• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Public relations
 Committee organization
 Florida -- A new A.I.A. region
 The FFAB -- Research for Florida...
 Planning and zoning
 43rd annual convention program
 Roster of 43rd FAA convention...
 Relations with the construction...
 Chapter coordination & Educati...
 Building codes
 News and notes
 Nominating & Program of student...
 School advisory
 Membership
 3rd annual roll call, 1956-195...
 Board of trustees, FAA loan...
 Centennial observance
 Advertisers' index
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00041
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00041
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Public relations
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Committee organization
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Florida -- A new A.I.A. region
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The FFAB -- Research for Florida building
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Planning and zoning
        Page 21
        Page 22
    43rd annual convention program
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Roster of 43rd FAA convention exhibitors
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Relations with the construction industry
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter coordination & Education
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Building codes
        Page 37
    News and notes
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Nominating & Program of student chapter AIA
        Page 42
        Page 43
    School advisory
        Page 44
    Membership
        Page 45
    3rd annual roll call, 1956-1957
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Board of trustees, FAA loan fund
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Centennial observance
        Page 50
    Advertisers' index
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Page 53
        Page 54
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




INSTITUTE
0





1857-1957cn
After 100 Years...
The Challenge
Sof The Future


43rd


Annual


FAA


Convention Issue


November, 1957


onia ti le

OFFICIAL JOURNAL of th. FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


*l J^











i 8 TEP TO
SUCCE SiSF U
BUILDING ...


















S'CONSU.L T"

AIC I- CITECT
,( The architect is the captain of your building
& team. He is the person who draws the plans
.specifies materials . takes bids on the
job . supervises construction and approves
payment of the bills.
An architect is an artist a creator a per-
son with the unique ability to combine art and
business, inspiration and science, imagination
and sound judgment. To become a qualified
architect calls for 10 or more years of inten-
sive study and apprenticeship, and licensing
ESTPESSED CONCUETL STITUlTE by the state in which he practices. All this is
... to prove an ability to solve whatever type
Member building problem you may have.
Building a home, or any other structure, is
one of the biggest investments most people
make in a lifetime. To protect that invest-
ment, consult a professional . an architect.
He is your guide to greatest value for your
building dollar.
R. H. Wright & Son is proud of its friendship
with the architectural profession in this area.
As a leading producer of concrete and concrete
products, we constantly strive to produce the
materials and render the services the archi-
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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sonford W. Goin. FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South James E. Garland
Irving E. Horsey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville . Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida ...... Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . .. Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
NOVEMBER, 1957


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 7


NOVEMBER, 1957


No. 11


CONTENTS
"Florida A New A.I. A. Region" .. .13
By Franklin S. Bunch, AIA
The FFAB Research for Florida Building .17
By Dr. Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
43rd Annual Convention Program 23 to 28
FAA Committee Reports:
Public Relations By Roy M. Pooley, Jr. 2
Committee Organization-By John L. R. Grand 4
Planning & Zoning By William T. Arnett 21
Relations with the Construction Industry 31
By John Stetson
Chapter Coordination-By H. Samuel Kruse 35
Education and Registration 35
By Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
Building Codes By Joseph M. Shifalo 37
Nominating 42
School Advisory-By Sanford W. Goin, FAIA 44
Membership By Roland W. Sellew 45
Board of Trustees, FAA Loan Fund 48
By John L. R. Grand
Centennial Observance 50
By William B. Harvard
Convention Message from the FAA President . 23
Roster of 43rd FAA Convention Exhibitors 28
News and Notes 38
Program of Student Chapter 42
By Craig W. Lindelow and Louis C. George
3rd Annual Roll Call 1956-1957 46, 47
Advertisers' Index .. .... .51

THE COVER
How do you illustrate "The Challenge of the Future"? How can the
implications of that theme be communicated? Only, we think, by
individual interest and participation of the 43rd FAA Annual Con-
vention--t which able and forward-thinking men will probe the
possibilities of their specialties . which include design, engineering,
materials and planning. So-this month a picture is replaced by a
program.


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Architects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.AA. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. .Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed, but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.IA. publications provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed, but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.










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Committee Reports


Public Relations

By ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
Chairman


A meeting of the Committee was
held at the Princess Issena Hotel at
Daytona Beach, August 24, 1957.
The following were present:
R. M. POOLEY, chairman; FRANCIS
R. WALTON, Daytona; M. H. JOHN-
SON, II, Fla. No. Central; ALBERT
BROADFOOT, Jacksonville (for ROBERT
WARNER); WAYNE SESSIONS, Fla.
South (for HERBERT SAVAGE).
Reports of the various chapters
indicate that outstanding results are
being obtained where a strong effort
is made to create good publicity..
Among the many exhibits pre-
sented was an excellent pamphlet en-
titled "Presenting Your Architect,"
which describes the services of the
Architect and contains a schedule of
minimum recommended fees.
FRANCIS WALTON contended that
the approach to public relations
typified by this pamphlet has been
the general policy of the profession
but has not been outstandingly effec-
tive and suggests that a more posi-
tive approach would be to de-empha-
size the mechanics of professional
practice and concentrate on the bene-
fits of the Architect's actual profes-
sional role.
Mr. Walton feels that the Archi-
tect's role is to "create environment."
By his training the Architect is
equipped to make the lives of people
richer, fuller and more satisfying by
providing for them an environment
of beauty and meaning coupled with
good functional qualities. The me-
chanics of achieving this end result
may be interesting, but over-emphasis
may confuse the potential client as
to just what is the real service of the
Architect. A lawyer affords legal pro-
tection. A doctor makes you well.
A dentist fixes your teeth. Does an
Architect just have conferences, draw
blueprints, copy specifications and
render bills? These thoughts pro-
duced considerable discussion without
any final conclusions, but indicate a
potential re-evaluation of present
public relations methods.
It-was recognized that the current
vertical structure of the Institute


committees imposes communications
problems in that F.A.A. committees
are not included in the direct vertical
alignment. This is a problem of
long standing which it is hoped may
be resolved by attainment of regional
status for the Florida Association of
Architects.
The Committee feels that press re-
leases from the national offices have
not been effective at the local level
and suggests an emphasis on local
origination to produce greater reader
interest.
The Committee feels that an ad-
vertising program on the state level
should be seriously considered and
will endeavor to present an additional
report on this subject at Convention.
The rather searching (or groping,
if you will) nature of the preceding
comments clearly suggests a signifi-
cant problem with which your com-
mittee was faced. The problem was
both basic and simple. Each mem-
ber present was attending his first
meeting of the committee. There
was a complete lack of continuity of
an established program. Your Com-
mittee feels that its mission is one
of vital importance to the profession
and earnestly seeks the creation of a
strong, vital and continuing Public
Relations Program at the State level.
To this end, the following specific
recommendations are respectively
submitted for your consideration:
1. Stabilization of the Committee:
This may be achieved by the ap-
pointment to the Chapter Committee
of only those members who are par-
ticularly interested and capable in its
work and retention of these members
for an extended period. The Chap-
ter President might appoint the com-
mittee chairman from the existing
membership and the chairman in
turn appoint his representative to
the State Committee in a manner to
assure a degree of continuity of mem-
bership. In turn, the president of
the F.A.A. could then appoint as
chairman of the State Committee an
experienced member with substan-
(Continued on Page 4)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Window!


Walls


with


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. I


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Tampa Doug LaHavne
Orlando 'Call Jatx
Palm Beach Ed Kader
Pensacola .


Jacksonville
Daytona Beach
Ocala . .
Tallahassee
ICall Jaxi


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Bob Gall
Van Akin
Al Yates


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NOVEMBER, 1957


Brown and Grist aluminum window walls pro-
vide architects with a colorful and versatile
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This million-dollar plant-130,000 square feet
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Light-weight, high-strength B&G window walls
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Erection is fast and easy, even without special
crews. Rugged, simple construction of B & G
window walls assures long, maintenance-free
life. And panels of Mirawal, or such other ma-
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a tremendous range of design possibilities. Ask
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7 PLY CONSTRUCTION
Lightweight, but sturdy, Thompson flush
doors are noted for their rigidity and
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quality is the result of high manufacturing
standards that include: cores of wood ribs
spaced 4-inches apart and butted against
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minimum width; rails of a minimum 21/2-
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plywood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
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In addition to 11 standard sizes-1/6 x
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Af.g.... DISTRIBUTED IN FLORIDA BY:

7j 1 _


Public Relations ...
(Continued from Page 2)
tial understanding of the Commit-
tee's program.
2. The Florida Architect: This is
the official Journal of the F.A.A. and
is recognized nationally for its ex-
cellence. Your committee believes
its value may be enhanced by greater
support in the form of submission
of the views of individual Architects
either as articles or "letters to the
Editor" and by expressions of appre-
ciation to advertisers.

3. Publicity: Highest quality art
work offers a powerful medium of
expression for the Architect. Models,
renderings and photographs prepared
to reproduce well in print should re-
sult in more frequent and more ef-
fective publication. The committee
feels that exhibition and award pro-
grams offer excellent opportunities
for good publicity and urges increased
participation.
RoY M. POOLEY, JR., Chairman
JACK \V. ZIMMER, Broward County
FRANCIS R. WALTON, Daytona Beach
M. H. JOHNSON, II, Florida North
ALBERT WOODARD, Fla. No. Central
F. TREADWAY EDSEN, Fla. Northwest
HERBERT R. SAVAGE, Florida South
ROBERT A. WARNER, Jacksonville
JOHN T. HART, Mid-Florida
JEFFERSON N. POWELL, Palm Beach.


Committee

Organization

By JOHN L. R. GRAND
Chairman
whilee efforts to arrange commit-
tee meetings (at the convention in
Washington and at Orlando) were
unsuccessful, the committee can re-
port progress. Committee members
William Harvard and John Stetson
discussed informally with your chair-
man at the Washington convention
assigned problems.
An interim progress report was sub-
mitted July 29th in which certain
by-law changes concerning the FAA
committee structure were proposed.
On September 14th, the chairman
met with President Wortman, the
Chairman of the By-Laws Commit-
(Continued on Page 6)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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NOVEMBER, 1957



























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835 WEST FLAGLER ST. MIAMI, FLORIDA PHONE FR 9-7673


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Corn. Organization ...
(Continued from Page 4)
tee, Jefferson Powell, and the Execu-
tive Secretary, Roger Sherman, at
Winter Park. The recommended
changes in the by-laws concerning
committees were reviewed and re-
vised to the form proposed and pub-
lished in the October, 1957, issue of
The Florida Architect.
The committee commends to the
membership President Wortman's
excellent statement and analysis of
Our Committee Problem in that
same issue.
The committee recommends fur-
ther action toward disentangling and
clarification of committee functions
and assignments. As a first step, i
recommends that the duties of the
Planning and Zoning Committee be
assigned the vertical standing Com-
munity Development Committee,
and that the Planning and Zoning
Committee be abolished. Further, it
recommends a functional simplifica-
tion of committees concerned with
Industry Relations. A single com-
mittee at the state level bearing the
title Industry Relations could be
assigned the duties of the following:
the Joint Cooperative Committee,
the Committee for Collaboration
with the Design Professions, the
Building Code Committee, and the
Home Building Construction In-
dustry Committee.
It is felt that of the non-vertical
standing committees the By-Laws
Committee should be continued as
is, and that the Budget Committee
might have its duties enlarged to
function as a Finance Committee. A
final question involves the possible
redesignation of the Legislative Com-
mittee as the Government Relations
Committee. Such redesignation
would have the effect of enlarging
the scope of the Legislative Commit-
tee beyond that originally antici-
pated. As the Government Relations
Committee it would deal with all
relations between the Association and
the state governmental agencies in
matters not within the province of
other specialized committees. The
realignment would also tie the func-
tion into the national vertical com-
mittee structure.
JOHN L. R. GRAND, Chairman
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, V.-Pres., N. Fla.
WVILLIAM B. HARVARD, V.-P., C. Fla.
JOHN STETSON, V.-Pres., South Fla.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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For Weldwood Paneling needs no painting, no

Free Weldwood School Planning Booklet. "Weldwood
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Weldwood built-ins provide a friendly atmosphere. Yet they often save
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wood natural birch for sliding doors, clothes rocks and benches. New
Preston School, New Preston, Conn. Architects: Nichols and Butterfield.


