• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Florida North West chapter
 Regional conference plans
 Gem in a new setting
 Chapter committees for 1958
 Message from the president
 The students' column
 Design factors for curtain...
 House on a hillside
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 A future must be planned today
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00044
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00044
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Florida North West chapter
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Regional conference plans
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Gem in a new setting
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Chapter committees for 1958
        Page 13
    Message from the president
        Page 14
    The students' column
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Design factors for curtain walls
        Page 17
        Page 18
    House on a hillside
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    News and notes
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
    A future must be planned today
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.










































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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS







Florida North West Chapter By Wm. Stewart Morrison, President

Correction By Robert E. Crossland . . . . . .

Regional Conference Plans . . . . . . . .

Gem In A New Setting By Marian Murray . . . . .

Chapter Committees for 1958 . . . . . . .

Message from The President By H. Samuel Kruse, President FAA .

The Students' Column By Craig Lindelow and Louis George . .

Design Factors for Curtain Walls By Robert E. Fisher . . .

House On A Hillside Home of William B. Harvard, St. Petersburg .

News and Notes...................

Advertisers' Index . . . . . .

In Conference Editorial: A Future Must Be Planned Today .


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
In Sarasota, as part of the art treasures of the Ringling Museum, is the only
18th Century Italian theater in the country. This tiny gem of antique Baroque
fantasy has now been housed permanently in its own building---a source of
prideful possession for Florida and a living memory of design history. The
story on the Asolo Theater begins on Page 9.


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished month at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida. telephone: MOhawk 7-0421
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
Ihose of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


VOLUME 8

NUMBER / a1 R

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


4

S 4

S 6

S 9

. 13

S. 14

. 15

. 17

S. 19

. 23

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Florida's newest AIA Chapter is
planning an ambitious Program

By Win. STEWART MORRISON
President

One of the first items of our Chap-
ter program will be to change the
election date of officers whereby the
next president will have more than
a few days to present the requested
information for The Florida Archi-
tect!
Again this year, the North West
Chapter will concentrate its efforts
towards better public relations. It is
my feeling that one of the best places
ta start is within the individual archi-
tect's office in an attempt to regain
recognition in the small low-cost
housing field.
There are too many well-estab-
lished architectural firms that con-
sider the service to a client desiring
to build a small house is below their
dignity to associate themselves with
such trivial projects. They either
direct this potential client to a small
office, or, run him out of their own
office by stating that they are too busy
with large projects to accept such an
insignificant project or by asking


Correction

Gentlemen:
Perhaps you have already been in-
formed of the error which occurred
in the middle column of page 7 in
the December issue of The Florida
Architect. It was my letter (not Robt.
E. Gallison's) which Sanford Goin
presented, and my thesis subject was
"A Refresher Course in Structural
Design" (not Industrial Design). My
purpose in writing at this time is not
to criticize, but to suggest that addi-
tional information concerning publi-
cation of this thesis might be of gen-
eral interest especially to those
confronted with State Board examina-
tions.
The thesis title is "A Refresher
Course in Structural Design for the
Architectural Profession A Sylla-
bus." This long title was used for the


a fee that is in excess of what the
small client could pay. I am sure
many other methods are used to avoid
the necessity of doing small house
design. These same well-established
offices do, from time to time, handle
this small residential work reluctantly
when a client is an influential citizen,
or perhaps a representative of some
firm with which he is doing business.
I have talked with many architects
about this problem and, in general,
they feel that this type of client
(Continued on Page 6)



Graduate School, which requires a
rather explicit description. The sub-
ject matter was organized to serve
either as a syllabus for an organized
refresher course, or as a guide for indi-
vidual study.
Reprints of this thesis have been
mimeographed by the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts as a serv-
ice to the profession. Copies are now
available at the Campus Book Store,
University of Florida, for the price of
$2.30 each (plus 25 cents for han-
dling and postage when ordered by
mail). This price is actually less than
cost, and, incidentally, I do not make
a cent on the sales.
I am forwarding this information
in the hope that those who need this
type of study guide might be in-
formed of its availability.
ROBERT E. CROSSLAND
Assistant Professor of Architecture
University of Florida, Gainesville
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Florida North West








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'North West Chapter . .
(Continued from Page 4)
should be handled by a young prac-
tising architect and is not a problem
of the established firm. It seems that
this general attitude of practically
driving a client out of your office
would leave the impression that the
architect's services are available only
to the rich. This rejected client may
go to the young practising architect
and, if he happens to be too busy to
associate with the small house design,
the client has no choice for architec-
tural services other than the kitchen
table draftsman, building supply
house planners and other free lance
operators who always seem available.
This is a tremendous field of archi-
tecture that seems to stray further


,Program,


and further away from the practising
offices which is the fault only of the
architect. To convince himself of
this fact, the architect only has to
look around his own community and
ask himself how many of the new
houses being built were designed by
architects.
Where we encounter bad public
relations with individuals being un-
sympathetic to the practice of archi-
tecture in general, it is possible that
he was once this rejected client.
It is in this small, seemingly unim-
portant and unprofitable business,
that our public relations should begin.
It is my desire to see if the North
West Chapter can work out a stand-
ard of service that will fit the needs
of this large field of clients and then
to make such a service available.


Theme, Set for
1958 Regional Conference


Problems generated by the huge
growth predicted for the South At-
lantic states in the next decade will
be subjects for discussion during the
three-day AIA Regional Conference
to be held at Sarasota April 17 to
19. Among matters to be treated will
be questions relative to urban and
suburban renewal and redevelopment,
the planning of new communities, the
impact of the Federal highway pro-
gram on community expansion and
architects' work with government
agencies.
Theme of the Conference has been
announced by Program Chairman
WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN as "The Arch-
itect's New Responsibilities in the
Dyqamic South." It was chosen in
view of implications engendered by
the anticipated growth of the four
states which make up the AIA's South
Atlantic Region. By 1975, Zimmer-
man said, the four-state area is ex-
pected to expand from its present
14-million population to approxi-
mately 20 million, with Florida's pop-
ulation figure alone accounting for
nearly half of the overall increase.
"This tremendous growth will place
a grave responsibility on the archi-
tects," Zimmerman said. "Ways and
means must be found of controlling
this development to obtain beauty,
order and unity;. a healthy and cul-


