• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Convention plans are complete
 By-law changes proposed
 Proposed resolutions
 Convention city - The background...
 Comprehensive designer - Profile...
 Our committee problem
 News and notes
 The profession and the press
 Editorial: The FAA deserves your...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00040
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Convention plans are complete
        Page 2
        Page 3
    By-law changes proposed
        Page 4
    Proposed resolutions
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Convention city - The background of Clearwater
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Comprehensive designer - Profile of R. Buckminster Fuller, convention panelist
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Our committee problem
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    News and notes
        Page 19
    The profession and the press
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Editorial: The FAA deserves your very best
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












































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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Werkt


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Ttmrw
M. T. Immenger
1261 E Ls
Ohla B1d.
ert Lauderdale


VICI-PRISIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florid
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . .. Sout Flrid
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. ainton Gamble
Broward County. William F. Bige1y, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach . Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Gain, FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest Coxen
Florida South . James L Garland
Irving L Honey
Vermoer Johnson
Jacksonville .. Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida . . Hill Stiggi
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . Harold A. Obet
Charles E. Duncan

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Rooge W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
OCTOBER, 1957


74F




Florida Architect


VOLUME 7


OCTOBER, 1957


No. 10


CONTENTS


Convention Plans Are Complete . . . .
Mrs. A. Wynn Howell Heads Ladies Program

By-Law Changes Proposed . . . .


Proposed Resolutions . . .

Convention City . . . .
The Background of Clearwater,
by Frances Reed


Comprehensive Designer . . . . .11
Profile of R. Buckminster Fuller,
Convention Panelist


Our Committee Problem . . . .
By Edgar S. Wortman, President, FAA

News and Notes . . . . .

The Profession and The Press . . .


. 15


. 19

. 20


Editorial . 24
The FAA Deserves Your Very Best

Advertisers' Index 24

THE COVER
This all-aluminum, 150-foot diameter Goedisic Dome erected in
Honolulu by the Kaiser Company a a convention and concert hall
was designed by a man who has been called one of the foremost
creative thinkers of this century. He is R. Buckminster Fuller, long
famed for his Dymaxion designs. Fuller will be one of the featured
speakers at the 43rd Annual FAA Convention at Clearwater next
month. A profile of the man and his major work starts on page 11.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Architects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the FAA. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed, but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications provided credit Is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed, but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . .Address all communications to the Editor
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.










Convention



Plans



Are Complete


Plans for the 43rd Annual FAA
Convention are practically signed,
sealed and delivered, according to
Chairman ROBERT H. LEVISON and
Assistant Chairman EUGENE H.
BEACH, pictured here. The program
which has been built around the
Convention theme "The Challenge
of the Future" is one of the most
stimulating of any FAA Convention
gathering. With a list of top-ranking
speakers heading the four seminar
panels scheduled for Thursday and
Friday afternoons, the professional
value of the Convention will un-
doubtedly merit a superlative rating.
Other highlights, however, will
prove equally as attractive to many.
One is the two-fold exhibit program.
The Manufactured Products exhibit
will include some 60 booths, and the
Architectural Exhibit promises to be
equally as fine as that of 1953 when
one of the present program chairmen,
WILLIAM B. HARVARD assembled an
exhibit of Florida Architecture by
Florida Architects which went on an
international tour for more than three
years.
Visitors to the Products Exhibit
will have an opportunity to win a
whole series of attendance awards.
Heading the long list which has been
assembled by Awards Chairman TONY
PULLARA is an all-expense-paid tour
around the glamorous Carribean--
for two. Included are such desirable
gadgets as TV and Hi-Fi sets, golf
carts, cameras and a whole range of
electrical appliances.
The FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION
has announced that it is planning to
stage a golf tournament for Conven-
tioneers with the hope that this


Convention event can be made an
annual affair. Full details of this will
be made available at Convention
Headquarters November 7.
The AIA's national Package Deal
Committee has chosen Clearwater and
the time of the FAA Convention to
hold its next meeting.
Entertainment Chairman EDMOND
N. MACCOLLIN has promised top-
flight entertainment talent--with a
professional MC for the two party
nights scheduled for both Thursday
and Friday.


Mrs. A. Wynn Howell Heads
Convention Ladies Program
Although FAA Ladies are welcome
at all sessions of the 43rd Annual
Convention, the Florida Central
Chapter Auxiliary, chairmanned by
Mrs. A. WYNN HOWELL of Lakeland,
has planned a special program for
them. It will start on Thursday, the
official opening day of the Conven-
tion and will continue until the Con-
vention is officially adjourned on
Saturday, November 9th.
First highlight of the Ladies Pro-
gram is an open house for all feminine
visitors to the Convention at the new
Clearwater Beach home of Mrs.
EDMOND N. MACCOLLIN, to which
transportation will be furnished by
the Auxiliary of the Florida Central
Chapter. Friday will be an especially
full day starting with a Ladies Break-
fast in the Skyline Room of the Fort
Harrison Hotel, followed by a con-
ducted tour of the Clearwater Art
Center. In the afternoon a Poolside


On the business side, FAA officers
and directors will offer a full agenda
of affairs requiring the thoughtful
consideration of all Chapter dele-
gates. The FAA, as one of the coun-
try's leading and most active State
Organizations, is on the threshold of
important developments.
As a member of the FAA you owe
it to yourself to attend this Conven-
tion. There's not too much time left
to reserve accommodations for it. So
better do it now and avoid being
sorry you didn't later on.