NOVEMBER, 1957


























































As the original, water-repellent preservative for
wood, WOODLIFE is a "non-swelling, paintable,
water-repellent wood preservative" as design.
lated by the Forest Products Laboratory. It
sa light-bodied, pcnIttrating solution contain-
ng pentachlorophenol (Federal Spec. No. TT-
W-570), as well as a blend of tetrachlorophe-
ol and 2-chlorothophenylphenol. It does no
discolor wood, is odorless when dry, leaves n
perceptible coating on the wood surface.


Tht First Methodist Church of Coral Gables was damage-
protected by Woodlifing all of the wood members in it.
Architect was Dean Parmalee, AIA; the builder, M. R. Har-
rison Construction Co. Woodlife treating by the Weaver
Lumber Treating Co. of Miami.


How to Spfeci yt ....

Wood of any species or form-from timbers
to millwork--can be WVooDLoFE-treated by
Immersion or by IHlooding. Roller-coating or
Brushing. Choice of the process used will
depend on the size and type of wood mem-
bers involved and the relative degree of pro-
tection required; and detailed specifications
are available to cover every contingency. . .
Immersion from three to 10 minutes will pro-
'ide protection adequate for most construction
purposes in 1olnda. For special, higher
reservative retention, a WOODLIFE laboratory
technician should be consulted. Flooding and
oIler-coating are both effective and are equiv-
lent to a half-minute immersion. The job-
ipping or thorough brush-coating of all end-
ruts should be specified in every instance.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


nP












tected in 8 Different Ways


In Florida especially, wood must be protected from damaging

effects of moisture, fungus, insects . WOODLIFE checks such

damage, invisibly preserves wood and lengthens its useful life


Retards Shrinking, Swelling: WOOD-
LIFE has "anti-wicking" action, pre-
* * venting moisture absorption during
wet seasons, evaporation during dry
ones. This it acts to prevent the
major cause of shrinking and swelling
of untreated lumber.


Reduces Warping: Moisture absorp-
tion is the cause again-and WooD-
0 LIFE'S unique ability to penetrate the
surface and coat cells prevents mois-
ture from seeping into wood fibers.
Outdoor exposure tests have repeat-
edly proved the points.


Guards Against Splitting: End split-
ting occurs in untreated wood when
* * moisture changes are constant and
rapid. With a WOODLIFE treatment,
moisture-content is stabilized, mois-
ture-changes minimized and the cause
of splitting removed.

Minimizes Grain Raising: WooD-
LIFE penetrates a wood surface with
0 o o an invisible water-repellent solution
which prevents absorption of the
moisture which causes grain-raising
and surface-checking. And the pro-
tection is a lasting one.


Prevents Decay: Wood decay is
caused by fungus. Ingredients in
* * WOODLIFE act as a poison to render
wood cells immune from attack from
fungus, thus preventing both start and
progress of decay. Tests have proved
it 100 percent effective.

Controls Stain: Fungus is the cause
of wood stains too. WOODLIFE is com-
6* *pletely effective in controlling attack
and the growth of stain-fungus-and
years of actual exposure have shown
the same results as severe laboratory
tests.

Stops Termite Attacks: Insects that
destroy wood won't attack any kind
* *of lumber treated with WOODLIFE.
Ingredients that control fungi are also
effective against many wood-destroy-
ing insects, including lyctus beetles
and carpenter ants.

Improves Paintability: Because
W\\ooDLif. prevents surface checking
* *and moisture absorption, it provides
a better base for paint and eliminates
the chief cause for many paint failures.
It thus helps to get a smoother,
longer-lasting finish.


NOVEMBER, 1957


2..


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i'i


I-


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- I


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"Florida--A New AIA Region"


During the 43rd Convention a resolution will be offered to
the effect that the AIA Board of Directors be petitioned


By FRANKLIN S. BUNCH
Chairman


to designate Florida as a new AIA Region. Here is a
committee statement in support of the proposed petition.


I... Florida and the
South Atlantic Region
The South Atlantic Region of the
AIA is composed of the states of
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Georgia and Florida. As of July 1,
1957 Florida had 424 of the corporate
AIA members in the region amount-
ing to 41 percent of the total regional
membership. Florida's 10 AIA chap-
ters comprise 66 percent of the total
chapters in the region.
Distribution of corporate member-
ship throughout the region is illus-
trated by the map (Appendix A). It
may be seen that two distinct and
separated geographical areas are indi-
cated. Due to the fact that most of
Georgia's 270 members arc concen-
trated in the Atlanta area in the north-
ern portion of the state, it appears that
the center of population of the total
Georgia, South Carolina and North
Carolina membership is near the
northwest corner of South Carolina.
At least 500 miles south of this point
lies the center of population of Flor-


ida's 424 corporate members. Florida,
being a complete peninsular, is iso-
lated from the center of activities and
interests of the remainder of the South
Atlantic Region.
Corporate AIA members in Florida,
at considerable expense of time and
money, have for many years supported
and built The Florida Association of
Architects, Inc., of The American In-
stitute of Architects to the place where
it performs all the funtcions of an
AIA Region, plus many others which
a multi-state region can never per-
form. To require that this 41 percent
of the regional membership and 66
percent of the regional chapters sup-
port the present South Atlantic Region
with additional time and money so
thatit can duplicate some of these
functions is an imposition.

2... Florida Geography
and Climate
Geography has played a trick on
Florida. Its coastline of 1,146 miles
is the longest of any state in the
nation. The mileage from Key West


to Pensacola is 811 miles, which ex-
ceeds the width of Texas (a separate
AIA Region) at its widest point,
where it is a mere 801 miles. Never
more than 145 miles, the Florida
peninsula does not end is meander-
ings until its last land formation is
some 600 miles south of the southern
boundary of the State of California.
All of South America is east of Flor-
ida and yet Florida is closer to more
foreign nations than any other Amer-
ican state.
Mountainous terrain and even
snow which are of considerable im-
portance to the architects of upper
Georgia and the Carolinas are of no
concern to Florida practitioners. Most
of Florida's people live in a tropical
climate, although Jacksonville and the
area westward to Pensacola are in a
temperate zone. Florida is so different
in geography and climate as to bear
very little resemblance to the other
three states of the South Atlantic Reg-
ion, AIA.
(Continued on Page 14)


The FAA REGIONAL COMMITTEE is chairmanned by Franklin S. Bunch, left, of Jacksonville; Miss Marion
I. Manley, FAIA, Coconut Grove, and Clinton Gamble, Fort Lauderdale. Though the statement here was
prepared by the Chairman, it represents the cooperative work and full agreement of the whole committee.
NOVEMBER, 1957







3... Florida, a Distinctive
Economic Region
Florida is all-American in flavor,
meaning that its economy is the
product of a fusion of minds native
to all sections of the country. By no
means "the deep south," Florida, in
1955, had 3,709,700 people of which
57 percent were born in other states
or countries. It is unrealistic to say
that Florida's economy is based over-
whelmingly on tourism, or that citrus
plays more than a stellar agricultural
role, although in both categories, Flor-
ida leads the nation. The diversifica-
tion of Florida's economy extends
from industrially-developed Pensacola
on one end, to the governmental and
educational center at Tallahassee, to
insurance and port-minded Jackson-
ville, to the citrus and cattle of Cen-
tral Florida and thence to the tourist-
filled areas on the southern end of
the state.
Continued growth of Florida's
economy as compared with that of
the other three states of the South
Atlantic Region, AIA is illustrated
by Appendix B. The dynamic char-
acter of Florida's growth is recognized
by Kiplinger Publications who publish
The Kiplinger Florida Letter, the
only one of their reports on an area
smaller than the nation. The entire
energies, resources and best thinking
of all of Florida's architects are needed
to cope with the diversified and ex-
panding economy of the state.

4... The Growth of Florida
In the period from 1950 through
1956 Florida's population increased
by 36 percent, while for the, same
period the- population of the other
three states in the South Atlantic
Region, AIA, increased by 9.1 per-
cent. To quote WILLIAM M. KIP-
LINGER in Changing Times:
"Everybody knows that the popu-
lation of the United States is increas-
ing. But Florida's population is in-
creasing two and a half times as fast.
The only places growing faster are
Alaska, Nevada and Arizona, and they
are still sparsely settled. Their com-
bined populatoin is not half of Flor-
ida's. Florida, then, is the Union's
fastest growing sizable state."
Over 2,600 people arrive in Florida
each week to make it their permanent
home. Thousands more want to. Flor-
ida is growing so fast and so big that
14


it is losing practically all identity with
the other three states of the South
Atlantic Region, AIA. Florida's inter-
ests and activities-and even its archi-
tecture to a large extent-are becom-
ing so different that if Florida remains
a part of the South Atlantic Region,
architects from Georgia and the Caro-
linas will have to participate in ever-
increasing numbers of problems in
which they have no interest-or Flor-
ida delegates will be attending meet-
ings that do not even touch on their
own activities.

5... Strength of the FAA
The growth of Florida's population
and economy is being paralleled by
the growth and prestige of architec-
tural organizations in the state. The
membership of the Florida Association
of Architects, AIA, is composed of all
the members of the ten corporate and
one student chapter in the state. All
of these are offshoots of a single orig-
inal chapter; and they were formed
by small, energetic groups who saw
the need for vigorous application of
AIA policies and influences in specific
local areas. The criterion has been a
need in a locality-whether a single
city, a metropolitan area, a county or
a combination of these.
The growth of the architectural
profession in Florida has highlighted
a whole series of local needs; and local
chapters have naturally been formed
to fill them. The editorial "Live
Splinter or Petrified Log from the
May, 1957, issue of The Florida Arch-
itect (Appendix C) expresses the
opinions of the architects of the state
on this question of more chapters
and more influence. A corollary to
the growth of the number of Florida
Chapters should be the growth of
the number of AIA regions. Decen-
tralization, where each part is vig-
orous and progressive, is the best
method of assuring the growth and
health of the whole. Leaders in in-
dustry and commerce have recognized
this fact; and many facets of Florida's
economy arethe result of it.
The Florida Association of Archi-
tects, AIA, has grown to the extent
that it now has a full-time executive
secretary to act not only in routine
AIA affairs, but also in state govern-
mental and public relations matters.
The executive secretary is also the
editor of a publication as good as any
in the country. The Florida Architect


disseminates information on the af-
fairs of the state association and the
local chapters and furthers the public
relations program of the profession.
An efficient state organizational set-up
including officers, board of directors
and committees with complete work-
ing relationships is functioning to the
benefit of every architect in the state.
The Florida Association of Archi-
tects has for many years carried on
a program which includes the activ-
ities presently being handled by AIA
Regions. In addition, the state asso-
ciation has performed a service for
its members and the citizens of the
State of Florida, which can never be
performed by a multi-state region.
This is its relationship to the state
government and is a most important
function. Florida Association of Arch-
itects', AIA, accomplishments in this
direction are not limited to legislative
matters. Some of these accomplish-
ments are listed in Appendix "D."
The effectiveness of Florida architects
at the level of state government can
be considerably increased if Florida is
made a region of the American Insti-
tute of Architects.

6... Benefits to The Institute
The American Institute of Archi-
tects has grown to a point at which
a new, forward and decisive step
toward a better integration of policies
and programs through a wider diversi-
fication of active representation is
urgently needed. Florida is one of sev-
eral states which has developed strong,
effective statewide organizations. Ex-
pansion of the Institute board to in-
clude direct representation from these
states will have the advantage of
providing the AIA with a more sensi-
tive and direct contact with chapter
groups welded into regions through a
natural community of interests. The
added strength of a wider diversity
of counsel and experience to guide
decisions of professional and admin-
istrative policy will also accrue to the
Institute. Thus, both action and re-
action will be facilitated and AIA
programs will be enormously but-
tressed through shorter, therefore
more efficient, channels of authority
than now exist.
With establishment of a new Flor-
ida Region of the AIA the present
lack of organized routine at the reg-
ional level will give way to the well-
staffed, well-run state association
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







headquarters. The Octagon will be
immediately provided with a means
to strengthen its operating procedures.
The Florida Association of Architects,
through its complete organizational
set-up, is a natural, direct and efficient
channel of two-way communication.
It is not only a clearing house for data
of a local character which can be made
useful nationally, but it is potentially
a "branch office" of the Octagon and
as such could immeasurably aid the
Institute staff in almost every phase
of its operations.
Policies only turn into programs at
local levels when local action gives
them meaning in terms of local appli-
cation. The Octogon's present direct
and expensive operational contacts
with 11 local Florida Chapters can
be vastly simplified when that part
of Institute responsibilities as pertain
to regional coverage and action is
turned over to the already function-
ing Florida Association of Architects,
AIA. Communications from chapters
to the state (and regional) office and
to the Octagon will flow naturally and
efficiently; and could as naturally and


efficiently flow in the opposite di-
rection.