tural environment for living; and to
prevent ugliness, congestion and spir-
itual and material decay.
"It is imperative that society look
to the architect to resume his role
of creating all of man's physical en-
vironment. He must guide growth
and coordinate the work of the various
specialists to create a product that is
beautiful, functional, orderly and uni-
fied."
The Conference program will be
handled on an informal round-table
basis. Architects of the Region will
discuss their problems and share their
knowledge and experience. There will
be an authority on each phase of the
program acting as moderator. The
overall Conference program will be
keynoted by an internationally fam-
ous speaker.
Site of Conference deliberations-
including discussion seminars and an
extensive exhibit of manufactured
products-will be the air-conditioned
Municipal Auditorium at Sarasota.
The Conference Committee of the
Florida Central Chapter, AIA, which
is official sponsor of the conclave,
has reserved some 200 rooms at sev-
eral of Sarasota's Gulf-front hotels
and at the downtown Orange Blos-
som Hotel, in which the working
headquarters of the Conference will
(Continued on Page 26)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





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GEM IN A NEW SETTING


By MARIAN MURRAY


A tiny jewel of showplaces--- the 18th Century Asolo
Theater---has finally been housed permanently as a
part of the State-owned Ringling Museum in Sarasota.
First built to honor an Italian queen, the little playhouse
now provides a unique and living'memoryjof its design era.


The only 18th century theater in
America has at last acquired a per-
manent home, in a setting worthy of
its beauty and elegance.
With both figurative and literal
fanfare, the State of Florida signalled
the official opening on January 10
and 11, of the building erected re-
cently to house the Asolo Theater -
one of the artistic treasures of the
State-owned John and Mable Ring-
ling Museum of Art. Though the
structure has been virtually completed
for nearly a year, and has been used
periodically since April, 1957, the
official opening was postponed until
finishing touches had been com-
pleted.
FEBRUARY, 1958


For more than 130 years after 1798
when it was built, the tiny jewel-like
Asolo Theater stood in the Castle of
Caterina Cornaro in an Italian hill
town some 40 miles north of Venice.
After 1930, when it was dismantled,
it lay for 20 years in a storehouse in
Venice itself. Then at the suggestion
of the late A. EVERETT AUSTIN, JR.,
director of the Ringling Museum
from 1946 to 1957, it was bought by
the State and brought to Sarasota.
Here it was installed in admittedly
temporary fashion within the audi-
torium of the museum, where it has
served as a background for all sorts
of cultural presentation, since 1952.
Several years ago, at the behest of


the Florida State Board of Control,
Miss MARION I. MANLEY, FAIA, of
Coconut Grove, drew plans for a
structure to be annexed closely to the
museum, containing offices, work-
rooms and storage space, as well as
the theater, which was to occupy the
far end. With rising costs, funds be-
came insufficient for the entire addi-
tion, and in 1955 it was decided to
build first the unit to house the
theater.
The resultant building, approxi-
mately 100 feet from the museum, is
constructed of warmly pinkish stucco
like that of the original building, and
created in a style serenely functional
(Continued on Page 11)






































































Above, lobby of the new-
ly completed building,
designed by Marian I.
Manley, FAIA, to house
the tiny theater which
was first built in the
Castle of Caterina Cor-
naro at Asolo, an Italian
hill town north of Venice.
Left, view of the new
building from the south-
west.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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How and why motels profit with sliding glass doors


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SJ dollar across the country, the open-view room with its sliding glass door
has become a big factor in successful motel operation. Motels and hotels
from coast to coast are finding the use of Ador all-aluminum sliding
S .glass doors a real competitive advantage.
This sliding glass door trend is motivated by the need for open dis-
play of the motel room to the guest-but beyond this indoor-outdoor
appeal there are many practical advantages. Guests and luggage find
easy entry through the fingertip-action Ador doors. Furniture can be
readily transferred from room to room through the wide openings and
easily moved over the low Ador threshold. Of special importance is the
Ador's exterior lock arrangement which can be keyed and master-keyed.
But, perhaps the greatest value the sliding glass door imparts is a
feeling of luxury at minimum cost. Details such as custom design
Three panels of glae combine jilousie, sliding vent Ador exterior lock with key provides lucite grip hardware and beautiful satin-silver finish are standard on all
and fixed section as complete Ador unit in this smart positive security and convenience to Ador doors.
motel room. guests, permits master keying.
For complete information contact: Ador Sales, Gilbert A.
Viola, 610-11 Biscayne Bldg., Miami, Florida.


raaa


O en dis la f i iti i


prO


t'









Chapter Committees for 1958


BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
Legislative: Donald H. Moeller.
Exhibits & Awards: Robert E. Hall.
Architectural Practice: Herbert S. Johnson.
Membership, Chapter Affairs: Morton T. Iron-
monger.
Public Relations: Joseph T. Romano.
Collaboration of Design Professions: Fred B.
Stresau.
Scholarship: Robert E. Hansen.
Hospitals, Public Health: William A. Gilroy.
School Buildings: Van W. Knox.
Building Code: William F. Bigoney.
AIA. / A.G.C. Joint Cooperative: Robert C.
Jahelka.
Chapter Rep. to Tech. Sec'y.: Bayard Lukens
Chapter Officer for Preservation of Historic Bldgs.,
Assoc. Dir. of Br. Bldg. Ex.: Robert G. Jahelka.
Annual Architects Party: Louis Wolff.
Planning & Zoning: A Courtrney Stewart.


DAYTONA BEACH
Chapter Activities (includes Chapter Affairs and
Chapter Programs) : Ralph F. Spicer.
Education and Practice (includes Education, Office
Practice, Awards and Scholarships) : William P.
Greening.
Public Relations (includes Public Relations, Pub-
licity Items, Government Relations) : Edwin M.
Snead.
Industry Relations (includes Home Building Const.
Industry, Collaboration with Design Professions) :
Joel W. Sayers.
Community Development (includes Community
Development, Zoning Codes, Preservation of
Historic Bldgs.) : Harry M. Griffin.
Special Design (includes Research, School Build-
ings, Hospitals and Health) : Francis R. Walton.


