• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Mid-Florida chapter to host 44th...
 FAA board of directors meet at...
 We need to know more about...
 Planned for future expansion --...
 The FAA's committee structure and...
 FAA standing committees for 1958...
 Regional conference plans...
 News and notes
 State board registers thirty-f...
 Advertisers' index
 Back Matter






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00045
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00045
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Mid-Florida chapter to host 44th convention
        Page 4
        Page 5
    FAA board of directors meet at Winter Park
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    We need to know more about schools
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Planned for future expansion -- Home of architect-owner Bruce Smith
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The FAA's committee structure and personnel
        Page 14
        Page 15
    FAA standing committees for 1958 & FAA office moved to Dupont Plaza Center
        Page 16
    Regional conference plans complete
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    News and notes
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    State board registers thirty-four
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
    Back Matter
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS




t 7TW I7sawe ---


Mid-Florida Chapter to Host 44th Convention .
FAA Board of Directors Meets at Winter Park .
We Need to Know More About Schools . .
By Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, President, AIA


Planned for Future Expansion Home of Architect-Owner Bruce Smith


The FAA's Committee Structure and Personnel .
Vertical Committee Assignments . .
Standing Committee Assignments . .
FAA Office Moves to Dupont Plaza Center . .
Regional Conference Plans Complete . .
By Gilbert Waters, 1958 Regional Conference Manager
News and Notes ......... . .


.11


. 14-16
. 14-15
. 16
. 16
. 17


Message from The President By H. Samuel Kruse, President, FAA


State Board Registers Thirty-four ..
Advertisers' Index . . .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 7225 S. W, 82nd Court, Miami

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
The St. Petersburg home of Bruce Smith is the third of what we hope may
be a continuing series of FAA architects' houses from every section of the
State. This is a notable example of how a small house planned for future
expansion can be developed to meet temporary needs and still retain a unity
and character of its own.


21
21


. 2 5
. 2 7


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished month at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida. telephone: MOhawk 7-0421 .
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
S. Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
Advertising representative is Ray Rickles
& Company, Chamber of Commerce Building,
Miami, FRanklin 1-0376.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


VOLUME 8

NUMBER 3


1958
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


4
6
. 4
. 6



















































Strength, load bearing ability and speed of construction were
three vital factors in the building of the Sunshine Parking
garage in downtown Miami. All three requirements were
accomplished through the use of 30' 6" prestressed concrete
Double "T" slabs, designed for a loading of 164 pounds per square
foot. Additional construction time was saved by placing the
concrete slabs directly on forms for composite pours.
Through the use of prestressed concrete and good construction
methods, the general contractor, allowed only 100 days to
complete the structure, finished the job 19 days ahead of time.
Architect: Stefan H. Zachar, Miami





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Mid-Florida Chapter To

Host 44th Annual Convention


One of Florida's newest, but most
aggressive, AIA Chapters took a
history-making step last month. The
Mid-Florida Chapter accepted the
invitation of the FAA to serve as host
for the 44th Annual FAA Convention
to be held in the new Deauville Hotel
at Miami Beach, November 20, 21
and 22, 1958. The invitation was
tendered by FAA President H. SAM-
UEL KRUSE to JOSEPH M. SHIFALO,
Mid-Florida President, as a result of
a decision of the FAA Executive
Committee made during a planning
conference held in Ft. Lauderdale,
February 7.
This decision to invite Mid-Florida
to be the host organization for the
1958 FAA Convention was made
necessary as a result of a surprise
action taken by the Broward County
Chapter at its February 7 meeting.
The Broward Chapter had been an-
nounced, at the 1957 FAA Conven-
tion, as hosts for the 1958 FAA meet-
ing. But later a group of its members
expressed their firm feeling that the
site of this year's meeting should be
in Ft. Lauderdale, rather than the site
selected by the FAA Convention
Committee. After considerable dis-
cussion the Broward County Chapter
voted to relinquish its opportunity to
host the 1958 Convention in view of
the fact that the FAA's definite com-
mitment for a Convention hotel could
not be changed.
The result of these moves puts the
Mid-Florida Chapter in a unique
position to prove its mettle. It will
be the first Chapter in FAA annals to
act as hosts to a state-wide gathering
held in a community away from its
own area of operations. Through a
successful sponsorship of the 1958
FAA -Convention the Mid-Florida
Chapter will blaze a trail of organiza-
tional activity and regional coopera-
tion that will undoubtedly attract
both regional and national notice.
The idea of conducting Annual
Convention activities in one place
with an FAA Chapter from another
locality acting as host-sponsor was
first proposed at an FAA Board meet-
ing during 1956. Early in 1957, then-


president EDGAR S. WORTMAN ap
pointed a three-man FAA Conven
tion Committee after more Board
discussion. This committee was
charged with the job of selecting hotel
sites adequate for FAA Conventions,
to set up procedures for conducting
Conventions so that work of indi-
vidual Chapter-members could be
lessened and to recommend to the
Board a method of rotating Conven-
tion sponsorship so that all Chapters
of the FAA might have the oppor-
tunity to act as FAA Convention
hosts even though the physical site
of the annual meeting might not be
in their own home area.
Formation of this committee and
an outline of its functions were re-
ported in The Florida Architect issue
of April, 1957. But in spite of the
fact that this new FAA Convention
policy has been actively studied for
more than a year and was ratified
by both FAA Board and Convention
action during the Clearwater meetings
of November, 1957,-reasons behind
it seem unclear to many Chapter
members and even to some of the
FAA directors.
Most of the reasons can be summed
up in one phrase the rapid growth
of Florida's State AIA organization.
During the past five years annual
meetings of the FAA have grown pro-
gressively in both numbers and im-
portance. The Clearwater Conven-
tion, with a full three-day program
and a registration totaling 543,
proved that the FAA had reached a
point where special facilities would
henceforth be necessary. And the
Convention Committee's research
showed clearly that few hotels within
the State could provide these facil-
ities.
Although many other organizations
have adopted the expedient of hold-
ing their conventions at the same
place year after year and dispens-
ing with the idea of their being spon-
sored by various chapters or groups of
members the FAA Convention
Committee wished to avoid this situa-
tion. Thus, it adopted the scheme
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Building gets


NEW LIFT!


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To Clients and Contractors the Lift Slab method
~Of construction offers almost unbelievable
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Percent over other methods; and the 7000
-sq.-ft. slabs of this building were fabricated,
Lifted and anchored in just nine weeks To
Architects and Engineers Lift Slab offers new
Freedom for planning, a wider scope for creative
design. And to all concerned Lift Slab
Pmay well show the way to better, faster and
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MARCH, 1958






Mid-Florida To
Host Convention
(Continued from Page 4)
of designating convention sites well
in advance this year it hopes to
set the site for both the 1959 and
1960 meetings and of inviting
various FAA Chapters to accept host-
sponsorship of convention activities
on a kind of rotation basis. The result
would be to permit even the smallest
and newest of FAA's chapters to act
as host at an Annual FAA Meeting,
even though its home area contained
no facilities adequate to FAA Con-
vention needs.
To make this practical the Com-
mittee recommended to the Board
that the administrative and clerical
work of the necessary pre-convention
activities be centered in the office of
the FAA Executive Director. This
would free chapter members from a
great deal of time-consuming work;
would tend to develop standard opera-
tion procedures for running conven-
tions and would also tend to expedite
and simplify operations through bet-
ter coordination from a central op-
erating office. But the scheme would
still leave with the Chapters the all-
important matter of Convention


theme, character, program and enter
tainment.
It was this operating scheme whicl
was discussed at the pre-Conventior
Board meeting last November anc
approved and ratified on the Conven
tion floor. And in the carrying out o
this scheme relative to the 1958 FA,
Convention, the Mid-Florida Chaptei
will become a pioneer in solidifying
a pattern of FAA organizational activ-
ity designed to strengthen service
operations of the FAA for the increas-
ing benefit of all its chapter members.
Members of the Mid-Florida Chap-
ter are solidly behind President
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO'S determination
to make the 1958 Convention pro-
gram a high peak of professional in-
terest and significance. Study has
already started on a Convention
theme and program. Committee
chairmen to work directly with the
FAA Executive Director's office will
be named by March 1; and it is ex-
pected that plans for the Convention
program can be made public within a
few weeks thereafter. Full details, as
these develop, will be published in
coming issues of The Florida Archi-
tect. Applications for advance regi-
stration and hotel reservations will be
mailed to FAA members in August.


