<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Proffessional service story told...
 Lien law to be subject of industry...
 A new "FIRST" opens in Miami
 Message from the president
 Five AIA chapters are regional...
 Home on a Georgia hill
 Cottage with a catenary
 Program -- Seventh annual SA regional...
 The people who make the progra...
 The building products exhibit
 Committees for conference were...
 The students' column
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00046
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00046
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Proffessional service story told by Broward county
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Lien law to be subject of industry conference
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A new "FIRST" opens in Miami
        Page 9
    Message from the president
        Page 10
    Five AIA chapters are regional neighbors
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Home on a Georgia hill
        Page 13
    Cottage with a catenary
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Program -- Seventh annual SA regional conference
        Page 16
    The people who make the program
        Page 17
    The building products exhibit
        Page 18
    Committees for conference were regional in scope
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The students' column
        Page 30
    Advertisers' index
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text


April, 1958








OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


m Regional Conference Program Issue










WOODCO E-ZEE-LOC, WOODCO E-ZEE-LOC "COLONIAL", WOODCO "FLORAVENT"
WOOD AWNING WINDOWS
Woodco Awning Windows
Offer These Advantages:
Extra Heavy Sash and Frame
0 Completely Assembled
Selected Kiln-Dried Ponderosa Pine
Toxic & Water-Repellant Treated
Easy To Lock 0 Sequence Air Control
e Double Vinyl Weatherstripping
(Pat. Pend.)
Finger-Tip Control Will Not Stick


To answer the constant search by
Architects, Builders and Home Owners
for a Colonial-type awning window
suitable for traditionally-styled homes,
WOODCO has adapted the features of
the E-ZEE-LOC Awning Window rec-
ognized for functional sturdiness and
long service life--to the development
of the Woodco E-Zee-Loc "Colonial"
Awning Window.


Check These Outstanding Features:
Factory-Assembled, 100% Ponderosa Pine
S* Toxic- and Water-Repellent Treated Specify These Other
Fully Weatherstripped Reliable WOODCO Products:
Aluminum-Lined 1-Piece Side Jambs
assure Smooth Operation
All Glass Bedded O CASEMENT WINDOWS
Recessed Finger Lifts
I "E-Z FIT" Framed Aluminum Screen i REMOVABLE "SLIDER"
Sliding Windows

\ woocl /doube EXTERIOR & INTERIOR
wood Flush & Panel Doors
windows
\ ] "VENTDOR" Jalousie Door
PRICED [] Weatherstripped W. Pine
MADE IGHT Door Frames
IN MOOERN OR TRADONAL HOME
See SWEETS CATALOG for Architectural Information
Available through Building Material Dealers
Visit WOODCO BOOTHS Nos. 6 & 7 at the A.I.A. Regional Conference
April 17th-19th in Sarasota, Fla.
For Complete Information, Write to




600 IELS AVNU JAKONIL 1, FLRD 363,363












I"


with FLORIDA


TILE


architects have a Florida-made

product that meets or surpasses

all standards of quality ...

with the added advantages

of availability and service.


i.
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" BEAUTY
P ECONOMY QUALITY
DURABI5LTY 1 Y


* [I


DISTRIBUTORS:


Atlanta Tile Contractors' Supply
Ft. Lauderdale South Florida Tile and Terrazzo Dist.
Ft. Myers Gulf Tile Dist.
Jacksonville --Moyer Marble and Tile Dist.
Melbourne East Coast Tile and Terrazzo Supply
Miami Miami Tile Dist., Inc.
Sarasota Palm Tile Dist.
St. Petersburg. Tile Dist., Inc.
West Palm Beach Sikes Tile Dist.
Winter Park South East Tile Dist.


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EU..
U...
EU..
EU..
U-U-U-U-


U....
EU....
U....
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"1"1-1"1
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APRIL, 1958







7Te




Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS




S' 74i Issae ---


Professional Service Story Told By Broward County
Lien Law to be Subject of Industry Conference .
A New "FIRST" Opens in Miami . . . .
Message From The President . . . . .
By H. Samuel Kruse
Five AIA Chapters Are Regional Neighbors . .
Home on a Georgia Hill ...........
Cottage With A Catenary . . . . . .
Program Seventh Annual SA Regional Conference .
The People Who Make the Program . . . .
The Building Products Exhibit . . . . .
Committees for Conference Were Regional In Scope .
The Students' Column . . . . . .
By Louis C. George
Advertisers' Index .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
This picture may strike a familiar note to those FAA members who were
fortunate enough to attend the Regional Conference incAtlanta last year and
to take part in the Hospitality Tour of Atlanta Architects homes. It is an
airview of the unusual home of Cecil A. Alexander, immediate past president
of the Georgia Chapter. More illustrations of this circular house appear on
pages 12 and 13.


4
6
9
. 4
. 6
. 9
. 10

. 11
....... 13
. . . 14
. . . 16
. . . 17
. 18
. 19
. 30

. 31


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished month at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida. telephone: MOhawk 7-0421 .
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
S. .Advertising representative is Ray Rickles
& Company, Chamber of Commerce Building,
Miami, FRanklin 1-0376.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


VOLUME 8 1

NUMBER 4

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








MUTSCHLER KITCHEN

featured in model apartment at


"THE FOUR SEASONS" LKICH


This is how "The Four Seasons,"
a new and luxurious residential
hotel, will appear when completed
in the very near future.


Kitimat Corporation, builder of "The Four Seasons"
residential hotel, has set up a model residence near the
construction site for viewing by prospective purchasers.
Suggested kitchen is by Mutschler Kitchens of Florida.
And here's how Kitimat Corporation describes it in
their sales brochure:
"An entire ceiling of light diffuses a soft illumination over
every inch of kitchen space. Lustrous Formica couAter
tops and spacious custom cabinets are precisely tailored to
each kitchen plan. The purchaser may choose the finest
appliances of any make.... Each kitchen has a convenient
breakfast bar with a hand painted wall mural of your choice."
Newspaper ads also feature the fact that custom-designed
Mutschler kitchens are available to each residence purchaser.
This kind of custom-design service is available at no extra
cost to all Florida builders and architects.


MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
Subsidiary of Mutschler Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace, Oakland Park, Fla. Phone: Logan 4-854
Please furnish me with information about your services
for builders and architects.

name
firm
address
city, state
---------------------------------------


APRIL, 1958









Serving


Florida


Architects


and


Builders...

REINFORCING STEEL
STRUCTURAL STEEL
COMPLETE ENG. &
FAB. FACILITIES
BAR JOISTS
ALUM. & STEEL SASH
STEEL DOORS & FRAMES
MISC. IRON AND
ALUMINUM
ORNAMENTAL IRON
STEEL ROOF DECK
STEELTEX
HIGHWAY PRODUCTS
CORRUFORM
SONOTUBES
METAL CULVERTS
POLYETHYLENE
PLASTIC FILM



FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION


"SItI wash 4oa wastit"f
TAMPA 8-0451
ORLANDO 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


This Broward County
Chapter exhibit was con-
structed of painted fram-
ing members supporting
three natural-finished
roof vaults of glued-lam-
inated plywood the
whole structure being in-
geniously secured by
aluminum "jiffy-joint"
fasteners, which with
aluminum pipes were also
utilized to provide hang-
ing support for the panels
that carried the exhibit
story. The result was a
highly_ effective_ booth
which attracted a great
deal of favorable atten-
tion throughout the term
of the BBE Exposition.



Professional Service Story Told


By Broward County Chapter


The story of architectural service
was effectively presented to the public
in a continuity of cartoons and cap-
tions last month as a high point of the
Broward Builders Exchange annual
building exposition. A Broward
County Chapter booth was developed
by a committee including ROBERT E.
HALL, WILLIAM P. PLUMB and KARL
RAUSCHERT with the glue-lam-
inated roof vaults and aluminum
"jiffy-joints" for its construction be-
ing donated* and erected by R. G. .
BAKER and E. TARANGER, respec-
tively, of Ft. Lauderdale.
The BBE Exposition was held in a-
Ft. Lauderdale's Municipal Audi-
torium; and before it had closed
thousands had viewed the story of
how "Andy Architect" provided the
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Building gets


A NEW LIFT!


i



sq.-fit of. i-
ing Lif Slab con-
'sruction thil:
School of Nurs-
in ,St. Vinreit
Ho1p-talc. Jekson-
.ville pretpe :
ARi t sdl ..