FLORIDA CENTRAL
Chapter Affairs and Membership: Roland W.
Sellew.
Education, Awards and Scholarships: William B.
Eaton.
Ethics and Professional Practice, Office Practice:
Thomas V. Talley.
Public Relations, Community Development: Elliott
B. Hadley.
Government and Legislative, Construction Industry
Relations: Anthony L. Pullara.
Home Building Industry: Howard F. Allender.
Collaboration with Design Professions: Edward D.
Wyke.
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: A. Wynn Howell.
Research: Edmond N. MacCollin.
School Buildings: Kenneth W. Dalzell, Jr.
Hospitals and Health:.Martin P. Fishback, Jr.
FEBRUARY, 1958


FLORIDA NORTH
Chapter Affairs: John L. R. Grand.
Education and Practice: Wm. Breidenbach.
Public Relations: Harry Reynolds.
Industry Relations: Myrl J. Hanes.
Community Development: L. N. May.
Special Design: David P. Reaves.
Program: Arthur L. Campbell.
Auditing: Robert E. Crosland.

FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL
Chapter Affairs, Membership, Education, Office
Practice: Ernest J. Stidolph.
Community Development, Preservation of Historic
Bldg.: Prentiss Huddleston.
Public Relations, Government Relations, Construc-
tion Industry Relations: A. P. Woodard.

FLORIDA SOUTH
Public Relations: Wayne F. Sessions.
Membership: Scott B. Arnold.
Urban Design and Housing: William A. Russell.
Collaboration with the Design Prof.: Edwin T.
Reeder.
Office Practice: Frank H. Shuflin.
Chapter Affairs: Irvin Korach.
Education: T. Trip Russell.
Relations with Const. Industry: Irving E. Horsey.
Research: Frances E. Telesca.
School Buildings: Chester L. Craft.
Hospitals and Public Health: M. Blair Wright.
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: A. J. Simberg.
Legislative and Political Action: Herbert R. Savage.
Architectural Information: Thomas J. Madden, Jr.
Special Messages: C. Robert Abele.
Historiacal and Records: H. George Fink, Sr.
Publications: James E. Ferguson, Jr.
FSC Roster: Edward G. Grafton.
Program: Samuel M. Puder.
Dining and Refreshment: Howard M. Dunn.
Host and Hospitality: Stephen C. Little.
Citations and Awards: M. Tony Sherman.
Finance: John O. Grimshaw.
Code: Igor B. Polevitzky.
Executive Comm. Advisory Council: Marion I.
Manley.
A.I.A.-DuPont Plaza: Wahl J. Snyder, III.
United Fund: Howard B. Knight.

JACKSONVILLE
Chapter Affairs: Willis L. Stephens.
Membership: W. Mayberry Lee.
Education and Registration: Ivan H. Smith.
Office Practice: George R. Fisher.
Awards, Scholarships and Allied Arts: Norman H.
Freedman.
(Continued on Page 14)
13





:....** 8:~vAA,


Message from The President

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
President, FAA

As indicated in the last issue of The Florida LIN, Office Practice; L. ALEX HATTON, Awards
Architect, this space will be available to the and Scholarships; ROY M. POOLEY, Jr., Public Re-
President of FAA for announcements, progress lations; JOHN STETSON, Home Building-Construc-
reports, and bits of information concerning the tion Industry; C. ELLIS DUNCAN, Collaboration
affairs of FAA which will be of interest to the with Design Professions: WILLIAM T. ARNETT,
membership and should be reported during the Community Development; FRANCIS A. HOL-
period between FAA Board Meetings. LINGSWORTH, Preservation of Historic Buildings;
Although the response from new Chapter ROBERT E. HANSEN, Research; JAMES E. GARLAND,
Presidents for requested information, essential School Buildings; R. DANIEL HART, Hospitals
for the organization, is still less than 100 percent, and Health; JAMES K. POWNALL, Legislative, and
it is so much better than in former years. For JAMES A. STRIPLING, Membership. Many of the
this, your President is grateful. It seems a sure committees are new and will have to start with-
thing now that the committees will be ready out the assistance of precedent. But since these
for action sooner than formerly. are vertical with Chapter committees, the new
The official announcement of committee ap- committees will have the course of going Chapter
pointments will be printed in the next issue of committees from which to draw, develop ideas.
The Florida Architect, announcement having ROBERT MURPHY has been selected to repre-
been postponed until Board approval at its Feb- sent the FAA on the General Committee for a '
ruary 1st meeting was received. Regional Planning Council, Rollins College, 10,
The following are your President's selections 11 and 12 April 1958.
for Chairmen of the vertical standing committees Your President will represent the FAA at the
and the standing Membership and Legislative first quarterly meeting of the Board, Florida State
committees: JOHN L. R. GRAND, Chapter Affairs; Chamber of Commerce, February 6, 1958, in a
WILLIAM B. EATON, Educationi FRANK H. SHUF- Jacksonville.


(Continued from Page 13)
Public Relations: Herbert Coons, Jr.
Government Relations: J. Brooks Haas.
Home Building: Cecil B. Burns.
Construction Industry: Roy M. Pooley.
Collaboration with Design Prof.: H. Lamar Drake.
Community Development: Robert C. Broward.
Urban Design and Housing: James E. Clements.
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: W. Stanley Gordon.
Research: Albert L. Smith.
School Buildings: A. Robert Broadfoot.
Hospitals and Health: Robert A. Warner.
Special Committee on Fees: Taylor Hardwick.
MID-FLORIDA
Membership: Joseph E. Carlisle.
Office Practice: F. Earl DeLoe.
Chapter Affairs: George H. Spohn.
Urban Design and Housing: John A. Burton.
Home Building Industry: James E. Windham.
Education and Registration: Richard B. Rogers.
Research: Carl E. Epting, Jr.
Awards, Scholarships: Laurance W. Hitt.
Preservation of Historic Bldg.: Henry P.
Whitworth.
Hospitals and Health: Ralph P. Lovelock.
Relations with Const. Industry: Charles L.
Hendrick.


Governmental Relations: James Gamble Rogers, II.
Public Relations: Fred G. Owles, Jr.
Collaboration with Design Prof.: Rhoderic F.
Taylor.
Collaboration with Departments of Education and
Research: George W. Bagley.
Community Developments: L. Alex Hatton.
School Buildings: Robert B. Murphy.