FAA Board of Directors

Meet at Winter Park


First FAA Board of Directors'
meeting of the year was held Satur-
day, February 1, 1958, at the Lang-
ford Hotel, Winter Park. Almost a
full roster of directors was present -
as well as a number of Chapter presi-
dents who had been invited to attend.
Among the latter were JOSEPH M.
SHIFALO, Mid-Florida; JOHN M.
EVANS, Broward County; THOMAS E.
EWART, JR., Jacksonville, and Mc-
MILLAN H. JOHNSON, Florida North.
Present also were all FAA officers and
EDGAR S. WdRTMAN, immediate past-
president of the FAA.
Business of the Board got under
way after the customary luncheon.
President H. SAMUEL KRUSE outlined
the policy of administrative operation
for the year, touching on the new
committee organization authorized by
By-Law changes at the 1957 Conven-


tion and indicating the necessity for
more active committee work through-
out the year. He named his selection
for committee chairmen which was
approved by the directors. (See pages
14, 15 and 16 of this issue for a full
listing of all FAA Committees.)
The Board considered three major
matters in the course of its meeting.
One was Regional Director SANFORD
W. COIN'S comments on the AIA
Board Meeting held at Phoenix, Ari-
zona, last November during which the
FAA's petition for regional status was
presented. The Regional Director
reported that reaction of the AIA
Board to the petition was generally
favorable, particularly in view of the
fact that some other states have also
requested recognition as individual
AIA regions. He said, however, that
(Continued on Page 26)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































.wMkto d/rns of P*Irn/y!


These rotary kilns used in making portland cement
are among the largest pieces of moving machinery
in the world. They are as much as 500 feet long-
the height of a 40-story building-and 12 feet in
diameter-big enough to drive a car through.
Out of these kilns comes a clinker that becomes
portland cement. This cement is used to make con-
crete, a construction material that has contributed
much to the strength and welfare of America.
Portland cement concrete helps create a better
and stronger nation through such diverse uses as
barracks and bridges, homes and hospitals, roads
and reservoirs, streets and schools, farm improve-
ments and factories, pipe lines and public build-
ings. Concrete's unusual resistance to weather-
ing, fire, decay, termites and vermin and its low
annual cost make it such a popular construction


material that the weight of concrete placed annu-
ally exceeds the nation's production of iron, steel,
copper, lead, zinc, aluminum and other non-
ferrous metals, brick, tile and lumber combined.
Developing information for making even more
durable and lower-annual-cost concrete is the job
to which the Portland Cement Association is dedi-
cated. Towards this goal scores of scientists and
engineers are at work on field projects from coast
to coast and in the Association's laboratories near
Chicago. Knowledge gained is made available to
cement users quickly and freely through the PCA's
broad program of education and technical service.
All of these activities are made possible by the
voluntary financial support of PCA's 69 member
companies. These companies make a large part of
the portland cement used in the U. S. and Canada.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
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MARCH, 1958 7



















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from coast to coast are finding the use of Ador all-aluminum sliding
glass doors a real competitive advantage.
iThis sliding glass door trend is motivated by the need for open dis-
play of the motel room to the guest-but beyond this indoor-outdoor
appeal there are many practical advantages. Guests and luggage find
easy entry through the fingertip-action Ador doors. Furniture can be
readily transferred from room to room through the wide openings and
easily moved over the low Ador threshold. Of special importance is the
Ador's exterior lock arrangement which can be keyed and master-keyed.

But, perhaps the greatest value the sliding glass door imparts is a
feeling of luxury at minimum cost. Details such as custom design
Three panels of glass combine jalousie, sliding vent Ador exterior lock with key provides lucite grip hardware and beautiful satin-silver finish are standard on all
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We Need to Know More about Schools





Last month, in Dallas, Texas, Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, spoke
to the 39th Annual Convention of the Associated General
Contractors of America, Inc., at the Statler-Hilton Hotel.
The AIA president touched on the development of America i-.
through use of new resources and commented briefly on the
architectural advances which would result. But most of his
speech dealt with our nation's schools the economics of
school plant construction and the effects of educational pol- 1 -
icies and programs on school planning and design. ...
Because much of what he said has direct and significant
bearing to Florida's overall educational problem, the major .
portion of his speech is reported here. (



By LEON CHATELAIN, JR., FAIA
President, American Institute of Architects


Some doubts about our future are
being raised today because we seemed
to have lagged behind Russia in some
areas. To overcome this lag, there's
a good deal of talk going on about
how to catch up. Some of this talk
involves us the architect and the
builder and we had better pay
heed. We had better pay heed bc-
cause there's confusion and misunder-
standing about public education. A
good deal of this confusion involves
school buildings what they are,
what they're worth, and what they
should cost.
The confusion comes from ignor-
ance; and this is a sad commentary on
American life. The average parent
and home owner is affected more by
the condition of his schools than
nearly anything else in his community
life. His schools cost him money and
affect the welfare of his children -
they hit him in the pocketbook and
in the family. Yet, by and large, the
public knows next to nothing about
its schools. This ignorance is not
confined to the proverbial John Smith
of Everytown, U.S.A. It has been
disseminated recently by a number
of prominent non-educational writers,
thus compounding -the confusion,
and, even worse, encouraging school
boards to embark upon unwise and
wasteful ventures.
MARCH, 1958


In the matter of public education,
basically, we arc dealing with two
kinds of things those we know,
and those we do not know. Here
are some of the facts:
The cost of school buildings has
doubled in the past twenty years, due
to advances in the price of land, ma-
terials, labor, and other expenses.
Yet during this same period in which
school-building costs doubled, the
cost of building generally has tripled.
In the difference between the two
figures lies a real tribute to the dedi-
cation and ingenuity of the nation's
educators, contractors, and architects.
The fact is that the school-building
is still the best bargain, dollar-for-
dollar, on the building market today.
Yet some people claim that schools
are over-priced and represent a heavy
tax burden upon the homeowner. Are
they a tax burden? The simple fact is
that if schools were built for nothing
at all, it would'make very little differ-
ence on the average fax bill. Let's
say that Mr. John Smith receives an
annual property tax bill of two hun-
dred dollars. The chances are his bill
will show that about half, or one
hundred dollars of that amount, will
be spent for education. But of that
one hundred dollars, only about ten
percent, or ten dollars, will be spent
on his municipal school-building pro-


gram. In other words, Mr. Smith's
share of his community's school-build-
ing costs will cost about the same
amount that he would spend in one
evening by hiring a baby-sitter and
taking his wife to dinner and a movic.
If school building increased at
the same pace for fifteen years, Mr.
Smith would pay about as much for
his new school buildings during that
time as he spends on one modest tele-
vision set. This does not seem unrea-
sonable.
The substantial expense of school
buildings is the interest paid on
financing and the annual cost of
maintenance and repair. For this rea-
son, we have this seeming paradox -
only the wealthy community can
afford a cheap school. We reject the
argument that school buildings should
be monuments. We feel that we won
this argument many years ago. We
can save money by avoiding the trap-
pings and ornaments of the past -
the fake columns, the parapet roofs,
and the gingerbread. Forcing schools
into a certain "look" adds nothing to
education, creates community eve-
sores, and wastes imagination and
money. Contemporary design is
simply the freedom to solve a prob-
lem without boxing a building into an
artificial style.
(Continued on Page 10)






About Schools ...

