• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 The chapter presidents speak &...
 Officers of the FAA's 10 chapt...
 Mexican trip planned for FAA...
 A new century reckons
 1958 - A year of destiny
 Elegance -- Here it grew from...
 The triennale of Milan
 Past presidents of the FAA
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00043
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January 1958
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00043
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The chapter presidents speak & Mid-Florida auxiliary
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Officers of the FAA's 10 chapters
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Mexican trip planned for FAA members
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    A new century reckons
        Page 11
    1958 - A year of destiny
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Elegance -- Here it grew from simplicity
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The triennale of Milan
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Past presidents of the FAA
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertisers' index
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












































































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FOR PERMANENT, FIRE-SAFE STRUCTURES...


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--- COI TC IRETE

Concrete is the one basic building material that actually gains strength as it
ages. Unlike other materials, it will not rust, rot, become termite-ridden or
weaken under extreme loads or weather conditions.
Proof of the dependable performance of today's concrete is all around
us ... most of south Florida's buildings rest upon concrete foundations and
are of masonry construction. Concrete is one of our most versatile building
materials. Higher strength mixes enable architects to design with less bulk
in structural framework. Precast, prestressed concrete provides standardized,
factory-produced units that are hauled to the site and eliminate costly form-
ing on the job. Prestressed roof beams for example, make possible clear
spans of 100 ft. or more to provide the architect with greater design freedom,
and the owner with more usable floor space free of space-robbing columns.
Sprayed concrete has proved itself ideal for swimming pool construction,
and precast concrete seawalls have proved effective in holding back our
ravaging tides. Unbelievable thin concrete shells for roofs, and a novel
lift-slab method of pouring all floors and roof of a building on the ground
and raising them into position with hydraulic jacks, are no longer dreams.
Yes, great things are happening in concrete and the future promises to
Sbe n less remarkable than the past. For 15 years, R. H. Wright & Son has
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JANUARY, 1958


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Florida Architect
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS


Ie 7Thi Isae .--.


. 4
. 6
. 8

. 15
. 25
. 25
. 26
. 28
. 32

. 4
. 27


The Chapter Presidents Speak .
Mid-Florida By Joseph M. Shifalo . . . . .
Daytona Beach By Craig J. Gehlert . . . . .
Jacksonville -By Thomas E. Ewart, Jr. . . . .
Florida South By Irvin S. Korach . . . . .
Florida Central By Robert H. Levison . . . .
Florida North Central By Forrest R. Coxen . . .
Palm Beach By Frederick W. Kessler . . . . .
Florida North By McMillan H. Johnson . . . .
Broward County By John M. Evans . . . . .
Student Associate Chapter By William R. Lynch . . .
Mid-Florida Auxiliary By Mrs. Ann R. Shifalo . . . .
Florida Central Auxiliary By Mrs. Alma L. Parish . . .
Officers of the FAA's 10 Chapters . . . . . .
Mexican Trip Planned for FAA Members . . . . .
"A New Century Reckons" By Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, AIA Pre
1958 A Year of Destiny By H. Samuel Krusg, FAA President.


. 17
. 2 1
. 23
. 3 1


The FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of
the Florida Association of Architects of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned by
the Florida Association of Architects, Inc., a
Florida Corporation not for profit, and is pub-
lished month at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida. telephone: MOhawk 7-0421 . .
Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are welcomed
but publication cannot be guaranteed. Opinions
expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor or the Florida Association
of Architects. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted by other official AIA publications,
provided full credit is given to the author
and to The FLORIDA ARCHITECT for prior use.
. . Advertisements of products, materials and
services adaptable for use in Florida are wel-
comed, but mention of names or use of illus-
trations, of such materials and products in
either editorial or advertising columns does not
constitute endorsement by the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects. Advertising material must
conform to standards of this publication; and
the right is reserved to reject such material be-
cause of arrangement, copy or illustrations.
. Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.
Printed by McMurray Printers

ROGER W. SHERMAN Editor
FAA Administrative Secretary
VERNA M. SHERMAN


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1958
H. Samuel Kruse, President, 811 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami
Arthur L. Campbell, First Vice-President, 115 S. Main St., Gainesville
William B. Harvard, Second Vice-President, 2714 Ninth St. N., St. Petersburg
Verner Johnson, Third Vice-President, 250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Secretary, 2910 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
Morton T. Ironmonger, Treasurer, 1261 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Roger W. Sherman, Executive Director, 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami

DIRECTORS
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Edgar S. Wortman; BROWARD COUNTY:
William F. Bigoney, Jr., Robert E. Hansen; DAYTONA BEACH: Francis R.
Walton; FLORIDA CENTRAL: Eugene H. Beach, Elliott B. Hadley, Anthony
L. Pullara; FLORIDA NORTH: Turpin C. Bannister, Myrl J. Hanes; FLORIDA
NORTH CENTRAL: Prentiss Huddleston; FLORIDA SOUTH: James L. Deen,
Theodore Gottfried, Herbert R. Savage; JACKSONVILLE: James A. Meehan,
Jr., Walter B. Schultz; MID-FLORIDA: L. Alex Hatton; FLORIDA NORTH
WEST: Hugh J. Leitch; PALM BEACH: C. Ellis Duncan, Jefferson N. Powell.

THE COVER
This year The FLORIDA ARCHITECT inaugurates a new policy of presenting
the work of the FAA's chapter members throughout the state. Scheduled
among other buildings for the first part of 1958 are'the homes of several
architects. The first appears in this issue the home of Andrew J.
Ferendino of Miami. This was one of the Hospitality Houses of the 42nd
FAA Convention in 1956.


VOLUME 8

NUMBER 1 1958

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Elegance Here It Grew from Simplicity
The Triennale of Milan By Emily V. Obst
Past Presidents of the FAA .. ..
Advertisers' Index . . . . .


sident
























~- .-
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II~II


The unretouched photograph at top was
taken in July 1957. It shows a section of the
Clearwater Causeway between Clearwater
and Clearwater Beach.
The concrete paving was completed in
1927-thirty years ago-and is in excellent
condition today.
Careful checking of official records show
no maintenance expense on the pavement
during the 30 years it has been in service!
Here is another impressive example of the
low annual cost when streets, highways and
freeways are paved with concrete.
With concrete-you get extra safety-wet
or dry it offers dependable skid resistance.
With concrete-you get extra comfort-
new type concrete assures smoother riding.
With concrete-you get extra economy-
moderate first cost, plus tremendous savings


Section of new concrete divided four-lane Freeway west
of Lakeland (U.S. 17-92)- the first construction in Florida's
program of interstate thoroughfares.

to the taxpayer because maintenance is
negligible.
Concrete will stand up, year after year,
under the pounding of constantly increasing
traffic loads.
And remember this in connection with the
nationwide plan for modern freeways. Cost
of initial construction is to be borne 90 per
cent by the Federal Government, and 10 per
cent by the states. However, maintenance
will be wholly an expense to be borne by the
taxpayers of the state.
You, as a taxpayer, cannot afford to have
Florida's interstate highway system paved
with any material other than concrete.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY


FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA *SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
JANUARY, 1958 3


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Your Tax Savings in




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Mid-Florida Chapter

By JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, AIA
President


The Mid-Florida Chapter, com-
pleting its second year of existence,
is looking forward to a new year with
keen anticipation of the many things
it hopes to accomplish. To say simply
that this past year has been a good
year would not give credit to the co-
operation of the chapter members,
nor to the many fine accomplish-
ments of our committees. We have
grown to a chapter having 23 Cor-
porate members, 5 Associate members
and 14 Junior Associate members in
the past year and above all, have
instigated a public relations program
which we hope will bring to the
attention of the people of the Mid-
Florida area the good work that is
being done by our chapter. 1958
should prove a banner year for all
architects in this area if the promised
outlook for the volume of construc-
tion holds true and the population
increase in this area continues as it
has in the past five years.
More and more people arc begin-
ning to realize that their home, their
commercial building or any invest-
ment in a structure is only valued as
high as the good quality of workman-
ship and design that an architect is
able to give it. The challenge of the
engineer and the scientist in this age
of rockets, missiles and satellites
should cause us all to search our abil-
ities and to see if we, as architects,
are prepared to meet this new design
challenge.