PALM BEACH
Chapter Activities and Membership: Harold V.
Obst.
Education and Practice, Office Practice, Awards:
Jefferson N. Powell.
Public Relations and Government Relations:
Wm. Ames Bennett.
Industry Relations, Home Bldg., Const. Industry,
Collaboration with the Design Prof.: Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr.
Community Development and Preservation of
Historic Bldgs.: David S. Shriver.
Research: Maurice E. Holley.
School Buildings: Edgar S. Wortman.
Hospitals and Health: Donald R. Edge.
By-Laws Revision: Raymond H. Plockelman.
Planning and Zoning: Kenneth Jacobson.
Legislative: George J. Votaw.
Program: Kenneth Jacobson.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






The Students' Columnn
By Craig Lindelow and Louis George

-, -I--- .--- ----~ =
i r* ..1 ^i **:* :*, 1


1PEARC[- UIBLI PIOM[ CDMP[TION1 11V


GROUP I-LOT 405
At 310
APRIL 17 1957
EDSON E.bAILLYSJR.


CLISTIS -.
W..-




ICLSVATIM cwn,

This design, by Edson Dailey Jr., will be built as a collaborative effort by
students of the U/F departments of Architecture and Building Construction
as an exhibit feature of the U/F Student Home Show scheduled for May 1 to 4.


Mr. WILLIAM JACKSON, of Kemp,
Bunch and Jackson, was the guest of
the month here at the University of
Florida. He gave a slide lecture in
the Law Auditorium Wednesday, Jan-
uary 8, and his subject covered the
proposed Atlantic Coastline Building
in Jacksonville. It was a very interest-
ing lecture and demonstrated a fine
solution to a very difficult site.
Of extreme interest was the meet-
ing of Mr. Jackson with the faculty
to discuss the proposed Architecture
and Fine Arts Building. If the legis-
lature does not cut our funds, we are
expecting some positive action very
shortly on this.
Just before Christmas vacation, a
competition for a house design for
our home show was held. Almost 50
entries were submitted. The decision
was a difficult one, but three excellent
designs were chosen. The first prize
went to EDSON DAILEY of West Palm
Beach, with DONALD J. BOONE of Ft.
Lauderdale, second, and WALTER
TAYLOR of Miami, third.


__~---^zZ ii





-- 7



-~---__.











FROM THE VIROLA TREE OF SURINAM

Make no mistake about i
HAMILT P OD at home in any home. Or o
OF ORLANDO. INC.
924 Sligh Blvd.. Orlando. Ph. GArden 5-4604 Dutch Cedar's warm, hone
HAMILTON PLYWOOD
OF ST. PETBRSBURO. INC. some in pattern
2860 22nd Ave.eNo. St. Petersburg Some groin patterns lend
HAMILTON PLYWOOD application. Wherever you
OF FT. LAUDERDALE, INC.
1607 S.W. 1st Ave. o t. Lauderdale it's beautiful.
F. JAckson 3-5415


FEBRUARY, 1958


Available in
12". 1V", or
16" squares,
16" x 8' panels,
or 4' x 8' ran-
dom "V"
groove panels.
In 3/16, Y,
3/8, V2, and
3/4-inch thick-
nesses. Match-
ing lumber,
doors, and trim
available.


We recommend
-' 9 3/4" 11-Ply
Dutch Cedar.
Stability is
guaranteed.











t. Dutch Cedar paneling is
office, or club, or restaurant.
y-brown coloring and hand-
themselves to almost any
panel, if it's Dutch Cedar


au~r~~~tP







































The Case of the Wire-Haired Octoplugs*


The wires were tangled and tattered. The double-sockets in the sockets had
double-sockets. Plug-uglies all over the place what a mess!
Any sleuth knows that the need to plug several lamps or appliances into one
wall outlet may be a telltale clue of Low Horsepower . due to the need
for more circuits and outlets. Yes, low horsepower means overloaded circuits,
blown fuses and poor performance from appliances. The answer: make sure
you specify

FU OUSEPOWER

. .with enough wiring capacity and plenty of circuits, outlets and switches
As firt r te to insure top efficiency from present appliances . and to fill all electric
by LOOK Magzine needs for years to come. That's the way to give your homes all the benefits
of modern electric living happier Florida living! See an electrical contractor
for details.



FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

*%Critic


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Design Factors for Curtain Walls


By ROBERT E. FISHER



Curtain wall construction and
to pin it down a little closer, alum-
inum curtain wall construction is
a subject of considerable magnitude.
Much has been written and spoken
about it. Much more will be written
and spoken in the coming months
and years. It is such a complex and
rapidly changing field that there are
no experts or conversely, anyone
who has designed a system for a build-
ing can consider himself an expert.
This discussion will be restricted to
what might be called the "curtain
wall" rather than the "window wall"
or single floor units set between floor
slabs. However, most of the items
relating to the curtain wall can be
applied to the window wall.
For purposes of definition let's con-
sider curtain walls under two major
classifications: The true curtain wall
and the modified type. The first, or
true type, is one in which the curtain
wall becomes both the exterior and
the interior of the wall. In this type
the spandrel panels are the sandwich,
or insulated type, finished on both
sides. Sometimes the inside of the
panel is left unfinished or given a
prime coat of paint to allow for fin-
ished decoration. This method of
curtain wall construction was first
accepted in the southern part of the
country, but is now becoming prac-
tically universal. The modified type
is one in which the curtain wall sys-
tem is backed up by some form of ma-
sonry. It becomes, in effect, almost
a veneer with the spandrel panels very
often consisting of sheet aluminum
with little or no insulation behind.
This method of construction is widely
used in cities where building codes
require the use of a back-up.
Now let's make a further break-
down which applies equally to both
of the types mentioned above. First
we have the vertical grid mullion
system consisting of a series of pre-
FEBRUARY, 1958


The accompanying article has been adapted for publication from
a seminar address presented before a recent meeting of the
Society of Aluminum Window Engineers. The author was trained
as an architect at the University of Michigan and is now Florida
representative of the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Company.