(Continued from Page 9)
Recently, several writers have stated
that schools are being designed as
"palaces," and that they're costing
too much; that this is so because edu-
cators, architects, and contractors
want it that way. This is sheer non-
sense. In each of these diatribes, the
writers have pointed to two or three
specific schools as examples which
prove their statements. The alleged
high cost of one of the schools was
cited over and over again. However,
no one mentioned that the commun-
ity in which the school is located has
an average annual family income of
twenty-one thousand dollars! Who
are we, or anyone else, to say that the
citizens of this rich suburb wasted
their money by buying a truly first-
class school?
On what should they have spent
their money? Has anyone criticized
them for buying new cars, new
clothes, and new television sets? Since
when is a school less important than
incidental, personal luxuries? It
seems to me there is a serious ques-
tion of human values at issue here.
Money can be saved on schools.
Of course it can. But it is rare when
very much of it can be saved on the
job site. The real savings to the com-
munity accrue through long-range
planning of school buildings. A ten-
year advance program is not unreal-
istic. Community studies on popula-
tion trends, projected location of in-
dustry, residential building plans, and
zoning development can be made at
great future savings to the commun-
ity. Planning targets can be adjusted
from year to year. Architects are given
time to make thoughtful design
studies. Contractors may bid more
accurately. Jobs are not dumped to-
gether on saturated building markets
which deprive the school board of
bidding competition. School boards
are not stampeded into rash decisions
and cut-rate schemes. Communities
are not persuaded to accept temporary
"package" buildings, fabricated with-
out professional advice and without
the needs of the individual site and
educational program in mind.
It may seem a new thought to
some, but the fact is that it would be
hard to find two municipal school sys-
tems in our entire nation which teach
the same thing in exactly the same
way. This is basic to American edu-
10


cation. As the architect and contrac-
tor know, seemingly minor changes
in teaching methods and material can
make substantial differences in the
school building. Take a science class-
room, for example. Will the students
be taught mainly at their desks, or
while standing at the chalkboards?
The answer to just this one question
will affect the amount of wall space
needed, the size of the wall boards,
the amount of storage required, the
type and size of seating equipment,
and the intensity and location of
lighting.
When you add to these questions
of curriculum and method the
peculiar needs of the local soil, the
climate, the degree of natural light
available, and the availability of ma-
terials and labor, you begin to realize
why educational facilities cannot be
mass-produced on a stock basis.
Besides long-range planning and
design tailored to specific community
needs, permanence of building is
essential to economy. Consider the
cost of replacing temporary buildings
not just the construction, but the
financing. The difference between a
two percent and three percent inter-
est rate can be twenty percent of the
cost of the entire building. Today's
school should be built of first-class
materials and it should be built to
last for forty years. This is not incom-
patible with flexibility. The good
school is situated on enough ground
to allow for expansion. It is designed
so that additional units can easily
be added without tearing down exist-
ings walls and laying new utility lines.
It is designed, as we like to say, for
ultimate use.
These are some of the things that
we know about education, and it is
our job, yours and mine, to tell this
story through our organizations and
individually, to the people we meet
and do business with. There are many
other things that we do not know,
but which are of interest to all of us.
I hope I have not given the impres-
sion that we know all there is to
know about designing for education.
One considerable area of uncertainty
concerns the psychological effects of
architecture upon man. There is con-
siderable hope, I am happy to report,
that we will shortly begin to find out
many new things about this subject.
The National Science Foundation has
granted a sum of money for us to
hold a conference which will in-


elude psychologists and sociologists-
to define needed areas of basic re
search in architecture.
These definitions have not yet beei
made, but I believe it can be pre
dicted fairly that some of them wil
have to do with finding the answer
to questions about human scale an(
the psychological effects of color. W<
know, for example, that lower ceiling:
cut down the cubic footage of a room
and, all things being equal, help re
duce the building cost of the unit
However, what effect does this have
on the students in a schoolroom? We
really do not know. This may seem
a rather obscure question. But is not
when you consider that the design
of one building can give the occupant
a sense of freedom and space while
another-containing the same square
footage seems to cramp and con-
strict. We know this much by ob-
servation. We also know that we
must find out the why to these ques-
tions before we can do as much as
we should to design a building which
materially encourages the learning
process.
Let us examine another part of the
educational problem. There is an
avalanche of effort today to provide
more and better scientists through
public education. As architects-the
people who plan human environment
and whose work must be tailored to
the function of the structure in ques-
tion we are greatly interested in
this subject.
The United States Department of
Health, Education and Welfare has
proposed a far-ranging scholarship
award program to worthy high school
students throughout the nation.
When we heard this, we immediately
thought of the logical connection be-
tween the awarding of scholarships -
mostly for science students and
the need for physical facilities in the
schools. It doesn't make much sense
to have one without the other. We've
been told by Secretary Folsom that
we're in trouble because only one out
of three high school students get a
year of chemistry, and only one out of
four takes physics. It seemed to me
that someone should speak out about
the obvious need for new and better
classroom facilities for science. It did,
until my staff looked into the subject
a little further. The available facts
were, to say the least, confusing.
According to the Department of
(Continued on Page 18)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































View from living room and porch overlooks lawn and grove toward golf course.


Planned for Future Expansion


Residence in St. Petersburg,

Bruce Smith, AIA, Architect-Owner



With himself for a client, an archi-
tect can practice what he preaches.
For his own home, Bruce Smith did
just that; and hardly a small detail of
the house pictured here was devel-
oped without good reason. The result
is a comfortable shelter for the Smith
family today but one which has
been planned for additions as future
circumstances may require.
The property is large seven acres
coursed by a creek, covered with a
grove of palmettoes, groups of oaks, I
bays and myrtle. The house is ori-
ented for views of the golf course and
the creek with plans for develop- ." '
ing the creek side on tap for the Carport serves as entrance shelter to both front (through porch) and
(Continued on Page 12) entrances. Screen cage over patio was made high to enhance outdoor eff


11


rear
*ect.


MARCH, 1958













future. Privacy is natural thus per
mitting almost complete openness oi
the southeast exposure of the one
room-deep plan. Shrewd use of porcl
and patio areas next to glass-closurec
Walls gives an illusion of size and free
dom which will be retained where
future additions turn the present liv-
ing room into a planned-for dining
room, provide a new living room at
the end of the present porch and
extend the northwest wing to include
one or more bedrooms.
Retained also will be all the pres-
ent assets of the Smith's home the
cross-ventilation in every room which
makes air-conditioning virtually un-
necessary; the screened bays, eliminat-
ing need for sash screens; the clay-tile
flooring, built of hollow units which





Above, children's porch (from nurs-
ery) opens to sleeping quarters
through 10-foot doors and has direct
connection to large screened patio.
Left, the present living room will be-
come the dining room when future
additions have been completed. A
pass-through from kitchen now serves
as a convenient serving area for buf-
fet suppers in living room and porch.
This view is from the patio outside
S ik, the living room window walls.