Card Party and Bingo Tournament
has been arranged and Friday night
marks the gala Night-Club Party, pre-
ceded by the traditional cocktail hour.
Mrs. Howell's Convention Com-
mittee includes: Mrs. ROBERT H.
LEVISON, Hospitality; Mrs. THOMAS
V. TALLEY, Special Breakfast; Mrs.
J. BRUCE SMITH, Card Party; and Mrs.
ANTHONY L. PULLARA, Prizes.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















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By-Law Changes Proposed


The following changes in the
Constitution and By-Laws of the FAA
have been developed as one proposal
for strengthening the Association by
bringing the By-Laws more in line
with the manner in which the FAA
actually operates and to align the FAA
committee structure with that of the
Institute.
The By-Laws Committee urges
every FAA Chapter member to care-
fully consider these proposed By-Laws
changes and be prepared to accept,
amend or reject them at the Clear-
water Convention next month.
JEFFERSON N. POWELL, Chairman
A. WYNN HOWELL
WALTER B. SCHULTZ
ARTICLE V
Officers of the Association
Section 1, subsection D, change to
read as follows: "(D) Only such
members as have been officers, or
members of the Board for at least
three years shall be eligible for the
office of President."
Section 4, subsection A, lines 9,
10 and 11: strike out "have charge and
exercise general supervision of the
offices and employees of this Asso-
ciation.'"
Section 4, subsection B, line 2:
strike out "or other assistant employed
by this Association."
Section 5, subsection A, line 5:
After the word "shall," strike out
"prepare the budgets" and insert
"assist the Budget Committee to
prepare the budget" in lieu thereof.
ARTICLE VI
Board of Directors
Section 1, subsection B: Strike out
the entire subsection and insert the
following in lieu thereof, "Each chap-
ter having up to 19 Institute members
shall have one director; each chapter
having from 20 to 59 Institute mem-
bers shall have two directors; and
each chapter having 60 or more In-
stitute members shall have three
directors. Institute membership shall
be determined from chapter rosters
showing all members approval by the
Institute 60 days prior to the Annual
Convention."
Section 4, subsection C, line 3:
After the word "than," strike out
"five" and insert "ten" in lieu thereof.


ARTICLE VII
Committees
Section 1: Insert the following in
lieu thereof "Section 1 -Classes of
Committees. There shall be standing
committees and special committees.
Standing committees shall be vertical
and non-vertical; vertical committees
shall be those designated by the
Institute, and non-vertical committees
shall be those necessary to the admin-
istrative operations of the Association.
Special committees may be estab-
lished by the Board of Directors or
the President."
Renumber present Section 1 as a
new Section 3- Nominating Com-
mittee.
Section 2: Strike out all of present



Chapters Please Note !
An Alternate FAA Director must
be elected for each FAA Director
elected by each Chapter. This is
stipulated in the FAA By-Laws,
Paragraph 8, Subparagraph C. The
function of the Alternate Director
is to serve as a pro-tem member
of the FAA Board in case of the
inability of the regularly elected
FAA Director to serve.


Section 2 and insert the following in
lieu thereof: "Section 2 Commit-
tee Structure. (A) Vertical standing
committees shall be composed of a
chairman and of the chairmen of the
chapter committees performing the
same functions as the Association
committee. Whenever functions are
combined at the chapter level, the
chairman of the chapter committee
shall serve as a member of each of
the Association Committees he rep-
resents functionally at the Chapter
level. Committee chairmen shall be
appointed by the President with the
advice of the Board of Directors for
three year terms. (B) Every special
committee shall expire with the fiscal
year, but any thereof may be re-
created. Members of special commit-
tees shall be appointed by the Presi-
dent and their terms of office shall
expire with the committee."
Section 3: Strike out all of present
Section 3 and insert present Section 1,
re-numbered as "Section 3 Nomi-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






eating Committee" in lieu thereof. Add a new Section 5 as follows:
Section 4: Add thereto an addi- "Section 5 -Reorganization. The
tional subsection as follows, "(E) President may, at any time, discon-
When their terms expire, committee tinue a committee, alter its classifi-
chairmen and members shall transmit cation, or make any changes in its
to their successors all records neces- personnel without regard to the terms
sary to the continuing work of the of appointment of the committee
committee." members."



Proposed Resolutions


The 42nd FAA Convention held
last year at Miami Beach adopted a
new method for the consideration of
Future resolutions. Part of this method
involved publication of proposed meas-
ures in the FAA Official Journal one
month prior to the annual conven-
tion, the object being to give FAA
membership time to consider both
the intent and content of each reso-
lution.
The measure adopted last year pro-
vides that "All resolutions shall be for-
warded to the Executive Secretary two
months prior to each Annual Conven-
tion." To date, only four proposed
resolutions have been received; and
according to terms of the new pro-
cedure, submission of other resolu-
tions for Convention consideration by
the Resolutions Committee must be
approved by a two-thirds vote of Con-
vention delegates. Chairman of the
Resolutions Committee is CLINTON
GAMBLE, 1407 East Las Olas Boule-
vard, Ft. Lauderdale. Members are:
A. WYNN HOWELL, Florida Central;
JACK MOORE, Florida North; IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, Florida South, and IVAN
H. SMITH, Jacksonville.
The following three resolutions
have been proposed by the Florida
Central Chapter:

Dues Payments
WHEREAS, membership dues of
the Florida Association of Architects,
Inc., and the several chapters is at
present on an annual basis; and,
WHEREAS, most members pay
their dues on their anniversary dates;
and,
WHEREAS, the collection of dues
at the State and Chapter level is dis-
tributed throughout each fiscal year;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED, that the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects, Inc., dues be in-
OCTOBER, 1957


voiced and collected on a 1-3 of the
year basis during the fiscal year of
application and acceptance of any
member, and that all invoices be
rendered and payable for a full year
as of January 1 of the ensuing year;
and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that a recommendation be forwarded
to the several chapters to comply with
this system of collection of dues at
the chapter level for greater uni-
formity.

Executive Secretary's Office
WHEREAS, the status, responsi-
bilities, duties and the authority of
the Executive Secretary of the Florida
Association of Architects, Inc., has
not been clearly and specifically de-
fined; and,
WHEREAS, members of the Flor-
ida Association of Architects, Inc.,
have not been fully advised of the
scope of work of the office of the
Executive Secretary;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED, that the status, responsi-
bilities, duties and the authority of
this office be clearly set forth and
that the title of this office be com-
mensurate therewith, and that the
status, responsibilities, duties and the
authority as set forth be incorporated
as a part of the By-Laws of the Florida
Association of Architects, Inc.
Commendation
WHEREAS, this Association rec-
ognizes the outstanding performance
of ROGER W. SHERMAN, FAA Ex-
ecutive Secretary, during the 1957
Legislative Session, as evidenced by
his comprehensive report of events in
Tallahassee which should have been
of interest to all Florida Architects;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED, that the President of the













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Convention Headquarters, the big building in the foreground, is just a five-minute drive from the beaches and the Gulf


CONVENTION CITY


Clearwater, now acclaimed as the gem of Florida's suncoast and site of
the FAA's 43rd Annual Convention next month, was once the stamping
ground for pirates and the homestead of a top-flight Florida pioneer.