set vertical mullions to which win-
dow and panel frames are attached.
The vertical mullion acts much like
a beefed-up projected mullion. If a
true grid pattern is required, heavy
horizontal members are applied at the
intersection of the window and the
spandrel panel frame. This type of
construction can be quite economical
because it utilizes standard window
sections.
The second type we shall call the
integral type, because the jambs of
the window and spandrel unit form
one half of the mullion, with the
other half being formed by the adja-
cent unit. The jambs are usually a
form of a channel and are mated
either by a spline or by making one
jamb a male and the other a female
and interlocking them. Normally the
head and sills of each unit are similar
to the jambs, but this can be varied
depending upon the sightlines re-
quired. In some cases the frame
members are designed in such a man-
ner as to accept a standard window;
and in other cases the frame member
is also the frame of the window.
The design of any of these systems
presents problems both from a struc-
tural and from a fabrication stand-
point. Let's take a few of the prob-
lems and look at them briefly. First
and foremost we must constantly bear
in mind two things: One, the system
must facilitate easy erection; and,
two, building tolerances must be
taken into consideration.
The first may sound elementary,
but some systems have been designed
so that the erection contractor would
need to hire iron workers only two
feet high in order to fasten the system
to the spandrel beams! The second
can be just as serious, because build-
ings are not built like Swiss watches.
The Building Research Institute rec-
ommends and practical experience
has shown that a 2" minimum


dimension between the beam and the
curtain wall will, in most cases, take
care of both erection difficulties and
building tolerances. Anything less
than this should be undertaken only
with the full understanding and ap-
proval of the architect. Try to place
the anchors so that the erection crew
can get at them easily and leave
enough room for them to use both
hand and power tools. In most cases
of multi-story work the spandrel panel
will be set after the curtain wall is up
in order to save damage to the panels
and to allow the erector to work be-
hind open frames. If, on occasion,
you must work closer than two inches,
set the anchors on top of the beam
or slab and slot them to allow for
plumbing of the system. If this is
done, make sure that the anchor is
not going to interfere with mechan-
ical units which may be installed
behind the spandrel panel.
Another problem that plagues the
designer is that of thermal expansion
and contraction. He must fasten the
system permanently to the wall, but,
at the same time, allow it to adjust
itself to both building movement and
temperature changes. Assuming a
minimum temperature (depending
upon the location of the job) of say,
0 degrees and a maximum tempera-
ture of 150 degrees and assuming
that the job is erected at a tempera-
ture of 75 degrees we see at once
that our system must be prepared to
contract 74 degrees in the winter and
expand 75 degrees on a hot day. This
adds up to a total of 150 degrees,
which means that the curtain wall
will expand about an eighth of an
inch horizontally in four feet and a
quarter of an inch vertically in 10 to
12 feet. This is a conservative figure,
because recommended design pro-
cedure calls for a differential from
minus 40 degrees to a plus 160 de-
(Continued on Page 18)





Curtain Walls ...
(Continued from Page 17)
grees. It is generally conceded that
a quarter of an inch between mullions
will take care of practically all expan-
sion problems.
We come now to the problem of
wind loads. It is becoming more
common every day to see specifica-
tions calling for the curtain wall to
be designed against a 35 lb. wind-
loading. This figure, based on the
Ensweiler formula (which is the most
frequently recommended method of
figuring such loads) means that we
are designing against winds in the
magnitude of 120 miles per hour.
Pressure loadings have not been com-
pletely standardized and are usually
tailored to meet the existing condi-
tions in a particular location.
Nor has there been a standardiza-
tion of the maximum allowable de-
flection of the curtain wall mullions.
This has been suggested as 1/240 and
is finding widespread use and a
few designers are using 1/175 and
1/360. If a symmetrical section is
used, the system will resist both pos-
itive and negative forces equally.
However, if a non-symmetrical sec-
tion' is used, the section should be
designed in such a manner as to resist
negative forces equal to at least two-
thirds of the positive forces. This is
particularly true in our local area
where hurricanes can bring about
severe negative stresses.
Of course; a curtain wall is only as
strong as the fasteners which hold it
to the structure which brings us
to the problems of anchorage. Sys-
tems may be set on shelf angles or
suspended by the use of clips. The
latter method is the most commonly
used today. Clip anchors may be set
on top of the spandrel beam or in the
face by means of bolts (if the beam is
steel) or by inserts poured into the
face of a concrete slab or beam. The
clips should be slotted to allow for
both building tolerances and thermal
expansion but should be designed
in such a manner as to prevent verti-
cal stacking. The clips should be
located for easy access by the erection
crew. Bolts with shear strength
enough to support the system com-
pletely glazed (plus a safety factor)
should be used. It is well also to
make sure that intersections of inside
finished work (such as suspended ceil-
ings) are designed in such a manner
18


to allow movement of the wall sep-
arately from the interior member.
As we know, a certain amount of
moisture may be driven through the
joints or be picked up from con-
densation. Naturally it is extremely
desirable to remove this moisture
before it gets to the inside of the
building. This can be accomplished
by either draining horizontal mem-
bers to the mullions and carrying the
moisture down to the base of the
system, or by providing weep holes.
But weep holes are not one-way
affairs. If water can get out, it can
also get in and pressures during a
driving rain can build up a good head
of water inside the system. There-
fore, it is desirable to baffle weep
holes, use metallic drain tubes, or
use a wick system. Another word of
caution with regard to weep holes.
If they are too small, they will clog
rapidly leaving no weeping whatever.
If they are too large, they will allow
entrance of an excessive amount of
water. It is also well to locate them
in such a manner that they will re-
ceive eddy currents rather than the
full force of the wind. Do not seal
the bottom of the mullion at ground
level if it is a hollow section. Silly
as this may sound, it has been done
- and on one occasion when a relief
hole was drilled at the base of the
mullion, the water sprayed almost
across the street from the head that
had been built up inside!
Now, let's go to the subject of
panels. As you know, they come in
all sizes, shapes, thicknesses and types
of insulation. Panels are made of
aluminum, steel, ceramics, masonite,
cement asbestos, fibre glass, and prob-
ably a number of other materials.
Finishes can be anodized, porcelain,
painted, natural, so on and so forth.
Interior insulation can be paper
honeycomb, aluminum honeycomb,
foam glass, fiber glass, vermiculite,
styrafoam, or plywood. Thicknesses
vary from 4" to 2V2" Some panels
have air space ahead of or behind the
insulation. They may be flat sheet,
box type, or rabbeted off-set. The
type of panel to be used is usually
determined by the architect; and a
few pertinent facts may help determ-
ine the proper panels.
Cement asbestos panels are prob-
ably among the most economical to
use and they can be painted read-
ily. Steel panels with porcelain fin-
ishes are very durable and medium