7... A New AIA Region
In location, geography, climate cus-
toms, population, character of indus-
try and commerce, rate of growth,
economic trends, a cross-section of
Florida does not conform to any
"normal" pattern. Professional prac-
tice is necessarily conditioned by these
characteristics; and thus the problems
and situations faced by architects in
Florida are not parallel to those in
other, even immediate neighbor,
states. The organization of The Flor-
ida Association of Architects will be
easily integrated into a new AIA
region and at a saving of considerable
energy- and probably expense-over
the present duplicative arrangement.
Government of national profes-
sional organizations and our country
is logically based on representation
from the next smallest political sub-
division, the state. In this Centennial
Year of the American Institute of
Architects it is essential to recognize


that future growth in numbers requires
growth and progress in AIA govern-
mental organization. The establish-
ment of policy by national convention
action is already proving to be un-
wieldy and lacking the study essential
to wise decisions. Government by an
expanded Board of Directors with
representation from the state level
should be the goal of the Institute.
Most of the other recognized pro-
fessional organizations such as the
American Medical Association, The
American Bar Association, The Na-
tional Society of Professional Engi-
neers are so governed. It is not neces-
sary that a national Board of Direc-
tors be restricted to any arbitrary
numbers to be efficient. The House
of Delegates of the The American
Medical Association is composed of
195 members.
Forward to ever higher summits-
growth-progress-strength-Florida
requests the honor of leading the way
in the second century of organized
United States architectural history.
The Thirteenth Region of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects-FLORIDAl


APPENDIX A, below . .

APPENDIX C, right ...

Typical changes in business opera-
tions in Florida as compared to the
remainder of the South Atlantic reg-
ion, AIA (Georgia, South Carolina,
North Carolina) for 1956 as com-
pared to similar periods in 1955.
(Source, U.S. Department of Com-
merce).
% Change %
In Ga., S. Car. Change
and N. Car. In Fla.


1. Wage and Salary
Workers in Manu-
facturing Industries
2. Number of
Telephones ...........-
3. Valuation of build-
ing construction ..--
4. Number employed
by construtcion
contractors -------
5. New business
incorporations _..
6. Cash receipts from
farm marketing ...--
7. Production of
electric energy __


+1.9 +7.1

+8.0 +14.2

-9.1 +11.7


+1.0 +9.0

+2.4 +19.4

-1.0 +8.2

+7.3 +16.2


Appendix continued on page 32
NOVEMBER, 1957


In his meaty discussion of Institute policies during
the Regional Conference at Atlanta last month, BEaYL
Puco, dynamic chairman of the AIA's Chapter Affairs
Committee, undoubtedly voiced many convictions of
thoughtful AIA members interested in the continued
development of the Institute's strength and influence.
As reported elsewhere in this issue, his speech was full
of practical inspiration. But it is open to question
whether all of his"statements relative to current organiza-
tional policies, particularly at both chapter and regional
levels, could be whole-heartedly accepted by all AIA mem-
bers in Florida.
Among these was a statement that a membership
of 100 was "an absolute minimum" for what he called
a "strong" chapter. He decried the "splintering" of
Chapters into smaller groups and implied that such
splinter chapters did not contain the inherent strength
of interest necessary for vigorous operation a an AIA
entity.
Now, there may be strength as well as safety in
mere numbers. But experience has not always borne
out that thesis. Mere numbers can also hide apathy and
lethargy; and it is certainly true that more can often be
accomplished by a few souls dedicated enough to be
vigorous and vocal than by ten or even a hundred times
as many whoe interest is cold to the point of inactivity.
The worth of a high interest in a small group has shown
itself countless times iRn countless situations. And the
growth of AIA membership in Florida is a particular tase
in point.
As a matter of historical fact, practically all of Florida's
10 AIA chapters are "splinters"-offshoots from a single
chapter, and originally formed by small, but energetic,
groups who saw the need for a more vigorous application
of AIA policies and influences in specific local areas
throughout the State. As recently as last year this process
produced three new chapters. It may yet produce another
one from the Florida Central Chapter-which, within a
single year, has more than gained back the membership
it lost through formation of the Mid-Florida Chapter
formerly listed on its roster.
No . .the criterion, it seems to us, is not an


arbitrary, numerical one. It is a need in a locality-
whether that locality is a single city, a metropolitan arca,
a county or state. The growth of the architectural
profession in Florida has highlighted a whole series of
local needs; and local chapters have naturally been
formed to fill them.
Part of Beryl Price's argument must, of course, he
granted. In the small chapter, personnel is often not
large enough to staff all committees without doubling
up. In theory, of course, that is not good--mrn though
the AIA recognizes the possibility and has suggested a
committee combination for small as well as large chapters.
But practically, here in Florida, AIA affairs arc handled
about as well in the eight small chapters as they are
in the two larger ones.
As to our small chapters' impact on community affairs.
it is spring to he a real one of increasing importance.
In Pensacola., in Orlando and particularly in Jacksonville
the new, small chapters are achieving public recognition
for the architectural profession which was formerly lack-
ing. Each is growing in numbers as wel as in public
stature, though probably none will ever reach the 100-
member mark which the AIA Chapter Afairs Committee
chairman sets as a desirable minimum.
Maybe our AIA set up in Florida is just another
indication of the fact that "Florida is Different." Each
Chapter as a member of The Florida Association of
Architects, is an integral part of a body which reinforces.
at the state level, the local influence of the Chapter
itself. With plans for an increasing service now under
way, the FAA will more and more give to its member
chapters the strength which added numbers might in
some cases, otherwise provide them. As liaison between
the FAA and its chapter-members grows closer, the work
of the FAA will serve as both a buttress to, and an
extension of, each Chapters local activities.
In Florida, at least, interest and initiative are gen-
eally favored over mere sac. In a region which is
expanding a dynamically a is the Sunshine State, a
group of live and sprouting splinters is much preferable
than a single petrified log, however lane.


Live Splinter or Petrified Log?


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









The FFAB...



Research for Florida Building


By DR. TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA
Dean, College of Architecture and Fine Arts,
University of Florida.


By November 7, when FAA con-
venes for its 1957 Convention at
Clearwater, the FLORIDA FOUNDATION
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF BUILDING
will be born. The possibilities of this
unique new agency deserve the close
attention and support of all members
of the building industry in Florida
and particularly of FAA and all Flor-
ida architects.
The idea of FFAB has risen during
the past several months out of search-
ing discussions between many mem-
bers of the building industry of Flor-
ida. In its present form, it is a chal-
lenging answer to a number of critical
problems which have faced the indus-
try over a long period. It promises to
provide the machinery by which the
industry itself can focus its great re-
sources to solve these problems and
thus improve its capacity to serve
both the expanding needs of all Flor-
idians and its own sound growth.
FFAB is the immediate brainchild
of representatives of FAA, the Associ-
ated General Contractors, and the
Florida Lumber and Millwork Associ-
ation, but FFAB is conceived as
drawing its members from the design
and management branches of the
whole building industry. Thus, not
only architects, general contractors,
and lumber and millwork distributors
should be interested in its success,
but specialty trade contractors, com-
munity planners, realtors, building
officials, financing agencies, interior
designers, home builders, landscape
architects, building managers, and the
manufacturers and distributors of
building materials and equipment
should also participate in its work.
No single one of these groups can
now marshall sufficient resources to
meet the industry's needs, but to-
gether since the whole industry is
and will continue to be the largest
in the state they can support an
NOVEMBER, 1957


Frank J. Rooney, Miami builder and
former president of AGC, was named
temporary president of FFAB at an
organization meeting of the research
group held last August in Gainesville.

exciting and far-reaching program of
development and research.
Every member of the building in-
dustry of Florida must be conscious
of the needs for such a program. The
industry, in both the state and nation,
finds itself in the enviable position of
conducting an unprecedented and
unexceeded volume of operations.
But, whereas agriculture, medicine,
engineering, and every field of mod-
ern industrial enterprise has long
since demonstrated the necessity and
indispensable benefits of concerted
investigation, experiment, and anal-
ysis, the building industry still pre-
sents the inexcusable paradox of
endeavoring to produce a progressive
product by principles, data, and
methods based on unchecked opin-
ion, partial knowledge, and super-
annuated habit.
It is no comfort to explain this
untenable situation by pointing out
the diffuse and disorganized character


of the building industry . It is
lame rationalizing to claim that al-
ready the growing effort of individual
companies has gained excellent, if
uncoordinated, improvements in some
building products and assemblies.
And it is non-sensical defeatism to
deny that men, who individually find
primary satisfaction in achieving a
meritorious product, can not or will
not cooperate voluntarily to improve
their capabilities.
By creating the means by which
such cooperation can be realized in
the building industry of the State of
Florida, FFAB assumes the following
purposes:
"a. To increase, enrich, and refine
the body of knowledge and
principles comprising the sci-
ences and arts of building by
research, discovery, experiment,
and other appropriate means.
b. To stimulate, augment, and en-
hance the capabilities of per-
sons concerned vocationally
with the creation of buildings
by disseminating the results of
research and study, and by aid-
ing and supporting, with finan-
cial assistance and otherwise,
technical educational programs
conducted at collegiate, insti-
tute, and conference levels.
c. To elevate by appropriate
means public understanding of
the desirability of high quality
in buildings "
It is important to note that the
specific research projects will arise
from the members of FFAB them-
selves. An FFAB committee on re-
search will refine the problems and
the FFAB Board of Directors will
approve and arrange for financing. It
is expected that most of the research
projects will be staffed, conducted,
and published for FFAB by the
17









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The FFAB...
(Continued from Page 17)
Bureau of Architectural and Com-
munity Research, a division of the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts
of the University of Florida. It is
probable that, at least initially, re-
search teams will be recruited from
the College's faculties of architecture,
building construction, and commun-
ity planning, and other appropriate
sources within or outside the Uni-
versity. The new head of the Uni-
versity's Department of Architecture,
JAMES T. LENDRUM, formerly Direc-
tor of the Small Homes Council,
University of Illinois, will bring val-
uable experience to the implementa-
tion of FFAB's research program.
While research foundations are by
no means new, FFAB will be a pio-
neering effort toward industry-wide
cooperation in the building field. Far
from competing with the existing
agencies, such as BRI, BRAB, or
other private and public research
agencies, FFAB will organize the con-
siderable resources of the building
industry in Florida to investigate the
problems of designing and erecting
buildings under the special conditions
prevailing in Florida. No national
agency, public or private, can be
counted on to undertake such a task.
If any headway is to be made, it must
come from our own grass roots.
It is indeed true that the benefits
of improved building in Florida will
accrue to the ultimate consumers, the
people of Florida. Since it is esti-
mated that Floridians will spend by
1970 a total on the order of $15
billions for new buildings, it would
be plausible to suggest that it would
be a wise public expenditure to in-
augurate a tax-supported program of
building research. If research can in-
crease the efficiency, safety, dura-
bility, and attractiveness of Florida
buildings by as little as one per cent
- any concerted effort should result
in a much higher rate it would
mean a saving of the order of $150,-
000,000, in addition to obtaining bet-
ter buildings. State-supported re-
search for such a goal is surely at
least as justifiable as long-approved
subsidies in other fields.
On the other hand, if indeed build-
ing merits classification as an indus-
try, it must assume some responsibil-
ity for improving its own capacities
and products. It is no longer remark-


able for progressive management to
allocate considerable sums for such
purposes. The Textile Institute, for
example, assesses its members annu-
ally 10 cents per spindle for research.
It seems clear, therefore, that the
building industry of Florida cannot
escape responsibility for leadership
and concerted effort in pursuing a
similar program in its own field.
It is obvious that in such a program
Florida architects and the FAA must
play an influential role. The profes-
sion has talked research for many
years, needs daily the results of sound
investigations, and would stand to
benefit both itself and its clients as
much as, or more than, any other
group in the industry. The possession
of special knowledge, proven prin-
ciples, and detailed reports giving
actual performances of specific build-
ings, assemblies, and systems would
fortify practitioners immensely in the
eternal struggle to guide clients to the
economy of high quality and to repel
the encroachments of ignorant pre-
tenders. Moreover, in supporting
whole-heartedly an energetic and sys-
tematic program of research, archi-
tects will fulfill the inescapable duty
of every profession to increase its own
competence.
It must be emphasized that FFAB
should and will be a creature of the
building industry of Florida. It is
not, nor should it be, an agency of
the University. Nevertheless, in co-
operating closely with FFAB in prose-
cuting research and education in the
building arts, the university's depart-
ments, faculties, and students in these
fields stand to receive immense ad-
vantages from witnessing and sharing
in a dynamic program.
By the time this statement is pub-
lished or soon after, FFAB will be
incorporated and be ready to receive
active support. Until the first annual
meeting and the election of the first
Board of Directors, the incorporators
will act as an interim board. FAA is
represented among the incorporators
by three of its current officers and
two directors. The initial group has
elected FRANK J. ROONEY of Miami
to serve as temporary president until
the first meeting of the Board of
Directors. On June 1, FAA's Board,
at its meeting in Clearwater, ex-
pressed its enthusiastic interest in
the proposed foundation and prom-
ised its concrete support at the appro-
priate time.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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Committee Reports