This past year's Awards Banquet,
which met with such wide approval
of all factions participating, will be
expanded to include as many factions
of the sub-trades as it is possible to
judge, and a hope that we can term-
inate the banquet with a Beaux Arts
Ball.
The Ladies Auxiliary continues to
keep our chapter members alert to the
obligations that we have to our pro-
fession by the splendid attendance
thcv have in their own group. With-
out their help chapter activities could
not enjoy the interest which has been
shown.
A new vcar is a new load of work
for all members and may we shoulder
the responsibility and make our chap-
tcr one of the most active in Florida.


Mid-Florida Auxiliary

By MRS. ANN R. SHIFALO
President


The Ladies Auxiliary of the Mid-
Florida Chaptr is embarking on a
program which, it is hoped, will com-
plement the work of our Public Rela-
tions Committee. This year, our
members are being invited to join
and participate in the various civic
groups which are formed for the bet-
terment of our community, and to
offer wvithin these groups the assist-


ance of the architect and his varied
training.
Our Program Chairman has prom-
ised us speakers for each auxiliary
meeting that will broaden the scope
of our understanding in all fields. The
responsibility of the "Architect's-wife"
to the profession should be the con-
tinual promotion of a better under-
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







e.-..A NEW RECORD


t. for Lift Slab


U -rl~n


Construction


T.3-er CI Golden iie." -uniI
I-il r co CGDeprat'.e 3p3rImenl
Eciignd t, J'- eph .li ie. :
Ind /-Dr3a an arch.re".I: Ir-
A SDller CC.r-ar.,
uld.ider


This month construction will start on a dazzling new cooperative
apartment at Golden Isles in Hallandale. This glass-and-aluminum
tower to the sun was designed' for Lift Slab and when its pent-
house roof has been anchored into place, more than 150 feet above its
entrance, it will become the highest Lift Slab structure in the world
.Because of Lift Slab, the 90,000 square feet of its 14 floors and
roofs will be poured, lifted and anchored in place within 90 days -
another time-and-money-saving performance over conventional
construction.


JANUARY, 1958


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Mid-Fla. Auxiliary ...
(Continued from Page 4)
standing of the work of the architect,
and to further this aim, we have
formed a list of speakers from both
the Auxiliary and from the Chapter
which will be available to all civic
bodies.


Daytona Beach

By CRAIG J. GEHLERT, AIA
President

Stimulated by the rapid growth of
our Chapter, a new policy was formu-
lated last year to combine our normal
monthly meetings into six well-
planned specific programs of interest
every other month. It is the aim for
the coming year of our Chapter to
provide an atmosphere of interesting
and provoking discussions so our
members will become better acquaint-
ed with all aspects of our community.
One of our main emphases of
progress is the instigation of a new
sub-committee on Zoning and Plan-
ning under the Community Develop-
ment Committee as our effort toward
dealing with the severe growth cvi-
(Continued on Page 8)



Officers of FAA's Ten Chapters


I Ieme eme' .'.I


For engineering data and technical
information on standard LEAP PRE-
STRESSED CONCRETE building
members including dimensions, physi-
cal properties and tables of loadings,
please call or write:
LEAP
CONCRETE
P. O. Box 1053, Lakeland, Fla.
CAPITOL CONCRETE CO.
Jacksonville, Florida
DURA-STRESS, INC.
Leesburg, Florida
PERMASTRESS, INC.
Daytona Beach, Florida
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland, Florida
SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED
CONCRETE, INC.
Pensacola, Florida
WEST COAST SHELL CORP.
Sarasota, Florida
R. H. WRIGHT & SON
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Your LEAP Associates in Florida


BROWARD COUNTY:
President _._ John M. Evans
Vice President_ Jack W. Zimmer
Secretary_____ William H. Peck
Treasurer ______ -Louis Wolff
DAYTONA BEACH:
President ____ Craig J. Gehlert
Vice President__ Edwin M. Snead
Secretary ____ __Carl Gerken
Treasurer_____ Walter K. Smith
FLORIDA CENTRAL:
President__ _Robert H. Levison
Vice President _A. Wynn Howell
Secretary_ ._Sidney R. Wilkinson
Treasurer __. Jack McCandless
FLORIDA NQRTH:
President__McMillan H. Johnson
Vice President- Lester N. May
Secretary __ John B. P. Marion
Treasurer__ ___D. Neil Webb
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL:
President _Forrest R. Coxen
Vice PresidentPaul A. McKinley
Secretary-
Treasurer David W. Potter


FLORIDA NORTH WEST:
President__W. Stewart Morrison
Vice President Frank J. Sindelar
Secretary __ Samuel Marshall
Treasurer __Thomas H. Daniels
FLORIDA SOUTH:
President___. Irvin S. Korach
Vice President Edward G. Grafton
Secretary _____C. Robert Abele
Treasurer ___John 0. Grimshaw
JACKSONVILLE:
President__Thomas E. Ewart, Jr.
Vice PresidentRobt. C. Broward
Secret'y Frederick W. Bucky, Jr.
Treasurer___ John R. Graveley
MID-FLORIDA:
President___ Joseph M. Shifalo
Vice President J. E. Windham, II
Secretary ___ Robert B. Murphy
Treasurer ____ John T. Hart
PALM BEACH:
President__Frederick W. Kessler
Vice PresidentKenneth Jacobson
Secretary ______ Donald R. Edge
Treasurer____ Harold A. Obst
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


PRESTRESSED

CONCRETE

is

today's


A further responsibility is to assure
that we have done everything possible
to permit our men folk to attend each
meeting.
Many outings are planned for 1958
and the friendship and understanding
which should result will build a bet-
ter Mid-Florida Chapter.


_ _


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How to bu


d "cold-snap comfort"


nto a Florida house the best and


cheapest may


Include a flame-type "florida Furnace" in the plans!
Every survey proves all over again that permanently-installed flame-type equipment is the
most efficient and economical answer to the Florida home heating problem. Using cheap
fuel, flame-type heating equipment pushes positive, circulating warm air all through the
house at lowest cost.
By including a flame-type "Florida furnace" in the plans of your houses you are extending
indoor comfort to every day of the winter for your clients.
Call on us for any information you may need on permanent flame-type home heating.


FLORIDA HOME 1Ga HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S.W. 8th STREET, MIAMI


JANUARY, 1958





Daytona Beach ...
(Continued from Page 6)
dent throughout the area. We feel
that this is an extremely important
subject for our profession to study
and advise not only as architects
with a view toward the future devel-
opment of the capacities of our town,
but as interested citizens who will be
judged accordingly by our effort. We
hope to be sufficiently ready when
the anticipated hiring of the services
of a City Planner for the Daytona
Beach area is made in the near future.
In view of the success of our Beaux
Arts Ball in honor of the Centennial
last year, we intend to continue and
develop this as the Chapter's annual
social affair, from year to year.
This year, as in the past, we will
endeavor to give freely of our interest
to other groups of the building in-
dustry to coordinate better relation-
ships and understanding of our mu-
tual problems. Relative to this we
recently participated in a combined
panel discussion arranged by our local
building exchange. Various problems
of all aspects of this industry were
placed before the panel open to the
public. As a result, not only the
building trades and architects
achieved a better understanding, but
also the general public was able to
perceive the various functions and
responsibilities of the profession and
industry to each other.
With only a few of the important
items listed above on the agenda, we
look forward to a lively and interest-
ing year one which should see our
Chapter continue its growth, not only
in membership, but in service to its
client, the community.