By Frances Reed


The story of Clearwater, as of all
Florida, is a story of adventure. Dark
days and bright, tragedy and romance,
are in its plot. Indian warriors, Span-
ish conquistadors, black-hearted pir-
ates stalk with vigor across these Sun-
coast pages, as elsewhere. But now
and again Destiny, in capricious
mood, has written in new characters,
new situations, to enliven the history
against which this modern Clearwater
is built.
Dr. Odet Phillippe, one of the
most colorful of these characters,
sailed his ship, "The Ney," up Old
Tampa Bay and into the story on a
Spring day in 1823. Even had he
known that he and his family were
OCTOBER, 1957


about to become the first white set-
tlers of the land toward which he
steered, it probably would not have
disturbed him. 'And he could hardly
have even dreamed that the acres he
would homestead would eventually
be dedicated to his memory as Phil-
lippe Park, one of the beauty spots
of Pinellas County today.
Dr. Phillippe--born Count Odet
Phillippe, in Lyons, France -was a
grand-nephew of King Louis VI. In
college, where he was studying to
become a surgeon, he became the
friend of a much older student,
Napoleon Bonaparte, who, when he
later became Emperor, made Phillippe
head surgeon of the French Navy.


When the French fleet was defeat-
ed in the Battle of Trafalgar the
Doctor was sent by the British to the
Bahamas as a prisoner of war. There
he endeared himself to the populace
by caring for the sick during a fever
epidemic, and spent his leisure in
learning to make and smoke cigars -
or, as he spelled it, "segars." Released
at the end of two years, but forbidden
to return to France, he joined the
large French Colony in Charleston,
South Carolina, where he became
influential and wealthy, not only from
his medical practice but as owner of
a large plantation.
Years later, reduced to financial
(Continued on Page 8)






Convention City ...
(Continued from Page 7)


,.n -j


As in any Suncoast city, boating and fishing is one of
Clearwater's major sports as this marina will attest.


Golf, too, is a popular pastime. There are two fine courses
in Clearwater, both available for Conventioneers' use.


'1 .4 -J


You can do it even in November-swim in the Gulf at
a fine, broad beach just five minutes from your hotel.


ruin through helping a friend, he built
a boat, named it for a famous French
general, and moved his family, his
hundred slaves and their overseers,
and his household goods to the East
Coast of the wild land of Florida to
start anew.
After much hard pioneering another
plantation began to flourish, just as
they had to flee an Indian uprising.
So narrow was their escape that they
saw the house go up in flames as they
sailed away.
Rounding the Peninsula of Florida,
they were halted by a pirate ship
captained by John Gomez, known as
the cruellest pirate in the whole
Caribbeanl The very thought of what
might happen to the Doctor's three
young daughters, Octavia, Charlotte
and Melanie, was horrifying! And he
and all his men might easily be forced
to walk the plank!
It turned out well, though. Most
of the members of the pirate crew
were suffering from a tropical fever,
and Dr. Phillippe had offered his
services. The men recovered quickly,
and Gomez had been most graceful.
He had given the Doctor a letter
guaranteeing him immunity from
pirate attacks forever; had lavished
upon him a handsome chest filled
with treasure; and, learning of the
loss of his home, had told him of a
great bay up the Florida coast, the
shore of which would be a desirable
site on which to build.
"It's the most beautiful bay in the
world, with the possible exception of
the Bay of Naples," said Gomez,
pointing on the map to Old Tampa
Bay, and to a spot about six miles
east of where the City of Clearwater
now stands. "Go there, Doctor. You
will not be sorry."
Dr. Odet Phillippe, remembering
the pirate's words, watched the shore-
line grow more distinct as he sailed
up the bay. You could see now how
high the land was; how luxuriant the
growth. You could see the white of
the shell mound gleaming in the sun-
shine as it sloped down to the water's
edge. It seemed almost like a moun-
tain. Gomez had mentioned this, too.
More than pleased with the place,
Dr. Phillippe unloaded his boat and
set his slaves and overseers to clearing
and building, and he and his family
left for the Bahamas to buy plants
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






and nursery stock for a citrus grove.
He is credited with having planted
here the first grove anywhere to be
set in rows and cultivated. He de-
veloped the art of budding and graft-
ing to improve fruits and create new
varieties. Some of his trees still stand
in Phillippe Park.
For a long time the Phillippes' only
neighbors were Seminole Indians. The
Doctor made friends with them and
became their physician. They, in
turn, taught him the medicinal value
of the mineral springs nearby, which
they called "the springs where the
healing waters flow." To a friend
Phillippe once wrote: "This is God's
own country, and this water is His
medicine, stirred by His hand and
deposited on this shore to heal men's
sufferings." The springs, now main-
tained as a spa, are visited by thou-
sands of health-seekers annually.
Dr. Phillippe lived for many years
on the shore the pirate Gomez had
recommended to him, and which he
always called "the mountain." Even-
tually new settlers drifted in, and the
Phillippe daughters, finding husbands
among them, became the ancestors
of many of the native residents of
Clearwater.
All was not peace in the intrepid
French Count's life on his mountain,
however. In 1848 the most severe
hurricane and tidal wave ever to hit
the West Coast of Florida destroyed
much of his property, even his home;
and again he must build.
He was beset by wars: the Seminole
War, when he was forced as a patriot
to help the Government round up
the Seminoles for exile, in spite of his
friendship and sympathy for them; the
War Between the States, when he was
forced to move his slaves inland to
prevent their capture by Federal gun-
boats coming into Tampa Bay.
Odet Phillippe died in 1869. Great-
nephew of a King of France, friend
of an Emperor, American pioneer
extraordinary, he lies buried in a
lonely grave on his "mountain," with
only a simple granite headstone to
mark the spot. Few people who play
in his beautiful park, even though
they may see the sign pointing up the
flower-hedged path, ever bother to
ask who he was.
This land which Dr. Phillippe set-
tled is believed to be rich in history
that dates far back into antiquity.
The Smithsonian Institution, in recent
years, sent an archaeological expedi-
OCTOBER, 1957