Indoor outdoor merger of
living space in this small
house is particularly evident
at night. Much of the light-
ing is from fixtures pointed
at the ceiling to produce an
indirect illumination. This
is supplemented by local
lighting--from spots, chair
lamps and an up-and-down
fixture in north-east corner
of the living room illustrated
in the picture on the oppo-
site page.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












serve as under-floor distribution ducts
for a forced warm-air heating system;
the varied use of "natural" materials
throughout Pasco County limerock
and used brick for walls, brick and
tile paving on patio and porches, fir
beams and posts, v-joint fir ceilings.
Indoors wood surfaces are mostly
stained gray except in the kitchen
(palmetto green and yellow) and the
redwood plywood used on the chil-
dren's porch. Outdoors a gray stain
has also been used on posts, beams
and trim, with the fence enclosing the
service areas left the natural color of
redwood.
The overall result is convenience
and casual comfort in terms of needs
and a complete adaptability in terms
of future growth.


The architect-owner has proved that even in a very small house the varying
requirements of children and adults can be met in a kind of zoned arrange-
ment. Children's areas-nursery, play porch and screened patio-are easily
supervised from any part of the house. But they can be separated from adults'
quarters quite as easily. Photographs of the Smiths' home were taken by
Annette and Rudi Rada. Interiors were decorated and furnished by E. C.
Hoffman and Myricks.


MARCH, 1958











Personnel and Duties of Vertical Committees for 1958


1 ... CHAPTER AFFAIRS -
Chairman, John L. R. Grand (Fla. No.)
Dept. of Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
Duties: To unify the efforts and objectives of all Chapters;
to encourage an interchange of information on Chapter affairs
and problems. In 1958 to continue the study and promote the
recommendations of the 1957 Committee on Chapter Coordina-
tion and Committee on Committees.
Assignment: Submit to The Florida Architect for publication
a description of the Chapter-Affair-of-the-Quarter selected by
the Committee after a study of the activities of the various
Chapters.

2... EDUCATION -
Chairman, William B. Eaton (Fla. Cent.)
2910 Grand Central, Tampa
Duties: At FAA level, to act as liaison between FAA Chapters,
the State Board of Architecture and educational institutions
and schools in the State which involve the construction industry
and the architectural profession. Develop long-range educational
objectives in Florida including advancement and improvement
of educational facilities and programs; advise on education
projects, funds for educational use and promotion of registration-
candidate training programs; andi presentation of the architec-
tural profession's interests to the State Board of Architecture
on matters of registration and maintenance of high standards
of competency as prerequisites for registration.
Assignment: Recommend to the Board at its 3 May meeting a
workable plan for the recruitment of high school students for
the profession.

3 ... OFFICE PRACTICE -
Chairman, Frank H. Shuflin (Fla. So.)
702 Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Duties: To explore the possibility of assisting the architect to
perfect himself in his profession through technical improvement
in his office organization and techniques; and to develop office
aids to accomplish this purpose.
Assignment: Submit to the Board at its 3 May meeting the
results of a study of the organizational and office practice
technique problems most universal among Florida architects and
recommend the course of action to assist architects in one or
more of these problems.

4 AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS -
Chairman, L. Alex Hatton (Mid-Fla.)
815 E. Colonial Drive, Orlando
Duties: In general, make recommendations for the giving of
awards and scholarships within the State of Florida to foster
the Allied Arts and promote ever closer relationships between
architects and sculptors, painters and other artists practicing
the fine arts allied with architecture; and supervise the pro-
gramming and presentation of FAA Student Scholarships at the
University of Florida and any others which might be established
by the FAA.
Assignment: Present to the Board at its 2 August meeting a
workable plan for giving awards to the clients of commendable
work performed by Florida architects.

5 PUBLIC RELATIONS -
Chairman, Roy M. Pooley, Jr. (Jax)
1028 Gary Street, Jacksonville
Duties: To coordinate work of similar committees in each of the
FAA Chapters with the national program of the Institute in
Public Relations matters; to formulate public relations policies
on behalf of the architectural profession at the State level; and


BROWARD


Morton T.
Ironmonger









Robert E.
Hansen


DAYTONA
BEACH


Ralph Spicer


FLORIDA
CENTRAL


Roland W.
Sellew


William P. Roland W.
Greening Sellew


SFLA. NO.
FLA. NORTH CENTRAL


Jack Moore










William
Breidenbach


Herbert S. William P. Thomas V. William
Johnson Greening Talley Breidenbach


Robert E.
Hansen











Joseph T.
Romano


William P.
Greening











Francis R.
Walton


William B.
Eaton











Elliott B.
Hadley


William
Breidenbach











Harry
Reynolds


Ernest J.
Stidolph









Ernest J.
Stidolph













Ernest J.
Stidolph










Ernest J.
Stidolph











Albert P.
Woodard


FLA. NORTH FLORIDA
WEST SOUTH


Ula F.
Manning









R. Daniel
Hart













Hugh J.
Leitch










R. Daniel
Hart











Roger G.
Weeks


Irvin
Korach









T. Trip
Russell













Theodore
Gottfried










T. Trip
Russell











Wayne F.
Sessions


JACKSON- MID-
VILLE FLORIDA


Willis L.
Stephens









Ivan H.
Smith













George
Fisher


George H.
Spohn









Richard B.
Rogers













F. Earl
DeLoe


PALM
BEACH


Harold V.
Obst









Jefferson N.
Powell













Jefferson N.
Powell


Norman H. Laurance W. Jefferson N.
Freedman Hitt Powell


Herbert
Coons, Jr.


Fred G. Ames
Owles, Jr. Bennett




monrig DeTrer unCersTanoing Derween Tne architect and the build-
ing industry and ever-increasing standards of performance and
service to the public, including the development of better and
more uniform building codes. The Chairman of this Committtee
shall be the FAA representative on the FAA-AGC-FES Joint Co-
operative Committee for the State of Florida.

7 ... COLLABORATION WITH DESIGN PROFESSIONS -
Chairman, C. Ellis Duncan (Palm Beach)
P. O. Box 695, Vero Beach
Duties: To cooperate on problems of mutual interest to the design
professions and other groups dealing with basic elements of
design and site planning. The Chairman of this Committee will
represent the FAA on the FAA-AGC-FES Joint Cooperative
Committee for the State of Florida.

8 .. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT -
Chairman, William T. Arnett (Fla. No.)
Dept. of Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
Duties: To cooperate on problems of mutual interest with the
Florida Planning and Zoning Association; to foster and encour-
age a study of re-planning and re-development of existing
communities as well as the planning and development of new
areas; and to invite the interest and participation of new mem-
bers of the architectural profession. To exchange and dissemin-
ate information regarding these activities. To encourage study
and research by the architectural profession of the various factors
which are a part of this understanding. To demonstrate by this
interest and activity the ability of the architectural profession
to assume a position of leadership in this field. To study the
criteria and procedures of agencies engaged in financing of indi-
vidual and multiple housing for the purpose of recommending to
these agencies the improving of present requirements ard prac-
tices with respect to both financing and design; or for the
purpose of other study, report and action.

9... PRESERVATION OF HISTORIC IlLDINGS -
Chairman, Francis H. Hollingsworth (Jax)
216 City Building, St. Augustine
Duties: To foster the preservation of the historic buildings of
the State of Florida, particularly those having architectural sig-
nificance, by encouraging the establishment of agencies to care
for them, in collaboration with the appropriate chapter when
that is feasible. To promote the preparation of measured draw-
ings and taking of photographs and the assembling of historic
data for filing in the FAA Archives in the University of Florida
of historic buildings to be razed and for which preservation is
not feasible.

10... RESEARCH -
Chairman, Robert E. Hansen (Broward)
311 S. E. 16th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale
Duties: To develop a comprehensive, continuing program of
architectural research with the FAA and in collaboration with the
building industry; and to make the results available to the pro-
fession, particularly the membership of the FAA.
Assignment: Submit to the Board at its 3 May meeting a
recommended course of action for the active participation of
the FAA in the proposed Florida Foundation for the Advancement
of Building.