Jacksonville Chapter

By THOMAS E. EWART, JR., AIA
President


Starting in 1956, our charter year,
the Jacksonville Chapter vigorously
pursued a program of community
service. Having met with great suc-
cess in our efforts to convince the
citizenship to back needed capital
improvements, we naturally pro-
ceeded into 1957 with the foundation
laid for a solid public relations pro-
gram. The year 1957 saw an increas-
ing number of members participating
in radio and television forums and
speaking to civic, fraternal and edu-
cational groups. By active participa-
tion in Chamber of Commerce and
Junior Chamber of Commerce activ-
ities, we have strengthened the posi-
tion of the architect in community
affairs.
The internal organization of the
chapter will receive a marked effort
toward strengthening its structure
and promotion of fellowship. We
will strive to develop a feeling of
comradeship and a unity of purpose.
Better understanding among members
will result in an increased tendency
to express ideas that should improve
our professional relations. Broaden-
ing our social activity with personal
contact undoubtedly will increase our
effectiveness as a chapter.
Jacksonville is long overdue as the
site for the annual FAA Convention.
By 1959 new convention facilities
should be available to us. In order to
surpass the excellence of past con-


Mexican Trip Planned For FAA Members


Plans are now nearing completion
for a six-day architectural tour of old
Mexico. The tour, planned for early
spring, has been highly endorsed by
architects who have taken it; and
though not officially sponsored by the
FAA, has the approval of that body.
The itinerary as planned by the for-
eign service department of Eastern
Air Lines includes visits to four towns
from a Mexico City headquarters.
Correspondence with the Mexican
Architects' Society indicates that of-
ficials of that group will act as hosts
8


to visiting Florida architects; and an
open invitation to a gala cocktail party
at the Hotel DelPrado in Mexico City
has been tendered. Mexican architects
will als6 act as guides during visits
to Mexico's principal architectural
achievements.
The tour is being planned to in-
clude a week-end in Mexico and
thus to permit attendance at a bull
fight for FAA aficionados. In Mexico
City visits will be made to the Cathe-
dral, the National Palace, the glass
factories and the brilliantly colorful


ventions, it will be necessary to start
preliminaries now. As a first step,
the formation of a ladies auxiliary is
mandatory. Not only will an auxil-
iary be extremely helpful at conven-
tion time, but it will serve primarily
as the social base for chapter activity.
Obviously, every chapter is faced
with the problems of increasing mem-
bership, non-attendance, providing
interesting programs and bettering
public relations. To solve these prob-
lems will require more than the
efforts of the executive committee
alone. The membership will largely
determine the degree of success which
will be achieved in 1958.



University City. On succeeding days
excursions will include trips to the
famous Shrine of Guadalupe, the
Pyramids of Teotehuacan, the Float-
ing Gardens of Xochililio, an over-
night stay at the famed bath resort
of Ixtapan and a trip to Taxco, made
famous by an American architect for
its hand-crafted silver.
The tour will start from Miami at
9:00 a. m.; and six full days later will
return from Mexico City at 11:55 p.m.
Cost is low $213.00 per person for
double hotel occupancy; $228.00 for
single occupancy. These figures in-
(Continued on Page 23)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























Church. Coral Gables Dean Parmalee, AIA, architect


74e c& 1eMia a" M-O-I-S-T-U-R-E


...the major cause of exposure-damage to wood


Even indoors, absorption of moisture by untreat-
ed wood can cause swelling, warping, surface-
checking and end-splitting each the start of
progressive deterioration . To guard against
such moisture-damage, specify that all woodwork
in any building be WOODLIFED, preferably by dip-
ping or flooding . WOODLIFE's "anti-wicking"
action prevents moisture seepage; and by pene-
trating the surface with an invisible, water-
repellent solution, WOODLIFE coats wood cells and
makes protection last and last and last ...


|74e 4w
ti WATER REPEllENT
S containing SPRESRVATIVE
PENTAchlorophenol PRESERVATIVE

Ingredients in Woodlife also protect wood from
decay, fungus, stain and attack by wood-eating
insects. They act as a poison to render wood
immune from attack by the micro-organisms
and insects which feed on untreated wood.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI - FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto Call Palmetto 2-101 I


JANUARY, 1958




7 DRAMATIC WAYS TO USE


SLIDING GLASS DOORS


Ador engineers apply
sliding glass doors
to wide range of
architectural requirements


48' wide opening was custom engineered by Ador for this
new car showroom.


Can sliding glass doors be economi-
cally custom designed to meet
special requirements of individual
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1958-2058


"A New Century Reckons...


By LEON CHATELAIN, JR., FAIA
President, the American Institute of Architects


A year ago my message to the Flor-
ida architects was prepared as we
were about to embark on our Cen-
tennial year and I outlined for you
our celebration plans. Much has hap-
pened since then, including a rather
unexpected finale to the highly stimu-
lating and pleasurable Annual Con-
vention of your state association at
Clearwater. Unaccustomed as my
wife, Mary, and I are to having a boat
sink under us,* the experience did
not dampen our enthusiasm for Flor-
ida in the slightest; and we look for-
ward to many more enjoyable visits
with you in the future.
Last year when I described in these
columns our plans for the Centennial
celebration, I doubt if any one of us
foresaw the possibility of such a fab-
ulous success. Many of you attended
the Centennial convention in Wash-
ington last spring. As you know, the
importance of that event was recog-
nized not only nationally, but inter-
nationally. Without question it served
to elevate perceptibly the prestige of
the Institute here and abroad.
In planning the program we set our
sights high. What we presented was
of interest not only to ourselves, but
to the public as well as was amply
demonstrated by the broad coverage


* The reference is to an accident which
occurred the morning of November 9,
1957, just prior to the adjournment of the
43rd Annual FAA Convention. President
and Mrs. Chatelain were fishing in the
bay water near Clearwater Beach. Their
boat pulled its anchor, scraped the point
of a coral reef and started to sink. Before
they realized it, the Chatelains were in
deep salt water. Fortunately, another boat
came immediately to their relief; and
what might have been a catastrophe,
happily became only a wet and incon-
venient incident but one which Leon
and Mary Chatelain will undoubtedly
remember always!
JANUARY, 1958


we received in the press, national
magazines, and on TV and radio.
While none of us is foolish enough to
use press clippings as a yardstick by
which to measure success (they
poured in by the thousands!) none-
theless we are extremely gratified to
know that literally millions of per-
sons were given the opportunity to see
and hear favorable comments about
the Institute and the profession.
To fully realize the overall impact
of the Centennial we can multiply
our success at the national level many
times again at the local level, where
successful chapter celebrations in
many sections of the country did
much to further widespread apprecia-
tion of our profession.
Our Centennial year is now his-
tory! We have basked in the lime-
light and have enjoyed unprecedented
public recognition. We have explored
the future and the vast potentialities
it can hold for us. But now we must
face up to the realities of the present.
I'm grateful to Central States Re-
gional Director LLOYD ROARK for an
apt description of our task. By chang-
ing only one letter in HENRY SAY-
LOR'S Centennial theme "A New
Century Beckons" Lloyd has given us
"A New Century Reckons" which
expresses it exactly.
Because we are fortunate enough
to live in a great democracy with an
economy based on free private enter-
prise, we always will have competi-
tion. To beat this competition we
have to make available, and con-
stantly deliver, a better service than
our competitors.
While the states protect the public
from potential physical dangers
through issuing licenses only to prop-
erly trained persons to practice archi-
tecture,they certainly cannot outlaw


". .. We are not content to rest on
our laurels. In this year we will seek
to find out how we can reach a new
objective . ."

building companies which comply
with regulations by having a registered
architect on the payroll. Ve know
that we can do a better job than such
organizations, but it is up to us to
prove it to the public. Unfortunately,
one incompetent job by an architect
hurts the reputation not only of its
perpetrator, but reflects adversely on
the entire profession.
The improvement of professional
competence always has been an Insti-
tute objective and many of our staff
activities, as well as those of commit-
tees are directed towards elevating
architectural education and training
at all levels, developing new tools and
techniques to assist the practitioner
in his work, and making available to
the membership the specific data be-
ing developed on building types and
relating to the uses of new materials.
It seems to me that all of us, in
this period of reckoning, should draw
fully on our existing resources and
even beyond that, try and anticipate
future developments so that inso-
far as possible we can go out ahead
by utilizing tomorrow's skills today.
(Continued on Page 30)










1958-A YEAR




OF DESTINY






By H. SAMUEL KRUSE, AIA
President, Florida Association of Architects


When the curtain was lowered on
the 43rd Annual Convention in
Clearwater, every person there must
have sensed that the FAA was on a
threshold of a new era in which men
of good will, dedicated to the highest
service to society, organized for a high
degree of integrated effort, will shape
an exciting and beautiful future for
the Florida Community.
The year 1958 is our year of
destiny.
For 43 years the FAA has worked
for strength, organization and posi-
tion in the state community. Now
we have the strength, now we have
the organization, now we have the
stature within the building industry
and, in large measure, the body
politic. Having these tools and a
good foundation, now is the time to
solidify ideas into programs, translate
programs into real benefits for our
community, our profession and our
individual interests.
Following the revised organization
of Committees as passed by the 43rd
Convention, the formulation of pro-
grams and the progress of the affairs
of the Association will rest mainly
upon the coordinated efforts of thir-
teen important Standing Committees,
ten of which will be vertical with
Chapters and the Institute. Upon
these committees the FAA depends
for the crystalization of ideas into
programs. Upon their accomplish-
ments FAA progresses, atrophies or
regresses. This year we shall have an
Administrative Secretary as well as an