01 V -.& O eW04 U 4

jd ea(keicHC cid fa*eedL

To Clients and Contractors the Lift Slab method
of construction offers almost unbelievable
economies. Dollar savings have reached to 30
percent over other methods; and the 7000
sq.-ft. slabs of this building were fabricated,
lifted and anchored in just nine weeks . To
Architects and Engineers Lift Slab offers new
freedom for planning, a wider scope for creative
Design . And to all concerned Lift Slab
may well show the way to better, faster and
more economical construction.



LIFT SLAB OF FLORIDA, INC.
410 East Beach Blvd., Hallandale, Florida


APRIL, 1958





Service Story...
(Continued from Page 4)
well-rounded professional service nec-
essary for construction of a home for
"Clarence Client" and his family. It
was a brief, but complete explanation
of architectural service dramatized
by drawings and a model (executed
by LEONARD JENKINS) of a house
designed for the exhibit by the office
of MORTON T. IRONMONGER.
Though headed by a committee
appointed by Broward County Chap-
ter president JOHN M. EVANS, the
exhibit was the result of cooperative
effort by many chapter members.
Landscaping, for example, was pro-
vided by the office of FREDERICK
STRESAU, an associate member; and
the photographs reproduced here were
taken by WAYNE WARREN.


Lien Law To Be Subject
of Industry Conference
Florida's Mechanics' Lien Law,
long the object of vocal dissatisfaction
on the part of several important fac-
tors of this state's building industry
is finally to be put under the spotlight
of a critical study if present hopes can
be realized. At least premilinary steps
toward such a study have been taken
through formation of a conference
called for April 2nd.
As now planned, representatives of
professional and trade associations
and financial groups will meet at the
Langford Hotel in Winter Park to
discuss the Lien Law. These groups
have been invited to send representa-
tives to the meeting: Florida Lumber
and Millwork Association; the FAA,
the FES and AGC; the Florida Bar;
the Florida Home Builders Associa-
tion and the Florida Mortgage Bank-
ers Association.
A conference on this subject is
timely; and from the one scheduled
at Winter Park may come a practical
program for completely overhauling
Florida's lien statutes and drawing a
bill which all segments of construction
can accept as being both workable
and fair. It will be recalled that the
Lien Law passed by the 1953 Legisla-
ture was anything but that and was
finally declared voided by the Florida
Supreme Court early last year. The
present Lien Law, passed by the 1957
Legislature, still leaves much to be
desired and should be revised.


PRESTRESSED

CONCRETE

is

today's


For engineering data and technical
information on standard LEAP PRE-
STRESSED CONCRETE building
members including dimensions, physi-
cal properties and tables of loadings,
please call or write:
LEAP
CONCRETE
P. O. Box 1053, Lakeland, Fla.
CAPITOL CONCRETE CO.
Jacksonville, Florida
DURA-STRESS, INC.
Leesburg, Florida
PERMASTRESS, INC.
Daytona Beach, Florida
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland, Florida
SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED
CONCRETE, INC.
Pensacola, Florida
WEST COAST SHELL CORP.
Sarasota, Florida
R. H. WRIGHT & SON
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Your LEAP Associates in Florida

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Hallmarks of Quality...


Versatile Marlite panels
embody all the dignified
beauty-but not the cost-
of true marble and are
adaptable to virtually any
architectural treatment.
Marlite Marble panels are
available in sizes up to
4 by 8 feet with graining
along the small dimensions.


IPI K...
Flush panel, solid core IPIK
doors are unconditionally
guaranteed against delamina-
tion and peeling and can be
furnished in any species of
hardwood in sizes up to four
feet wide and eight feet high.


This is the plywood that
comes in full, 12-foot panels
in both exterior and interior
grades and all the usually
specified thicknesses.
Westag Plywood is available
in a wide variety of fine,
beautifully-figured hard-
woods without a price
premium for extra height.


Regional AIA Members are Invited to
SSee Our Permanent Display at
The New Dupont Plaza Center in Miami


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.

71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI --- FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto . Call Palmetto 2-101 1


APRIL, 1958





































In this unusual bathroom, note the repetition of the floor motif on the vanity wall in Tile Gems.


A beautiful tile bathroom can be the outstanding feature of a home.

In addition to its colorful eye appeal, American-Olean Tile adds solid

value which home buyers recognize... truly the mark of a quality home.




/jmerican-Olean CERAMIC TILE

AMERICAN-OLEAN TILES OF MIAMI, INC. DISTRIBUTORS IN SOUTHEAST FLORIDA OFFICE AND DISPLAY LOUNGE: 1150 S. MIAMI AVE.
TELEPHONE: FRANKLIN 4-4976
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









PINEW


V. r T~ =mu'ua~~ um
I- ----- Fi;d lilt Null fil Es
Illl~rrr r rllC Eno gMn Irtum

ULM nu assolrr~urmr. U=rr
~~ ~- igh .m ____.
= -mm =orh
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It houses a hotel, an office building and 250,000 square feet of exhibit space.


A New 'FIRST' Opens in Miami ..


The Architects' International Bureau of Building Products is
the business core of the world's first triple-purpose building


What was reported in these pages
less than two years ago as an idea, a
plan and a program has finally blos-
somed into a thriving and significant
reality. The $11,000,000 Dupont
Plaza Center has been completed;
and last month a group of some 1,000
architects and top-ranking executives
of building products firms took part
in an open-house ceremony marking
the official opening of a structure
which has already written a new chap-


ter in the annals of Florida's building
industry.
The design of the building, in
model form, was granted an award
citation at the FAA's 42nd Annual
Convention architectural exhibit. But
aside from that, the Dupont Plaza
Center has chalked up an impressive
record of "firsts." According to its
owners, it is the first building of its
kind in the world comprising a
301-room luxury hotel, a 70,000


square-foot office building and a huge
exhibit area under a single roof. As a
focal point for construction industry
interests and it had already become
that before its official opening March
16 it is the first structure in the
country to provide working and living
areas in conjunction with a compre-
hensive display of building products.
And this display itself would establish
the building as a record-breaker, for
(Continued on Page 24)


They head-up the new Bureau of Building Products...


Clinton T. Wetzel,
President, AIBBP
APRIL, 1958


Edwin T. Reeder, AIA, Frank H. Shuflin, AIA,
Executive Vice President Secretary-Treasurer







Message from

The President

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA


Many of the vertical standing com-
mittees were assigned specific tasks
at the time of their selection. These
assignments were published in The
Florida Architect for March, 1958,
along with a list of the personnel and
duties of the Committees for 1958.
Three of these committees; Educa-
tion, Office Practice and Public Rela-
tions, are expected to make recom-
mendations to the Board at its May 3
meeting in Winter Park. If it is pos-
sible, committee chairmen of these
committees should attend this Board
meeting. However, whether the chair-
men attend or not, a written report
of their activities, together with the
committees' recommendations must
be received by your president by the
last week in April. Vice-presidents
will work with their committees to


assure the timely submission of re-
ports.
The Legislative Committee not
a committee vertical with the Insti-
tute, but a most important standing
committee of the FAA, whose core
is vertical with the similar commit-
tees of the Chapters-has the assign-
ment of organizing itself into an
operating organization with specific
operational direction. This committee
was requested to complete this assign-
men and report to the Board at its
May 3 meeting.
The Legislative Committee is well
on the way to completing its assign-
ment, although, in the broadest sense,
its assignment is a continuing one
and cannot really have a beginning
and end. It is heartening to observe
the Legislative Committee chairman,


JAMES K. POWNALL, function. The
FAA is fortunate to have so seasoned
a chairman to guide its legislative
activities.
On March 25, the Legislative Com-
mittee chairman met with our Execu-
tive Director to discuss the legislative
program for this year, in preparation
for the next session of the Legisla-
ture.
There seem to be at least three
areas in which FAA influence and
opinions should be expressed. These
are: 1-A constitutional amendment
to enable Florida communities to
take advantage of Federal urban re-
newal legislation; 2 Legislation to
permit the development of planning
and zoning regulations by Florida
counties; and, 3 The revision of the
Mechanics Lien Law into a more gen-
erally equitable and workable statute.
This calls for concerted action with
other organizations of similar purpose
as ours, to give direction and leader-
ship to the Legislature. If you are
asked to serve on the Legislative
Committee, accept; and, having ac-
cepted, perform your specific task
vigorously.