One of the finest landscaped causeways in the %tate con-
nects Clearwater with its beaches, just two mihes away.


tI l


Nearby Tarpon Springs, one of the famous sponge centers
of the world, teeming with old-world charm and customs.


tion under Dr. Matthew Sterling to
spend many weeks excavating the
mound. Unusual relics of pre-historic
and early American Indian life were
discovered.
The site of the mineral springs the
Doctor valued so highly is thought
to be the spot where, in 1539, Her-
nando DeSoto landed and established
headquarters from which to start his
expedition to the West, and eventual
discovery of the Mississippi River.
DeSoto named the camp Espiritu
Santo Holy Spirit -and the
springs still are called Espiritu Santo
Springs.
This coast was a trysting place of
the pirates who for many years in-
fested the waters of Gulf of Mexico
and Caribbean Sea. Legend has it


that a heavy iron bar, now grown far
up among the branches of a giant oak
tree on the Phillippe mound, was the
gibbet from which pirate captives were
hung. The old tree is known as the
"gibbet oak."
Pirate tales abound along the Sun-
coast, and pirate gold is believed to
have been buried at many points.
The oft-told story of a sunken pirate
ship off Honeymoon Island, north of
Clearwater Beach, s e n d s treasure-
hunters scurrying for salvage equip-
ment whenever it is revived. Adding
credence to the story, sponge-fisher-
men from Tarpon Springs have re-
ported seeing the silt-buried hull when
the tide was low and the water suffi-
ciently clear.
(Continued on Page 22)






































Ribbed panels of precast concrete, prefinished in natural color and measuring 4 by 20 feet, form the walls of the
new Miami Springs Recreation Center, for which Stewa d and Skinner were architects. Jorgensen & Schreffler
and Maurice H. Connell & Associates, Inc., were the engineers. General contractor was Bradford Builders, Inc.


Good as it is for the solid bones of a building, Hollostone is
just as suitable for wall construction. Precast panels are of
special advantage in industrial and commercial work... For
data on types, sizes, finishes and range of use, call us . .


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












R. Buckminster Fuller, one of


the most creative and controversial


figures of our time, will be a


speaker at the 43rd FAA Convention's


seminar on design next month






COMPREHENSIVE DESIGNER


A Michigan State College Centen-
nial Award given to R. BUCKMINSTER
FULLER in 1955 described him as
"Engineer, inventor architect, teach-
er, mathematician, author and philos-
opher." Who's Who tabs him simply
as "engr." -and then devotes some
50 lines of close-packed and abbrevi-
ated data to prove the meagerness of
the title. U. S. Steel's FOSTER GUNNI-
SON has called him "the unquestioned
genius of the entire field of pre-
fabricated constructions." He has
been called "a visionary," "crackpot"
(an appelation now recognized as
obsolete by certain red-faced observers
of his earlier work), "engineering
philosopher" and "the greatest living
engineering genius."
An article in Fortune once de-
scribed him as "... a chunky, power-
ful little man with a build like a milk
bottle, a mind that functions like a
cross between a roll-top desk and a
jet-propulsion motor, and one simple
aim in life: to remake the world."
Fuller's own description is less in-
volved. He calls himself, simply, a
"Comprehensive Designer."
The specific name is not important.
But the man is. And he has been so
OCTOBER, 1957


for the thirty years since he first
emerged from a mental Gethsemane
at Chicago in 1927 and shocked the
design world with his proposal for
a "universally-conditioned and in-
dustrially-reproducable" dwelling unit
labelled Dymaxion. Ever since he has
been a needle-sharp thorn in the flesh
of smugness, complacent compromise,
sloppy-surface thinking. In that time
he has demonstrated practical revo-
lutions in the fields of sanitary equip-
ment (the Phelps Dodge unitary
bathroom), automotive transportation
(the three-wheeled, 4-D transport),
prefabricated dwellings (the Wichita
House, prototyped by Bell Aircraft
to sell for $4,000), cartography (the
Airocean world map), mathematics
(Energetic Geometry), and light-
weight, self-supporting and portable
structural shelter units (Geodisic
domes).
Fuller's work has earned him top
recognition in varied fields. He has
been a technical editor of Fortune,
chief mechanical engineer for the
Board of Economic Warfare, and a
senior assistant in the Foreign Eco-
nomic Administration. He is now
chairman of the board of his own


Fuller Research Foundation and an
active force in the widening activities
of two other corporations founded
to develop the structural fruits of his
research. For the past several years
be has been increasingly in demand
as a lc turer-particularly in the
architectural schools of MIT, N.C.
State College, Cornell, Yale, the
Universities of Michigan, Minnesota,
Oregon, California, Georgia, Illinois,
Wisconsin, Kansas, North Dakota,
Washington, Colorado; and at Prince-
ton, Clemson College and McGill.
He is a member of the Harvard
Engineering Society (which should
please him the more since he was
fired twice from Harvard for paying
too scant attention to the business
of his education) and the American
Society of Professional Geographers.
He has received the U.S. Marine
Corps Award of Merit for his Geodisic
shelters which the Corps says has
made all their other shelters obsolete
and is "the first major basic improve-
ment in mobile military shelters in the
past 2,600 years." He is also the
recipient of an Award of Merit from
the New York Chapter, AIA; the


R.UORKA





































A bird's eye view of a Geodisic Dome designed by Fuller and constructed under
license of his patents in Honolulu, during February of this year. It was built
to house a convention arena and as a philharmonic concert hall and measures
150 feet in diameter. This dome, fabricated of aluminum by the Kaiser Com-
pany was erected in 24 hours. It served as a prototype for another unit
erected in August at Virginia Beach for use as a civic auditorium. This is the
first all-aluminum dome. Others, like the restaurant dome at Wood's Hole,
Mass., have been built with wood struts and a transparent plastic cover.nj.