Executive Director. We shall have
a central office. An administrative
guide will be published and issued in
the form of a Standard Operating
Procedure. Relieved of bothersome
procedural and communication prob-
lems, the committees for 1958 can be
expected to achieve greater goals than
in the past with the resultant greater
progress for FAA.
At the first meeting of the Board
of Directors in 1958, the Committee
appointments and duties will be pre-
sented for approval. At that time
certain committee assignments will
also be presented for approval as well
as specific duties for our Vice-Presi-
dents. The appointments and duties
will be published in The Florida
Architect, as in the past. This has
been very, useful to the membership
as well as the members of committees
for communication purpose. To in-
crease the efficiency of communica-
tions between membership, commit-
tees and officers, it is proposed to
have a President's Corner published
in each issue of The Florida Archi-
tect, where specific committee assign-
ments, committee, officer and other
business items of special interest to
the mcinmbtrhip can be presented.
In this way the membership can be
informed of undertaken by its organization and
make such critical comments neces-
sary to refresh the spirit, stimulate
the imagination and create a warm
sense of organizational solidarity. It
is not intended to provoke unfavor-


able criticism in 1958; however, all
criticism, laudatory or bitter, all ideas,
conforming or non-conforming, sub-
mitted in sobriety or with levity to
this Administration will be welcomed.
Upon the exchange of ideas and the
light of criticism, activity in the right
direction can be led.
It is appropriate at this time to
set a few goals for 1958. Listed
below in outline form are, under var-
ious headings, our position as of the
present, along with attainable goals.
The headings are the names of stand-
ing committees, since they so aptly
describe the activities of our Associa-
tion.

Chapter Affairs:
The work of the old Committee
on Committees and Chapter Coordi-
nation has set up the organization
and the desirable unification of Chap-
ter and FAA administrative proced-
ures. This having been done, it is
desirable that every Chapter, along
with the FAA Administration, put
the machinery to work.
There should be no secrets be-
tween Chapters.
Every Chapter activity should be
reported through the Vice-Presidents
to the Chairman of the Committee
on Chapter Affairs. The activities of
one Chapter often stimulates another
Chapter to do the same, similar or
better activity. This trading of ideas
is necessary for the progressive quality
of Chapter functions. \e have the
machinery; put the machinery to


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







CHAPTER AFFAIRS: We have the machinery; put the machinery to work and all
Chapters will benefit . PUBLIC RELATIONS: In the public's mind our profession
becomes worthy of serious recognition in direct proportion to the individual architect's
interest in his profession . COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: The time for educating
the public to the need for planning, zoning, redevelopment, workable and uniform
codes is now . RESEARCH: Such activity is in the scope of our responsibilities to
ourselves and to the building industry . LEGISLATION: We are not interested in
legislating ourselves into business, but are determined to preserve and elevate stand-
ards . FLORIDA AS A NEW AIA REGION: We shall continue to perform all acts
necessary to win favorable action on our suit to The Institute . .


work and all Chapters will benefit.

Education:
Today we can look back on a long
list of achievements in the field of
education. Our relationship with the
University of Florida is very close.
We have provided loan funds for
students and student awards. We
have successfully promoted, along
with others, the appropriation of
funds for a new building for the
teaching of architecture at the Uni-
versity of Florida. However, the field
is broad and much more can be done.
We can do more to coordinate the
recruitment program. Institute pam-
phlets should be made available to
every high school in the State of
Florida and a coordinated, well-
planned speakers' bureau can cover
every high school during "Career
Week," if any, or several months
before graduation.
More post-school education can be
used. It is just as important that
the practicing architect keep abreast
of current doctrine and techniques
as it is for students of architecture.
A traveling seminar visiting each
Chapter once a year can be of con-
siderable value, if properly planned
and imaginatively conceived and pre-
sented. Such seminars can acquaint
the architect with accounting pro-
cedures, physical organization and
techniques for office procedure, as
well as new planning and structural
techniques.
We should make an effort to have


a course in architecture written for
every level of education, from kinder-
garten through College, and promote
its being taught in the schools of the
State.

Public Relations:
We have accepted the premise that
the public relations program is up to
the individual, that he shall do the
best possible job on projects commis-
sioned him to do, maintaining the
highest of professional conduct, and
that he devote some of his time to
explaining the profession to the pub-
lic. This premise does not preclude
guidance, education and coordination
of individual effort.
We have Chapters who have done
excellent work in public relations;
some have done little. Some individ-
uals do a good job interpreting our
profession to laymen; others, not.
First we must learn what the public
thinks about us. This can be done
by having a survey made, or by ac-
quiring surveys made in areas of sim-
ilar construction.
Through the use of workshops with
capable leaders the experience of var-
ious individuals and chapters can be
discussed and evaluated for the ben-
efit of all.,
Armed with tlhe knowledge of what
people think of us, techniques can be
devised that will aim at their atti-
tudes. Techniques should be empha-
sized; more on how to do the job
rather than what to do. We can
devise consistent replies for the stock


questions asked by the layman con-
cerning our profession. Then the con-
fusing assortment of answers will not
be given and the public will more
readily understand us; neighbor can
check with neighbor and come up
with the same answers. Perhaps a
handbook on Public Relations for
Architects is in order.
In discussing public relations, this
Administration is aware that archi-
tects are public too. To maintain a
strong FAA for promoting the inter-
ests of individuals, it is incumbent
upon the Administration to show
Florida architects the importance of
active participation in their profes-
sion's affairs on Chapter, State and
Institute levels. In the public's mind
our profession becomes worthy of
serious recognition in direct propor-
tion to the individual architect's in-
terest in his profession.
As it is necessary to get the story
of architecture to every segment of
society, so is it necessary for every
community activity to feel the pres-
ence of architects. Effort should be
made to encourage architects to fill
vacancies on every board or commit-
tee concerned with architecture, plan-
ning, zoning, the arts, and other re-
lated fields. Public Relations com-
mittees can prepare lists of local and
state boards and committees on which
an architect can serve for the benefit
of the profession or its status in the
community. Should a vacancy occur
on such boards or committees, an
(Continued on Page 14)


JANUARY, 1958






(Continued from Page 13)
architect should be urged to fill the
vacancy and a campaign instituted for
his appointment.

Relations With the
Construction Industry:
The FAA has established a good
working relationship with the coop-
erative groups of the building indus-
try. The Joint Cooperative Commit-
tee FAA-AGC-FES has set for itself
goals of great significance for the
industry in the State. FAA will con-
tinue to give leadership and active
assistance in achieving these goals and
introducing new ones in this coop-
erative effort.
As important as the Joint Coopera-
tive Committee work is, we must not
be so involved with its goals that we
forget the many segments of the
industry with which architects are
working constantly, but with which
we do not work on an association
level. We must be alert to the oppor-
tunities as they arise, to the welding
of all elements of the construction
industry into an organization which
can be representative of the whole
industry. If such opportunity arises
in 1958, the FAA must work for
unity of the industry.

Collaboration with
Design Professions:
Our relationship with the design
professions has been well established
with engineers. Whether this is be-
cause the engineers are the only
designers with whom we have prob-
lems, or not, is not readily apparent.
We shall expand our relationship
with the other design professions, if
for no other reason than the exten-
sion of our public relations program.
In this, FAA will take the initiative.

Community Development:
The FAA made a start last year in
showing the people of our state our
interest and concern in community
planning problems by active partici-
pation in the Florida Planning and
Zoning Association. The 1957 presi-
dent of FPZA, Kenneth Jacobson, an
active member of our organization,
has been reelected. We shall support
him and the FPZA program with
renewed vigor this year.
We can do more. The time for
educating the public to the need for
planning, zoning, redevelopment,


workable and uniform codes is now.
We must encourage and give leader-
ship in the initiation of organizations
and programs for the happy develop-
ment of our communities. Many of
our members and some of our Chap-
ters are now actively engaged in this
type of leadership. We can render
them assistance and learn from them
how similar leadership can be applied
to other communities.