Carlisle-Porter, Lincoln Mercury Motor Co., Clearwater, Fla. Rilco Hip Beams, 51/4"x26"x39'l" to
52'8" long. Also purlins r facias. Rilco Deck of Western Red Cedar. Architect, John Randal McDonald.

What You Create Rilco Can Build
Rilco adapts itself to any design economically, beautifully. The
natural grain of fine wood in Rilco laminated members adds warmth to
churches, schools, auditoriums, stores and shopping centers. They allow
complete design freedom to the architect, mellow to become more
beautiful with age.
Maintenance-free Rilco members are riot subject to chemical change,
rust, corrosion or vibration are completely fire safe need no con-
cealment or encasing Rilco cedar or spruce D&ck makes its own attrac-
tive ceiling eliminates the cost of lath, plaster, joists and bridging.
SEE OUR EXHIBIT No. 16
At the South Atlantic AIA Conference
Sales Office:
Yeandle and Fox Laminated Products
702 East Broward Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Rilco Laminated Products, Inc. 155 Washington Street, Newark 2, N. J.


Elementary School Project "C'l Vero Beach,
Fla. Rilco laminated pitched beams spans
36, 40 and 56'. Architect, David V. Robin-
son, Vero Beach. Contractors Clutter Const.
Corp., Miami Springs.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Five AIA Chapters



Are FAA's Neighbors


In AIA's South Atlantic Region,
comprising the states of Florida,
North Carolina, South Carolina and
Georgia are 15 AIA Chapters, ten
of which are in Florida, three in
Georgia and one each in the two
Carolinas. According to the SA Re-
gional Council's By-Laws, adopted at
the Atlanta Conference in April,
1957, each Chapter is represented on
the Council by one member entitled
to cast the number of votes to which
his Chapter was entitled at the pre-
ceding Convention of the AIA. Ac-
cordingly, the following lists the nu-
merical number of votes per Chapter
and the name of regional representa-
tives who were named at this writing:
North Carolina: 13; W. R. JAMES,
JR. . South Carolina: 9; JOHN M.
MITCHELL, JR .... Georgia: 13; MRS.
ELLAMAE E. LEAGUE . South
Georgia: 3; ROBERT D. GUNN . .
Augusta: 2 . Broward County: 4;
ROBERT E. HALL ... Daytona Beach:
2; HARRY GRIFFIN . Florida Cen-
tral: 6; ROBERT H. LEVISON ... Flor-
ida North: 3; ARTHUR LEE CAMP-
BELL . Florida North Central: 2;
DAVID W. POTTER ... Florida North
West: 1 . Florida South: 9; Miss


MARION I. MANLEY .. Jacksonville:
6; A. EUGENE CELLAR . Mid-Flor-
ida: 2; JOSEPH M. SHIFALO . .Palm
Beach: 5; JEFFERSON N. POWELL.
Of these, the Chapters in North
Carolina and South Carolina are the
only AIA groups in their respective
states. The North Carolina Chapter,
now the largest in the Region, was
organized in July, 1913, chartered by
the AIA in September, 1913. Its
total membership is now 308, includ-
ing 250 corporate members. With a
strong, cohesive program which in-
cludes a monthly magazine, Southern
Architect, the Chapter affairs are co-
ordinated by an Executive Secretary,
H. J. STOCKARD, JR., with headquar-
ters in Raleigh. The Chapter is
especially active in the fields of P/R,
education and school planning; and a
former president, A. G. ODELL, JR.,
is a member of the AIA Committee
on Schools. 1958 officers are: W. R.
JAMES, JR., president; ROBERT L.
CLEMMER, vice-president; KENNETH
M. SCOTT, secretary; and ARTHUR C.
JENKINS, treasurer.
The South Carolina Chapter has a
current membership roster of 135,
(Continued on Page 20)


William R. James, Jr.,
President, No. Carolina Chapter, AIA


John M. Mitchell, Jr.,
President, So. Carolina Chapter, AIA


H. Lowrey Stulb, ,Robert D. Gunn,
President, Augusta Chapter, AIA President, So. Georgia Chapter, AIA
APRIL, 1958


Clement J. Ford,
President, Georgia Chapter, AIA


,v.


i


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Home on A Georgia Hill .. .


This unusual house is the home
of Cecil A. Alexander, who
is also the arcihtect and
a past president of the
Georgia Chapter.
It was one of several architects'
homes included in the
Hospitality Tour conducted
as a part of last year's Regional
Conference held at Atlanta.


This is a home for a family con-
sisting of two girls and parents. The
family enjoys its life as a unit, yet
each member values his own privacy;
and the design objective was to ex-
press the life of the family, provide
fully for its various aspects includ-
ing the entertainment of large groups
and hospitality to frequent overnight
visitors and to make the most of
a six-acre plot dominated by a hill.
The circular form grew from these
requirements. This shape provided
a plan expressive of family unity, yet
provided each individual with privacy
and his own outlook. A guest room
which doubles as a library cares for
visitors. The central domed court
provides a casual meeting area during
the normal flow of domestic life and
also serves as an overflow entertain-
ment area for large gatherings.
Also, the shape permitted a con-
dcnsed solution to the planning prob-
lem imposed by the site the crown


of the hill which commanded views
over level areas reserved for outdoor
activities. A playroom abutting the
ground slope occupies a lower level;
and for a sense of security it is walled,
in contrast to the visually open glass
areas of the main living floor. Be-
cause of the plan shape and the size
and character of the location, me-
chanical measures for privacy were
not necessary. Wide roof overhangs
eliminate need for drapes; and outside
lighting at night enhances the desired
feeling of openness.
The central court is sheltered by a
roof of folded plate design and day-
lighted partly by clerestories formed
by the plate design and partly through
a plastic bubble at the apex of the
flat-pitch roof cone. The plates were
formed of marine plywood, glued and
screwed to a wood frame; and the
shape of the dome is held by means
of an exposed tension cable encircling
it at the base.







Cottage With A Catenary


The Healey House, designed

by Ralph S. Twitchell and

Paul Rudolph, is one of the

buildings included in

the Architectural Tour of

the SA Regional Conference

at Sarasota.


This unusual small house made
architectural news a few years ago
when it was first built, chiefly because
of the roof construction. But its de-
sign involved more than a successful
experiment in structure, as this com-
ment by PAUL RUDOLPH indicates:
"In a sense this is an anti-social
building. It makes no attempt to
blend with its environment. Because
of its placement, form and color it
tends to dominate the bayou. In this
cottage the intent was to demonstrate
that harmony between the work of
nature and the work of man can be
brought about by clearly differentiat-
ing between the two.
"The form of the cottage is the
result of using steel in tension for


the roof structure. A wooden post and
lintel system of construction has been
employed, with the 22-feet between
the major east and west beams spanned
with one-half by one-eighth-inch flat
steel bars set 12-inches on centers and
hung in a natural catenary form. Two
inches of flexible insulation was clip-
ped to the top of the flat bars and
a saran-vinyl plastic "cocoon" -
was sprayed on top as well as the
bottom of this sandwich, so the entire
roof can move and stretch with vary-
ing wind pressures.
"The long sides of the cottage are
filled in with wooden jalousies which
control the privacy, ventilation and
sun. The two short sides arc plate
glass and strongly direct the visual
focus along the axis of the bayou."