11 ... SCHOOL BUILDINGS -
Chairman, James E. Garland (Fla. So.)
7795 S. W. 79th Court, Miami
Duties: To study the principles of planning up-to-date school
buildings and to make available conclusions of the studies to the
membership of the FAA and to the profession. To institute
programs along with the Public Relations Committee for dis-
seminating new ideas in school planning to the school boards
of the State of Florida.

12... HOSPITALS AND HEALTH -
Chairman, R. Daniel Hart (Fla. No. West)
P. O. Box 928, Pensacola
Duties: To cooperate with state agencies engaged in programs
affecting the hospitalization and public health; to cooperate
with private agencies likewise engaged for the purpose of
establishing procedures and design criteria of mutual value.


Frederick B. Joel W. John M.
Stressau Sayers Crowell


A. Courtney
Stewart


David
Leete


Elliott B.
Hadley


Robert G. Harry M. A. Wynn
Jahelka Griffin Howell


William A.
Gilroy









Van W.
Knox







William A.
Gilroy


Francis R.
Walton









Craig J.
Gehlert


Edmond N.
MacCollin


Myrl J.
Hanes






Lester N.
May
















Lester
N. May









David
Reaves


Kenneth W. David
Dalzell, Jr. Reaves


Martin P.
Fishback, Jr.


David
Reaves


Albert P.
Woodard






Prentiss
Huddleston
















Prentiss
Huddleston









Forrest R.
Coxen









Forrest R.
Coxen







Forrest R.
Coxen


F. Treadway
Edson






F. Treadway
Edson
















Ula F.
Manning









Thomas H.
Daniels









Ellis W.
Bullock, Jr.







Hugh J.
Leitch


Edwin T.
Reeder






William
Russell


Lamar
Drake


Rhoderic H. Hilliard T.
Taylor Smith


Robert C. L. Alex
Broward Hatton


A. J. Simberg W. Stanley
Gordon


Henry P.
Whitworth









Carl E.
Epting, Jr.


Kenneth
Jacobson
















David S.
Shriver









Maurice E.
Holley









Edgar S.
Wortman







Donald R.
Edge


Albert L.
Smith


Francis E.
Telesca









Chester L.
Craft, Jr.







Blair
Wright


A. Robert Robert B.
Broadfoot Murphy


Robert A.
Warner


Ralph P.
Lovelock








FAA Standing Committees for 1958..


1 ... LEGISLATIVE -
Chairman, James K. Pownall (Broward)
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Membership: Broward, Donald H. Moeller; Daytona Beach,
Edwin Snead; Florida Central, Anthony L. Pullara; Florida
Central, Albert P. Woodard; Florida North West, Carlton Nob-
lin; Florida South, Herbert R. Savage; Jacksonville, J. Brooks
Haas; Mid-Florida, James Gamble Rogers, II; Palm Beach,
George J. Votaw.
Duties: The Committee on Legislation is an operating com-
mittee of the FAA. Its function is to guard and advance
the interests of Florida architects as these may be involved
with actions of the Florida State Legislature. The Com-
mittee organizes and coordinates the chapter activities and
those of individual architects with that of the FAA Execu-
tive Director to these ends. The Committee works closely
with the FAA Board and the Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture and maintains a close contact with legislative affairs
toward the end of providing the architectural profession
in Florida with an effective and state-wide representation
of its coordinated needs.
Assignment: The vertical committee shall be the basic com-
mittee. Submit to the Board at its May 3 meeting the full
committee, its organization and its operational directions.
2... MEMBERSHIP -
Chairman, James A. Stripling (Fla. No. Cen.)
Fla. Educ. Assoc. Bldg., Tallahassee
Membership: Broward, Morton T. Ironmonger; Daytona Beach,
Carl Gerken; Florida Central, Roland W. Sellew; Florida North,
John L. R. Grand; Florida No. Central, Ernest J. Stidolph; Flor-
ida North West, Samuel M. Marshall; Florida South, Scott
Arnold; Jacksonville, W. Mayberry Lee; Mid-Florida, Joseph E.
Carlisle; Palm Beach, Harold V. Obst.
3... BUDGET -
Chairman, Edwin T. Reeder (Fla. So.)
Dupont Plaza Center, Miami
Membership: Morton T. Ironmonger, Broward; Arthur Lee
Campbell, Florida North; Verner Johnson, Florida South; Wil-
liam B. Harvard, Florida Central.
4... NOMINATING Personnel to be named at later date.
5 ... JOINT COOPERATIVE COMMITTEE, FAA-AGC-FES -
Chairman, John Stetson (Palm Beach)
217 Peruvian Avenue, Palm Beach
Membership: Anthony L. Pullara, Florida Central; C. Ellis Dun-
can, Palm Beach.
6 ... BY-LAWS CONSTITUTION CHANGES -
Chairman, Walter B. Schultz (Jax)
227 Park Street, Jacksonville
Membership: A. Wynn Howell, Florida Central; Jefferson N.
Powell, Palm Beach; James L. Deen, Florida South.
Assignment: Prepare the necessary changes in the Constitu-
tion and By-Laws to be enacted should the FAA become a
regional district of the AIA. Prepare changes in By-Laws
which will permit the Board and Treasurer to delegate the
operations of their duties to the Executive Director's office.


Define the Executive Director's place in the FAA organic
zation.
7 ...RESOLUTIONS Personnel to be named at a later datE
8... BOARD OF TRUSTEES, FAA Loan Fund -
Chairman, John L. R. Grand (Fla. No.)
Dept. of Arch., Univ. of Fla., Gainesville
Membership: Edward M. Fearney, Florida North; William 1
Arnett, Florida North.
9 ... CONVENTION POLICY -
Chairman, Verner Johnson,-to serve 1 yr. (Fla. So.)
215 N. E. 18th Street, Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Florida Central
10... FLORIDA-REGION OF AIA -
Chairman, Franklin S. Bunch (Jax.)
33 So. Hogan Street, Jacksonville
Membership: Marion I. Manley, FAIA, Florida South; G. Clin
ton Gamble, Broward.
II ... FAA BOARD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE -
Chairman, H. Samuel Kruse (Fla. So.)
Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Membership: Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Florida Central; ArthL
Lee Campbell, Florida North; William B. Harvard, Florida Cen
tral; Verner Johnson, Florida South. Ex-Officio members: Mor
ton T. Ironmonger, Broward; Edgar S. Wortman, Palm Beacl
Roger W. Sherman, FAA Exec. Dir.
DUTIES OF VICE-PRESIDENTS .
Vice Presidents shall be responsible for the timely reporting
of the vertical committees assigned to them and encourage
committee action.
Vice Presidents will make monthly reports to the Presider
of their assigned committees' activities, as well as the activi
ties of the Chapters in their districts.
Vice Presidents shall visit at least one meeting of each c
their Chapters during the year and arrange to give, at these
meetings, a three-minute talk explaining how FAA help
Chapters.
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS:
Arthur Lee Campbell ..
(No. Florida District)
1 Chapter Affairs
2 Public Relations
3 Community Development
4 Preservation of Historic Buildings
William B. Harvard .
(Cen. Florida District)
1 Education
2 Awards and Scholarships
3 Hospitals and Health
Verner Johnson .
(So. Florida District)
1 Office Practice
2 Research
3 School Buildings
4 Home Building-Construction Industry
5 Relations with Design Professions