Research:
Last year the FAA indicated that
it recognized its obligation to the pro-
fession and the building industry to
conduct research for the improve-
ment of service to the public. This
was done by expressing an interest
and promising participation in the
formulation of an organization of
interested elements of the building
industry into a Florida Foundation
for the Advancement of Building.
The importance of research in all
the phases of our professional activ-
ities is recognized. That there is no
agency now actively engaged in re-
search of problems peculiar to Flor-
ida building design and methods is
indication that more effort must be
made to the end of attaining such an
agency. Our interest in the organiza-
tion of FFAB should go further than
mere participation. We should be-
come an active promoter of its or-
ganization and leader of its activities.
Such activity is in the scope of our
responsibilities to ourselves and to the
building industry and is our inherited
obligation from those predecessors of
our profession who have passed on to
us benefits of their research often
without recognition or reward.
Membership:
We have made rapid strides to the
ultimate goal of enrolling in member-
ship, all architects in good profes-
sional standing, registered in the
State of Florida. We shall not relax
in our efforts to seek eligible individu-
als for the attainment of our goal.

Legislation:
The 1957 experience with our
Executive Director as our representa-
tive at the Legislature has given us
the direction for organizing an even
better vehicle for expressing our opin-
ions on legislative matters concerned
with our profession. In 1958 we have
a "quiet" year in which to align our
machinery in this new direction in


preparation for the next Session. The
program envisions the participation
of every member in a general way
with many delegated specific responsi-
bilities. The program will be directed
to various Commissions, Boards and
Departments of the State Govern-
ment, as well as every Legislator, to
make them aware that we are not in-
terested in legislating ourselves into
business, but that we are determined
to preserve and/or elevate standards,
and that we can and are available to
aid and assist in all matters related to
our profession.
Florida, a District of The AIA:
Our application for a responsible
place in The Institute organization as
a new regional district is before The
Institute for acceptance. We shall
continue to perform all acts necessary
to win favorable action on our suit
to The Institute. In anticipation of
favorable action and to prepare for
the orderly acceptance of the duties
of a Regional District of the AIA, we
should prepare the necessary revision
to the By-Laws and Constitution
ready for their enactment, should our
desire become a reality. Our claim to
responsible leadership in The Insti-
tute will be greatly influenced by our
deportment at the 1958 Regional
Convention of the South Atlantic
District in Sarasota.
We must do all we can to make it
a success and to demonstrate our
vigor and our unselfish concern for
all problems related to our pro-
fession.
This outline of program for 1958
is not too ambitious for an organiza-
tion of the strength and high purpose
such as the FAA.
The year has been called the year
of destiny because I am very con-
scious of the pressure of events that
channel our activities in new direc-
tions. For 43 years FAA has pre-
pared itself to meet the new horizons,
the new responsibilities urged upon
us; and we accept them with con-
fidence. With a little effort from
each member, properly coordinated,
we can shape our destiny and accom-
plish much.
Has History not shown us that
great things are done by a few de-
termined people? We are few in
number, but we are determined, tal-
ented people, strongly organized. I
am privileged and proud to give lead-
ership to such a group.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Florida South

By IRVIN S. KORACH, AIA
President


Following a centennial year of
progress and achievement, Florida
South Chapter is geared to the con-
tinuance of a planned program for
expansion of services to our members
and to the public.
With an active chapter of 190
members, we must first provide the
opportunity for closer personal rela-
tions and to benefit from interchange
of ideas. This we hope to accomplish
through stimulating and thought pro-
voking programs at meetings and pos-
sible additional get-togethers for sem-
inars.
With the creation of a permanent
headquarters in the new duPont Plaza
Building, we will now have a clear-
ing house for information and ready
dissemination of chapter news. Here
also we plan to sponsor and display
architectural exhibits and those of
allied arts. More interest in FAA has
been shown by our members as evi-
denced by attendance at the recent
convention and the establishment of
FAA offices with our chapter area
should foster stronger ties of relation.
AIA public relations become top


priority in chapter musts. Our com-
mittee must better acquaint the pub-
lic with the services and responsibility
of the Architect and the functions he
performs in the pattern of our grow-
ing cities. We know that individually
architects are playing important roles
in community life and that this must
be highlighted so that our younger
and newer members can be indoc-
trinated in public affairs.
At long last Dade County has a
unified building code and we feel
proud of our hard working architects
who played a major part in its con-
ception. However, its adoption, en-
forcement and revisions as time may
bring about, are vital to our profes-
sion so that the entire construction
industry may derive the benefits of
these standards.
Our close association with the Uni-
versity of Florida College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts has brought
about a scholarship fund for students
or furtherance of school projects. Our
committee on education will continue
and expand this project.
The fine relations between the


chapter and the construction industry
is expressed by our awards to the
craftsmen, who translate our plans to
reality and whose outstanding work
merits recognition. This year our
awards committee will plan to foster
the creation of community recogni-
tion for structures of noteworthy
design.
Each year has brought increasing
responsibility to Florida South's share
of participation in national and state
architectural organizations, county
and city administration. This year we
intend to point all effort to make AIA
a leader in our community.


Florida Central

By ROBERT H. LEVISON, AIA
President


1958 The First Year of The
Challenge seems to the Florida
Central Chapter to be a year of re-
newed effort in every respect.
We will strive to elevate even fur-
ther the standard of ethical practice
among our members and hope to
further their understanding with re-
spect to the responsibilities and obli-
gations incurred by them as Archi-
tects. We hope to enhance public
relations by bringing a better under-
standing to the public in general of
the value of the service of an Archi-
tect, no matter how small the project.
It is our aim to strive for closer
cooperation between Chapter Com-
mittees and Vertical Committees of
JANUARY, 1958


the State and National Organizations,
in all phases of our profession, with
a maximum effort in the direction of
initiating, at Chapter level, programs
which may be of benefit to the entire
State Organization.
Chapter meetings will be devoted
to continuing seminars on informa-
tive topics with a special emphasis
placed on cooperation with the re-
mainder of the industry, research, and
other new ideas which may raise the
standard of practice in our area.
The Regional Conference, to be
held in Sarasota for three days from
April 17th to 19th, 1958, will be a
major undertaking for the many
members of the Chapter with the


aim of each member to let the whole
region know more about the "Magic
State" in which we live. The Con-
ference, under the able leadership
(Continued on Page 23)

























1VP,



i I_


1n1 pnoTograpns Dy Alexanare ueorges


The master bedroom opens to the outdoors and a gardened extension of the screened
loggia facing the lake. As in the other two bedrooms, wall openings are fitted
with a combination of glass sliding doors and redwood jalousies which provides
an easy control of both ventilation and light. Walls other than the stacked,
gravel surfaced block behind the bed are covered with jade green silk wall-
paper. The recessed carpet is cocoa; the ceiling is covered with white acoustic plaster.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Elegance--Here it grew from simplicity...







This is the home of ANDREW J.
FERENDINO (Pancoast, Ferendino,
Skeels and Burnham, Architects, of ,.....
Miami) and he designed it as he did
for three sound reasons. First, he rr .
wanted to capture within it the placid / 'A 71
beauty of a lake-shore site and the Ill '
almost-perfection of FREDERICK B. .
STRESAU'S landscaping. Second, he _
wanted both comfort and convenience
to live along with the outdoor beauty. The house is on a slight elevation
Third, he wanted flexibility of both overlooking a man-made lake to
the east from whence come pre-
space and privacy to serve the varied ailing breezes. With glass doors
needs and interests of an active and separating the loggia and terrace
gregarious family. \ (which is a slick terrazzo surface
Evidence that he got what h for dancing) from inside living
Evidence that he got what he \areas, opened fully, the house
wanted is shown here- and was ex- becomes a great screened canopy
perienced in three dimensions by those producing an almost indescribable,
but wholly delightful, sense of
42nd Annual Conventioneers fortu- freedom coupled with sheltered
nate enough to have visited the Feren- \ security. Below, the carport and
\ workshop wing from the entrance
dino home during the 1956 conclave's loggia.
loggia.
closing Hospitality Night. \
The full beauty of the lake-bordered
rock and pine-studded acre surrounds
the house, is shut out only by glass
and a few solid walls where the de- v
signer bowed to the force of personal
privacy, the weather rudeness of cer-
tain exposures and the requirements
of structure and equipment. Actually,
this house seems like a canopy for the
breeze; for two of its walls are entirely
of glass and the others are so contrived
as to ehco this free and completely
open character.
Actually, too, this house seems a
great deal larger than it is because of
this open character and because,
with glass doors stacked out of the
wall, screened loggias and terraces be-
come extensions of the living space
as a sort of "milling area" which is --
as ideal for entertaining as it is for
satisfying an understandable desire
for plenty of personal elbow room.
The illusion of size is furthered by .
a shrewd and sensitive use of materials. .
The brick floor of dining-living-hall -
areas carry through to the screen log-
gia facing the lake, for example and
(Continued on Page 19)
JANUARY, 1958 17






















































































18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











(Continued from Page 17)
carry into the landscape itself via brick
walks and steps fitted to the gently
rolling contours of the site. As another
example, in both kitchen-dining areas
and in the master bedroom cement
block, surfaced with Chattahoochee
gravel, carries through from the outside
to interior partitions. And throughout
the house the floor-to-ceiling openings,
windows as well as doors, provide few
obvious lines of demarkation to set
the outdoors definitely apart from the
space within.
This skillful preoccupation with ma-
terials has created, within this house,
a sense of unity without resort to con-
trived details. The character, the color
and the texture of simple materials
have been sometimes blended, some-
times contrasted to produce a sense
of elegance, but of a casual kind that
is completely livable.
This casual livability has been enor-
mously enhanced by the color and
character of its furnishings. As with
the landscape architect, the interior
designer, GEORGE M. SCHWARTZ, was
retained while the house was merely
an idea in sketch form. Thus, the final
result represents a successful collab-
oration of architect, landscape archi-
tect and interior designer.