All photos by Joseph J. Steinmetz


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


a 0 a




























.I/


APRIL, 1958






South Atlantic Region, AIA



Seventh Annual Conference





Sponsored by
The Florida Central Chapter, AIA


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16
12:00 Noon Registration,
Orange Blossom Hotel.
THURSDAY, APRIL 17
8:00 A. M. Registration,
Orange Blossom Hotel.
9:30 A. M. Conference Opens,
Municipal Auditorium.
Robert H. Levison,
Host Chapter President, presiding.
10:00 A.M. -Building Products Exhibit Opens,
Municipal Auditorium.
John M. Crowell, presiding.
11:15 A. M.- First Building Products Exhibit.
Prizes Announced.
Municipal Auditorium.
12:00 P. M. Keynote Luncheon,
Lido-Biltmore Hotel,
Robert H. Levison, presiding
Keynote Address by Douglas Haskell, AIA,
"The Architect's New Responsibilities in
the Dynamic South."
2:30 P. M. First Seminar "Revitaliz.ing the
Existing Community," H. Samuel Kruse,
President, FAA, presiding.
Municipal Auditorium; Moderator: Paul
Rudolph;
Panel of Regional Architects and Civic
Leaders.
4:30 P. M. Building Products Exhibit,
Municipal Auditorium.
5:00 6:00 P. M. Cocktails as Guests of Con-
ference, Building Products Exhibit.
7:30 P. M. Awards Dinner under the Stars,
Gulf and Bay Club,
Regional Director, Sanford W. Goin, FAIA,
presiding.
Honor Awards by Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA,
President, AIA.

FRIDAY, APRIL 18
9:00 A. M. Registration Continues,
Orange Blossom Hotel.


9:30 A. M. -Second Seminar-"Building New
Communities,"
Sidney R. Wilkinson, presiding;
Municipal Auditorium; Moderator:
Richard J. Neutra, FAIA;
Panel of Regional Architects.
11:30 12:00 A. M. Building Products Prize-
winners named and Pre-lunch Cocktails,
Municipal Auditorium.
12:30 A.M. -Luncheon, Lido-Biltmore Hotel;
Talk: "Putting the Highway Programs on
the Right Road" by Rex Anderson;
Panel of Regional Architects
Herbert C. Millkey, past regional director,
presiding.
3:00 P. M. Regional Conference Business
Session,
Municipal Auditorium,
Regional Director Sanford W. Goin, FAIA,
presiding.
7:30 P. M. Dinner (informal),
Lido Casino,
Edgar S. Wortman, Immediate Past Presi-
dent, FAA, presiding.
Entertainment by The Sailor Circus.

SATURDAY, APRIL 19
10:00 A. M. Final .Seminar "Working With
Government," Municipal Auditorium,
William R. James, Jr., presiding;
Moderator: John Taylor Egan;
Panel of Regional Architects and Civic
Leaders.
12:00 A. M. -Building Products Exhibit Closes,
Municipal Auditorium.
1 :00 P. M. Luncheon,
Lido-Biltmore Hotel,
John M. Mitchell, Jr., presiding;
Conference Summary by Eric Hodgins.
2:30 P. M. -Architectural Tour,
Leaves from Lido-Biltmore Hotel.
2:30 P. M. Florida Central Chapter Meeting,
Lido-Biltmore,
Robert H. Levison, President, presiding.


16 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








The People Who Make The Program...


Theme of the Seventh Annual
S. A. Regional Conference, "The
Architect's New Responsibilities in
the Dynamic South," will be de-
veloped through a keynote address,
four round-table seminars and a sum-
mary comment at the closing meeting
on Saturday. DOUGLAS HASKELL,
AIA, will keynote the Conference;
and ERIC HODGINS, former editor of
Fortune and author of the whimsical
best-seller "Mr. Blandings Builds His
Dream House," will present a sum-
mary of Conference round-table dis-
cussions.
Topics of these round-table sem-
inars were picked to carry through the
Conference theme in fields of specific
interest. Seminars will be completely
informal; and it is hoped that audi-
ence participation will be active and
constant. The first, "Revitalizing the
Existing Community" will be mod-
erated by PAUL RUDOLPH and will be
led by a panel composed of JAMES H.
KENNEDY and CLINTON GAMBLE,
from Florida; SYDNEY CARTER, Au-
gusta, Georgia; and EDWARD L. WIL-
SON, Fort Worth, Texas.
The second round-table concerns
"Building New Communities" and
will be moderated by RICHARD J.
NEUTRA, FAIA. The panel includes:
ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL and A. EU-
GENE CELLAR from Florida; W. E.
FREENMAN, JR., South Carolina; and
OWEN F. SMITH and HOLLIS L.
LEVEY, North Carolina.
Moderator for the third round-
table will be REX ANDERSON, regional
engineer (in Atlanta) for the Federal
Bureau of Public Roads. The subject,
"Putting the Highway Programs on
the Right Road," will be developed
by a panel including: MCMILLAN H.
JOHNSON and ALF O. BARTH, both of
Florida.
The final seminar will center on
"Working with Government Agen-
cies." Moderator of the session will
be JAMES TAYLOR EGAN, former U. S.
Commissioner of Housing who will
lead the discussion of these panel
members: CHESTER LEE CRAFT of
Florida; MRS. ELLAMAE E. LEAGUE
and PHILLIP HAMMER, of Georgia;
and D. M. MCKINTOSH, JR., of North
Carolina.


DOUGLAS HASKELL, AIA

As keynote speaker of the 1958
Regional Conference he brings to his
subject theme a long experience of
observation and constructive comment
relative to the pattern and character
of architects' professional activities.
For the past 25 years he has been
a vocal and insistent champion of
professional progress; and has capped
his notable accomplishments as an
architectural commentator with an
equally notable success as editor of
Architectural Forum. As a lecturer he
has addressed countless lay and pro-
fessional gatherings and has been an
active leader in promoting closer
understanding and coordination be-
tween various elements of the con-
struction industry.





PAUL RUDOLPH

Moderator of the first seminar of the
Conference is, at 40, already distin-
guished by accomplishment and hon-
ors. Noted for his ability in creative
and uncompromising design, he has
received many design awards, was
named as "Outstanding Young Arch-
itect" at a Sao Paulo conference four
years ago, has been visiting design
critic at six major universities and is
now serving as Chairman of the Yale
University Architectural School. No
stranger to the lecture platform, he
has addressed convention gatherings
of both the FAA and the AIA. His
professional philosophy and approach
have been the subject of many articles
published, in this country and abroad.





RICHARD J. NEUTRA, FAIA

Internationally known as a vigorous
proponent of advanced design and
planning, the moderator of the Con-
ference seminar on "Building New
Communities" has had a long and
eminently distinguished career as an
author and lecturer as well as a
creative and productive building pro-
fessional. Beginning his architectural
career in city planning, he has also
made significant contributions in the
fields of residential design, school
planning and construction and struc-
tural techniques. He has received
almost innumerable awards for his
professional work and has been the
recipient of almost as many honors
from technical and professional so-
cieties in this country and abroad.


APRIL, 1958


LEC~E~

r







?L~I


..