Grand Prize for the United States
from the Triennale trade fair held at
Milan, Italy, in 1955; an honorary
degree of Doctor of Arts from the
University of Michigan; and, as of
June this year, another honorary de-
gree of Doctor of Science from Wash-
ington University in St. Louis.
Such is the man who will be one
of the major speakers in the Seminar
Program scheduled for the 43rd An-
nual Convention of the FAA next
month. He is already known to some
of those who will be attending this
Convention. But to those who have
not already had the privilege of meet-
ing Buckminster Fuller and of hearing
him share his knowledge and convic-
tions with an audience, this Conven-
tion opportunity should prove to be
a long-remembered experience.
The theme of the Convention -
"The Challenge of the Future" is
one which has been Fuller's main
mental concern for almost forty years.
The end-aim of all his research and
analysis, his creative designing, his


prototype demonstrations of that cre-
ativity has been to answer the future's
challenge in terms of improved en-
vironments for a world population
which he calls "the Human Family."
And his patient and persistent efforts
to obtain a practical public accept-
ance of his ideas in terms of finite
items which industry could make and
market have been a measure of his
implicit faith that the future can be
wonderful if humans will "use forces,
not fight them" to make it so.
To those who know his record but
do not know the man, Fuller's work-
history may appear to be a succession
of grand failures, save for the past five
years during which the technical and
public acceptance of his Geodisic
Domes has stirred a heavy ground
swell toward new design forms and
has generated some penetrating re-
appraisals of both the theory and
practice of structures. But the lack
of immediate public acceptance or
even the disinclination of industry to
commit its finances and factories to


the production of his products has
never dismayed him. In every in-
stance he has succeeded in obtaining
the specific interest and the financial
means necessary to bring each idea
into demonstrable reality. The fact
that these realities worked as vast
improvements over present techniques
-as his analytical synthesizing told
him they would--has always been
more important to Fuller than the
full and immediate realization of their
industrial or commercial possibilities.
Some thirty years ago he clearly
saw that the popular acceptance--
much less understanding- of his
principles and prototypes would be
long deferred even after he had proved
their practical workability. Then he
expressed the conviction that a time-
lag was inevitable; and he set the
"gestation period" for the dawn of
actual production activity based on
his research and designs as between
22 and 25 years. It has worked out
almost exactly on schedule. His pre-
occupation with the structural prin-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ciples and forms of the Geodisic dome
began in the very early 30's. On
Christmas Eve, 1952, Henry Ford II
became his first customer for a Geo-
disic dome to cap the Ford rotunda.
And in 1954 one of his favorite
prophecies came true when a Sikorsky
"Workhorse" helicopter first lifted its
own 50-foot-diameter Geodisic dome
hanger and transported it from fabri-
cating plant to construction site.
The almost instant recognition of
these Geodisic domes and their ever-
widening field of application is not
regarded as phenomenal by Fuller -
and is anything but that if you under-
stand how his thesis conflicts with
the ponderous statics which regulate
industrial activity. In the 4-D bath-
room, in the Dymaxion car even in
the factory-fabricated Wichita House,
wherein Fortune saw, in 1946, the
shaping promise of a huge new in-
dustry the scope of the idea-demon-
stration outran the current capacity
of industry to capitalize it. Tooling
costs alone were then impossibly huge;
and the gamble against a yet uncon-
ditioned public acceptance held great
and unfavorable odds.
But in the domes Fuller has tapped
a deep well of industrial possibili-
ties the employment of many small,
standardized and inexpensive elements
to create an integrated whole with
a uniquely principled construction
which seems now to contain endless
application possibilities. Geodisic
Domes have been used for radar shel-
ters, for a restaurant (at Woods Hole,
Massachusetts, where the tearing
winds of Hurricane Hazel blew against
it harmlessly), guest houses, exhibition
arenas, barracks, warehouses, aircraft
hangars. One of the domes to span
some 750 feet -is now under study
for housing a new playing field for
the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Fuller
Research Foundation says the prac-
tical dimensions for this construction
are virtually limitless and for the
first time the idea of comfort-condi-
tioning whole communities with a
transparent bubble membrane may
have found a beginning root in reality.
Thus it will be no dreaming vision-
ary who will address the Convention.
It will be a brilliantly far-thinking
technician whose self-styled title of
"Comprehensive Designer" implies his
concern with the full gamut of crea-
tive thinking and the demonstrated
ability to fashion analytical thought
into advanced reality.
OCTOBER, 1957


In 1951 students of MIT
took Fuller's Geodisic
Dome as the basis for a
house design and pro-
duced this result an
"exploded" plan of dis-
asociated living units in
a natural gardened setting
with the entire space
completely conditioned
within a covering mem-
brane of a geodisic dome.







Another possibility for use
of the domes for resi-
dences is this Geodesic
Garden Dwelling, designed
by Fuller at the request
of New York's Museum
of Modern Art for a fu-
ture exhibit of his work.








A 30-year-old prophesy
comes true. Early Dy-
maxion literature shows
shelter units being deliv-
ered by air an idea
Fuller held as practicable
when light but strong
materials could replace
the dead weight of struc-
tures due to improved do-
sign. Here a helicopter
easily carries the 1100
pounds of its 50-foot
diameter hangar from
fabrication area to con-
struction site.









American exhibits housed
in Geodisic Domes have
stolen the show in ten
foreign trade fairs-par-
ticular'y that held in Poz-
nan, Poland, where the
dome measured 140 feet
in diameter. This one-
the first erected under
the fair program-was
erected last year at Ka-
bul, Afghanistan.


~%* A-


a






FLORIDA HOMES DO NEED HEAT...


THE FINISHING TOUCH


No Florida home is truly complete without built-in space heating. By
including an oil or gas "Florida furnace" in your plans you are extending
carefree comfort and livability to every day of the year for your clients. You
are specifying the kind of heating proved most efficient and economical for
weather conditions prevailing in Florida. Call on us for any information
you require on "flame-type" heating installations.