Opposite page, above, indicates how
living areas open directly onto the
loggia paved, planted and screened
outside the line of glass doors and
provide unusual flexibility of space
utilization. Below are the two sides
of the two smaller bedrooms left,
from the brick paved hall shown
above; and right, from screened,
gravel-paved loggia on the entrance
front. Louvers on both sides are red-
wood; as is the vertical sheathing of
the outside walls. On this page, above,
the dining room part of the general
living area. Sliding glass doors open
it to the terrazzo-paved terrace and
kitchen at the right. Below, right, the
kitchen, looking through the breakfast
room. Here, as in both bathrooms,
small-scale mosaic tiling has been used
on floors and several working surfaces.
The general color scheme for these
tiles is blue and green, with touches of
yellow a combination which de-
creases in intensity in the bathrooms.
JANUARY, 1958


19









































The Case of the Wire-Haired Octoplugs


The wires were tangled and tattered. The double-sockets in the sockets had
double-sockets. Plug-uglies all over the place what a mess!
Any sleuth knows that the need to plug several lamps or appliances into one
wall outlet may be a telltale clue of Low Horsepower . due to the need
for more circuits and outlets. Yes, low horsepower means overloaded circuits,
blown fuses and poor performance from appliances. The answer: make sure
you specify

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by LOOK Magazine
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








The Triennale of Milan...


An exhibition to anticipate and to remember



By EMILY V. OBST, AIA


Every three years since 1907, Milan
has produced the Triennale, an inter-
national exhibition of modern indus-
trial art and architecture. I was most
fortunate in being able to attend it
this year, and, had I seen nothing else
during the five weeks I was in Italy,
my trip would have been well worth
while.
This current Triennale, the elev-
enth, was captained by some of the
world's outstanding architects, engi-
neers, and industrial designers, in-
cluding ALVAR AALTO, NIKOLAUS
PEVSNER, PIER LUIGI NERVI, Gio
PONTI, WALTER DORWIN TEAGUE,
and GEORGE NELSON, to name a few
of the many collaborators. Its theme
was tri-partite: 1. the relations be-
tween the arts, 2. contemporary archi-
tecture, and 3. the production of art
and "industrial design" (a phrase that
has been absorbed intact into the
Italian vocabulary). The aim of the
Triennale, to show the interrelation
between these three facets, was suc-
cessfully accomplished.
In Milan, the existing Palazzo dell'-
Artc al-Parco received a new face.
The main approach through the park,
Viale Alemagna, was covered with a
canopy, above which hung the flags
of the twenty-three exhibiting na-
tions. The old brownstone front of
the Palazzo had been masked skill-
fully by architects GIULIO MINOLETTI
and NELLY KRAUSS with vertical rows
of metallic laminations, extending the
full height of the building. On flex-
ible supports, these eight hundred
laminations were mobile, producing
an unending play of light and shade.
The first major exhibit in the build-
ing, the "International Show of Mod-
ern Architecture," was divided into
Structure, as an expression of tech-
nique and as a dynamic expression of
architecture; and The economic-social
aspects of housing. Roughly, this ex-
hibition covered the periods from
1930 through 1956, as being a period
corresponding to a new determination
JANUARY, 1958


The Triennale from the air. Most of the major exhibits involving modern
architecture, art and industrial design were housed in the Palazzo dell'-Arte
al-Parco; others were sheltered in structures erected for the purpose as the
prize-winning Geodisic Dome of R. Buckminster Fuller, upper left in picture.


in architecture, described as "post-
rationalism."
The first part of the architectural
exhibit, Structure, was historical, in
that models and sections of earlier
structures were exhibited, such as the
cupola of San Gaudenzio by A. AN-
TONELLI. On the floor above were
shown modern works, starting with
the pavilion of GUNNAR ASPHIND of
the Stockholm Exposition of 1930,
down through recent examples. On
the main floor were working draw-
ings, photographs, and models of con-


temporary housing projects. One wall
was devoted to illustrations of the
"Fondazione per l'Urbanistica Aldo
Della Rocca" of Rome.
Adjacent to the architectural ex-
hibit was the Museology show. Here,
problems of locations of exhibits and
of lighting, both natural and artificial
were shown and described. For this,
various works of art had been bor-
rowed from the different museums
throughout Italy. Also on the first
floor of the Palazzo were exhibits of
(Continued on Page 22)






The Triennale ...
(Continued from Page 21)
industrial art, glassware, ceramics, tex-
tiles, both Italian and of the other
exhibiting nations.
The International Show of Hlabi-
tations was in the garden. A series of
pavilions, built with panels of novo-
pan and steel channels, all similar,
had been erected for exhibitions by
the various countries, including
France, Yugoslavia, Germany, Den-
mark, Sweden, Finland, Italy, and an
international display of furniture.
Nearby were the United States pavil-
ion, architect Ponti's pavilion, and
the fabric exhibition building.
Each of the above mentioned coun-
tries displayed its furniture and mode
of living within one of these pavilions.
The furnishings and way of life were
similar, expressing the time of the
twentieth century, rather than the
geographical differences of place. The
exhibit of the United States was
about the media of communication,


housed in a geodesic structure by R.
BUCKMINSTER FULLER. (The build-
ing: most exciting; the exhibit: in my
opinion, very dull.)
Architect Ponti of Milano designed
his own pavilion, consisting of a living
room, kitchen, bedroom, and bath.
The exterior walls were of translucent


vitreous cement, polychrome, with
deep blues predominating in a stained
glass effect. Inside were furnishings
and a glass bookcase, also designed
by Ponti.
On the-second floor of the Palazzo,
eighteen countries displayed individ-
ual exhibits of their industrial arts,
including furniture, textiles, ceramics,
flatware, and glassware. Two especi-
ally were impressive. The Canadian
exhibit consisted of mass-produced
wood furniture from the aluminum
production city, Kitomat. Functional,
beautifully designed in the Scandi-
navian tradition, and well construct-
ed, furniture from Kitomat should
become widely known and used in
the near future.
In my opinion, the best exhibit in
this particular section was that of
Japan. The large room was turned
into a garden with a pebble floor,
winding walks, and subdued lighting
originating from sources hidden in
wood cubes placed on the floor. Var-
ious shaped holes in these fixtures
allowed the direct emission of light.
Japan's exports shown were few, but
those were effectively displayed. The
most striking exhibit was that of a
very large jardiniere. That which
seemed to be brown fruit on long
stems, was, on close examination a
mass of brown porcelain electrical in-
sulators! Also exhibited as abstract
sculpture was a gigantic white porce-
lain electrical insulator.
I wish that space permitted me to
describe each exhibit in detail. The
Eleventh Triennale closed in Novem-
ber, 1957. But three years from now
there will be a twelfth one; and every
architect should plan to visit it for
education and inspiration.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


The "pavilion" designed by architect Gio Ponti was actually a small house-
apartment, constructed of polychrome vitreous concrete of translucent character
and containing an exhibit of furnishings and accessories.


This is the Yugoslavian section of the International Home Show.