priced. Porcelainized aluminum pan-
els cost a little more, but are both
durable and light. Color-anodized
aluminum panels are available in
many colors and are usually priced
somewhat above the others. Sheet
aluminum uninsulated panels are eco-
nomical to use where there is a back-
up. They are usually furnished in an
embossed pattern to eliminate "oil-
canning" and are very often back-
sprayed with a sound deadening ma-
terial. Thickness of the panel varies
with the job it is required to do.
Generally the "U" factors required
are .15 to .20 and many manufactur-
ers are hitting these values with 1"
and 1/2" panels. This is an improve-
ment over some of the earlier 2" and
2Vz" panels which were difficult to
adapt to most curtain wall sections.
It is almost a necessity and is
an advantage to outside-glaze the
panel. In the first place, the panel
is usually left out during erection of
multi-story jobs in order that the
erector may get behind the frame to
anchor the system. Exterior glazing
also allows individual panels to be
removed easily in case of damage. It
means that the inside leg of the
rabbet can be an integral part of the
frame, thus acting as a moisture stop.
Panels should be allowed adequate
clearance in the rabbet in order that
they might adjust to the expansion
to the curtain wall frame. And, as a
final word, always check with the
manufacturer as to the maximum
sizes available in his particular line.
Caulking is a subject unto itself;
and I believe that the most satisfac-
tory results will be found by design-
ing so that the minimum amount of
the best sealant available is used. I
am well aware that we cannot design
an absolutely weather-tight curtain
wall (at least within the price ranges
required for most work) that is flex-
ible, with only metal to metal con-
tacts. But we should design toward
that end and use the sealant as an
assist and a safety factor. The thiokol
compounds are among the best seal-
ants in the business and, while they
are a little higher priced and a bit
more difficult to work with than con-
ventional sealants, they have the abil-
ity to retain their resiliency over long
periods of time. Other compounds
are being marketed at present with
similar characteristics and I would
suggest that the window and curtain
wall designer follow these carefully.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








House on A Hillside..


House of

William B. Harvard, AIA,

St. Petersburg, Fla.

All photos by William Amick


This house is a rarity to the pan-
cake terrain of South Florida. It's a
house on a hillside. The hillside is
on the outskirts of St. Petersburg; and
the owner-architect is WILLIAM B.
HARVARD, AIA.
The hillside will explain the fact
that the house has a split-level plan
- with the carport, on the lowest
level, providing a drive-through access
to the streets which form two boun-
daries of the corner lot. Room ar-
rangement was the result of three
plan requirements.
One was to utilize fully the natural
advantages of the lot. This, in addi-
tion to a sharp slope toward the south


and east, commands a pleasant view
of a wooded ravine in a city park
across the street. Another was to pro-
vide easily accessible quarters for
three children, so arranged that
mutual privacy of both parents and
children could be respected but
with a supervisory view of the chil-
dren's wing possible from the parents'
master suite.
A third special design factor was
need for space and facilities which
could be adapted easily and quickly
to serve well the requirements of
entertainment. Piano recitals were
one type of entertainment to be
(Continued on Page 21)


FEBRUARY, 1958






--HJ house on

S*A Hillside

SL,
( .-.-- ----- ,,^





serve as a natural setting for the
house, with no attempt to alter the
S -- original character of the site. The
Only concession to formal change is
Sat the entrance where the same gray
slag as is used on the roof has been
A, spread as a terrace area in place of
M --I grass. Slag terrace and concrete drives
have been stained with green copper
sulphate to echo the patina of the
S-- reverse-batten treatment of the walls.
S- Below, exterior from the southwest
corner of the lot. Opposite page,
above, east wall of the living room
S^ from the entry; and below, kitchen
looking from the breakfast room-
S\ from which a view of the city park is
framed through the living room win-
Sdows-toward the dining room exit
S to the brick terrace.


























20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
20 THE. F ARCHITECT'


20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









planned for; informal dinners both
indoors and out which involve
expert use of a barbecue were another.
Thus, the living room was designed
with a two-story height, acoustically
treated and fitted with a balcony
opening from the master suite. And
the "library" doubles as an indoor
barbecue area, easily reached from
the kitchen through the dining room
and from the brick grille terrace just
outside the sliding glass of the dining
room wall.
The design problem of fitting these
requirements to both site and budget
was solved in the architect's own
words "as simply as possible for
maximum economy and low mainte-
nance." The desired natural look to
blend with the site was obtained
through use of gray-stained cypress
boards laid vertically on a backing of
copper-coated building paper. The
copper coating was pre-weathered
with a mild acid and shows as mel-
lowed green strips between the gray
of the cypress. Near ground levels,
walls are masonry to give permanent
protection against wet-wood termites.
The masonry is finished with dark
green, marble dash stucco. The low-
pitched roof was designed with un-
usually wide eaves for weather pro-
tection.
Indoors the same sort of disciplined
simplicity prevails. Throughout the
house, walls of living and sleeping
areas are wood beautifully matched
mahogany planks on the first floor
and in the master suite; cypress else-
where. The mahogany has a natural-
color, rubber finish; the cypress is
stained gray and soft white. Through-
out the house, too, ceilings are acous-
tical plaster which provides a strik-
ing visual contrast with the wood-
surfaced walls as well as offering a
practical measure of sound control.
Floors are resilient throughout car-
pet in the master suite, sisal squares
in the dining room and /4-inch vinyl
tile in terrazzo patterns elsewhere.
Windows are mostly wide-panel
jalousies combined in the living
room with center and top lights of
fixed sash.


FEBRUARY, 1958






House on

A Hillside



























Above, dining room, looking toward brick terrace from the
entry. Sliding doors between the two indoor areas allow
completely open circulation for entertainment and a full-
wall view of the rear terrace from the entrance. Left, TV
room which doubles for a general play area for the children.
Stairs at the left lead to the parents' suite, up a half-flight,
and to first floor level. Below, south wall of the parents'
suite, a room beautifully panelled with mahogany planks.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes


1958 Directors' Meetings
FAA President H. SAMUEL KRUSE
has scheduled the following dates for
regular meetings of the FAA Board
of Directors during this year: Febru-
ary 1, May 3, August 2 and November
8. The Langford Hotel at Winter
Park has been designated as the site
for the meetings, since its central
location minimizes travel time and
expense for most Board members.
Meetings will begin at luncheon. They
will be preceded, in the morning, by
a meeting of the Board's Executive
Committee, the sequence being de-
signed to permit Board ratification as
may be required of actions recom-
mended or taken by the Executive
Committee.