FLORIDA HOME )HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S.W. 8th STREET, MIAMI
14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











Our Committee Problem



By ED3AR S. WORTMAN
President, FAA


Progress of the FAA as a state-level
professional organization has now
come to a point at which an improve-
ment of its committee structure is
vital. Committees are the working
muscles of any association. In the
FAA this is particularly true. As it
now exists, the FAA is an association
of Florida's ten AIA Chapters, operat-
ing for the purpose of giving the
membership of chapters the profes-
sional representation at the state level
which would otherwise not be possible.
Because of its organization set-up,
therefore, the FAA's committee pat-
tern must not only reflect the pur-
pose of its state-level activities, but
must also tie-in with the interests
and activities of its member chapters
as indicated by the committee pattern
of each chapter. It is the present


confusion of these committee pat-
terns which constitutes one of our
present problems. The solution to
that problem lies in the overall co-
ordination of committee work so that
each chapter will be operating along
similar organizational lines and so
that the committee set-up of the FAA
can provide focal points for state-wide
action to which each chapter can
contribute its cooperative share.
In the past and currently until
suggested improvements become effec-
tive confusion in committee organi-
zation (and therefore a lessening of
productive results in committee work)
has arisen both at the chapter level
and the FAA level. Chapters have
not consistently followed the com-
mittee structure proposed by the
Institute as indicated on the two


charts below. And because of that
fact, the FAA has been unable to
effect a committee pattern which
could carry through the direct lines
of that structure to efficiently rein-
force chapter committee activities at
the state level.
The charts below show clearly just
how the Institute has thought through
the whole committee structure-from
chapter, to state or regional organi-
zation to the national level. The
Institute has recognized that size of
chapters vary; and it has therefore
suggested that both committee organi-
zation and activity is subject to vari-
ation. The right-hand chart indicates
a way in which these variations can
be handled in the large, medium and
small chapter. And if each of Flori-
(Continued on Page 16)


DIAGRAM OF VERTICAL COMMITTEE RELATIONSHIPS
Lavel Reg. Director Committees Compos.toll
NATIONAL COMMITTEE
SCompesed *f Cheerm... and
S ee member from *ech of
,the 1 Reeons*. Lch ef *the
member is etementlelly
SCheirmea ef his Negloel
c.Aman Committee.
2 '


S REGIONAL COMMITTEE*
S! The Cheirmee, Melieted by
/ IsisIII the ReNeesei Director and ep.
Z po ted by Tke Berd, its
R CHAIRMAN 1cw11t. aeciMof Rg onr-re
cu co. D c in I o or r e*oIlO
Salnttivo frome each Chapter
o t t11 RoIos*. H*e **tem'
0 finally Chairmen of hi Chop-
0 tefar CEmmittee.

S\ CHAPTER COMMITTEE
he r CheirmeWm, mes by
SwIe Rogical Coes mttsc.*
Secrtical Chapter Committeeu
.CHAIRMAN .me e combed as Shown
e onhr of Sopeetod Vot-
0 icl Chepter Comieeo* Strec-
ta-e Implifnesti


SWhere Stete is -toerminhe with Regies (Tneses d New Yort) the Regleil
*l41vitlesii r e rried ** by the Stllle 0oeittle-Y.

OCTOBER, 1957


SUGGESTED CHAPTER COMMITTEE STRUCTURE
Integrating vertical committees at national & chapter levels

Small medan CNational
S lle dium Committees in L rge Chapter S Exec.
Chapter Chapter Staff Exec.
*r Chapter Affairs
Chapter Membership Holmes
Chapter Centennial Observance *
Chapter
Activities

& *Office Proctice Taylor
Practice L Awards 8 Scholarships

Public Public Relations
Relations Government Relations
Public
Relations
SIndustry J* Home Bld'g Construc. Industry Morris
Relations L Collaboration w. Design Rofess ns

Community* Community Development
Deverpm't a*Preser. of Historic Buildings Petengill
Community
Deverpm?,
Research
special School Buildings Powley
1 Hospitals 8 Health
a Vertical Committees + through 1957 only
Prlmed I Chaeter AMffe r Ceommte. The America Mteetute of Afrchtecth. JaImery 15






Committee Problem ...
(Continued from Page 15)

da's 10 chapters will revise, where
necessary, their individual committee
pattern in line with this Institute rec-
ommendation, the greater part of the
FAA's present problem can be solved.
Some chapters have already done
this notably three of the smaller
ones. It would be to everyone's ad-
vantage if all chapters took immediate
steps to do likewise. It would then
be possible for the FAA to revise its
own committee set-up adequately to
develop the force of a vertical, truly
representative organization.
This can strengthen our coopera-
tive activities in two important ways.
First, it can provide a direct channel
from chapter to state or region and
to the national level for any proposal
for any sort of action. Second, it can
work equally as well the other way.
Action seen as desirable from the
FAA's state-level viewpoint could then
be referred to committee chairmen
for prompt, decisive reaction by each
chapter. Thus, through a smoothly-
operating committee relationship the


two-way communication lines between
chapters and the FAA as their state-
wide representative would be kept
constantly open and useful.
Of Florida's 10 chapters, only two
--Florida South and Florida Cen-
tral -can be called "large" in that
each numbers more than 100 mem-
bers. Four others, represented on the
FAA Board by two directors each,
can be considered as "medium"; and
the four remaining are in the "small"
category. But each group has the
same interest locally and at the state
or regional level. Thus a committee
structure common to each -as out-
lined on the Institute's chart would
do much to streamline committee
operations, thus making committee
work more effective locally and more
telling in results at the level of state
or regional operation.
To accomplish this desirable result
in the chapters requires only an under-
standing and approval at the chapter
level. Perhaps some by-law changes
may be required in some chapters.
But whatever revisions may be neces-
sary in individual chapters can be
easily and quickly accomplished if
each executive board of each chapter