Planning and Zoning


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT
Chairman


The Committee on Planning and
Zoning was established on a state-
wide basis for the first time this year.
Its purpose is to coordinate the poli-
cies and programs of the Florida Plan-
ning and Zoning Association with the
interests of the architectural profes-
sion throughout the state, and to
stimulate interest in planning and
zoning matters at the chapter and
community levels.
The FPZA: The Florida Planning
and Zoning Association is a non-
profit association to encourage or-
derly physical and economic develop-
ment in the communities of the state.
Last year its membership included 66
organizations, 156 individual mem-
bers, and 410 subscribers to the
Newsletter.
The purpose of the FPZA is five-
fold: (1) to promote cooperation
among the official planning and zon-
ing boards or commissions, civic
bodies, citizens, technicians, and
students interested in planning and
zoning in the State of Florida, (2) to
cultivate and stimulate an interest in
planning and zoning by local govern-
ments, (3) to encourage the observ-
ance of sound planning and zoning
practices, (4) to exchange informa-
tion, advice, and assistance among its
members, and (5) to engage in re-
search and issue publications on plan-
ning and zoning matters.
Among FPZA publications are the
Proceedings of its annual conferences,
and the monthly Newsletter of Flor-
ida Planning and Zoning. The Asso-
ciation maintains an active rental
library on planning and zoning at its
headquarters in Auburndale where
Fred H. Bair, Jr., is executive secre-
tary.
Kenneth Jacobson, AIA, of Delray
Beach, is serving as president of the
FPZA this year, and it is gratifying
to report that an increasing number
of Florida architects are serving ac-
tively on local planning boards and
commissions throughout the state.
NOVEMBER, 1957


The 1957 Legislature: Two impor-
tant matters of continuing interest
and concern to architects and plan-
ners engaged the attention of the
1957 Legislature. The first was the
administration enabling legislation on
planning, zoning, and subdivision reg-
ulation. The second was the proposal
to amend the State Constitution to
permit participation in the national
urban redevelopment program. Un-
fortunately, neither of these forward-
looking proposals was enacted.
Florida thus remains one of three
states without comprehensive enabl-
ing legislation for planning and zon-
ing, and one of the few states without
constitutional authority to undertake
urban redevelopment. For the next
two years, at least, Florida commun-
ities will have to get along with an
antiquated hodgepodge of local acts,
some of which are of doubtful legal
status; and for the next two years
Florida cities will be unable to make
a start on cleaning out urban decay
in order that private enterprise may
begin the comprehensive renewal of
our cities.
The Concern of Architects: Why
should architects concern themselves
with such matters? To those with
caring minds the answer is abundant-
ly clear. In the century which lies
ahead, it is the whole community-
not the piecemeal building which
must be the "initial and essential and
ultimate concern" of the architect.
What should architects do about
the problems of urban environment?
To those genuinely concerned, the
civic problems section of the AIA
Centennial Convention provided co-
gent and practical answers. Every
forward-looking architect owes it to
himself, his clients, and his com-
munity to give thoughtful attention
to the forum on "The Future of the
City" as reproduced in capsule form
in the July issue of the Florida Archi-
tect and -as presented in full in the
July issue of the AIA Journal.


There is evidence of increasing
awareness among architects of the
vital professional and political issues
which confront us. And as Henry
Luce recently pointed out, not only
architects but millions of Americans
have begun to see that architecture
is more than a building here and
there-architecture is a whole city,
architecture is the whole sweep of
the continent.
The Community as Client: There
are indications that more and more
architects, in serving the interests of
an individual client, are keeping in
mind their simultaneous responsibil-
ity to the community of which their
projects will be a part. Certainly our
citizens are beginning to see, if we
may paraphrase John Donne, that no
building is an island, entire in itself;
every building is a piece of the com-
munity, a part of the whole.
Recommendations: 1) That the
FAA, as well as the chapters through-
out the state, give serious considera-
tion to a continuing affiliation with
the FPZA as organizational members.
Organizational memberships are $10
a year, with Newsletter subscriptions
$3 each in adidtion.
2) That all Florida architects give
serious consideration to a continuing
affiliation with the FPZA as indi-
vidual members. Individual member-
ships, including a subscription to the
Newsletter, are $5 a year.
3) That the FAA continue to work
with the FPZA and other organiza-
tions interested in an adequate basic
set of planning laws for Florida to
the end that our cities and counties-
singly or jointly, as the need may
arise-may have proper tools to guide
the orderly growth and development
of the state.
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, Fla. N., Chrm.
WILLIAM R. GOMON, Daytona Beach
SIDNEY R. WILKINSON, Fla. Central
WILLIAM A. RUSSELL, Florida South
ALBERT R. BROADFOOT, Jacksonville
KENNETH JACOBSON, Palm Beach









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T7e ortey-7hird dntuat




FAA Convention


FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA NOVEMBER 7, 8 and 9, 1957






CONVENTION MESSAGE FROM THE FAA PRESIDENT


EDGAR S. WORTMAN, AIA
President
Florida Association of Architects


The theme for this 43rd FAA Convention is much more than just
a phrase. The future holds a very real clh.llnge to our professional associa-
tion. It is a clallelng in terms of a sound, purposeful growth, a greater
depth and breadth of service, a more efficient internal coordination and a
more stable basis for operation of an expanded FAA organization.
And this challenge is an immediate one to all of us. The way in which
we meet it, individually and collectively, will gauge the future develop-
ment of the FAA. It is not too much to say that within the next two
years the FAA will need to face and solve a number of problems,
the solution to which will largely determine the future course of FAA
progress.
Last January, in these columns, I suggested a number of points which
seemed to call for decisive action. One was the need for better coordina-
tion between local operations of individual Chapters and the state-wide
activities of the FAA. Another concerned an improved organization of
committees and the need for improving committee activities to gen-
crate more generally productive results. A third was the desirability of
an AIA regional status for Florida. Still another was the growing urgency
to enlarge the FAA's administrative facilities to care for the rapidly-
increasing work load resulting directly from the growth of our profession
in the state and the broadening scope of FAA interests and activities.
During the past year committees have been working on the first three
of these points. Their reports to the convention call for definite action;
and if recommendations are followed, we can look forward to immediate
iinproutcient in our inter-professional relationships. The matter of a
regional status for Florida now calls for Convention action, though an
ultimate decision on the committee's proposal is beyond our local ability
to control.
The fourth point additions to our administrative facilities will
require decisive action within a year. The FAA has now grown to a point
at which a4centralized business office adequately staffed and equipped to
discharge its many responsibilities is essential. Provision for it involves
many facets of our professional association; and I suggest it as one of the
most important FAA considerations for 1958. The needed means for
expanding the scope of our professional activity and public influence
can develop only through your cooperation. I urge you to offer it fully.


NOVEMBER, 1957 23










"The Challenge of The Future"


With Sputnik beeping messages
from outer space and with trips to
the moon already imminent in the
plans of various scientific experts, the
Future may be closer than most of us
now realize. Time-wise, the AIA's sec-
ond hundred years will equal the span
of its just-completed century. But in
terms of physical development, it will
pass in a geometric progression.


It is inevitable that solutions to
problems which are now the preoccu-
pation of the new space-scientists will
ultimately have profound effects on
the design and structure of new build-
ings for new purposes and even
(who knows) new worlds. Certainly
the trend of current research and
events points only in the direction of
change and challenge. And it is the


consideration of this trend in var-
ious phases affecting the activities of
architects which constitutes the
theme and core for this Convention.
Men who will probe the core and
develop discussions of the theme are
anything but science-fictionists. But
each, in his special field, has caught
the spark of the future in his ap-
proach to current problems.


R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER
"Comprehensive Designer"
New York City, N. Y.

In terms of design the future offers an immense and
complex challenge. As a "Comprehensive Designer," Mr.
Fuller has had, more than most men, an opportunity at
first hand to analyze the elements of which design is com-
pounded. Thus, as Keynoter of the Convention's theme,
he will highlight some of the forces which must inevitably
shape the future thinking of designers. For more than 30
years Mr. Fuller has been a vocal and vigorous proponent
of creative design in terms of industrial products and
processes. He has demonstrated application of the creative
design process in a number of varied fields; and his newest,
the Geodisic Dome, has already written a new chapter of
shelter history.






MAURICE E. H. ROTIVAL, AIA
Community Planner and Consultant
New York City, N. Y.

In the development of future communities, planning may
well become the key to the realization of many possibilities
which now seem unattainable. As a demonstrated master
of'the planning technique, Mr. Rotival has already shaped
the future of many communities in many countries. He is
known for the breadth and scale of his projects; and during
Friday afternoon's seminar session he will discuss the
important part which planning can play in realizing the
full potentials of our communities' future. No stranger
to Florida, Mr. Rotival is now at work on the traffic
redevelopment of Winter Park; and part of his discussion
will deal with pre-solving some of Florida's future devel-
opment problems.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






DR. ALBERT G. H. DIETZ,
Engineer, Teacher, Consultant
MIT, Cambridge, Mass.

New materials and new ways of using them have revolu-
tionized building within the present generation; and they
may well repeat the process during the next one. As one
whose entire professional career has been intimately con-
cerned with materials and their varied uses, Dr. Dietz is
eminently qualified to discuss the significance of their
future-and even, perhaps, to suggest how current trends
of materials development may react on the future of archi-
tectural design. As a professor at MIT, Dr. Dietz has
headed that institution's Plastics Research and Adhesives
Laboratories, has directed its Impact Program and has
served on the future-peering Solar Energy Committee. He
will speak at the Seminar Friday.






EDWARD COHEN
Consulting Engineer
New York City, N. Y.

The importance of the engineering challenge to our archi-
tectural future cannot be over-emphasized. Creative engi-
neering has resulted in structural accomplishments which
were not dreamed of a few years ago; and the swift
development of that creativity is shaping new forms, solv-
ing new structural problems, employing structural elements
in new ways. Mr. Cohen, as an associate of Amman and
Whitney, consulting engineers, has been in the forefront
of such developments. He has done structural research as
well as structural design and has been active party to
outstanding accomplishments with steel, concrete, alum-
num. Some of these have seemed to challenge the future;
and he will discuss that challenge at Thursday's seminar.






DR. TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA
Dean, U/F College of Architecture and Fine Arts
Gainesville, Florida

Any program as far-reaching and diverse as "The Chal-
lenge of the Future" in terms of Design, Structure, Mate-
rials and Planning justifies some coordinating commentary
to key prognostication to immediate progress. As an edu-
cator, research scholar and author, Dr. Bannister possesses
special ability to deliver such a commentary. Thus, he
will highlight the overall significance of the Convention's
seminar sessions at the final luncheon meeting on Saturday.
Dr. Bannister has considered the future of architects
previously in his analytical study "The Architect at
Mid-Century" as a member of an AIA Commission. Here
he will be dealing with the future of architecture as a
summary of the two-day seminar sessions.
NOVEMBER, 1957









Program


-4I


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION

FORT HARRISOH


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
10:00 A. M. Fourth-quarterly meeting of the
Joint Cooperative Committee-FAA-AGC-
FES, John Stetson, Chairman, presiding.
This meeting is scheduled for adjournment
at noon to permit committee members to
to join the FAA Directors at luncheon.
12:00 Noon Meeting of the FAA Board of
Directors, starting with luncheon.
1:00 P. M. Registration opens for Chapter
Members, Guests, Students and Exhibitor
personnel, Main Lobby. Identifying badges
will be required for admission to all FAA
business sessions and other scheduled Con-
vention affairs.
6:00 P. M. to Closing Check with your Com-
mittee chairmen for possible dinner meet-
ings. Evening is unscheduled for early
Convention arrivals.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7
8:00 A. M.-"Y'AII Come!" Breakfast, Sugar'n
Spice Room, Ground Floor. For group con-
ferences, committee meetings or visiting.
9:00 A. M. Registration continues Main
Lobby.
Opening ceremony, Building Products and
Materials Exhibit, Mezzanine Floor. Roland
W. Sellew, President Florida Central Chap-
ter; Robert H. Levison, Convention Chair-
man, and Hon. Lewis Homer, Mayor of
Clearwater, officiating.
Architects' Exhibit opens, Circus Room.
10:00 A. M. First Business Session, FAA, Sky-
line Room, 10th Floor, Edgar S. Wortman,
President, FAA, presiding.
Reports of FAA Officers.
Reports of FAA Committees.
11:30 A. M. Visit Products Exhibit.
12:30 P. M.-Keynote Luncheon Meeting, Crystal
Ballroom, Roland W. Sellew, President,
Florida Central Chapter, AIA, presiding
Keynote Address by R. Buckminster Fuller.
2:30 P. M.-First Seminar Session, Crystal Ball-
room, John Stetson, FAA 1st Vice-Presi-
dent, moderating.
Section A-Design: R. Buckminster Fuller,
speaker; T. Trip Russell, Robert M. Little,
panelists.