The


Building


Products


Exhibit


Bellaire Products, Inc.
Allied Products of Florida, Inc.
Bryan Water Softener
Miami Window Corporation
Day-Brite Lighting Company
Woodco
Woodco
Buckingham-Virginia Slate Corp.
Graham Door Sales
Monostructure, Inc.
U. S. Plywood Corporation
The Mabie-Bell Company
General Engine & Equipment Company
Master Bronze Powder Company
Libbey-Owens Glass Company
Rilco Laminated Products
Garden City Plating Company
Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Sales, Inc.
Mastic Tile Corporation of America
Wenczel Tile Company
Brown & Grist, Inc.
Arketex Ceramic Corporation
Midcoast Wholesalers, Inc.
St. Petersburg Glass & Mfg. Co.
Kohler Company
Independent Nail Company
thru 30 ... Powernail Company,
Robbins Flooring Company
Protective Flooring


CONFERENCE NOTES- Registration headquarters will
be the Orange Blossom Hotel in downtown Sarasota. Con-
ference Seminars and Business Sessions will be held in thp
Municipal Auditorium as will the Exhibit of Building
Products. The Architectural Exhibit will be held in the
Sarasota Art Association Galleries, immediately adjacent to
the Auditorium . Luncheon meetings will be held at
the Lido-Biltmore Hotel, overlooking the Gulf of Mexico,
and the Friday night banquet (informal) will be at the
Gulf and Bay Club . Transportation between various
locations of Conference events will be provided for by


31 . Technical Furniture Company
32... Hunter-Douglas Aluminum Corp.
33 ... Electrend Distributing Company
34... Briggs Manufacturing Co.
35 .. The Formica Corporation
36 . Bond-Howell Manufacturing Co.
37 ... F. Graham Williams Company
38 ... Vinylithic Products Co., Inc.
39. Norton Door Closer Company
40 ... Ware Laboratories, Inc.
41 .. Florida Linstone Corporation
42 ... Keuffel & Esser
43 ... Lexsuco Corporation
44 ... Benjamin Moore & Company
45... Robbins Floor Products
46. Concrete Products, Inc.
47 .. Vermiculite Roof Deck Applicators
48 ... Arcadia Metal Products
49 ... Natco Corporation
50 ... Kalwall Corporation
51 . Green's Fuel of Florida Corp.
52... American Encaustic Tile Company
53 ... Florida Prestressed Concrete Assoc.
54... Mosaic Tile Company
55 ... Inland Steel Products
56... Foster Refrigeration Company
57... Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company
58 ... Ludman Corporation


free bus service for those who do not have their own
transportation means. Also, rental cars at special Confer-
ence rates ($5 per day, with 50 miles per day free) will
be made available to Conference visitors at the airport
and for use throughout the three-day session . Those
planning to join the Architectural Tour on Saturday after-
noon should register for transportation as early as possible
. . Tickets for luncheon and dinner meetings should also
be purchased early at the registration desk. Luncheons
are $3.00 each; the Awards Dinner (Thursday) is $6.50;
and the Sailor Circus Dinner (Friday) is $7.50.


8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ENTRANCE







Committees for Conference

Were Regional in Scope


Organization of this Seventh An-
nual SA Regional Conference really
got under way as a result of a Reg-
ional Council meeting in Jackson-
ville, held in early November, last
year. At that time a Council Con-
ference Committee was set up and
the decision made to employ a Con-
ference Manager. ROLAND W. SEL-
LEW of Sarasota, was named General
Conference Chairman as representing
the Florida Central Chapter, this
year's sponsor of the Conference.
Named on Sellew's committee were:
SIDNEY R. WILKINSON, Conference
secretary, and ERWIN GREMLI, treas-
urer. GILBERT WATERS, Sarasota P/R
executive, was appointed as managing
director of the Conference. Regional
Council treasurer, is JOHN L. R.
GRAND.
Selected by the Conference Com-
mittee chairman to plan for and ad-
minister various phases of the program
were: WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN, CARL
VOLLMER, EDWARD J. SEIBERT and
WILLIAM RUPP, Program; WERNER
KANNENBERG, JOHN M. CROWELL,
ELIZABETH WATERS and JOHN E.
PIERCY, Exhibits; EDGAR HANEBUTH,
B. A. BROSMITH and JACK WEST, Res-
ervations; RICHARD SLATER, Transpor-
tation; Louis F. SCHNEIDER, Publicity.
Ladies Events are in charge of JOYCE
\VEST.


In addition to this working com-
mittee of the sponsoring Florida Cen-
tral Chapter, Regional Director SAN-
FORD W. GOIN, FAIA, called on each
chapter in the SA Region to appoint
a representative as a member of a
special Advisory Committee of the
Regional Council to assist the spon-
sor-chapter group. Named were MOR-
TON T. IRONMONGER, Broward Coun-
ty; WILLIAM P. GREENING, Daytona
Beach; ROLAND W. SELLEW, Florida
Central; ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL,
Florida North; DAVID W. POTTER,
Florida North Central; HUGH J.
LEITCH, Florida North West; WAHL
J. SNYDER, Florida South; A. EUGENE
CELLAR, Jacksonville; JOSEPH M. SHI-
FALO, Mid-Florida, and HILLIARD T.
SMITH, Palm Beach.
Members appointed from chapters
in the other three states of the South
Atlantic Region were: CECIL A.
ALEXANDER, Georgia; SIDNEY PORTER
DRISCOLL, South Georgia; GILBERT
O'BRIEN, Augusta; WILLIAM R.
JAMES, JR., North Carolina, and Louis
M. WOLFF, South Carolina.
Actual programming of seminar dis-
cussion subjects developed from re-
sults of a questionnaire circulated
relative to the overall theme of the
Conference "The Architect's New
Responsibilities in the Dynamic
South." Though moderators of the


Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
SA Regional Director


seminars have been selected for their
specialized knowledge of the subjects
noted and will present their own views
and recommendations, it is hoped that
participation of seminar audiences
will be active and constant.
The three-day session, April 17
through 19, will mark the second time
that Florida has played host to a Con-
ference of the South Atlantic Region;
and this is the seventh annual con-
fcrence to be held in this Region. Past
conferences have been held in: At-
lanta, Georgia, 1957; Raleigh, N. C.,
1956; Charleston, S. C., 1955; Savan-
nah, Georgia, 1954; Miami, Florida,
1953, and Atlanta, Georgia, 1952.


Robert H. Levison, AIA Roland W. Sellew, AIA
President, Florida South Chapter Regional Conference Chairman
APRIL, 1958


Gilbert Waters
Regional Conference Manager


ANi~.






Regional Neighbors ...
(Continued from Page 11)
111 of which are corporate members.
It was also founded in 1913. Though
covering the entire state, the Chapter
has no official publication and does
not employ an executive secretary.
During the last three years and cur-
rently the Chapter's major effort has
been support of the Clemson Archi-
tectural Foundation for the develop-
ment of the Clemson College School
of Architecture an effort which
has rallied the support of all mem-
bers, has raised more than $50,000
and has sponsored the strengthening
of curricula to the extent that the
school now enjoys an accredited list-
ing. ALBERT SIMONS is currently a
member of the National AIA Com-
mittee on Preservation of Historic
Structures. Officers for 1958 are:
JOHN M. MITCHELL, JR., president;
A. H. CHAPMAN, JR., vice-president;
HOMER BLACKWELL, secretary-treas-
urer.
The Georgia Chapter is the second
largest, but is by far the oldest in the
AIA's SA Region. Founded in 1906,


it currently numbers 288, of which
221 are corporate members. The
Chapter does not employ an ad-
ministrative executive, nor does it
publish a magazine. But it does issue
a mimeographed monthly News for
which WILLIAM E. WILLNER serves
as editor. The Chapter has an active
program, highlighted by cooperative
action with other elements of the
construction industry and close associ-
ation with engineers through the
Architects-Engineers Institute. It is
active also in conducting an educa-
tional program in cooperation with
Georgia Tech and the State Exam-
ining Board. Members serving on
AIA national committees are: MATT
L. JORGENSON, Hospitals and Health;
SAMUEL I. COOPER, International Re-
lations; RICHARD L. AECK, Advance-
ment of the Profession; PAUL N.
HEFFERNAN, Awards and Scholar-
ships; HENRY J. TOOMBS, Community
Development; HAROLD BUSH-BROWN,
Education; and HERBERT C. MILL-
KEY, Chairman, Package Deals Com-
mittee. Officers serving in 1958 are:
CLEMENT J. FORD, president; JOHN
W. CHERRY, vice-president; JOHN W.


VAUGHT, secretary; and JULIAN C.
JETT, treasurer.
The South Georgia Chapter was
founded in 1922 and is made up of
architects practicing in the southern
one-third of the State. Membership
totals 30, of which 22 are corporate.
Officers for 1958 are: ROBERT D.
GUNN, president; WILLIAM P. BER-
GEN, vice-president; and EDWIN C.
ECKLES, secretary-treasurer.
The Augusta Chapter, founded in
1948, includes the territory of Rich-
mond County, Georgia, and has a
membership total of 28, including 17
corporate members. It does not issue
a Chapter publication and is cur-
rently not engaged with any "special
or unusual program." Officers for
1958 are: H. LOWREY STULB, presi-
dent; J. ROBERT MCCREARY, vice-
president; JOHN R. THOMPSON, secre-
tary; R. STANFORD WOODHURST, JR.,
treasurer.
The three largest of these five AIA
groups considerably ante-date forma-
tion of the ten Florida AIA Chapters
which now comprise the FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS. Accord-
(Continued on Page 23)


"fustest with



the mostest"


In the famous words of General Nathaniel
Bedford Forrest, K&E does "get there
fustest" with a complete line of the high-
est quality equipment and materials for
architects and engineers.

