, Post Office
Department, Washington 25, D.C.
Cost of the AIA stamp is still face
value, and presumably will remain so
until it becomes rare. The Post Office
charges for handling the stamps on
mail orders-five cents for quantities
to 100, ten cents up to 300 and fif-
teen cents up to 700.

IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, FAIA, a past
president of the FAA, has been
named as a member of the AIA's
1958 Honor Awards Jury.


Harry E. Burns, Jr., Jax,
Cited for Public Service
Recognition of the community in-
tcrest and public service activities of
HARRY E. BURNS, JR., Neptune Beach
architect and member of the Jackson-
ville Chapter, was made recently in
the form of a citation given Burns by
the Jacksonville Beach Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce. The architect's
long record of community service was
the basis of the award.
He is now serving his second term
as Councilman and a short time ago
was named chairman of the Tri-City
Advisory Planning Commission which
he was instrumental in founding.
Burns has also been active in city


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24 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Pleased with results of the 7th Regional Conference were, left to right, John
L. R. Grand, Council Treasurer, Sanford W. Goin, FAIA, Regional Director,
Roland W. Sellew, Chairman of the Conference Committee, and Ernest T .H.
Bowen, II, FAA secretary.


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planning, slum clearance work and
Bov Scout affairs. He has been an
active participant in Jaycee activities
and last year was one of 10 men in
Florida named in the Jaycee's Key
Man Award.

The Students' Column
By CRAIG W. LINDELOW
The Fourth Annual Architectural
Exposition (home show) is rolling
along with wonderful response from
exhibitors. Every year we have grown
and this year is exceptional. This
promises to be an exciting show well
worth a few hours' drive to sec. One
of the features this year will be the
apprentice bricklayers competition
sponsored by the Bricklayers', Masons'
and Plasterers' International Union.
Another distinctive feature and part
of the Exposition program will be
the annual Student AIA sponsored
Awards Luncheon. This will be held
May 3, at the Student Service Cen-
ter. Dates of the Exposition are
May 1 thru 4 from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
During the past month, the faculty
and students had the pleasure of
entertaining three very interesting
personalities: Professor D. A. POLY-
CHRONE, engineer, from Georgia
Tech, JOSEPH SMITH, architect and
delineator from Miami, and Bo Bous-
TEDT, architect, from Sweden.


Myrl Hanes, member of the Florida
North Chapter and a director of the
FAA, was last month elected by the
Gainesville City Commission as Mayor-
Commissioner. The position is filled
by vote of the five members of the
City Commission of which Hanes has
been a member since 1955. He was
reelected in March for a second three-
year term.
MAY, 1958


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Full Legislative Committee
Named by Pownall
Last month JAMES K. POWNALL,
Chairman of the FAA Legislative
Committee named additional mem-
bers of that Committee to provide the
group representation in each major
community throughout the State. Fol-
lowing the custom established last
year, he also named four members-at-
large: FRANKLIN S. BUNCH of Jackson-
ville; SANFORD W. COIN, FAIA, of
Gainesville; RICHARD B. ROGERS, of
Orlando; and RUSSELL T. PANCOAST,
FAIA, of Miami.
The expanded Legislative Commit-
tee now numbers 21, excluding the
four members-at-large. They are, by
AIA Chapters: Jacksonville, J. BROOKS
HAAS, Jacksonville, and F. A. HOL-
LINGSWORTH, St. Augustine; Florida
North, MYRL HANES, Gainesville;
Daytona Beach, EDWIN M. SNEAD,
Ormond Beach, and GOUVERNEUR M.
PEEK, Deland ;Palm Beach, GEORGE
J. VOTAW, West Palm Beach, and
JEFFERSON N. POWELL, Palm Beach;
Mid-Florida, JAMES GAMBLE ROGERS,
Winter Park; Florida North Central,
ALBERT P. WOODARD, Tallahassee;
Florida North West, CARLTON NOB-
LIN and R. DANIEL HART, both of
Pensacola; Florida Central, ANTHONY
L. PULLARA, Tampa, ELLIOTT B.
HADLEY, St. Petersburg, ROBERT H.
LEVISON, Clearwater, THOMAS V. TAL-
LEY, Lakeland, and SIDNEY R. WIL-
KINSON, Sarasota-Bradenton; Florida
South, HERBERT R. SAVAGE, FRANK E.
WATSON and C. ROBERT ABELE, all
of Miami; Broward County, DONALD
H. MOELLER, Hollywood, and ROB-
ERT G. JAHELKA, Ft. Lauderdale.
In naming the Legislative Commit-
tee's expanded membership, Pownall


commented on the make-up and
functions of the FAA group which
he heads.
"It should be borne in mind by
each Chapter," he said, "that the
FAA Legislative Committee is set up
to function only at the State level and
primarily on matters involving the
State Legislature. As now constitut-
ed this committee includes one or
more representatives from each FAA
Chapter selected to provide it with
a broad coverage of interest and co-
operative action as may be needed in
the larger communities in the State.
"Because of the State-level func-
tions of this FAA Committee, its
members are not involved with mat-
ters touching county or town govern-
ment. For this reason each Chapter
should probably have a local political
action committee to deal with prob-
lems special to its area or commun-
ity."