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









3rd Annual Convention


OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


Section B -Structure: Edward Cohen,
speaker: Meyer Deutschman, Ivan Smith,
panelists.
5:00 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit.
6:30 P.M. Cocktail Party, Products Exhibit
area and Poolside, Florida Central Chapter,
AIA, hosts.
7:30 P. M.-Exhibitors' Buffet Dinner, Poolside,
informal. Presentation of Product Exhibi-
tors' awards by Anthony L. Pullara. After-
dinner entertainment; music, dancing and
specialty acts.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

8:00 A. M.-Chapter Affairs Breakfast, Skyline
Room, for all Chapter presidents and
Chapter Affairs Committee chairmen.
Moderator and discussion leader, Beryl
Price, formerly chairman, National AIA
Committee on Chapter Affairs.
9:00 A. M.-Registration continues in Lobby.
Visit Products Exhibits.
10:00 A. M.-Second Business Session, FAA, Sky-
line Room, Edgar S. Wortman, President,
FAA, presiding. Completion of old business;
introduction of new business.
11:30 A. M. Visit Products Exhibits.
12:30 P. M.-President's Luncheon, Crystal Ball-
room, Edgar S. Wortman, President, FAA;
presiding. Recognition of AIA Fellows;
commentary by Leon Chatelain, Jr.; FAIA,
President, AIA, and by Sanford W. Goin,
FAIA, AIA Regional Director.
2:00 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit.
2:30 P.M. Second Seminar Session, Crystal
Ballroom, Franklin S. Bunch, FAA Vice-
President, moderating.
Section C- Materials Dr. Albert G. H.
Dietz, speaker; Taylor Hardwick, David
Reaves, panelists.
Section D Planning -Maurice E. H.
Rotival, AIA, speaker; Sidney Carter, Rus-
sell T. Pancoast, FAIA, panelists.
5:00 P.M. -Visit Products Exhibit.
Convention Registration desk closes.
6:30 P.M.-Cocktail Party, Exhibit area and
Crystal Ballroom, 10th Floor, Florida Cen-
tral Chapter, AIA, hosts.
7:30 P.M. till closing -The Architects' Party,
Crystal Ballroom. Entertainment, music
and dancing. Dress optional.


SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9

8:00 A.M.- Students' and Junior Associates'
Breakfast Meeting, Skyline Room. Program
sponsored by AIA Student Chapter.
9:00 A. M. Visit Products Exhibit.
10:00 A.M. Final Business Session, FAA, Sky-
line Room, Edgar S. Wortman, President,
FAA, presiding. New business, election of
new FAA officers, new resolutions, an-
nouncement of 1958 Convention site and
host chapter.
11:30 A. M. Final visit to Products Exhibit.
12:30 P.M. Challenge Luncheon, Crystal Ball-
room, Robert H. Levison, 43rd Convention
Chairman, presiding.
Seminar Summary address by Dr. Turpin
C. Bannister, FAIA, introduced by Sanford
W. Goin, FAIA, AIA Regional Director.
Presentation of Awards:
For the Architects' Exhibit,
William B. Harvard, Mark Hampton.
For Exhibit Attendance "Super-Prizes,"
Anthony L. Pullara.
2:30 P.M. 43rd Annual FAA Convention
adjourns.
Products Exhibit closes.
CONVENTION NOTES:
All Delegates must be registered prior to voting on all
Convention business requiring formal action as covered in the
FAA Constitution and By-Laws.
Transportation between airports and Convention Head-
quarters will be furnished if desired. Notify Ralph W. B.
Reade (Clearwater 3-2265), Transportation Chairman, or check
facilities at the Registration Desk, Main Lobby.
Ladies of the Convention are cordially invited to attend
all business and seminar sessions of the Convention if they
so desire. A Ladies' Program has been planned for the three-
day Convention period. Full information regarding it may be
obtained at the Registration Desk. Registration will be necessary
for the Open House on Thursday afternoon, the Friday morning
Breakfast and the Poolside Card Party on Friday afternoon.
Needed transportation will be furnished by the Auxiliary of
the Florida Central Chapter.
Eligibility for Products Exhibit attendance awards must be
established through registration, by name and address, at each
exhibition booth.
All Convention visitors are advised to check the hotel
bulletin board in the Main Lobby for information relative to
location and times of committee meetings, special luncheons,
group meetings, etc.
Check-out time for all Conventioneers will be 5:00 p.m.
to permit attendance at Saturday's Challenge Luncheon.
The Florida State Board of Architecture will hold its 1957
fall meeting Tuesday and Wednesday, November 5 and 6, from
9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Location of the meetings will be
posted on the hotel bulletin board.


NOVEMBER, 1957 27


HOTEL, CLEARWATER


- NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 1957







Sixty center of no#weatin.a...


Exhibit of Building Products and Materials


2. 10 This year a new system for determ-
-- ining eligibility for booth attendance
24 2 II 17 7E awards has been developed. Each
S-- 90Exhibit Booth attendant will have at
.l 6 hand a visitor registration booklet. As
s L. B Y each booth is visited by an architect,
---he will be asked to note his name
4 7 5 and address for entry in the exhibi-
20 13 tor's booklet. Compliance with this
Request will qualify the architect for
27 I 4 the receipt of any of the several
booth-attendance awards-which will
--- be distributed through a surprise rou-
S 16 t5 I \ = fine developed by the committee.
.q 4. --


ISO \ S s 3 4. 3.5 &Wt 97 1 5 40 4 1 4 1 4S +4 4 4 1 4-7 146 1-11 50 1 1 53


Here again is a once-a-year opportunity to obtain, leisurely and at first hand, a wealth of technical
information toward the end of easing the job of writing proper specifications. Here is also another
welcome opportunity to meet old friends, make new ones and enjoy a relaxing conviviality with both.


1... Concrete Products, Inc.
2... Cement Enamel
3... Aluminum Co. of America
4... Russel & Erwin
5... Florida Prestressed Concrete Association
6... Harris Standard Paint Company, Inc.
7... Broward Marine, Inc.
8... Williams & Williams Products Corporation
9... DayBrite Lighting, Inc.
10... Typhoon Prop-R-Temp Heat Pump
11... Independent Nail & Packing Company
12... Lift Slab of Florida, Inc.
1 3... Tiffany Tile Corporation
14... Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Sales, Inc.
15... Florida Filters, Inc.
16... Burdett Sound & Recording Company
17... Allied Products of Florida, Inc.
18... Burnett Brothers, Inc.
19... Aquatite Tile Co.
Hartstone Concrete Products Co.
Pinellas Lumber Co.
Tampa Sand & Material Company
20... Florida Cast Stone Company
21... Briggs Beautyware
22... Dallas Ceramic Company
23... Portland Cement Association
24... Hotpoint
25... D & C Planning Company, Inc.
26... Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.
27... Monostructure, Inc.
28... Miami Window Corporation
29... Peninsular Telephone Company


30... Woodco Corporation
31... Woodco Corporation
32... Electrend Distributing Co.
33... Benjamin Moore & Co.
34... Sierra Electric Corporation
35... Larsen Products Corporation
36... Rilco Laminated Products, Inc.
37... Norman Ascher & Associates, Inc.
38... Acousti Engineering Company of Florida, Inc.
39... Arcadia Metal Products
40... Flamingo Wholesale Distributors, Inc.
41... Flamingo Wholesale Distributors, Inc.
42... Schlage Lock Company
43... Herman Miller Furniture Company
44... United States Plywood Corporation
45... Romany-Spartan Tiles
46... Unit Structures, Inc.
47... Owens-Corning Fiberglas
48... Dibbs Aluminum Products, Inc.
49... The Mosaic Tile Company
50... American-Standard
51... Flexicore
52... E. G. Koyl, Inc.
53... Ther-Mo-Roof, Inc.
54... Executone Distributors of Florida
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57... Foster Refrigerator Corp.
58... Logan Lumber Company
59... A. M. Byers Company
60... George C. Griffin Ce.
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Ree e






Committee Reports




Relations with the Construction Industry


By JOHN STETSON
Chairman


The work of the Joint Cooperative
Committee for the year 1957 actually
commenced at the meeting held on
November 8, 1956, in the Madrid
Room of the Hotel Seville in Miami
Beach, Florida. At this time the 1957
program was set up, and included
such items as state-wide planning and
zoning, a State licensing law for gen-
tral contractors, a State Building
Commission and Building Code,
closer cooperation of the three groups
(FAA, FES, AGC) in public rela-
tions, simplification of state docu-
ments and unification of bidding
procedures. The actual beginning of
this work was undertaken at the meet-
ing of the committee held at
Orlando on July 27th. This meeting
produced an attendance of seven
architects, seven contractors and five
engineers.
The committee is very interested
in setting up machinery to insure a
State Building Commission, to in-
clude many of the present boards,
such as State Board of Health, State
Hotel Commission, and a new Build-
ing Commission. There is no thought
to include professional boards such as
the Architects and Engineers State
Boards, in this act. The committee
feels that a simplified state-wide
building code is a must. It also feels
that there are too many present
boards and regulations governing con-
struction, and too many applications
necessary to obtain permits. The pres-
ent program calls for a report at the
next meeting as to feasibility and
possibility of working out an act to be
presented to the Legislature at a
later date. Indications now are that
this is possible, and that during 1958
the committee will have an invigorat-
ing program in presenting this to the
legislators.
A study has been made of the prac-
ticability of a State Board and Licens-
ing Law for General Contractors. We
have discovered that other states have
such a law, and will cooperate with
NOVEMBER, 1957


the AGC in establishing the machin-
ery to provide such a law for the State
of Florida. It is needless to say that
the architects should be more than
interested in seeing this program
achieve success. We all realize the
necessity of establishing the con-
tractor in a position above the level
he now finds himself, and of elim-
inating the risks involved in finding
ourselves forced to do business with
irresponsible and untrained men. We
have found that all well established
and reputable contractors would wel-
come this law, and are doing all pos-
sible to see its adoption in the near
future.
The State committee has studied
the feasibility of inclusion of other
groups in our Joint Cooperative Com-
mittee, but have recommended that
other associations, such as Home
Builders and Realtors, be included
only on the local level as is now the
case. We have made it a point to
keep close scrutiny on the labor pic-
ture and at each meeting receive a
report on the situation as it exists
in the state at that time. The com-
mittee has considered the study of a
program, which would include repre-
sentatives of organized labor, in find-
ing ways to obtain increased produc-
tion and lower construction costs.
The only recommendation which
could be made at this time would be
that any committees appointed to
work on any of the above mentioned
items, and representing the FAA, be
composed of men best qualified


through experience in working with
building code committees and con-
tractors organizations. One of the
items discussed during the year, and
one which no doubt will receive a
good deal of notice through the years
to come, was "responsibility for
design error." This has been a sore
spot from Chapter level to AIA com-
mittee level. There must be some
recommendations approved and
adopted, and it is quite possible that
the FAA could, through its associa-
tion with the Joint Cooperative Com-
mittee, establish the precedent that
would follow through to the National

level.
Another recommendation would
be that the FAA spearhead a meeting
each year with the Governor of the
State of Florida in conjunction with
representatives of the FES and AGC,
to discuss the building industry and
its problems. This could be an excel-
lent public relations gesture and one
which could provide a much better
insight into the necessity of closer
cooperation between State agencies
and the professions involved.
JOHN STETSON, Chairman
DONALD R. EDGE, Palm Beach
MYRL J. HANES, Florida North
CHARLES L. HENDRICKS, Mid-Florida
LEWIS M. HITT, Florida South
ROBERT G. JAHELKA, Broward County
RoY M. POOLEY, JR., Jacksonville
ANTHONY L. PULLARA, Fla. Central
FRANK J. SINDELAR, Fla. Northwest
ALBERT WOODWARD, Fla. N. Central
FRANCIS R. WALTON, Daytona Beach


The report of the FAA LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE will be presented on
the Convention floor. A preliminary report of this Committee was sub-
mitted at the August meeting of the FAA Board of Directors. Since then,
however, the Committee has not met to consider recommendations for
FAA action. A meeting is scheduled immediately prior to the Convention
opening; and the Legislative Committee report for this year will be devel-
oped on the basis of decisions made by the full Committee at that time.
A .i ary report a this







"FLORIDA--A New AIA Region.."
(Continued from Page 15)


APPENDIX B


Al.A. CORORATE WIKRSmP 0;
SOUTH ATLAIC DISTRICT
AS OF S1T JOLY 1JS7 7


Of 1035 Corporate members in the
present AIA South Atlantic Region,
Florida's 10 Chapters list 41 percent,
as of July 1, 1957. But as indicated
by the map, this 41 percent are far
removed from both interests and
contact with corporate groups in the
three other states.