Just name it! Drafting, reproduction, sur-
veying, optical tooling equipment and


materials, slide rules, measuring tapes.
K&E has them all. It's the result of 90
years of leadership.

For the name of your nearest authorized K&E
Dealer, ask our representative at the K&E Booth
in Sarasota, April 17 to 19th.


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0 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






















what'


FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT


The recent acquisition of Sterling Equipment Manufacturing
Corporation by Miami Window Corporation has resulted in
certain changes in personnel, policies and philosophy.
Sterling, the South's largest fabricators of food service
and hospital equipment, is now in the unique position to
help architects, engineers, and contractors in planning
and layout of any type food service problem.

We welcome any opportunity to give information and
advice on your problems in the preparation and service
of food and offer the cooperation of our design and
engineering departments on these problems as well as on
any specialized equipment your clients might need.
The design and engineering staff, after careful analysis
of floor plan, type of service, menus, and other pertinent
data, will design and layout with you any size installation.

Combine keen and personal interest in your problems with
experienced know how and you come up with Sterling.




STERLING
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IAe Sout'i taj.ew Fadicatoa

A DIVISION OF THE MIAMI
APRIL, 1958


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ANONAS



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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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State!






Regional Neighbors ...
(Continued from Page 20)
ing to Institute records, the first chap-
ter in Florida was chartered at the
AIA Convention of 1921 as a state-
wide group. In April, 1929, this single
Chapter was divided into three; and
as a result of an intensive study cov-
ering about a year the new chapters
were named to cover what then
seemed logical jurisdictional areas -
North, Central and South Florida.
This situation prevailed until 1947.
At that time growth of the architec-
tural profession within Florida ap-
peared to make further division desir-
able. Accordingly, in 1947 two new
AIA Chapters were formed Day-
tona Beach and Palm Beach both,
notably, on the rapidly expanding
cast coast. Daytona Beach Chapter
was an off-shoot of the Florida North
Chapter; and the new Palm Beach
Chapter's territory had formerly been
part of the Florida South area.
In 1950 the Florida South area was
still further divided by formation of
the Broward County Chapter; and
the year before, in 1949, the Florida
North Central Chapter had been
formed as an additional split-off from
the original Florida North Chapter.
Two further divisions of the Florida
North Chapter were finally made,
one in 1955 with the establishment
of the Jacksonville Chapter, the other
in the following year, 1956, when the
Florida North West Chapter was
chartered. It was during 1955, also,
that the Mid-Florida Chapter was
formed as a division from the Florida
Central Chapter.
Growth of Florida and of Flor-
ida's three original AIA groups has
been the reason, of course, for estab-
lishment of what a former AIA offi-
cial calls "splinter chapters." Trav-
cling distance, a cleavage of com-
munity interest and in at least six
instances a firm conviction that small
groups can prove more effective
locally than can a large one are among
other reasons for the development of
Florida's current AIA chapter organi-
zation. All of the ten units have
grown since their respective forma-
tion. The growth is measurable not
only in members, but also in terms of
their local impact on community
affairs, some instances of which have
been notably influential.
(Continued on Page 24)
APRIL, 1958


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ship have been employed in the
manufacturing of a quality
product.

Thompson flush doors, in beau-
tiful figured gum, lauan ash
and birch can be specified for
both exteriors and interiors in
both standard and special sizes.


S0


m. m ,',..





_ *:l _r


AIR .......... 7- PLY CONSTRUCTION
........... Lightweight, but sturdy, Thompson flush
'.......... doors are noted for their rigidity and
resistance to warping and twisting. This
quality is the result of high manufacturing
standards that include: cores of wood ribs
spaced 4-inches apart and butted against
stiles on alternate sides to provide continu-
ous vent space; stiles of a 1 1/8-inch
minimum width; rails of a minimum 21/2-
inch width; panels of 3-ply, cross-banded
plywood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
both sides. Only non-shrinking, craze-re-
sistant adhesives are used to produce inte-
grated bonding that is highly resistant to
both moisture and mildew.
In addition to 11 standard sizes-1/6 x
6/8 to 3/0 x 6/8 interior and 2/6 x 6/8
to 3/0 x 7/0 exterior-Thompson flush
doors are obtainable in special sizes.



1 S7R & DISTRIBUTED IN FLORIDA BY:




71 .


Regional Neighbors ...
(Continued from Page 23)
Florida South is still the largest
unit with a total roster of 208, 134
of which are corporate. Next is Flor-
ida Central with 71 corporate and a
roster of associates and junior associ-
ates to bring its total membership to
143. Jacksonville's total is 93, with
58 corporate; Palm Beach numbers
50 corporate with a total member-
ship of 93. Broward County, the
State's fourth largest chapter lists 46
corporate, a total membership of 59.
The present Florida North Chapter
contains 27 corporate in a total roster
of 45; Mid-Florida is next with a total
of 44, including 24 corporate. The
Daytona Beach Chapter roster num-
bers 30, with a corporate membership
of 17. Total membership of Florida
North Central is 24, 12 of which are
corporate; and the state's newest AIA
group, the Florida North West Chap-
ter, has a corporate registry of 13,
a total current membership of 17.




Florida's New 'First'
(Continued from Page 9)
the Architects' International Bureau
of Building Products occupies, on
three levels, some 250,000 square feet
of exhibit space. With this huge
area put fully to its intended use, the
Bureau will provide designers, specifi-
cation writers, builders and even "Mr.
and Mrs. Homebuilder" with working
displays and technical data covering
some 10,000 products relating to all
phases of construction.
The Bureau is actually the heart
and core of the Dupont Plaza Center.
As a matter of record, planning of the
unique triple-function structure grew
from the dream of one man to pro-
vide the construction industry with
a central source of information on
building materials, products and serv-
ices. The man was CLINTON T.
WETZEL; and his dream took shape
as an outgrowth of his successful
operation of Miami's Architects' Sam-
ples Bureau. A centralized building
products display backed up with
an easy availability of design and
specification data on each product -
was what Wetzel visioned as an
answer to one of the construction
(Continued on facing page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







On Miami's Bayfront---New Landmarks for Old ...


industry's most potent needs. The
newly-opened Bureau at the Dupont
Plaza Center has been developed
and staffed to meet that pressing need
for information. In full-scale opera-
tion and new exhibits are now be-
ing installed at the rate of about 50
per month the Architects' Inter-
national Bureau of Building Products
will be more than double the size of
Holland's Bouwcentrum, until now
the most complete exhibit of its kind.
To architects and their construc-
tion associates throughout the South
- and particularly in every one of
Florida's 67 counties, the AIBBP
will undoubtedly prove as valuable as
is a reference law library to the legal
profession. It will provide designers,
for example, with a source for selec-


For many generations the site of the
new Dupont Plaza Center has been
especially prized. Until 1929 the Royal
Palm Hotel Hotel stood there, built by
one of Florida's pioneer promoters,
Henry M. Flagler, as the last word in
turn-of-the-century luxury and ex-
clusiveness. And years before Flagler's
railroad linked Miami with the North,
it was the scene of many Indian en-
campments, relics of which were un-
covered during excavation for the
foundations of the new, triple-purpose
building . These two pictures, taken
from the same spot across the mouth
of the Miami River, indicate a time
span of about 40 years and point up
in dramatic fashion the character of
changes that are occurring swiftly, not
only in Miami, but thruout the State.