Honors From Architects
Recent awards for craftsmanship,
service to the architectural profession
or outstanding civic leadership have
included these:
In Miami, the Florida South Chap-
ter awarded to RANDOLPH STUNNING,
sheetmetal worker, its annual Crafts-
man of the Year Award. Nine other
trade artisans were similarly honored
with certificates.
The Florida South Chapter has
also established an Architectural Cer-
amics Award. It carries a prize of
$150 for "the best use of ceramics
as part of an orchitecrual concept."
It will be awarded at the Annual
Miami National Ceramic League Ex-
hibition, the sixth of which is sche-
duled for opening March 21, 1958,
at the Lowe Art Gallery at the Uni-
versity of Miami.
In Gainesville, the Florida North
Chapter presented three awards in the
form of bronze AIA Centennial Med-
als. One went to MARK B. LEWIS,
master carpenter, in recognition of
his ability as a craftsman and a
teacher of his trade. Another was
tendered to FRED E. CLAYTON, engi-
neer and Gainesville business man, for
his interest in and long service to the
architectural profession. The third
was presented to BENMONT TENCH,
JR., in recognition of his work as legal
counsel for both FAA and Chapter.
In Sarasota, the Florida Central
Chapter awarded AIA Centennial
(Continued on Page 24)
FEBRUARY, 1958


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 30)
IMcdals to: KENNETH DONAHUE, di-
rector of the Ringling Museum, for
his efforts to dramatize the AIA's
Centennial Year program; and to
I)AVID B. LINDSAY, JR., and KENT
McKINLEY, Sarasota newspaper pub-
lishers, for their continuing public
recognition of the architect's role in
community affairs and development.

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry!
Entry slips and fees covering sub-
mission of projects for the Tenth
Annual Program of National Honor
Awards must be received by the In-
stitute at its Washington headquarters
by February 11. A non-returnable
registration fee of $10 is required for
each building or group of buildings
submitted.

Mid-Florida Meeting
From FRED G. OWLES, Jr., this
report:
The Mid-Florida Chapter began its
third year with a highly-spirited Lad-
ies' Night at Pearce's Restaurant on
January 16th. President Shifalo, who
is entering his second term, outlined
the projects and activities for the
coming year. The program will in-
clude our Chapter's efforts to "sell"
the idea of regional planning over a
five-county area in Central Florida.
The Chapter-sponsored school to as-
sist applicants in their preparation for
the State Board will continue under
the able direction of JOHN LANGLEY.


McKINLEY
sun control products
"finest under the sun!"
all-weather protection attrac-
tive appearance minimum
maintenance.
Designed by sun-control engineers
for architect and builder-skill-
fully made of lifetime alumi-
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your McKinley Represent-
ative-see Sweet's Ar-
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LOCAL McKINLEY REPRESENTATION: CLEAWATER, PHONE 35-7094
24


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


NOTICE
Registered architects, resident in the State of Florida, and currently main-
taining professional practice in the State, are invited to submit brochures of
their experience and capabilities relating to the design and construction of a
County Court House at Fort Pierce, Florida.
All data submitted, and possible subsequent negotiations with the St. Lucie
County Board of County Commissioners with respect to retaining an individual
or firm for professional services, shall be in accordance with the standards of
professional ethics established by the American Institute of Architects. Bro-
chures shall be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners, at the Court
House, Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida, not later than March 4, 1958.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, St. Lucie County, Florida.
By HARRY KICLITER, Chairman.





And a Beaux Arts Ball may be
included in our annual Awards Ban-
quet plans.
H. H. HARRIS, who has recently
opened an office in Sanford, was wel-
comed by the Chapter as a transfer
member of the Washington Metro-
politon Chapter. DON PHELPS was
advanced to the status of an associate
member; and DON THOMPSON was
present as a prospective member.

Court Reverses
Wage-Hours Decision
Thanks are due EDWIN R. BROWN,
Executive Secretary of the Central
Florida Chapter, AGC, for directing
attention to the following:
A Federal court of appeals has
reversed the Labor Department's at-
tempt to include architectural and
engineering firms under wage hour
coverage. The court ruled that non-
professional employees of an archi-
tectural or engineering firm are not
subject to the Fair Labor Standards
Act.
The Labor Department has at-
tempted to apply Wage-Hour pro-
visions on the basis that such firms
used the mails and interstate trans-
portation facilities to transmit archi-
tectural and engineering documents.
But the Court held that such firms
were engaged in "essentially local ac-
tivity" and that plans and specifica-
tions drawn up and sent out of a
state are not "goods" in the ordinary
sense. Thus, employees of such firms
were not producing goods for inter-
state commerce.


Wahl Snyder, 1957 president of the
Florida South Chapter, presents the
Craftsman of the Year Award plaque
to Randolph Tunning, right.
FEBRUARY, 1958


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WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER.


Office Changes
In Pensacola the firm of Hart and
Leitch has been dissolved. R. DANIEL
HART will continue practice at the
firm's address, 10 North Spring Street.
HUGH J. LEITCH has opened his own
office at 2925 Navy Building, Pen-
S sacola.
ELLIS W. BULLOCK, JR., has been
named as an Associate Architect in
the Pensacola firm of Look and Mor-
rison.
In Bradenton RICHARD H. SLATER
and Louis F. SCHNEIDER have joined
to form the firm of Slater & Schneider,
I Architects, with offices at 1107 Sixth
Avenue West, Bradenton.