APPENDIX D

Some accomplishments of The Flor-
ida Association of Architects, AIA, in
relation to the Government of the
State of Florida.
1. Sponsored original legislation
passed in 1915, and many improving
amendments since, establishing the
Florida State Board of Architecture.
2. Provided a source of respected
information to Governors concerning
the qualifications of persons being
considered as appointees to the Flor-
ida State Board of Architecture.
3. Maintained a full time lobbyist
at each regular biennial session of
the Florida Legislature for the past
eight years.
4. Provided authoritative, respected
and much used source of information
to members of the Legislature on all
problems concerning laws dealing
with construction and related sub-
jects.


5. Consistently served as a watch-
dog to prevent weakening of laws pro-
tecting the health and safety of the
public, with particular emphasis on
the Florida Hotel and Restaurant
Commission.
6. Successfully opposed ill-consid-
ered moves to utilize stock plans for
school construction in Florida.
7. Helped secure legislative appro-
priation for College of Architecture
and Fine Arts Building at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
8. Assisted Governor's Committee
on Schoolhouse Construction by pre-
paring cost estimates that provided
basis for state school construction ap-
propriations.
9. Worked closely in numerous
conferences with representatives of
the State Department of Education
in development of school plant plan-
ning standards.
10. By direct testimony, advised
the State of inefficiency and unfair
tactics of a state bureau which was
practicing architecture and influenced
action abolishing such practice, thus
returning to private architects the
handling of correctly negotiated com-
missions for state buildings.


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34 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports



Chapter Coordination

By H. SAMUEL KRUSE
Chairman


1. OBJECTIVE:
The Committee on Chapter Co-
ordination, composed of the Chapter
Secretaries and the Secretary of the
FAA by action of the 42nd Conven-
tion, is charged with the study of
matters pertaining to the time of
installation of officers, collection and
apportionment of dues and other
matters of a similar nature and to
make recommendations to the Chap-
ters and the FAA for the purpose of
better understanding, coordination
and integration of the By-Laws and
administration of the organizations
concerned.
2. ACTION:
The Committee performed its
study by mail. Possible courses of
action were embodied in a memo-
randum sent to all Secretaries for
comments and amplification. This
memorandum proposed, for a start,
the coordination of the time of meet-
ings and election of officers and the
vertical organization of committees


with the Institute. After receiving
comments and suggestions in reply
to the memorandum and comparing
these with comments from the FAA
Committee on Committee Organiza-
tion and various Treasurers of the
Chapters and the FAA, the Commit-
tee on Chapter Coordination is pre-
pared to make the following recom-
mendations for adoption by both
Chapters and FAA.
3. RECOMMENDATIONS:
1. Each chapter shall have a Leg-
islative Committee vertical with the
FAA Legislative Committee.
2. The Chapters and the FAA
shall have the standing committees
as recommended by the Institute and
vertical with the Institute.
3. FAA Board Meetings shall be
within the first week of the month
and Chapter Meetings, the second
week of the month.
4. FAA election of officers shall
be at the Convention in November;
the election of Chapter officers at the


October meeting prior to the Con-
vention.
5. Chapter Chairmen for the
Legislative and Standing Committees
be appointed by the time of the elec-
tion of FAA officers in November.
6. New FAA Board and old FAA
Board shall attend the last quarter
meeting together, immediately fol-
lowing the Convention. Terms of
office for Chapters running from
October to October; for FAA; Nov-
ember to November.
7. Dues for the Chapters and the
FAA be invoiced and collected on a
one-third of the year basis during the
fiscal year of application and accept-
ance of any member, and all invoices
shall be rendered and payable for the
full year as of January of the ensuing
year.
4. CONCLUSIONS:
The work of coordinating organiza-
tion and administrative procedures is
a continuing task. Although several
resolutions will be proposed at the
43rd Convention which will develop
the coordination program, the work
of this Committee cannot be consid-
ered finished. It it suggested that a
similar committee be appointed to
continue the work in 1958 until all
of the Chapters, together with the
FAA adopt uniform procedures.
H. SAMUEL KRUSE, Chairman
Secretary, FAA


No meetings of the FAA Com-
mittee on Education and Registration
were held during the past year since
most of the things in which this
Committee was interested were carry-
over matters from the prior year.
As Chairman of the Committee,
and because of my location in Gaines-
ville, I made the necessary arrange-
ments for securing a jury to judge the
student architectural competition for
the annual FAA scholarship. The
subject of the competition was "Mar-
ried Student Housing" and the $250
scholarship was awarded to Donald
Abernathy of West Palm Beach.
Morton T. Ironmonger, Chairman of
the Jury and Treasurer of the FAA,
made the award at a luncheon meet-
NOVEMBER, 1957


ing of the Student Home Show on
April 27, 1957.
Another matter of considerable
interest to the Committee was the
appropriation for the building for
architecture at the University of
Florida. Due to the generation of
considerable interest in this project
by members of the Legislature in past
sessions, however, the appropriation
was generously provided for without
necessity of any extended effort on
the part of the profession during the
past session of the Legislature.
Though no opportunity will pre-
sent itself for a meeting of our Com-
mittee prior to the Convention in
November, there is one matter which
I believe to be worthy of the interest,


not only of the Committee, but of
the FAA membership at large. This
matter is the establishment of a
research organization through the
facilities of the College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts at the University
of Florida. Dr. Bannister has done
a terrific amount of work in bringing
this matter to the attention of prac
tically all facets of the construction
industry in Florida, and I am sure we
will be hearing more from him as to
the details later on.
SANFORD W. COIN, FAIA,
Chairman
ROBERT E. HANSEN, Broward County
RALPH F. SPICER, Daytona Beach
WILLIAM B. EATON, Florida Central
WILLIAM BREIDENBACH, Fla. North
JAMES STRIPLING, Fla. No. Central
R. DANIEL HART, Fla. Northwest
JERRY P. SIMMONS, Florida South
S. RALPH FETNER, Jacksonville
RICHARD B. ROGERS, Mid-Florida
BYRON SIMONSON, Palm Beach


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Committee Reports



Building Codes

By JOSEPH M. SHIFALO
Chairman


The following is a report of our
committee's activities for the year
and, as you can see, some areas have
been quite active in code revisions,
while others have not. The report is
broken down into Chapter areas in
order to let you see more clearly the
picture in the separate areas, rather
than the State as a whole.
PALM BEACH AREA: Mr. Frederick
W. Kessler, committee member from
this area, reports that the Joint Co-
operative Committee between the
Palm Beach Chapter and the A.G.C.
has produced a more uniform code
based on a study by the members of
this committee. The Southern Build-
ing Code as a basis has been amended
to include many changes pertinent to


the Palm Beach area.
DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER: Unfor-
tunately due to the illness of Mr.
William R. Gomon, committee mem-
ber from this area, very little has been
done to strengthen the code or to
adopt a uniform code. However,
many revisions were made to the
Southern Building Code last year and
my information is that these are serv-
ing to supplement the local code in
a step toward a uniform building
code.
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER: Mr.
Myrl J. Hanes reports that the South-
ern Building Code with revisions is
serving very well for the whole of the
Gainesville area.
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL CHAP-


TER: Mr. Forrcst R. Coxcn attended
the meeting of the Florida Industrial
Commission in Tallahassee as a repre-
sentative of our committee and re-
ports that the Commission met and
adopted the A. S. A. Safety Code for
Elevators, Escalators and Dumbwait-
ers, revised 1955. The other activity
in this area has been the strengthen-
ing of the Southern Building Code.
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER: The
report from Mr. Igor B. Polevitzky,
our committee member in this area,
is more enthusiastic than any other.
The Dade League of Municipalities
composed of seventeen municipalities
in South Florida, with Mr. Polevitzky
as Chairman of the Technical Com-
mittee, has just completed the semi-
final draft of the South Florida Build-
ing Code. A code-writer and a con-
sultant, who answered to no one
except the Technical Committee, was
hired to get the job done and it is
reported that they have done a very
admirable job. This is indeed a very
good start for the adoption of this
South Florida Building Code by all
(Continued on Page 44)


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News & Notes


Duval County Names
New School Architect


JOHN P. STEVENS has been ap-
pointed Supervising Architect for the
Duval County Board of Public In-
struction, according to a recent an-
nouncement by I. W. BRYANT, super-
intendent. He will succeed A. ROn-
ERT BROADFOOT who has held the
post for the past three years, but who
recently resigned to enter private
architectural practice. The new ap-
pointee has worked for several local
firms and recently returned from New
York City where he was employed in
the firm of Harrison and Abramovitz.

State C of C To Hold
Meeting in St. Pete

The 41st Annual Meeting and
Business Conference of the Florida
State Chamber of Commerce will be
held in St. Petersburg, November 17,
18 and 19. Headquarters of the three-
day session will be the Soreno Hotel;
and the Convention's theme will be


Hostesses to Convention
Ladies will be this com-
mittee of the Florida
Central Auxiliary. The
Committee has planned a
full program for visiting
ladies, complete details
of which will be available
at the Convention regis-
tration desk in the lobby
of the Fort Harrison
Hotel. Left to right are:
Mrs. Elliott B. Hadley,
Mrs. Edmond N. MacCol-
lin, Mrs. Robert H, Levi-
son, Mrs. Anthony L.
Pullara, Mrs. J. Bruce
Smith and Mrs. A. Wynn
Howell, Committee Chair-
man.


"Spotlighting the New Florida." A
number of prominent Florida busi-
nessmen arc scheduled for talks rang-
ing from observations on Florida's
business climate to consideration of
Federal-State relations. Governor


LEROY COLLINS will give the prin-
cipal address at the opening luncheon
November 18. All FAA members are
invited to attend. Reservations are
available from HAROLD COLLEE, 8057
Expressway, Jacksonville 11.


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James T. Lendrum, AIA, has been
appointed head of the Department .of
Architecture of the U/F's College of
Architecture and Fine Arts and will
assume his new duties December 1.
An architectural graduate of Michigan
University and a holder of an MS in
architecture from Illinois, Lendrum
has been director of the Illinois Small
Homes Council since 1949, having
previously taught at Illinois since
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


17J




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NOVEMBER, 1957 41






Report of
Nominating Committee
ANTHONY L. PULLARA, chairman of
the FAA Nominating Committee,
which includes CLINTON GAMBLE
and WM. STEWART MORRISON, has
announced the following committee
nominations for FAA officers during
1958:
For president, EDGAR S. WORT-
MAN, Palm Beach; secretary, ERNEST
T. H. BOWEN, II, Tampa; treasurer,
MORTON T. IRONMONGER, Ft. Lau-
derdale. For Vice-President repre-
senting the South Florida FAA Dist-
rict, to serve a term of three years, the
committee named H. SAMUEL KRUSE,
of Miami.