FAA Office Moved

to Dupont Plaza Center

The long-planned-for move has
finally taken place! Last month the
FAA files were trucked into the
Dupont Plaza Center. With them,
of course, went all the files of The
Florida Architect; and shortly the
FAA Administrative Office will have
a formal downtown Miami address.
We say "shortly," because right
now our new headquarters office is


not numbered; and for another month
mail should be still addressed to the
old headquarters at 7225 S. W. 82nd
Court, Miami 43. But the office is
operating right now. It's located on
the mezzanine floor, just off the
Tarleton Hotel lobby and overlooks
Biscayne Bay to the south and east.
The space, of course, is part of that
designated by the building's manage-
ment for use by the architectural pro-
fession some 2500 square feet of
it which the Florida South Chapter
is now considering plans to develop


and furnish.
Some construction is still going o
in the building and around or
office the "finishing touches" ai
very much in evidence. But the furn
ture and telephones are in; and w
can always find a place for a visitor I
sit and chat awhile. Incidentally their
are two telephones, one for the FA
Executive Director's office listing; tl
other for listing in the name of T1
Florida Architect. The former
FRanklin 1-8253; the latter FRankli
1-8331.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Regional Conference Plans Complete


By GILBERT WATERS
1958 Regional Conference Manager


Florida, Georgia, North Carolina
and South Carolina architects are
assured a memorable meeting when
they attend the 1958 South Atlantic
Regional Conference of the American
Institute of Architects in the Gulf
Coast resort city of Sarasota on April
17 through 19.
The entire city has cooperated to
arrange an unmatched program. And
nationally recognized speakers are
coming to Sarasota to participate in
"shirt-sleeves" roundtable discussions
of the Conference theme "The Archi-
tect's New Responsibilities in the
Dynamic South." WILLIAM ZIMMER-
MAN is program chairman. CARL
VOLLMER is speakers' chairman.
Speakers who have agreed to par-
ticipate include: RICHARD NEUTRA
of Los Angeles, a fellow of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects, famous
for his individual architectural works
and a leader in the field of commun-
ity planning; and PAUL RUDOLPH,
recently named Chairman of the De-
partment of Architecture of Yale
University.
Rudolph, a native of Kentucky, and
a graduate of Alabama Polytechnic
Institute and Harvard University, has
practiced in Sarasota, Florida, since
1947. He has been visiting lecturer


This suggests some of the top-quality
acts which will be witnessed by Con-
ference visitors at a special Lido
Casino showing.
MARCH, 1958


at schools throughout the nation, in-
cluding Georgia Institute of Tech-
nology, Clemson College, and the
University of Florida. He won the
"Outstanding Young Architect's
Award" at the Brazilian International
Competition in 1954.
Other speakers will be announced
later.
For the ladies, there will be recrea-
tion activities at Sarasota's superlative
white sand Gulf beaches, as well as
tours and luncheons, arranged by
JOYCE WEST, ladies' events chairman.
The Conference Headquarters is
in the downtown Orange Blossom
Hotel, and Sarasota's luxury Gulf-
front resort accommodations arc also
making 200 rooms available to Con-
ference-goers at special rates obtained
by E. C. HANEBUTH, reservation
chairman.
Delegates who fly in will have
rental cars at their disposal at low
rates set especially for the Confer-
ence. A schedule of free Conference
busses has also been arranged by DICK
SLATER, transportation chairman.
Sarasota's Sailor Circus a super-
lative aggregation of nationally fam-
ous young circus performers will
give a private performance for the
Conference at Lido Casino. The
Ringling Museum will be host at a
reception for the Conference in the
beautifully landscaped courtyard of
the celebrated Italian baroque


museum. Reception is in charge of
E. J. SEIBERT.
The annual Architectural Awards
Exhibit is being presented at the Sara-
sota Art Association Galleries and
will be a featured presentation of the
Sarasota cultural season. Entry forms
for the exhibit have been sent to all
architects in the region by BETH
WATERS, architectural exhibit chair-
man.
The Conference Building Products
Exhibit was virtually sold out by mid-
February the earliest of any Re-
gional Conference on record. Nearly
60 manufacturers will display the
latest products and services for the
building industry. WERNER KANNEN-
BERG is exhibits chairman and JOHN
CROWELL is manufacturers' exhibit
chairman.
With the Sarasota area considered
by many as a cradle of contemporary
architecture, a tour of Sarasota build-
ings arranged by JACK WEST will in-
clude a number of projects of real
significance in annals of recent design.
Registration and reservation in-
formation has been sent to architects
in the 15 Chapters in the four States
of the South Atlantic District, and
registrations are being received at the
Conference Headquarters, 12 South
Pineapple Ave., Sarasota, it is an-
nounced by ROLLAND W. SELLEW,
Regional Conference general chair-
man.


Sarasota's Municipal Auditorium will be headquarters for the 1958 S.A. Reg-
ional Conference. It will house an exhibit of architects' work in addition to a
building product exhibit of almost 60 materials and equipment manufacturers
and distributors.






About Schools...
(Continued from Page 10)
Health, Education and Welfare,
ninety-two percent of the senior high
schools in the country were offering
chemistry and physics in 1956. But,
at the same time, only thirty-six per-
cent of the senior high school stu-
dents were taking chemistry and only
twenty-six percent were taking physics.
The figures seem to show clearly that
the facilities are there, the courses are
available the students just aren't
taking them.
There is another disturbing factor
here. The figures themselves don't
tell us what kind of facilities our
schools have; what sort of programs
are being offered. Are they good pro-
grams? We couldn't find out. Sev-
eral educational organizations have
told us within the past few days that
they're just now planning to find out.
The National Science Teachers Asso-
ciation tells us that we don't even
know how many science classrooms in
the country have gas, electrical out-
lets, and running water. In this proud
nation of pushbuttons, new car styles,
color television, and the chemise, this
is lamentable ignorance.
There is another element which is
much harder to measure. This is the
imagination and interest of the
teacher. The best laboratory in the
country won't produce a good science
program if the teacher is inadequate.
However, it can be argued that an
imaginative teacher can conduct a
good science program without elab-


orate classroom facilities. Physics can
be taught with a book, a buzzer, a dry
cell, and a few brain cells. A running
stream near a schoolhouse can be used
for water-flow experiments and chem-
ical analysis.
Another question we must ask con-
ccrns the number of science students
we want. Is it a bad thing that one
out of three high school pupils takes
chemistry? Isn't that enough? Will
mass scholarships and more facilities
produce Einsteins? Would more
music schools produce Bethovens?
You can encourage geniuses, but can
you mass-produce them? It is rela-
tively easy to raise many serious ques-
tions concerning all of the crash pro-
grams which have been outlined to us.
Obviously, we need a thorough un-
derstanding of our assets and needs
before we can draw enough solid con-
clusions to put us on the proper path.
This is of more than passing interest
to architects and contractors, because
the improvement of teaching meth-
ods and curricula will inevitably lead
to improvement in the physical facil-
ities of schools. One leads irrcsistably
to another.
From what we now know, I offer
several personal observations. They
are not original or new, yet I think
they are valid. We do know that we
need more school buildings so that
classes do not become too large for
effective teaching. We do know that
we should pay our teachers more -
much more in order to get and
hold the best possible people for the
important job of teaching.