Florida Central . .
(Continued from Page 15)
of Colonel ROLAND W. SELLEW will
deal with subjects of vital interest to
all who live within the borders of the
South Atlantic District and the im-
portance of presenting the role of the
Architect to the public will be
stressed. With this in mind, for the
first time in the history of the Annual
Event, a Conference Director has
been appointed. Mr. GILBERT
WATERS of Sarasota has been named
to this position and one of his most
important functions will be that of
providing information to the public
on the Conference and the work of
Architects in the Region. The Con-
ference will be conducted on an in-
formal delegate-participation basis
with emphasis on sharing knowledge
and experience. There will be three
exhibits during the Conference:
Manufacturers, Architectural, and
Students. The Architect's responsi-
bility to his community during the
coming period of great regional
growth will be upmost in our minds.
See you in Sarasota in April.


ROSTER OF FAA
PRESIDENTS
1928-1929 _- Robert Greenfield
1930_-_______ Nat G. Walker
1931 ------ Bernard W. Close
1932 ---- Henry L. Taylor
1933-1934 __ Richard Kiehnel
1935 ----Theodore H. Skinner
1936-1937 Frederick G. Seelman
1938-1939-_Russell T. Pancoast
1940-1941 -- Elliott B. Hadley
1942 -------Robert Law Weed
1943-1946 __James A. Stripling
1947-1948 -- Franklin S. Bunch
1949 ----- Robert M. Little
1950-1951 Sanford W. Goin
1952 ------- R. Daniel Hart
1953-1954--Igor B. Polevitzky
1955-1956--- G. Clinton Gamble
1957 -- Edgar S. Wortman
1958 -- H. Samuel Kruse



Mexican Trip ...
(Continued from Page 8)
elude all trip expenses except the few
meals in Mexico City, tips for service
and $3.00 needed for a tourist card.
Travel to and from Mexico City
will be on Guest Airways; and con-
nections between Miami and other
Florida cities will be arranged by
Eastern Air Lines. Full details in-
cluding reservation applications-will
be mailed shortly to the FAA mem-
bership from the Ex. Director's office.
JANUARY, 1958


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UNI







Florida North Central

By FORREST R. COXEN, AIA
President


The coming year may not be the
most important or eventful year that
the Tallahassee area is to have. It is
hoped, however, that it will be one
which each member will remember as
having contributed to at least one
local project or event. The first step
in obtaining a strong, active chapter
is to obtain the individual interest of
each member and it is with this
thought in mind that chapter activ-
ities for the coming year have been
programmed.
One of several plans adopted to
increase participation of the member-
ship is a "buddy" scheme of assigning
a younger associate member to be
the assistant of each elected corporate
chapter officer. We believe this will
take some of the routine work-load
from the older corporate member and
at the same time give the associate
a feeling of responsibility to the chap-
ter. This will, in effect, give desired
"training" to our younger associates



Palm


Beach

By FREDERICK W. KESSLER, AIA
President
As we start another new year we
realize more than ever the tremend-
ously expanding area in which we
live; and the challenge for good plan-
ning and progressive architecture for
this area is more than ever present.
This challenge will call for more
thought and hard work on the part
of all of us and will be one of our
main aims in this chapter for 1958.
By now, most communities in the
territory of the Palm Beach Chapter
have adopted the Southern Standard
Building Code, with their own slight
variations. During the past year the
badly needed Palm Beach County
Zoning came into effect, after much
thought and work. With this also
came the County Building Code.
This is particularly important in view
of prospective county expansion and
will result in a much more orderly
JANUARY, 1958


on their way up the ladder and could
possibly keep the older corporate from
"dropping the ball" on certain items
of chapter business, as has been the
case in the past.
Our chapter has promised coopera-
tion with our state organization in
the matter of collecting the entire
chapter's dues by the end of the first
month of the year in order to give our
state organization, as well as our local
chapter, operating funds for the year.
Also, in line with this, there will
be a drive for new members in our
area, and a reviewing of the history
of each man, with the idea of raising
his chapter classification.
As was mentioned earlier, our chap-
ter has suffered from a lack of operat-
ing funds, and a combined budget
and by-laws committee will be formed
to study this problem.
The Florida North Central Chap-
ter is not the newest chapter in our
state, having been formed in 1940.


growth. In this, our Architects will,
during the:.coming year, play ar in-
creasingly valuable part.
Several of our mfiembers again this
year will be rendering service to our
several communities by serving on
various city boards, such as Planning,
Zoning, Contractor's Licensing,
Building Board of Appeals, and Parks
Commission.
During the coming year, we hope
to be able to increase our chapter


However, it is probably one of the
smallest and because of its size has
not been able to perform in the pro-
fessional or social circle as its many
big brothers throughout the state.
The year's activities will be cen-
tered around our University of Flor-
ida Traveling Exhibit, a joint meet-
ing with a local contractor's group,
the sponsorship of an "Architect's"
bowling team, and other activities.


attendance at meetings and thereby
gain in stature through a greater
exchange of ideas. In line with this,
we are planning several interesting
and informative technical programs.
We also expect to provide some
purely social meetings for the sole
purpose of good fellowship.
We wish to obtain better public
relations through our work and hope
each project will reflect the valued
services of the Architect. During past
years our good relations with the con-
struction industry as a whole have
been largely due to a very active Joint
Cooperative Committee. We wish
to further and better this project.
Two of our members, George Vo-
taw and Donald Edge, have recently
volunteered to teach prospective
draftsmen and other interested per-
sons in allied fields, at the Palm
Beach Vocational School. This pro-
gram, we hope, will continue through
the new year.
With continued .support of our
normally active Corporate Members,
the Junior Associates, and our excel-
lent slate of Officers and Directors,
we feel that much good work will be
accomplished during 1958.







Florida


North

ByMcMILLAN H. JOHNSON, AIA
President
The Florida North Chapter is now
going into its third year since the
major division in which the Jackson-
ville area members changed over to
form their own chapter. The result
of this division has been that a sta-
bility and high percentage of member
participation has been achieved,
which has been, and it is hoped, will
continue to be highly satisfying.
The excellent chapter accomplish-
ments, in reference to the Centennial
Year under past president, A. L.
CAMPBELL, are planned to be con-
tinued until February. The final ac-
tivity of this centennial is to be the
awarding of centennial medals to
individuals who, though not in the
profession, are being recognized for
their services, craftsmanship, interests,


public mindedness or other charac-
teristics that place them, in the arch-
itects' eyes, as persons meriting such
recognition.
Efforts are being made to get more
participation in the Standing Com-
mittees and to get them operating
more fully. The Special Design and
Chapter Affairs Committees are to
continue with various exhibitions of


the AIA Honor Awards Exhibit for
which suitable publicity will be ar-
ranged by the Public Relations Com-
mittee.
This chapter's schedule of monthly
meetings, except July and August, is
to be continued; and emphasis is be-
ing placed on continuing the excel-
lent programming in which subjects
of cultural and professional interest
will be presented, interspersed with
occasional social functions. Presenta-
tion of studies concerning annexation
by Gainesville of adjacent populated
areas and discussions of other munici-
pal and community problems are also
considerations for chapter meeting
programs.
The student chapter of the AIA at
the University of Florida has pro-
posed various projects which the
Florida North Chapter will back up
and give what assistance is deemed
necessary. This encouragement is
considered to be of importance since
the interest of the professional archi-
tect in the student goes a long way
toward helping the student's future
attitude and interest in the AIA.


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26 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Fla. Central


Auxiliary


MRS. ALMA L. PARISH
President


Several years ago the Ladies' Aux-
iliary of the Florida Central Chapter
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects was being proposed by a few of
our husbands as a means of expand-
ing interests and combining forces
in a common endeavor to gain mem-
bers and to enable Mrs. Architect to
know what goes on, and why.
Through the Auxiliary, a ripe field
of activity has been found for Mrs.
Architect. At regular meetings, in
addition to Committee activities,
there may be a talk or discussion on
some phase of Architecture and the
Allied Arts, as perhaps "Decorating."
"Public Relations" has even received
some new twists since Mrs. Architect
has been heard from.
Organization occupied most of the
time of our earlier meetings, under
the leadership of MRS. A. WYNN
HOWELL of Lakeland, our first Presi-
dent. The forming of two Chapters
from the Florida Central Chapter
set us back, to be sure. However,
MRS. ELLIOTT B. HADLEY of St.
Petersburg, the past President, has
proved at our last two meetings that
we have more than regained our
losses. We enter the year of 1958
with "The Will To Do," and promise
that we will be heard from.