will initiate such action for its mem-
bership.
In the FAA action has already
been started along these lines. An
FAA special committee headed by
JOHN L. R. GRAND has made specific
recommendations including certain
by-law changes to make improve-
ments in the FAA committee struc-
ture feasible. It is hoped that the
FAA Board of Directors will approve
these measures at its November meet-
ing and that the way can be cleared
at the 43rd Annual Convention for
completely eliminating the current
confusion by next year.
This will be possible only if the
Chapters cooperate by bringing their
own committee set-up into line with
Institute recommendation. These rec-
ommendations do not, of course,
prevent any chapter from appointing
special, temporary committees to care
for any local situation which may be
encountered. But they do provide an
overall method for strengthening the
operations of our professional organi-
zation. And that, right now is what
Florida chapters and the FAA need
to clear up the confused operating
situation that now exists.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Proposed Resolutions ...
(Continued from Page 5)
Association express the appreciation
that is felt by all members of the
Florida Association of Architects, Inc.,
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects for the invaluable services ren-
dered by ROGER WV. SHERMAN.
The following resolution has been
proposed by the newly-formed FAA
Regional Committee, chairmanned
by FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, Jacksonville.
Petition for Regional Status
WHEREAS, the members of the
ten chapters of the American Institute
of Architects in Florida feel that the
objects and purposes of The Institute
can be furthered to the best advantage
by the establishment of the State of
Florida as a Region of the American
Institute of Architects;
WHEREAS, the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects, Inc., of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects, for many
years, has been performing all the
functions of an AIA Region, and
has been rendering many other valu-
able services to the public and the
profession in the State; and
WHEREAS, the attached state-
ment, "Florida--A New AIA Reg-
ion" contains substantiating data to
justify the establishment of Florida
as an AIA Region;
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED, that the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects, Inc., of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects, does
hereby petition the American Insti-
tute of Architects to take appropriate
action as soon as reasonably possible
to establish the State of Florida as
a Region of the American Institute
of Architects; and,
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the Florida Association of Archi-
tects, Inc., of the Ameircan Institute
of Architects, does hereby extend to
the American Institute of Architects
the assistance and cooperation of this
Association, its resources, its officials
and its members, in the integrating
of the organizational structure of this
Association into that of a new AIA
Region.
The "attached statement" referred
to in the third paragraph of the fore-
going resolution is now in preparation
by the FAA Regional Committee and
will be presented in completed form
to the 43rd Annual Convention.
OCTOBER, 1957


Memo To:


Your Specs Writer


Subject:


Care of Fine Doors

Fine hardwood doors are quality-crafted like fine furniture. But
too often their careless handling on the job results in damage or
neglect that shortens their useful life, lessens the trouble-free per-
formance for which they were designed. Here are four ways to avoid
damage and insure performance:


Specify that all doors shall be edge-sealed or prime-
coated by supplier prior to delivery at job.


Schedule job delivery after plastering has dried.
Require doors to be stored flat in dry, ventilated
area and protected with covering blanket of plastic
vapor-barrier or equivalent.

3 Require all doors to be two-coat edge-sealed after
fitting, but before hanging.. Cover this by clause
Sin both carpenter's and painter's specs.

Have job supervisor check on all points in sequence.
Use small mirror to check proper sealing on vital
top and bottom edges of all hung doors. Lack of
such sealing is most frequent cause of moisture
penetration resulting in warping, sticking, eventual
damage from rot.


IPIK DOORS...

IPIK Solid Core Flush Doors are of proven
quality, unconditionally guaranteed
against delamination and peeling. Made
with a 5-ply construction and a solid
core of low-density, quartered hardwood
staves, they can be specified up to a
four-foot width, an eight-foot height
and a two-inch thickness. You can also
specify them in any species of hardwood
veneers and in addition call for special
cutting of face veneers to achieve the
exact design effect you seek.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI - FRanhlin 3-0811
IMC. Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto . .
Call Palmetto 2-1011
,,






TROPIX-UJEE SLDE-A-FOLD


DOORS-SHUTTERS
(Patents Pending)

Handwoven of lifetime redwood or blonde
mahogany . Provide complete
accessibility without requiring the floor
and wall space of swinging doors . .
This new development using the slide-
a-fold door principle provides smooth,
dependable action for a lifetime . Saves
space and creates beautiful effects
at minimum cost.


AVAILABLE IN STANDARD AND CUSTOM SIZES

TROPIX- WEVE PRODUCTS, Inc.
3590 N. W. 52nd Street, Miami Phone: NE 4-1749


The extruded
aluminum doors that are

STRONG ENOUGH
TO LIFT

A CADILLAC!


^/aeol
JALOUSIE
DOORS
$'ace'
GLASS
PANEL
DOORS


This sample VacolJalousie Door is actually
supporting the full weight of the Cadillac.
Proof of the tremendous strength of the
double overlapping and interlocking cor-
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WANDERS N


OTHER QUALITY VACOL PRODUCTS / .. I CF '
Sliding Glass Doors Jlousie Windows ODUC E. ANDERSON MFG. CO. I. ,
Awning Windows Screen Doors P.O. Box 430 Brodnton, Florida
Extruded Aluminum Shoots for light .
constructionLORIDA AR
8 -. ,L * A. . ARCH,,
8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


*.HMu
wg






News & Notes


What's Your Address Now?
Some of you haven't been receiving
your copies of The Florida Architect
recently. That's probably because you
have changed your address and have
not yet told us about it. Or it may
be the magazine is now being sent
to your office -and your copy is
being "borrowed" by someone else. A
note to us will cure both situations.
Tell us when you move; and if you
want the magazine delivered to your
home instead of the office, send along
your home address so we can change
our stencil records.

Palm Beach
Architects in Palm Beach area are
now wiser than they were at least
about hurricanes. At the Chapter's
September 12th meeting they heard
R. H. SIMPsON, regional director of
the National Hurricane Research Pro-
ject discuss the freakish characteristics
of hurricanes in general and the havoc
wrought by Audrey in particular.


As part of the following business
meeting, HILLIARD T. SMITH, presi-
dent, announced that the October
7th meeting would commemorate the
Chapter's tenth anniversary. He also
announced that the Chapter was plan-
ning to sponsor a 16-week's vocational
training course in drafting for which
GEORGE J. VOTAW and DONALD EDGE
have volunteered as instructors.
AMES BENNETT suggested a new
P/R project for the Chapter spon-
sorship of a Little League Baseball
project. Cost is minor $250 for the
first year, $125 yearly thereafter-
but returns in good sport, Chapter
recognition and youngsters' pleasure
are large. The proposal was approved.