Program of
Student Chapter AIA
By CRAIG W. LINDELOW
and LOUIS C. GEORGE
We are presenting this column to
re-introduce you to the activities of
the Student AIA Chapter at the Uni-


versity of Florida.
First, we would like to introduce
our officers for this school year; pres-
ident, THOMAS KINCAID of Winter
Haven; vice-president, W. RAYMOND
LYNCH of Jacksonville; coordinator of
Architectural Exposition, WILLIAM
R. DALE of West Plam Beach; sec-
retary, RAYMOND W. MALLES of
Gainesville; treasurer, DAVID R. GOD-
SCHALK of Ft. Lauderdale; assistant
treasurer, RAYMOND POELVOORDE of
Palm Beach.
The big interest at this time is the
coming convention in Clearwater.
Thanks to the generosity of the
FAA, many student attendance plans
have been given a tremendous boost.
More than 40 students are looking
forward to convention activities. We
are hosts at the convention breakfast
Saturday and will present a panel dis-
cussion on the new "Log Book Sys-
tem."
Following the convention, the
Department of Architecture and the
AIA Student Chapter are hosting the
eminent BUCKMINSTER FULLER. Mr.
Fuller will be with us from Nov. 11
through Nov. 15th. During this time


he will be available to any and all
the students to answer questions and
pass on valuable information to us
garnered from his vast experience.
Our guest program got off to a fly-
ing start with the popular FRANK E.
WATSON of Miami. This is the first
time a guest program of this type has
been initiated here with so much suc-
cess. This program includes many
nationally-known architects who will
be our guests during this school year.
Our calendar is just about filled; and
to keep you informed, we will intro-
duce our guest and the dates of his
visit, each month in this column.
Looking to the future, which is all
too close, the Architectural Exposi-
tion here at the University promises
to be, without a doubt, the biggest
and finest show ever put on here.
We are getting a tremendous amount
of cooperation from the Florida
North Chapter, which will help make
this our greatest success. The Archi-
tectural Exposition is coming in the
spring. But don't wait till then to
visit us. You are all welcome to the
University at any time, so stop in and
see us soon.


FITS

ALMOST ANY SPACE...



AN ELECTRIC

WATER HEATER

For flexibility in planning... specify
ELECTRIC water heaters. They
"iiiiiiituck away anywhere . need no
S special flues or vents. They elimin
Il:.. ate heat radiation . designed to
heat the water, NOT the house. Im-
portant, too... electric water heaters
........ ........ .l .. are clean, safe, fast and economical.







FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










































Engineers and Architects: Greeley &r Hansen, Chicago.


The Cosme Water Plant near Oldsmar, Florida,
illustrates a pleasing and practical use of concrete in
modern design. Built for the City of St. Petersburg for the
softening and purification of its water supply, the
buildings are of architectural concrete. Roof and floor
slabs are Flexicore precast concrete. Exterior walls are
finished with White Portland Cement paint.

Here again-through concrete-strength, fire safety,
storm safety, termite safety, low maintenance cost, and
an extra safeguard for sanitation, are built right into
the structures.


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA *SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
NOVEMBER, 1957 43


4r-- *
~4P&
lb,
~Z~n.; 6*


rC' ~E'r~~gli



























































1 ,H sq.ft. of precast beams, joists and
slabs...the new A. & P. warehouse at N.W.
.. lid St. and 37th Ave., Miami, Fla.
Architect: Robert Karl Fres
Contrator: Morris S. Burk



SALES ~ ~ AGNC FO FLRD LIHIA IC


03SS381SIUd ISV33dd


Building Codes ...
(Continued from Page 37)
municipalities and unincorporated
areas in South Florida.
FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER: AS
you know, the Florida Central Chap-
ter has been busy trying to complete
plans for our 43rd Annual Conven-
tion and our committee member, Mr.
Howard F. Allender, has not had
much time to work on codes.
BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER: Mr.
John M. Evans reports that efforts
have been made to participate in the
formation of the new South Florida
Building Code with the Florida
South Chapter.
FLORIDA NORTHWEST CHAPTER:
Mr. William S. Morrison reports that
efforts are being made to revise and
strengthen the Southern Building
Code.
JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER: Mr. Tay-
lor Hardwick reports that intermit-
tent efforts have been made to estab-
lish a uniform code and have met
with very little success. The use of
the Fire Underwriters' Code with a
multitude of revisions has seemed to
satisfy the City Commission in this
area.
MID FLORIDA CHAPTER: The
Orange County area has just recently
set up a zoning board and commis-
sion for the entire county area and
has adopted the Southern Building
Code with revisions. This Chapter
has members on an advisory com-
mittee to the Zoning Commission
and it is hoped next year will provide
a much more uniform code.
It looks like it will be some years
to come before the State or even part
of our State, with the exception of
South Florida, can be operating under
a uniform code. However, all indica-
tions are that where architects, engi-
neers, building departments and
members of the construction industry
have made efforts a general strength-
ening of the Southern Standard
Building Code is evident.
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Chairman



School Advisory

By SANFORD W. GOIN, FAIA
At the request of Mr. Lamar Sarra,
Chairman of the Governor's Com-
mittee on Schoolhouse Construction,
a special committee of the FAA made
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






a study of school planning and costs.
The full FAA report was incorporated
as an appendix to the report of Mr.
Sarra and his committee. Details of
the report have been previously cov-
ered in The Florida Architect (M.ai.
1957, issue, pages 11 and 12).
The members of the FAA com-
mittee were: SANFORD W. COIN,
FAIA, Chairman; EDGAR S. WORIT-
MAN, Palm Beach; WILLIAM STEW-
ART MORRISON, Ilorid.a Northwest;
SIDNEY R. WILKINSON, Florida Cen-
tral; and ALBERT R. BROADFOOT,
Jacksonville. The committee was also
assisted in its work by GEORGE M.
MEGGINSON, State School Architect,
Florida State Department of Edu-
cation.



Membership

By ROLAND W. SELLEW
Chairman
Prior to March 12, when member-
ship of this Committee was desig-
nated, letters were sent to all Chap-
ters requesting a tabulation of mem-
bership numbers in each grade. Pur-
pose of the request was to make pos-
sible an analysis and check against
the roster of registered architects in
various areas, thus indicating w'-ich
Chapter areas had been most success-
ful in recruitment. However, since
only a few of our 10 Chapters pro-
vided the information, the purpose
could not be realized.
On May 24th a letter was sent to
all Committee members suggesting
three appropriate methods for encour-
aging Chapter membership. One
specific suggestion concerned new
registrants; the idea being to show
them that the AIA and the FAA were
interested in their progress. It was
felt that for this group and for those
just graduating from architectural
schools a marked degree of interest
should be shown, since both they and
the Chapters have much to gain from
a mutual affiliation. Excerpts from
that letter follow:
"A comparison of the roster of
registered architects resident within
the state and the latest AIA mem-
(Continued on Page 48)
NOVEMBER, 1957


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Curing Compounds
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3rd Annual Roll- Call---1956-1957


Listed here are the firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA
grow during the past year. All services, materials and products which they
make or sell are of a quality to merit specification. They seek your approval
of what they offer; and in giving it you serve the interests of all concerned.


ADOR
Fullerton, California
Gilbert Viola, 610 Biscayne Bldg., Miami
Aluminum sliding glass doors.
Agency Boylhart, Lovett & Dean,
Inc., 135 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles
ADVANCE METAL PRODUCTS, INC.
2445 N. W. 76th St., Miami
Mfgrs. specialty building products.
ALUMINUM INSULATING CO., INC.
1050 E. 15th St., Hialeah
Distributor Alumiseal reflective and
vapor barrier materials.
V. E. ANDERSON MFG. CO., INC.
P. O. Box 430, Bradenton
Extruded aluminum windows and doors
Agency--Keller-Crescent Advertising,
Evansville, Indiana
ARCADIA METAL PRODUCTS
Fullerton, California
R. Saffell, 3759 N. W. 79th St., Miami
Sliding glass doors.
ARMOR-FLEX PRODUCTS
2111 So. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Distributor, tile, fiberglass, etc.
ASSOCIATED ELEVATOR & SUPPLY
COMPANY
501 N. W. 54th St., Miami
Pneumatic tube systems, access panels
BELL TELEVISION, INC.
755 N. E. 79th St., Miami
Electronic systems.
Agency-Irving Davis Adv. Agency,
151 W. 51st St., New York City
BRUCE EQUIPMENT COMPANY
24 N. W. 36th St., Miami
DuKane sound systems.
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURGH
460 Melwood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Aluminum railings.
CEMENT ENAMEL OF THE CARIB-
BEAN, INC.,
134 Maderia Ave.., Coral Gables
Wall surfacing.
CONCRETE STRUCTURES, INC.
12825 N. E. 14th Ave., No. Miami
Prestressed and precast concrete units.
DALLETT EQUIPMENT COMPANY
3845 N. W. 35th Ave., Miami
Steel islands and curb facings.
Agency-George Wilhelms,
3155 S. W. 23rd Terrace, Miami
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
Miami 52, Florida
Decorative masonry materials.
Burr-Southern barbecue units.
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
4550 37th St. N., St. Petersburg
Electric heating systems.


EXECUTONE DISTRIBUTORS
404 Eunice Street, Tampa
224 Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables
2070 Liberty St., Jacksonville
220 No. Orlando St., Winter Park
Intercommunicating systems.
FARREY'S WHOLESALE HARDWARE
COMPANY, INC.
7225 N. W. 7th Ave., Miami
Doors, fixtures and locks.
FLAMINGO WHOLESALE DISTRIBU-
TORS, INC.
1002 East 27th St., Hialeah
205 North 1 th St., Tampa
Robbins Floor Tile
FLORIDA FOUNDRY r PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd St., Miami
Ornamental castings.
FLORIDA GENERAL SUPPLY CORP.
1310 Flamingo Way, Hialeah
Air conditioning.
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th St., Miami
Oil and gas heating.
Agency-Bevis Associates, Inc.
Ingraham Bldg., Miami
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
DIVISION,
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa
Manufacturers of cement.
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Assoc.,
Inc., 206 S. Franklin St., Tampa
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Miami
Electric utility.
Agency--Grant Advertising, Inc.,
201 S. W. 13th St., Miami
FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
215 South Rome Ave., Tampa
Reinforcing steel and accessories.
Steel and Aluminum windows.
FLORIDA TILE INDUSTRIES, INC.
608 Prospect St., Lakeland
Manufacturers of glazed wall tile and
trimmers.
Agency-Henry Quednau, Inc.,
404 Thirteenth St., Tampa
GAS INSTITUTE OF GREATER MIAMI
561 N. E. 79th St., Miami
Gas use and appliances.
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Air Conditioning Division,
900 Orange Avenue, Winter Park
Air conditioning.
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Laminated Products Dept.
Regional Sales Office,
Rutland Bldg.. St. Petersburg.
Textolite
Agency--Brooke, Smith, French &
Dorrance, Inc.
GRAHAM INDUSTRIES, INC.
892 N. E. 30th Court, Ft. Lauderdale
Garage doors.


Agency--Charles W. Broun Associates
P. O. Box 4272, Sarasota
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
"B" and "G" Aluminum awning
windows and window walls.
Mirawall panels.
HORST GUNTHER
3927 N. E. 2nd Ave., Miami
Furniture, interior designers.
HAMILTON PLYWOOD
924 Sligh Blvd., Orlando
2860 22nd Ave. No., St. Petersburg
1607 S. W. 1st Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Cabinet and paneling plywoods.
Agency-Travis Messer, Advertising
P. O. Box 7368, Orlando
HOLLOSTONE COMPANY OF MIAMI
480 Ali Baba Ave., Opa-Locka
Precast concrete products.
INDEPENDENT NAIL & PACKING
COMPANY
Bridgewater, Massachusetts
Fastenings
Agency-Warner Alden Morse
P. O. Box 720, Brockton, Mass.
INTERSTATE MARBLE & TILE CO.
4000 N. Miami Ave., Miami
Marble and ceramic tile.
Agency-Hinant, Patrick & Assoc.
1545 N. W. 17th Ave., Miami
LAMBERT CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
2125 West Central Avenue, Orlando
Waterproofings, protective coatings,
cement colors, concrete additives.
LARSEN PRODUCTS CORPORATION
4934 Elm St., Bethesda, Maryland
Bonding materials.
Agency-William A. Hatch, Inc.,
907 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md.
LEAP CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland
Prestressed concrete units.
Agency-Sanborn Advertising,
P. O. Box 949. Lakeland
LIFT SLAB OF FLORIDA, INC.
410 E. Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Method of construction.
LUDMAN CORPORATION
North Miami
Aluminum windows. Curtain walls.
Agency-Roland, Bodee & Flint, Adv.
2138 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
MAGIC CITY SHADE & DRAPERY
CORP.
297 N. E. 67th St., Miami
Custom bamboo and wood draw drap-
eries, fabrics for architectural use.
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC.
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Concrete and building products.
MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
5200 N. W. 37th Ave., Miami
Aluminum awning windows.