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Broward


County


By JOHN M. EVANS, AIA,
President


If the past is simply prelude for the
future, then I think we face the next
twelve months with much optimism
and hope. Under MORTON IRON-
MONGER, our past president, the
Chapter has increased in both size
and enthusiasm. We have begun to
work most closely with our allied pro-
fessions and the Broward Builders'
Exchange. This has led already to
important revisions in City and
County codes and zoning. In doing
these things we have developed strong
liaison between these bodies and our-
selves which should prove very valu-
able during the coming year.
\Vhile continuing these objectives
of the past year, we are faced with a
new problem and the method needed
to solve it. This is inter-relationship
of the architects in the chapter. I
feel that this basic relationship re-
mains the vital clement in FAA life.
We must aim to develop a point of
view which would be dedicated to
advancement of the profession on the
local level with a subsequent cross-
fertilization of architectural thoughts
and ideas.
I stress the need for support be-
tween chapter architects as an abso-
lute necessity for the future of the
profession. The complexity of archi-
tectural problems makes the hit-and-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


MORE COMFORTABLE

HOMES WITH



0 0 0





miss methods of yesterday where
every man found successful solutions
by trial and error a method which
will not work today. We must be
able to communicate among ourselves
by means of chapter seminars, cri-
tiques, climate conferences and cost
analysis. These things can be very
successfully investigated at the chap-
ter level where they have a greater
degree of relevance then at a state
and national level.
Needless to say this chapter level
of cooperation is difficult to come by.
We have only to examine carefully
our inner selves to appreciate the
strains involved in practicing architec-
ture in a competitive business atmos-
phere. We must recognize that these
disagreements are the woof and warp
of life and not limited to our own
profession. Closer contact promotes
understanding; and understanding
breeds a tolerance and sympathy
which any of us might find need of
some day.
But the results are worth the effort.
The dynamics of group action are
overwhelming in results and implica-
tions. Certainly we all recall the
architectural spirit that flourished in
the atelier or architectural school
drafting room. It is this communal
spirit that was so productive that we
wish to duplicate by chapter action.
It is not optimism that makes me feel
that it can be done. Rather it is
because of a basic faith in architects
and in their intelligence and foresight.



Regional Conference -
Sarasota, April 17 to 19
Date of the South Atlantic Reg-
ional Conference, AIA, has been set
for April 17 through 19, 1958. Head-
quarters for the meeting will be the
Municipal Auditorium in Sarasota.
Sponsor of the Conference this year
is the Florida Central Chapter; and
ROLAND W. SELLEW, two-term past
president of the Chapter, is in charge
of all Conference arrangements. Work-
ing as a committee of the Chapter
with him are: WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN,
program; CARL VOLLMER, speakers;
EDWARD J. SEIBERT, hospitality; and
WVILLIAM Rupp, recreation.
In addition, the committee will in-
clude three chapter members in charge
of exhibits under the chairmanship of
(Continued on Page 30)
JANUARY, 1958


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Regional Conference ...
(Continued from Page 29)
WERNER KANNENBERG: JOHN M.
CROWELL, products; ELIZABETH B.
WATERS, architectural; and JOHN E.
PIERCY, students. EDGAR HANEBU IT
is in charge of reservations, assisted by
BERT A. BROSMITH for hotels and
JAMES WEST, tours. MRS. JOYCE
WEST is in charge of the ladies' pro-
gram.
ERWIN GREMLI and SIDNEY R.
WILKINSON have been named as Con-
fcrence treasurer and secretary respect-
ively, Louis F. SCHNEIDER is in charge
of publicity; and RICHARD SLATER of
transportation. GILBERT WATERS,
Sarasota publicity man has been
named as Conference Director.


"ERRORS & OMISSIONS"
We are sorry indeed that a mes-
sage from the President of the
Florida Northwest Chapter, AIA,
could not be included with others
in this issue. Circumstances made
it impossible for President William
Stewart Morrison to get his picture
and copy to us to meet a publica-
tion deadline. We hope both can
appear as part of the February
issue.


A New Century . .
(Continued from Page 11)
I'll stop preaching right here. But
before closing, I want to tell you
about the new goal that was set for
the Institute by the Board of Direc-
tors when it met recently in Arizona.
By the way, we are delighted to have
your hard-working SANFORD GOIN as
a member of the Board. He is an
excellent representative of Florida
and the whole South Atlantic Region.
Already off to a fine start, I know
he will ably advance the interests not
only of his State and Region but of
the Institute as well.
We all are aware of the great
strides the Institute has made since
its founding and particularly during
the past twenty-five years. During
the Centennial year we talked about
them and patted ourselves on the
back. But we are not content to rest
on our laurels. In this year of reckon-
ing we will seek to find out how we
can reach a new objective "the
establishment of the Institute as the
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comprehensive, authoritative force
and voice of the architectural profes-
sion and as a dominant factor in the
construction industry in the U. S."
The Board directed me to appoint
a special committee to study and
recommend policies whereby this ob-
jective can be reached. Logically,
falling within the purview of this new
committee are such subjects as the
status of the Institute vis-a-vis educa-
tion, licensing and accrediting; mem-
bcrship structure; types and extent of
service rendered by the Institute to
its membership and to the public;
and relationships with other profes-
sional and non-professional groups
concerned with the construction in-
dustry.
In establishing this committee we
arc not seeking a routine checkup and
approval of the status quo, nor are
we looking for a bluc-sky "out of this
world" program. We think there are
things that the Institute could and
should be doing that would further
benefit the profession and the public.
We have set a new goal and want the
best possible advice on how it can
be attained.




ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Ador Sales, Inc ..... 10
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 29
Associated Elevator &
Supply Co. . . 30
Dunan Brick Yards . 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co.. 28
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 30
Florida Home Heating
Institute : . . 7
Florida Portland Cement Co.. 3
Florida Power & Light Co.. 20
Florida Steel Corp. . . .32
Florida Tile Industries . .
Graham Industries . . 24
George C. Griffin Co. . 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 26
Leap Concrete . . 6
Lift Slab of Florida . . 5
Mr. Foster's Store . .. 23
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Prescolite Manufacturing Co.. 30
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 9
Shaffer Signs . . 28
Thompson Door Co. . 27
Unit Structures, Inc. . 24
F. Graham Williams Co. .31
R. H. Wright
& Sons, Inc. . 2nd Cover

JANUARY, 1958


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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Student Associate Chapter

By WILLIAM R. LYNCH
President


Here in Gainesville, the student
associate members are still talking
about the Convention in Clearwater.
For most of us, it was our first con-
vention, and we were greatly im-
pressed. We had imagined that a
bunch of "old fogeys" would prob-
ably be wringing out dry speeches all
day long, and were greatly relieved
to find it the very invigorating func-
tion that it was.
This discovery leads me to what
I hope will be our theme for many
years to come. We have a growing
consciousness of the importance of
the professional nature of architec-
tural practice. Making professional
acquaintances and exchanging ideas
with other architects are the processes
that will greatly advance the stand-
ards of architectural education, train-
ing, and the profession. Recognizing
this as the task toward which we can
best direct ourselves through the
Student Chapter, we are ambitiously
writing a vigorous program for the
coming year.
But simply to outline the projects
under way would be inadequate. The
real sigrAficance of all of our activity
stems from the awareness that is
developing within us toward profes-


sional responsibilities. We are find-
ing that the social aspects of the
chapter are important, but are right-
fully eclipsed by the more important
concern for enlarging the students'
understanding of the present and
future scope of architectural practice.
Through efforts, on and off campus,
this will be our central theme.
Our next step should include a
major collaboration with parent or-
ganizations on informal levels for
planning future activities.


FAA'S 1957 President Gets Design Award

EDGAR S. \VORTMAN, AIA, of Lake
\Vorth, the immediate Past President
of the FAA, is the first Florida archi-
tect named as a recipient of the
"M i a m i Window Fenestration
Award." Here he is shown with
SIDNEY G. KuSWORM, JR., president
,I / and general manager of the Miami
Window Company which sponsored
the award program. An engraved
stainless steel placquc was given
\Vortman for his design of the Pahn
Beach County Junior High School.
The Award program was started by
the company "... to recognize out-
standing design; to stimulate the art
of scientific fenestration; and to sug-
gest improved solutions to all types
cf fenestration problems."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






t .a. ic* I1 i ni lii il -


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These are the grille tile
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import from Venezuela
The,'re somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama
But the hale the same
sort of slight color
variations and occasional
kiln markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished wall


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