- tV


tion of finish and decorative materials
and specification writers with tech-
nical data on recommended standards
for use over a tremendous range of
structural products and equipment
units. It will permit builders and sub-


contractors to check on the availabil-
ity and installation techniques of
specified products with which they
may not be familiar; and it will even
permit architects' clients to visualize
(Continued on Page 26)


McKINLEY
sun control products
"finest under the sun!"
all-weather protection attrac-
five appearance minimum
maintenance.
Designed by sun-control engineers
for architect and builder--skill-
fully made of lifetime alumi-
num. For details, contact
your McKinley Represent-
ative-see Sweet's Ar-
ch19itectral ile
19e/Mc,


designed and manufactured by the o.0. McKINLEY CO.. inc. ndianapolis 5, Ind. wII
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LOCAL McKINLEY REPRESENTATION: CLEAWATER, PHONE 35-7094 I -M., Pme od"U,
APRIL, 1958 25









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* ELIMINATES NEED FOR STUFFING PAPER OR BROKEN
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BOND AREA BETWEEN BLOCK AND BEAM KEPT AT MAXIMUM (SECTION
2704.2, SOUTH FLORIDA BUILDING CODE OUTLAWS FELT BLOCK SEPAR-
ATORS WHICH REDUCE BOND AREA).
SOLID CAP HOLDS WATER IN CONCRETE (CORRECT WATER CONTENT AS-
SURES MAXIMUM STRENGTH).

Exclusive Distributors:
BOOKER & COMPANY, INC. PENINSULAR SUPPLY COMPANY
Tampa & Orlando Miami Ft. Lauderdale West Palm Beach


Dealers:


MIAMI
Alexander Hardware
No. Miami Hardware. Renuart Lbr. Co.


SARASOTA
Stottlemeyer Lumber Co.


FT. LAUDERDALE
Pacific Lumber Co.


W. PALM BEACH
CBS Division
Maule Industries


A ad Sda
"... Coie Saf<



Z I k ." *


METAL PRODUCTS, Inc.
2445 N.W. 76th STREET, MIAMI
Manufacturers of Specialty .Building Products


Florida's New 'First' . .
(Continued from Page 25)
design details in terms of actual colors
and forms, thus saving both from
possible misunderstanding.
As the full development of
Wetzcl's products bureau highlights
the number one importance of the
construction industry, so the construc-
tion of the Dupont Plaza Center it-
self emphasizes the tremendous
change and expansion of Florida and
in particular the surge of the greater
Miami area as a headquarters for
international as well as regional com-
merce and affairs. Some notion of
how dramatic this change and expan-
sion is can be gained by comparing
triple-purpose building and HENRY
the across-river views of the new
M. FLAGLER'S Royal Palm Hotel
which once graced the same site as
the gardened core of a millionaire's
winter-playground society.
The convenience of a riverside
yacht mooring 800 feet of it is
still there. And so is the luxury of
superbly-appointed hotel living. But
brisk business will replace the social
chit-chat of winter vacationers. There
will be visitors in plenty; and they
will undoubtedly be quite as cosmo-
politan a group as that which strolled
the wood-framed corridors of the old
Royal Palm. But the emphasis of
their visits will be on the continued
development of the Sunshine State
and will center on the myriad details
of the construction industry which
has had and undoubtedly will con-
tinue to have such a direct and
significant influence on that develop-
ment.
To make such visits satisfactorily
productive, every segment of the
Dupont Plaza Center has been de-
signed to meet in many instances
to far exceed contemporary stan-
dards of good practice. In the exhibit
area display turntables have been
installed in the two-story entrance
foyer; and portions of the ceiling of
product display floors have been left
open to permit full view of the com-
plex service lines, each line or duct
being identified by color. Every tech-
nique of modern display science is
being employed to reveal the struc-
tural bones of products and equip-
ment as well as finishes, textures and
colors. A complete library of tech-
(Continued on Page 28)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Fr "'o

Sam ple Bor



L~ Fre


Actual samples of nearly 50
STRONGHOLD@ and SCREW-TITE
Nails-each type engineered
for a specific application.
Makes selection easy!
HERE'S a handsome new sample
board that takes little space on your
desk or drawing board-helps you
specify the right nail for every
purpose.
It enables you to see actual sam-
ples of nearly 50 different STRONG-
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Nails-the nails that have revolu-
tionized construction methods. It
includes the newest additions to
THE STRONGHOLD LINE-nails espe-
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application of new types of build-
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use of modern cost-and-labor-sav-
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Get one of these new STRONG-
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Just write us on your letterhead-
we'll gladly send it without cost or
obligation, along with important
technical data resulting from the
continuing program of scientific
laboratory testing and research
carried on at Wood Research Lab-
oratory, Virginia Polytechnic Insti-
tue, under our sponsorship. You'll
find this information valuable.


rodINIO TE

wl1e1111 0 11 Ua


See Us at Booth 26
AIA South Atlantic Regional Conference
SARASOTA MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM
April 17 to 19









7-


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BPAlE No&
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Display Board is 12"x 18", with easel back for counter display. Free to dealers,
distributors, architects. Write us for yours-todayl


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There is only one STRONGHOLD Line-the Original. Made only by
INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING CO.
Pioneer Develoflers and Largest Manufacturers of Threaded Nails
BRIDGEWATER, MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.A.


Q Copyright Independent Nail & Packing Company, 1958. Trade Marks Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.
Distributed by
INDEPENDENT FLORIDA NAIL CORPORATION


Warehouse:
5605 S. W. Shore Blvd., Tampa 11
Telephone Tampa 64-4441


Residence, Norman M. Lewis
P. 0. Box 10553, St. Petersburg 33
Telephone St. Petersburg 70-6722


APRIL, 1958


r~Y1SI
~c~T3u=
u


~U r~--


'8?3



.'4;











41


INDEPENENT NAL & PACING CO


a






Florida's new 'First' . .
(Continued from Page 26)
nical and "Where to Buy" data is
now being assembled; and a continu-
ing information service covering new
displays, changes in existing ones and
the announcement of technical im-
provements and new models is being
developed. When completely staffed
and integrated, the Architects' Inter-
national Bureau of Building Products
as now planned will constitute a
virtually all-inclusive clearing house
for all sorts of informative data on
all types of building materials, equip-
ment and services.
Routine operation of the Bureau
includes a continuing series of educa-
tional tours through the acres of dis-
play floors, special TV broadcasts of
demonstrations involving use of dis-
played products and closed circuit
TV shows to serve as educational
seminars during convention gather-
ings of firms whose products form
part of the Bureau's exhibit. The
value of a hotel offering complete


facilities for such conventions has
already been demonstrated; and the
Skyroom, a banquet hall serving up
to 750, has already been booked by a
number of firms of national scope.
The various other hotel areas the
301 air-conditioned rooms, the swim-
ming pool, the four cocktail lounges,
the dining and meeting rooms -
make it possible for any member of
the building industry to visit the
Bureau, live, entertain and transact
business comfortably under one roof.
Professional and trade organiza-
tions representing various segments
of the construction industry already
have moved into headquarters space
in the new building. The FAA has
its office in Room 302 part of the
2500 square feet of air-conditioned
space overlooking Biscayne Bay and
the Hotel Tarleton's swimming pool
allocated to the Florida South Chap-
ter of the AIA. Other associations
include those of the general contrac-
tors, the interior decorators, the engi-
neers, the Producers' Council, and
the home builders.


Operation of the whole complex is
under the direct supervision of CLIN-
TON T. WETZEL, as executive vice-
president of Dupont Plaza Center;
and on his management committee is
FRANK H. SHUFLIN who, with the late
JOHN E. PETERSEN, was architect of
the building. Wctzel acts also as
president and managing director of
the Architects' International Bureau
of Building Products. Executive vice-
president of the Bureau is EDWIN T.
REEDER who also heads the board of
exhibit design charged with the
responsibility of assisting product
firms to develop displays geared to
the special interests and requirements
of building professionals. Serving with
him on this design board are IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, FAIA, ROBERT LAW
WEED and ROBERT FITCH SMITH.
In addition, MEYER DEUTSCHMAN is
the engineer member, GATES MEYERS
the representative of the decorators.
Remaining member of the exhibit
control board is ELLIOT J. SPRATT,
past national president of the Pro-
ducers' Council.