46 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









MIRACLE ADHESIVE SALES COMPANY
City Center Bldg., Lake Worth
Miracle adhesives.
MR. FOSTER'S STORE
35 West Flagler St., Miami
Office furniture.
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc., 503 Ainsley Bldg.,
Miami
MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA
2959 N. E. 12th Terrace, Oakland Park
Design original kitchens.
Agency-Juhl Advertising Agency
2nd and Harrison St., Elkhart, Indiana
PERLITE INCORPORATED
1050 S. E. 5th St., Hialeah
Lightweight aggregate.
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 No. Main St., Orlando
Portland cement.
PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
Berkeley, California
Lighting fixtures.
Agency-John O'Rourke Advertising
Flood Bldg., San Francisco, Calif.
A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N. W. l th Terrace, Miami
Architectural woodwork and supplies.
REEVES FENCING, INC.
101 So. 13th St., Tampa
Fencing
Agency-Phyllis Lacey Adv., 2308
No. Dale Mabry, Tampa.
RILCO LAMINATED PRODUCTS, INC.
155 Wash'ngton St., Newark, New Jersey
Designers, fabricators wood products.
Agency-E. T. Holmgren, Inc., First
National Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minn.
SISTRUNK, INCORPORATED
401 N. W. 71st St., Miami
a Custom made West Indies Shutters.
STYLON
140) N. W. 54th St., Miami
3813 Grand Central Ave., Tampa
* 815 N. W. 8th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Ceramic tile.
THOMPSON DOOR COMPANY, INC.
5663 N. W. 36th Ave., Miami
Doors.
* TROPIX-WEVE PRODUCTS, INC.
3590 N. W. 52nd St., Miami
Woven wood doors.
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th St., New York City
Interior and exterior olvwood.
Agency-Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc.
247 Park Ave., New York City
UNIT STRUCTURES, INC.
Peshtigo, Wisconsin
Glued laminated timbers.
Agencv-R. E. Breth, Inc.
Green Bay, Wisconsin
VUN-RUSS COMPANY, INC.
1090 E. 16th St., Hialeah
Aluminum Windows.
Aaency-Robert Hurwitz
278 S. W. 37nd Ave., Miami
F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS COMPANY
1690 Boulevard, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, roofing,
tile, aluminum windows and roof decks
R. H. WRIGHT & SON
1123 N. E. 4th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale
Precast, prestressed concrete products.
Aaency-Peter Larkin,
3132 N. E. Ninth St., Ft. Lauderdale
BETTER HOMES, INCORPORATED
P. O. Box 505. Savannah, Georgia
Jamaica Dors.
Agency---Tom Daisley Advertisinn,
Great Southern Bldg., Columbia, S. C.


NOVEMBER, 1957


Can Arch/tects



Forid aod










If they CAN if you offer Quality to give the
Service architects demand they want to know about it.
And the best place to tell them is in THEIR VERY
OWN MAGAZINE.

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT- the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building"-for through draw-
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create . .

Architects themselves won't buy your products. But
their specifications control your sales. To help them
specify the product or service you offer, tell them about
it where they'll see it regularly- HERE . .


Florida's ONLY OFFICIAL

FAA Journal . .Owned, read

and used by architects


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:_:Z







ii i Membership ...
(Continued from Page 45)
bership list reveals a number of Cor-
porate Members who are presently
affiliated with out-of-state Chapters.
I enclose a sheet giving names of such
individuals and suggest that a letter
be written to those resident in your
Chapter area, inviting them to attend
meetings with the thought that they
might be encouraged to transfer.
"Florida Central has found it
worthwhile to invite newly-registered
architects to Chapter meetings and to
consider the desirability of AIA mem-
bership. Our Chapter has picked up
a substantial number of members by
this means. It would work equally
well elsewhere."
Discouragingly enough, not a single
reply to this letter was received.
Personal contact with committee
members has not been possible, since
no meeting of the committee has
been held. However, such a meeting
is planned for 10 a.m., Nov. 8, in the
Cloud Room of The Fort Harrison
Hotel, Clearwater. It may then be
possible to amplify details of this
report.
ROLAND W. SELLER, Chairman


Custom Cast Placques Board of
I I Trustees


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tLORIDA FOUNDRY 3737 N. W. 43rd Street
Miami, Florida
- & PATTERN WORKS M,
48


FAA Loan Fund
By JOHN L R. GRAND
Chairman
In discharge of our duty as Trus-
tees of the Florida Association of
Architects Loan Fund at the Uni-
versity of Florida, we submit this our
annual report of activities and status
of the Fund.
Attached is a detailed account of
the status of the Fund. These de-
tailed figures must be studied in their
tabular form to be understood and no
attempt will be made to read them
to the convention. We invite all
interested members to consult copies
which have been made available to
the Officers and Members of the
Board.
The Board of Trustees met twice
during the year. Its principal activity
has been to endeavor to assist the
UniTcrsitv in collecting delinquent
(Continued on Page 50)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







COSTS GO

DOWN WHEN

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natural grain of fine wood in Rilco lami-
nated members adds warmth to classrooms,
gymnasiums, auditoriums, churches. Pound
for pound, laminated members are stiffer
and stronger than other common building
materials in practically all important struc- Factory fabricated. Rilco beams
tural properties. Maintenance-free Rilco re hoisted into place on the
Elementary School Proeect "C"
members are not subject to chemical iVero Beach, Fla.) Securely
wrapped o prevent damage...
change, rust corrosion or vibration .. com- "read tor any wod 'fidh'...
pletely firesafe . need no concealment or Pitched beam spans are 36 ft.,
encasing. Similarly, Rilco cedar or spruce 40 ft. and 56 ft.
deck makes its own attractive ceiling and Architect David V Robison.
eliminates the cost of lath and plaster, 'ero Beach
joists and bridging. Contractor Clutter Construction
Coro. Miami Springs.
SEE OUR EXHIBIT NO. 36
At the Florida Association of Architects
Convention.
Sales Office:
Yeandle and Fox Laminated Products
702 East Broward Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


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I. W. Phillips & Co., Morgan & Bell Streets, Tampa
Sentell Supply Company, Inc.,250 N.E. 72nd Street, Miami
Factory Representative: Robert E. Gallaher, 6500 S.W. 47th Street, Miami

NOVEMBER, 1957 49














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FAA Loan Fund ...
(Continued on Page 48)
accounts. Mr. Edward M. Feamey
paid a personal call on Mr. Joseph C.
Boris to urge him to pay his debt. As
noted elsewhere in the report, the
University is now endeavoring to seek
repayment from the endorser. Similar
action is being taken with respect to
another delinquent beneficiary of the
fund, Mr. Charles Worley. By way
of contrast, Mr. Ray van Sickler has
paid off his loan completely and in
doing so, enclosed an extra $21.50
donation to add to the FAA loan
fund.
The Board plans further activity in
conducting a campaign to advise the
worthy students in architecture of the
availability of the fund.
Members of the Board of Trustees:
JOHN L. R. GRAND, Chairman
EDWARD M. FEARNEY, Florida North
\VILLIAM T. ARNETT, Florida North



Centennial
By Wm. B. HARVARD
Chairman
In making this, the final report of
the Centennial Committee for the
F.A.A., I wish to thank all the mem-
bers of the committee and also thank
the Centennial Committee members
appointed by the various chapters to
conduct their special programs and
publicity for the chapters in the vari-
ous localities throughout the state.
In reflecting on the year's centen-
nial activities throughout the country,
it is gratifying to see the great amount
of really good publicity given the ar-
chitectural profession on this occa-
sion.
In this report it must be mentioned
that the National Centennial Con-
vention in Washington in May was
a fabulous success and that there will
be a recurring amount of favorable
publicity to the profession for years
to come. For this Centennial Con-
vention there was prepared an out-
standing film entitled "The New
Age of Architecture," prepared by
Time, Inc. This film has been made
available to the Program Committee
for our F.A.A. Convention in Clear-
water.
WILLIAM B. HARVARD, Chairman


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









ADVERTISER'S INDEX


Ador . .
Advance Metal Products, Inc..
Aluminum Insulating Co.
V. E. Anderson Mfg. Co.
Arcadia Metal Products ..
Associated Elevator & Supply Co.

Bruce Equipment Co. ...

Concrete Structures, Inc.


Dunan Brick Yards 3rd Cover

Electrend Distributing Co. . 38

Flamingo Distributors . . 12
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works 48
S Florida Home Heating Institute .36
Florida Portland Cement Co.. . 43
Florida Power & Light Co. . 42
'* Florida Steel Corp. .. . 18
Florida Tile Industries . . 10

t General Electric Textolite . 29
Graham Industries... . .40
George C. Griffin Co. . . 3

Hamilton Plywood . ... .37
r Hollostone Company of Miami . 41

Independent Nail & Packing Co. 11
S InterState Marble & Tile Co. . 30

Lambert Corporation .. . 45
Larsen Products . .. 49
Lift Slab . . . 5

Magic City Shade & Drapery Co. 2
S Miami Window Corporation 4th Cover
Mr. Foster's Store . . 6
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida .33

Perlite, Inc. . . .. 16
Portland Cement Association . 52
Prescolite Manufacturing Co. . 50

A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 8 and 9
Reeves Fencing, Inc . .. 32
Rilco Laminated Products, Inc.. 49

Sistrunk, Inc . . .. 48
Stylon of Miami . . .. 22

Thompson Door Company . 4

United States Plywood Co. .. 7

F. Graham Williams Co. .. .51
R. H. Wright & Sons, Inc. 2nd Cover


NOVEMBER, 1957


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pros.


*

ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1084 ATLA
LONG DISTANCE 470 G






FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


NTA

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1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1.5154


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Design of Edsel Ford High School

features distinctive, economical

Concrete Shell Roofs

The first concrete shell roofs constructed in
Michigan were used in the Edsel Ford High School
in Dearborn. Four shell units were built: two over
the boys' gym, one over the girls' gym, and a fourth
over an intermediate building housing the swim-
ming pool and locker rooms. All four roofs have
spans of 100 ft. and identical arches of 121-ft.
radius and a rise of 13 ft.
Concrete shell roof construction was selected
because (1) it provided unobstructed interiors, (2)
it was adaptable to the architectural design and
(3) it was economical to build.
Concrete shell roof construction is gaining
rapidly in popularity with architects and engineers
for buildings requiring large unobstructed floor
areas. Roofs with spans up to 300 ft. and more
can be built without interior columns. They are
ideal for auditoriums, exhibit halls, hangars, train
sheds, repair shops and warehouses.
Concrete shell roofs are economical to build,
need little or no maintenance, have long life and
low insurance rates. They are true low-annual-cost
construction. Write for free illustrated literature.
Distributed only in the United States and Canada.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 North Main Street, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement
and concrete... through scientific research and engineering field work
52


Large photo shows completed structure. Girls' gym is in foreground,
boys' gym in rear. Depressed roof between gyms covers swimming
pool and locker rooms. Small photo above shows dean, unobstructed
interior in boys' gym. Photo below shows how shell roof design was
repeated in roof over walk connecting gymnasium wing with audi-
torium. Architect, Eberie M. Smith Associates, Inc.; engineer, Alfred
Zweig; contractor, 0. W. Burke Construction Co. All are from Detroit.


1; 56


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















Decorative

Barandas


These are the grille tile
of hard, fired clay we
import from Venezuela
They're somewhat lighter
in color and more
delicate in scale than
those from Panama
But they have the same
sort of slight color
variations and occasional
kiln markings that
make for a really
beautiful texture in
the finished wall.


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BRICK


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DUNAN BRICK YARDS,
INCORPORATED .,
-.MIA FLORIDA TU 7-152 .
MIAMI, FLORIDA TU 7-1525 '''" : ."


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M l ALL-ALUMINUM
V * * AWNING WINDOW


VERSATILITY UNLIMITED

The inspired designs of today's modern buildings, reflect advanced
architectural concepts, in the use of new materials and construction
technique. Modern fenestration, typified by Miami Window installations
in many of the nation's finest schools, churches, hospitals, commercial
and industrial buildings, have given their architects new freedom of
expression from the limitations imposed by less versatile windows.

Miami, the original all aluminum awning window has proven
in over one million installations, its superiority in: design ...
engineering advancements ... in manufacturing excellence and
constantly maintained quality. It is the finest window of its type
ever manufactured. Constant improvement, through intensive
engineering and research effort will continue to keep it so.

Miami Window Corporation engineering department welcomes
the opportunity to translate your sketches into working
drawings, there is no obligation.


miami window corporation
P. O. BOX 877 INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI 48, FLORIDA

C 1-




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