Correction, please.
Two errors which sneaked into the
April issue should be set right. One
was in reference to the design of the
model house in the Broward County
Chapter display at the Broward Build-
ing Exposition. The design was not
developed in the office of MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, as noted on page 6, but
was a cooperative effort on the part
of the Chapter's booth committee.
The other was designation of ROB-
ERT H. LEVISON, on page 19, as presi-
dent of the Florida South Chapter.
He is, of course, president of the Flor-
ida Central Chapter; IRVIN S. KOR-
ACH is president of Florida South. We
are glad to correct these errors and
tender apologies for them to all con-
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Business ...
(Continued from Page 9)
on the floor, through invitation of
the Regional Director. As a result,
a substitute motion was offered to
the effect that ". . the South
Atlantic Regional Council endorses
the petition . that Florida become
a region." Reference was to the pe-
tition authorized by the FAA at its
43rd Annual Convention last year
(see October and November, 1957
F/A) and presented by Regional Di-
rector Coin to the AIA Board of
Directors at that body's November,
1957, meeting at Phoenix, Arizona.
The substitute motion was offered
by Mitchell of South Carolina and
was passed unanimously. Linked
with it was a request that Regional
Director Coin bring to the attention
of the AIA Board, for that body's
information and careful consideration
the original resolution presented by
James.
Another resolution by Miss MA-
RION I. MANLEY also passed unani-
mously -concerned an invitation to
the Institute to hold its 1962, 1963
or 1964 National Convention "in the
area of the South Atlantic Region."
In like manner the Council adopted
a resolution proposed by HUGH J.
LEITCH, thanking the Florida Central
Chapter and all others concerned for
their successful development of the
Conference program.
Another discussion by delegates
and floor observers centered on the
apparent policy of the Federal High-
ways Commission to disregard factors
of local planning and control. This
culminated in a motion by FRANCIS
R. WALTON that the Regional Di-
rector present to the AIA Board for
consideration and appropriate action,
the Council's recommendation that
". .the Bureau of Federal High-
ways establish a policy that accredited
professional planners be required on
all Federal Highway Programs." Pas-
sage of the motion was unanimous.
Final business involved approval of
the Council's budget by member
Chapters. By unanimous action on
a motion presented by Mitchell of
South Carolina, presentation of the
Council's budget by the Treasurer
and its approval by Chapters can now
be conducted via mail correspondence,
thus making a special meeting of the
Council for this purpose unnecessary.
MAY, 1958


JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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weather.



SBut thousands of "home folks" and visitors suffered un-
necessary discomfort and even illness last winter because
of makeshift, inadequate heating in houses and other
buildings not equipped with built-in systems of sufficient
capacity.


Repeated surveys prove that the most satisfactory solution to
Florida's heating problem is small space-saving oil or gas equip-
ment permanently installed out of the way or completely out of
sight. "Florida furnaces" of this type, large enough to circu-
late adequate volumes of warm air to every room of the house FL R WALL
or building, will . W L
1. Keep homes comfortable during cold snaps.
2. Induce tourists in apartments, hotels and motels to
stay in Florida longer.
3. Increase the value and saleability of new homes.
This summer, let's finish the job of assuring indoor comfort
during Florida's "cold snap" weather! By including oil or gas ... ......
"Florida furnaces" in every plan, you will serve your clients Models also available for Windows, Attics,
better . make a major contribution to the State's overall Utility Rooms
economy and health.




FLORIDA HOME U.NS U HEATING INSTITUTE

1827 S.W. 8th STREET, MIAMI
28 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT























Elementos Ornamentales....
That's the name of the really beautiful grille tile we import from the Caribbean.
They're of hard-burned red shale, with the occasional kiln marks and slight color
variations which make for just the right amount of texture in the finished wall.
The one used in the Miami building shown above is one of several patterns made
in Panama. Another series of patterns somewhat lighter in color and more
delicate in scale is imported from Venezuela ..


Im


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INCORPORATED
Phone TU 7-1525 MIAMI, FLORIDA




















































Remember this M-operator is guaranteed for the life of the window.

Fenestration is a powerful element of architectural design; and Miami Window products provide the
completely versatile means for solving fenestration problems in any type of building. From a cottage
to a cathedral they assure high, economical performance based on efficient engineering and quality-
controlled production.

SMiami Windows are in world-wide use to meet every fenestration need. Ask for details. ; _k .

miacmi window corporation
P.O. BOX 877, INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI 48, FLORIDA