SPECIFY...




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From the Virola tree of Surinam


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PLYWOODS


To give your client unusual beauty at moderate cost, specify
Dutch Cedar. He will appreciate its warm, honey-brown
coloring and handsome rotary-cut grain. You will like its superior
construction and easy workability. Ask your dealer
for samples.


PANELING:
Available in 12", 14", or
,-- 16" squares, 16" x 8'
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CABINETS:
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rI' Distributed
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF ORLANDO, INC.
924 SI.ghl BI.d ORLANDO Ph GArden 5-4604
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF ST. PETERSBURG, INC.
2.r,0 22nd A.e. No ST PETERSBURG Ph. 5-7627
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF FT. LAUDERDALE, INC.
1607 S. W. Isr Ave. FT. LAUDERDALE JAckson 3-5415

.8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Dei'ush.


PREVENTS RUST


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< Visit Our Exhibit at Booth 47


VERMICULITE ROOF DECK APPLICATORS ASSN.
P. O. Atlanta Box 8127, Station F . .. Atlanta 6, Georgia


APRIL, 1958


FOR NEW OR RUSTED METAL . More than
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ONE GALLON will cover 600 to 800 square
feet and one coat is usually sufficient. Both
for interior and exterior, Derusto is unsur-
passed for all metal surfaces.
VERSATILE Derusto is basically designed as a
metal coating. Because of its power of pene-
tration and strong bonding qualities, Derusto
may be also used on wood, brick and many
other surfaces. Derusto may also be applied
over damp metal. Derusto gives you LOWER
ORIGINAL COST and LOWER MAINTENANCE
COST.

SEE ARTHUR BROOKS,
SOUTHEASTERN FACTORY REPRESENTATIVE
AT BOOTH 14 during
So. Atlantic AIA Regional Conference,
Sarasota April 17-19


MASTER BRONZE POWDER COMPANY, INC.
CALUMET CITY, ILLINOIS HAMMOND, INDIANA





Mel Banks
Future Heating
ST. PETERSBURG
Ph. HE 6-3400
TAMPA
Phone 2-0871

Corwin Heating &
Electric
NAPLES
Ph. Midway 2-7301

Electrend East
Coast Co., Inc.
MIAMI
LAKE WORTH
VERO BEACH
FT. PIERCE
Call Collect:
Boca Raton 5101
FT. LAUDERDALE
Ph. JA 3-6464

Electrend
Sales & Service
CLEARWATER
Phone 34-9341

Electrend
Sales & Service
ORLANDO
Phone 2-7166

Electrend
Sales C Service Co.
SARASOTA
Ph. RI 7-3380

Pasco Lumber Co.
DADE CITY
Ph. Lo 7-3567


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Telephone HEmlock 6-8420
WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER.


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3737 N.W. 43rd St., Miami


The Students' Column
By Louis C. GEORGE
The Florida State Conference of
the Bricklayers' Masons' and Plaster-
ers' International Union of America
sponsored a student competition for
the design of an AFL-CIO Museum
of Labor.
First-place winner was J. CARL
AnBOTT from Ft. Myers. Second
place went to JERRY GARCIA of
Tampa. Third place was shared by
five students: JOSEPH G. F. FARRELL,
Sarasota; WILLIAM R. LYNCH, Jack-
sonville; WALTER Q. TAYLOR, St.
Petersburg; Luis F. COLL-ARANA,
Puerto Rico; and RONALD D. GAR-
MAN, Pennsylvania.
This year's Home Show again fea-
tures a recreational theme for its cen-
tral exhibit. It will be a detached
recreation pavillion with its setting in
a Florida garden. The wonderful
response to last year's central exhibit
was the moving force behind this
year's recreation theme. There will
be many exhibits geared to the Flor-
ida home; and the individual class
exhibits will be in keen competition
for the prize this year.
Dates of the Home Show are May
1 to 4, 1958. The place is the con-
course of the stadium at Florida
Field; the time, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00
p.m. We'll be looking forward to
seeing all you architects and your
wives and families.



Office Changes
In Palm Beach, the firm of Plock-
elman and Powell announce the in-
clusion of DONALD R. EDGE as a
general partner of a new architectural
firm of PLOCKELMAN, POWELL AND
EDGE. Offices are at 230 South
County Road, Palm Beach.
The EDWIN T. REEDER ASSOCIATES,
have announced removal of their
offices from 1777 Biscanye Boulevard,
Miami, to the new Dupont Plaza
Center No. 1, Miami, Building.
DON REIFF announces a change of
address to new offices at 1185 71st
Street, Miami Beach.
FRANK H. SHUFLIN, Architect and
Associates, have moved into new
offices in Suite 702 of the Dupont
Plaza Center, Miami, from their
former offices in the Roper Building.
Frank Shuflin, with the late JOHN E.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


"SINCE 1921"




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433 W. Bay St.

Jacksonville, Fla.






PETERSEN, was the architect for the
Center which combines a 301-room
hotel, a 14-story office building and
over 200,000 square feet of building
product exhibit area.
In Coconut Grove, W. PINSON
WHIDDON has opened a new office
for architectural practice at 3490
Main Highway.
In Ft. Lauderdale, LESTER AVERY
has moved from 231 S. E. 5th Avenue
to new offices at 1040 Bayview Drive,
Ft. Lauderdale.
In Orlando, RICHARD BOONE
ROGERS, president of the State Board
of Architecture, has announced the
removal of his office from 14 East
Church Street to 516 East Central
Avenue. His new telephone is GArden
2-2104.
The firm of JOSEPH, VLADECK AND
ABRABEN, of Miami Beach, was dis-
solved as of January 31, 1958, ac-
cording to a notice received from
WILLIAM CHARNEY VLADECK, of the
New York firm of Joseph & Vladeck.
Mr. Vladeck wrote The Florida Arch-
itect requesting that notice to this
effect be published.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 26
American Olean Tiles of Miami 8
A. R. Cogswell . . 30
Day Brite Lighting, Inc. . 23
Electrend Distributing Co.. 30
Florida Foundry and
Pattern Works . . 30
Florida Home
Heating Institute . . 32
Florida Power & Light Co.. 22
Florida Steel Corporation 4
Florida Tile Industries, Inc. 1
George C. Griffin . . 6
Hamilton Plywood . . 28
Independent Nail Company 27
Keuffel & Esser Company . 20
Leap Concrete . . 6
Lift Slab of Florida, Inc. 5
Ludman . . 3rd Cover
Master Bronze Powder Co. 29
0. O. McKinley Company, Inc. 25
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 3
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 7
Rilco Laminated Products. Inc. 10
Sterling Equipment Co.. . 21
Thompson Door Co. . 24
Vermiculite Roof
Deck Applicators Asso.. 29
F. Graham Williams Company 31
Woodco Corporation .3rd Cover

APRIL, 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. & Secretary
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.






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VISIT OUR BOOTH No. 37, AIA REGIONAL CONFERENCE

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UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LAW BUILDING
Curtain Wall by Ludman
Architect: Robert M. Little, Miami, Fla.
Contractor: Fred Hlowland, Miami, Fla.



the architect's vision sets the pace for the future...

by Lawrence Field


The plans an architect draws today may well
determine the architecture of the future.

When an architect does project the future
in his plans, he must find the materials with
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For example, within very recent years, cur-
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Its engineers are constantly formulating
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Furthermore, an architect can always rely
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Ludman know-how, based on years of actual
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Ludman engineers are glad to be of assist-
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In Ludman Curtain Walls lie the means by
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for the future. Write to us for full, detailed
information on our curtain wall system.
The Ludman Corporation Founded 1936
* Miami, Florida.





















































Precise engineering is the reason the M-operator is guaranteed for a window's life.


It's the technical core of Miami Window values. Shop detailing fits the specified products precisely to the job
for easy, on-schedule installation; and production control keeps quality high, with no possibility for improve-
ment overlooked. Such engineering means economy and high fenestration performance in any type of building.

Material, design and production standards meet or exceed every AWMA requirement.

miamii window corporation
P.O. BOX 877, INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI 48, FLORIDA