I believe we also face a funda-
mental problem of reassessing our
thinking about education. We can-
not turn back the clock and say that
everything will be much better if we
just re-concentrate on the three R's.
There are no longer sharply divergent
schools of progressive and conserva-
tive education. Experimentation is
always necessary to progress. In many
American cities today, school boards
are experimenting with teaching by
means of closed-circuit television sys-
tems. This can hardly be called a frill
or a waste of money.
I do think, however, that we need
to place a good deal more emphasis
on scholastic excellence, on competi-
tion among students within the
schoolroom. I also firmly believe that
we all have a big job to do outside the
schoolroom. We blame youth for
lack of interest in science and explain
it on the ground that our youth con-
siders scientists to be "cgg-heads" and
therefore social oddities. Yet in the
face of this statement, youthful ex-
perimentation in rocketry has become
so widespread that there is serious
concern over the likelihood of per-
sonal injuries. This does not sound
as though youth lacks interest in
science. One priceless and unique
characteristic of youth is its perpetual
curiosity. We, as adults, have the
power to direct that curiosity into
worthy channels. There seems to be
evidence that we have failed to do
this; instead, we have forfeited these
opportunities through preoccupation
with amusing and coddling ourselves


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





with material comforts and needless
luxuries.
Perhaps it is we who really need
re-education. Certainly we need re-
education which will make us want to
put our spare dollars into better
schools rather than into more per-
sonal gadgets. It is for us to set the
examples, else youth, as it always has,
will reflect our attitudes and lose sight
of those things in life which are
worthy of its time.
I am not at all sure that the educa-
tion our children are getting today is
any worse than it was twenty years
ago. However, I am sure that today's
children need far more and better
education than has ever been neces-
sary in the past. As architects and
contractors, it is our joint responsi-
bility to build schools which, unlike
the prison-like, pompous buildings of
yesterday, serve to encourage learning.
If such buildings can be combined
with imaginative teaching that stimu-
lates student curiosity in the physical
sciences-and the arts-it is entirely
possible that our young people may
come to consider the acquisition of
knowledge as something which is not
socially desirable, but pleasurable. If
this is done, we as a nation will have
nothing to fear from anybody not
even ourselves.



The Institute Is Planning
New Series of P/R Movies
The first two in a series of semi-
animated movie shorts on architec-
tural subjects have just been com-
pjleted and can be either purchased
or rented from the AIA. Done on a
minimum budget, both are 15-minute
cartoon films intended primarily as
discussion aids for adult and youth
groups, though also suitable for TV.
One, "What's a House?" traces the
evolution of residences and points up
the importance of the architect in
solving problems of site planning,
orientation and construction.
The second "A School for
Johnny" is concerned with filling
community needs for schools, indi-
cating how architects are meeting
modern educational requirements in
terms of design and structural econ-
omies.
The films are for sale at $65 each,
or may be rented for $5 per film.
MARCH, 1958


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes


Broward County

The February 7 meeting of Flor-
ida's third largest AIA Chapter was
held following luncheon at the Galt
Ocean Mile Hotel and was one of
the largest on record. Chief purpose
of the meeting was to permit mem-
bers to consider the report of a Chap-
ter committee including President
JOHN M. EVANS, Vice-President JACK
\V. ZIMMER and FAA Director WIL-
LIAM F. BIGONEY which, on the pre-
ceding Saturday, had discussed the
matter of Ft. Lauderdale as the site
for the 1958 FAA Convention before
the FAA Board of Directors at its
Winter Park meeting. Present by in-
vitation at the Broward meeting were


FAA President, H. SAMUEL KRUSE,
FAA Vice-President VERNER JOHN-
SON, FAA Secretary ERNEST T. H.
BOWEN, II, and the Executive Direc-
tor and Administrative Secretary of
the FAA.
Director Bigoncy outlined the pro-
posal made to the FAA Board: that
the Miami Beach hotel selected by
the FAA Convention Committee
(represented at this meeting by John-
son, present chairman, and Bowen,
1957 chairman) be changed as a 1958
convention site in favor of a com-
bination of two adjacent hotels in the
Ft. Lauderdale area. FAA officers
pointed out that a contract with the
selected hotel had already been
signed; that it could not now be


broken; and that the choice lay with
the Chapter as to whether it would
serve as the 1958 Convention hosts
under these circumstances or relin-
quish the opportunity to pioneer the
new FAA convention scheme to an-
other chapter.
Opinion was divided among those
leading the discussion following Bi-
goney's report; but at the final vote a
majority decided that the Chapter
should forego the Convention spon-
sorship this year. In announcing the
decision, President Evans pledged the
Chapter's active participation in the
1958 Convention to the extent, at
least, of "100 percent attendance."
Other Chapter business of im-
(Continued on Page 22)


Message from The President

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA

Next month, 17-19 April, the South Atlantic We can't become
District 1958 Regional Conference takes place we gain support fron
in Sarasota, our Florida Central Chapter being South Atlantic District
the Sponsor and The Florida Architect being the port unless we can sho
Conference Publication. Concurrent with the up. Adult concern foi
Conference, the Regional Council meets to per- lems, although these p
S form regional business. Each Chapter of the directly, is one manif
South Atlantic District has one Representative It will be important th
on this Council. Each Representative of the to Sarasota be large ii
Council casts the number of votes which his pation active and mat
Chapter was accredited with at the Institute The year 1958 seems
Convention in Washington, D. C. banner year of firsts.
If Chapters have not already done so, their the FAA moved into i
Council Representatives should be selected im- the office of the FAA
mediately. Only those individuals who are certain and/or secretary, and r
S they can attend the Council should be selected in various nooks and c
and these individuals should be thoroughly in- domicile. Our new hoi
structed as to the accredited number of votes Building in Miami, F
their Chapters are entitled to and the policies paint is hardly dry, it
and ambitions of the Florida Association of visitors. Drop in an(
Architects. It seems appropriate that the < office, you know.
S Regional Council at the Sarasota meeting make With the official
some official expression concerning FAA's ambi- appointments accomp
Stion to b-come a District of the Institute. It is hope that committees
believed that an expression favorable to FAA is th-ir assignments. T
S po sible with a 100 percent Florida vote as a has a particularly im]
nucleus, our organization for tl


i Regional District unless
Sour sister states of the
. We can't gain their sup-
w that we are ready-grown-
* solving professional prob-
roblems might not be ours
station of our readiness.
at the FAA representation
i numbers and its partici-
ure.
destined to become FAA's
On Thursday, 13 February,
ts first home. In the past
moved with each president
nore recently had its being
crannies of The Shermans'
ne is in the Dupont Plaza
'lorida, and, although the
is ready for business and
I say, "Hello." It's your

notification of committee
lished, it is our earnest
will attack immediately
he Legislative Committee
portant task of preparing
he legislative year.


MARCH, 1958


. ij






News & Notes


(Continued from Page 21)
portance included the following:
Chapter participation in the Broward
Building Exposition to be held in
Ft. Lauderdale, March 11 to 15, to
feature a graphic explanation of the
architect's function; formation of a
Chapter speakers' bureau to be made
available to community groups; and
a continuation of the Chapter's past
participation in a student scholarship
program. Part of the members' dis-
cussion centered on ways to help solve
some of Broward County's problems
which have developed as a result of
the area's unusually rapid expansion.
Treasurer Louis WOLFF reported
as head of the Chapter Party Com-
mittee; and as a result of discussion
relative to his report, the Chapter
voted to hold its 1958 party at the
home of a member rather than at a
hotel or club. But at adjournment-
time no member had volunteered to
act as host to the 75 couples which
the committee had estimated would
attend.