Regional Conference ...
(Continued from Page 6)
be located. Rates for Conference vis-
itors start at $8 per day.
Plans for the Conference have been
developed by the Committee of the
sponsoring Chapter and by a special
advisory group made up of repre-
sentatives from the various chapters
m comprising the South Atlantic Reg-
ion. ROLAND W. SELLEW heads the
Chapter's Conference Committee;
and SANFORD W. COIN, FAIA, Reg-
ional Director, is serving as chairman
of the Advisory Committee. Working
with him from Florida are: MORTON
'r. IRONMONGER, WILLIAM P. GREEN-
ING, ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL, DAVID
W. POTTER, HUGH J. LEITCH, WAHL
J. SNYDER, A. EUGENE CELLAR, JOs-
EPH M. SHIFALO, ROLAND W. SEL-
T.Ew and HILLIARD T. SMITH. All
are the immediate past presidents of
Florida's 10 AIA Chapters.
Advisory group members from other
states in the Region include: from
Georgia, GILBERT O'BRIEN, Augusta;
CECIL A. ALEXANDER, JR., Atlanta;
SIDNEY PORTER DRISCOLL, JR., Savan-
nah. WILLIAM R. JAMES, JR., Win-
ston-Salem, is serving as representa-
tive from the North Carolina, with
Louis M. WOLFF, Columbia, acting
for the South Carolina chapter.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


i


May Heads Civic Group
LESTER N. MAY, vice-president of
the Florida North Chapter, has been
elected chairman of the Gainesville
Citizen's Committee on Annexation.
SANFORD W. GOING, FAIA, is the
other architect-member of the Com-
mittee which was formed to study
the matter of annexation, currently
one of Gainesville's "hot potatoes."





Volume Trend Up

Most recent figures released by the
F. W. Dodge Corp. covering con-
struction volume in Florida indicate
that 1957 was a banner year in all
three major categories of building.
Contracts for the first 11 months
of last year totaled over one and one-
quarter billion dollars $1,263,598,-
000 which was 19 percent higher
than for the same period of the pre-
ceding year. Non-residential construc-
tion amounted to $377,002,000, up
36 percent; residential, $673,297,000,
up 13 percent, and heavy engineer-
ing work, $213,299,000, also up 13
percent.
Some indication that this year will
follow the same trend line was the
volume of future construction con-
tracts let in the month of November,
1957. These amounted to $93,593,-
000, or 10 percent above November,
1956. Compared with the preceding
year, non-residential construction con-
tracts let during November, 1957,
were up 5 percent. Residential con-
tracts showed a factional percentage
gain, while heavy engineering con-
struction volume was substantially
higher.



ADVERTISER'S INDEX
Ador Sales, Inc.. . .. 12
Advance Metal Products, Inc.. 25
Electrend Distributing Co. . 26
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 24
Florida Home Heating Institute 7
Florida Power & Light Co. . 16
Florida Steel Products Corp. 6
Florida Tile Industries . 2
George C. Griffin Co. . 23
Hamilton Plywood . . 15
Invitation Notice . . 24
Leap Concrete . . 4
Lift Slab of Florida . . 5
Ludman . .. 3rd cover
Miami Window Corp. 4th cover
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 8
0. O. McKinley Co . . 24
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 3
Shaffer Sign Service .. 26
F. Graham Williams Co. . 27
R. H. Wright
& Sons, Inc. . 2nd cover

FEBRUARY, 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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in conference ...







A Future Must





Be Planned Today


Early last month Institute Presi-
dent LEON CHATELAIN, JR., FAIA,
made a statement before the House
Sub-Committee on Banking and Cur-
rency at a hearing in Washington.
The hearing had been called for the
purpose of studying a proposal to
authorize $250-million a year for two
years to aid communities throughout
the nation to cure some of their civic
blight. The measure was advocated by
President Eisenhower and was pro-
posed as a continuation of the slum
clearance and urban renewal program
that has accomplished much to start
a progressive urban redevelopment in
cities where blight was becoming a
serious civic disease.
But not in Florida. Our state is
one of the three in all the 48 which
thus far has adopted no legislative
provision to make urban redevelop-
ment possible under the plan con-
templated in the Federal aid pro-
gram. This program contemplates
that local bodies undertake the re-
sponsibility of first recognizing the
local need for slum clearance and
urban renewal; and then take the
first steps necessary for accomplishing
needed results through acquisition of
the community's blighted areas and
the formation of an organization to


carry out a needed and well-planned
redevelopment program.
Right now such steps are impos-
sible in Florida. And they will con-
tinue to be impossible unless the
1959 Florida Legislature adopts an
amendment to the State Constitution
authorizing municipalities to exer-
cise powers of eminent domain and
taxation relative to slum clearance
and urban renewal projects.
An effort was made to accomplish
this during the 1957 legislative ses-
sion. Sponsored by Representatives
GIBBONS and MANN of Hillsborough
County, LAND of Orange, ROBERTS of
Palm Beach, HERRELL of Dade and
WEINSTEIN of St. Johns, a bill was
introduced (House Joint Resolution
No. 1094) which was designed to
give Florida cities needed authoriza-
tion to begin some solution to the
growing problem of blight which the
State's major cities are now facing.
The bill was referred to the House
Committee on Constitutional Amend-
ments and it died quickly without
more than the most casual consid-
eration by that body.
The dispatch of this measure at
the time it was presented to the
Committee was probably expected by
its sponsors. By the time the bill came


up in committee, legislators were
neck-deep in controversy relative to
final drafting of the State's new Con-
stitution. So it is perhaps understand-
able that scant notice was given to
a measure which did not seem to
bear the stamp of expediency.
But the urgency of this matter is
very real. Slum clearance and urban
renewal projects are part and parcel
of the broad plans now in the making
to assure sound future development
of our State. As of now, Florida cities
are legally powerless to undertake
them thus the elimination of civic
blight cannot now be integrated with
measures leading to the solution of
traffic and transport problems or even
those involving needed improvements
to local zoning situations.
This "Slum Clearance Bill" will
undoubtedly be re-introduced at the
next session of the Legislature. Its
sponsors are vigorous and progressive
and are now marshalling the support
for this bill which was lacking last
year. So far the need for this measure
as a civic tool for shaping urban im-
provement has not been sufficiently
publicized to clarify the advantages
which such a constitutional amend-
ment would bring to Florida's com-
munities.


* *,,. -


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LAW BUILDING
Curtain Wall by Ludman
Architect: Robert M. Little, Miami, Fla.
Contractor: Fred Howland, Miami, Fla.



the architect's vision sets the pace for the future...

by Lawrence Field


The plans an architect draws today may well
determine the architecture of the future.

When an architect does project the future
in his plans, he must find the materials with
which to implement that vision.

For example, within very recent years, cur-
tain walls have introduced new dimensions
of freedom in design and given the architect
a new fluidity of line, and a cleanness of
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Eminently practical, ingeniously adaptable,
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a valuable saving in construction time
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The Ludman Corporation was one of the
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Its engineers are constantly formulating
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Patented Auto-Lok aluminum awning win-
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Ludman know-how, based on years of actual
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Ludman engineers are glad to be of assist-
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