Florida Central
The Tampa Terrace Hotel was the
site of the February 8 meeting of the
Chapter's Executive Board and mem-
bers. The Board met at 10:30 A.M.
with eight Chapter directors and
GILBERT WATERS, Regional Confer-
ence Manager, present. Minutes of
the preceding meetings (on Decem-
ber 14) were ratified an action
necessary due to the absence of a
quorum in December. At the Chapter


meeting, called to order by President
ROBERT H. LEVISON at 2:45, the 32
members attending approved the re-
port of 1957 Convention Treasurer
JACK MCCANDLESS and gave him a
rising vote of thanks for his painstak-
ing and efficient services. They lis-
tened to a report by FAA Director
ANTHONY L. PULLARA on the FAA
Board meeting of February 1; heard
Gilbert Waters outline the agenda
for the Regional Conference sched-
uled for April 17 to 19 at Sarasota;
and discussed a proposal by Research
Committee Chairman EDMOND MAC-
COLLIN that the Chapter authorize
at least a token support to the Florida
Foundation for the Advancement of
Building.
The Chapter voted that $50 be
donated to the Foundation; and that
the Research Committee investigate
details regarding Foundation mem-
bership requirements and report back
to the Chapter. Chapter members
also decided that all reservations for
Chapter meetings be paid in advance
- with no reservations honored un-
less so paid.
The following applications were
approved by the Chapter for mem-
bership:
Corporate: ALFRED T. FLOYD, JR.;
GLENN O. JOHNSON; RICHARD H.
SLATER; HERBERT L. WALKER, JR.
Associate: RICHARD MCCLAIN JONES;
ROBERT L. GRUNDMAN; E. JASON
ROBARTS; JOSEPH J. FILLINGHAM. Jun-
ior Associate: JAMES B. PETERSON. In
addition, the application for transfer
(Continued on Page 24)





Theme of the Annual
Architects' Ball held Jan-
uary 31st by the Florida
South Chapter was "Look
Ahead"-and it found
expression in a series of
weird and wonderful head
dresses of which these are
examples. Here FAA
President H. Samuel
Krus6, left, and Steve
little, Ball Chairman,
watch, with Mrs. Otis
Dunan, while the zany
creations are paraded
around the room. A prize
went to Dade County
Manager "Hump" Camp-
bell, one of the Chapter's
honor guests, for his out
of this world top-piece.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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News & Noteis
(Continued from Page 24)
to the Chapter of SAMUEL C. WENT-
WORTH was approved.
The meetings were followed by a
dutch treat cocktail party and dinner,
after which the membership and their
wives viewed a color sound film on
Aluminum in Architecture presented
by ROBERT E. FISHER of the Kaiser
Company.
Correction:
Last month we published an article
on "Design Factors for Curtain
Walls" written by ROBERT E. FISHER.
In the foreword which accompanied
it, we referred to the author as "...
trained as an architect at the Univer-
sity of Michigan." In doing so we
created a wrong impression; and we
are glad to set the error right here in
the interests of strict accuracy.
Mr. Fisher did graduate from the
University of Michigan Architectural
School. But his degree was for a newly-
instituted course in Industrial Design
-not architecture. After graduation
he did pursue additional studies in
the fields of architecture and archi-
tectural engineering. But he did not
do so at Michigan; and he does not
regard himself as essentially "trained
as an architect" and thus qualified for
either registration or professional
architectural practice.
This correction is published with
the hope of eliminating a source of
possible embarrassment to Mr. Fisher
from the erroneous reference.
State Board Grants
Registration for Florida
Practice to 34
The ranks of Florida's registered
architects has been increased by 34
according to an announcement by
MORTON T. IRONMONGER, Secretary
of the State Board of Architecture.
Of the total registrations granted in
January, the State Board registered 14
"by exemption" since each held an
unexpired certificate of registration
by some other state. The remaining
20 new registrants were listed as hav-
ing passed the Junior Examination
held by the Board, January 6 to 9,
1958. Successful examinees were:
Clearwater:
FRANK R. MUDANO
Ft. Lauderdale:
WILLIAM N. HOYER
HENRY O. TRIMM
(Continued on Page 26)
MARCH, 1958


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State Board. ..
(Continued from Page 25)
Gainesville:
WILLIAM H. MASON
Jacksonville:
WILLIAM H. KENT
WILLIAM J. WEBBER
Miami, Miami Beach:
WILLIAM C. KREIDT
DAVID N. LESLIE
RICHARD S. LEVIN
RICHARD VAN HARREN
Orlando:
MALCOLM O. K. McQUAIG
Palm Beach:
JAMES E. ASHLEY
Sarasota:
RODGER B. CUTTING
WESLEY C. SALTER
St. Petersburg:
ROBERT GRUNDMAN
Tallahassee:
JACK S. RILLING
Tampa:
JOSEPH FILLINGHAM
FRANK S. VALENTI
Waldo:
JAMES C. PARLIER
Winter Park:
MANFRED LOPATKA
Registration by exemption was
granted to the following: EUGENE G.
BAKER, Glens Falls, N. Y.; JOSEPH E.
BRIGHT, Valdosta, Ga.; THEODORE R.
CROMAR, JR., Silver Springs, Md.;
GEORGE C. HADDOX, Bethesda, Md.;
BENARD R. KLEKAMP, Miami; JAMES
T. LENDRUM, Gainesville; LOREN M.
MURRAY, Silver Springs, Md.; AR-
THUR T. POCHERT, Miami Beach;
CYRIL E. SCHLEY, Detroit, Mich.;
WALTER S. SNELL, Jacksonville; EARL
H. STRUNK, Miami; DONALD E.
THOMPSON, Sanford; RAY F. WARD,
Pontiac, Mich.; and CLIFFORD N.
WRIGHT, Birmingham, Mich.


Directors' Meeting .
(Continued from Page 6)
no formal decision relative to Flor-
ida's status had yet been made; and
that were the matter to be favorably
reported this year, ratification or
approval of the FAA petition by the
AIA Board could not become effec-
tive until 1959 and that full regional
status for Florida could not become
operative until 1960.
Another matter concerned ratifica-
tion by the full FAA Board of the
service agreement between the FAA
and the FAA Executive Director.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Each clause of the agreement as
drafted was read by President Krus6
and discussed; and the agreement was
finally approved unanimously. As
executed, the arrangement covers a
two-year period; and unless renewed
by the Board prior to the 1959 FAA
Convention, will expire December 31,
1959.
Third highlight of the meeting was
a long discussion centering on the
location of the 1958 FAA Conven-
tion site. This was led by a delega-
tion from the Broward Chapter which
desired the site in Ft. Lauderdale if
the Broward Chapter were to act as
hosts. The Board voted to support
the former decision of the FAA Con-
vention Committe which had author-
ized a contract with the Deauville
Hotel at Miami Beach; and it author-
ized the FAA Board Executive Com-
mittee to issue a Convention-Host
invitation to another Chapter should
the Broward County membership de-
cide to support the position of its
delegation and relinquish the priv-
ilege of sponsoring the 1958 Conven-
tion.


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sibility of associateship or partner-
ship. Complete resume on request.
Reply to Box 3158, Florida Arch-
itect.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Ador Sales, Inc . 8
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 25
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 26
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . 26
Florida Home Heating
Institute . 28
Florida Portland Cement Co 3
Florida Power & Light Co. 20
Florida Steel Corp. .. 4
George C. Griffin Co. 6
Hamilton PlyWood . 24
Lift Slab of Florida, Inc. 5
Ludman Corp. 22-23
0. O. McKinley Co., Inc. 18
Mr. Foster's Store . 19
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Portland Cement Association 7
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. 6
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 1
Unit Structures . 24
F. Graham Williams Co. 27

MARCH, 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1084
LONG DISTANCE 470


ATLANTA

GA.


1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


FACE BRICH STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
HANDMADE BRICK GLAZED TILE
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS SALT GLAZED TILE
GRANITE UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE ALUMINUM WINDOWS
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE AND ALUMINUM
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE" SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1-5154






Build dependable oil or gas heating



into your houses... l .


It's cheap to buy, cheap to use proved best all-'round
for Florida! Every survey proves all over again that permanently installed oil or gas
equipment is the most efficient and economical answer to the Florida home heating problem.
Using cheap fuel, oil or gas heating equipment pushes positive circulating warm air all through
the house at lowest cost.
By using an oil or gas "Florida furnace" in the plans of your houses you are extending indoor
comfort to every day of the winter season for your clients.
Call on us for any information you may peed on oil or gas home heating.

j .


FLORIDA HOME kC HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S.W. 8th STREET, MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




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