Student Chapter
Through their president, WILLIAM
DALE, members of the AIA Student
Chapter, which now numbers more
than 100 at the U/F, have proposed
a part-time apprentice program. They
hope practicing architects will permit


them to work in offices during the
summer so that on graduation they
will be able to offer a full year's prac-
tical experience in addition to a
degree. Weekly salaries would be low
(about $45), but employing archi-
tects would be asked to keep job
records and sign performance reports.
Dale also offered the full coopera-
tion of the students in putting on
traveling exhibits of students' work
as parts of exhibits by the Chapters.

Daytona Beach
Some 35 members of the Chapter
gathered at Morrison's Imperial
House September 9 for an excellent
dinner and a program that ran itself.
President William P. Greening intro-
duced the FAA Executive Secretary
who moderated an informal discussion
relative to his office, the coming FAA
Convention, operation of The Florida
Architect and highlights of the FAA's
legislative experiences at Tallahassee.
(Continued on Page 20)


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OCTOBER, 1957 1





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 19)
Jacksonville and Northwest
Meetings similar to that in Daytona
Beach were held by the Northwest
Chapter in Pensacola on September
3rd and in Jacksonville on September
18th. At Pensacola attendance was
unfortunately small; but the Chapter
approved a new type of meeting pro-
gram involving an cvery-other-month
party night to include the ladies of
the Chapter. Plans were also discussed
for increased Chapter participation in
civic and regional activities.
The Jacksonville meeting in the
Rooscvelt Hotel was preceded by an
Executive Committee dinner meeting
at which both the FAA Executive
Secretary and Regional Director SAN-
FORD W. GOIN, FAIA, were guests
Director Coin spoke briefly at the
Chapter meeting, after which Presi-
dent EUGENE CELLAR requested the
FAA Executive Secretary to lead a
round-table discussion on such topics
as operation of his office, publication
of the FAA journal and current FAA
activities, including next month's
Clearwater Convention.


THE PROFESSION
AND THE PRESS
What can be done to help
newspaper editors devel-
op an interesting feature
section and at the same
time serve the interests
of local architects is sug-
gested by this cover of a
24-page tabloid section
of the Sarasota Sunday
Herald-Tribune. As
worked out by Gilbert
Waters, P/R and public-
ity man for the Sarasota-
Bradenton Association of
Architects, it was a well-
edited, well-arranged pre-
sentation of area archi-
tects' work keyed to the
centennial celebration
theme of the AIA. Be-
cause the idea was news-
worthy, the paper's edi-
tors welcomed the ma-
terial; and enough local
advertising was sold by
the paper to make the
feature section a profit-
able one-a happy situ-
ation for all concerned.
Architects paid for a co-
operative chapter ad on
the back page.


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0 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 20)

Mid-Florida
Four members were selected by the
Chapter to assist in the work of the
Orlando Planning Board, headed by
Chairman GEORGE W. JOHNSON.
They are: ROBERT B. MURPHY, JAMES
E. WINDHAM, III, FRED B. OWLES,
Jr., and CLIFFORD WRIGHT.
Florida South
Most of the Chapter's September
10th meeting time was taken by a
guest speaker, DAN PAUL, attorney for
the Miami Metropolitan Charter
Board who was appointed to his post
by Governor LEROY COLLINS. Mr.
Paul spoke on the new "Metro"
government of Dade County.
The Chapter will elect its 1958
officers at the next meeting scheduled
for November 5th. The Chapter voted
to develop an exhibit booth for the
"Design Derby" which is being spon-
sored by the local AID Chapter and
the Designer's Guild. HERBERT R.
SAVAGE, chapter P/R chairman, will
be in charge of the exhibit.
Committee Appointments
President EDGAR S. WORTMAN has
named CLINTON GAMBLE chainnan of
the FAA Nominating Committee.
Other members are ANTHONY L. PUL-
LARA, Florida Central, and WILLIAM
STEWART MORRISON, Fla. Northwest.
Also named by President Wort-
man was a new FAA special commit-
tee, charged with the task of pre-
paring a resolution petitioning the
AIA to establish Florida as a new
AIA region. This Regional Commit-
tee includes FRANKLIN S. BUNCH,
Jacksonville, as chairman, and CLIN-
TON GAMBLE, Broward County, and
MIss MARION I. MANLEY, Florida
South, as members.
To act as a liaison representative
of the FAA to the Hotel and Res-
taurant Commission in Tallahassec,
President Wortman last month named
RICHARD B. JESSEN, of Tampa. The
new appointee is a former president
of the Florida Central Chapter and
is now serving as a supervising archi-
tect for the Hotel Commission.
A. J. SIMBERG, Florida South, has
been appointed by Regional Director
SANFORD W. GOING, FAIA, as a mem-
ber of the AIA Committee on His-
toric Buildings.
OCTOBER, 1957


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Convention City...
(Continued from Page 9)
The earliest chapter of adventure
in this coastal story goes back to 1528
when Panfilio DeNarvacz, appointed
governor of Florida by the King of
Spain, arrived by ship with 400 men
and climbed up the 30-foot-high
bluffs overlooking Clear Water Har-
bor and the Gulf beyond- the site
on which the City of Clearwater now
stands.
Here the Spaniards found one of
the largest Indian villages in Florida,
inhabited by the Hirrihiguas, a tribe
of the Seminoles, with the council
lodge of their Chief Ucita. Cruelly
mistreating the Indians, the Spanish
forces finally were driven out, and the
Seminoles inhabited the bluffs until
forced into exile during the Indian
Wars of 1835-42. American fanners,
seeking a mild climate for their crops,
then began to drift in and homestead
the land for cotton plantations and
orange groves.
Toward the end of the Seminole
War a fort, called Fort Harrison,
was established on the bluffs as a
convalescent camp for sick American
soldiers. Historians call this the real
beginning of Clearwater, with the
Sa t e r farming community growing
gradually into the present city, with
its 40,000 population.
A tablet now marks the site of the
old fort, on one of the city's finest
waterfront estates. The main north-
south thoroughfare bears the name
Fort Harrison Avenue, and the Fort
Harrison, the city's finest downtown
hotel, will be convention headquarters
for the Florida Association of Archi-
tects in November.
Within this Gulf Coast story many
picturesque settlements sprang, each
to write its own vivid chapter. One
of the most interesting is the Greek
Community in Tarpon Springs, six-
teen miles north of Clearwater, where
a thriving sponge industry is carried
on in the age-old manner of the
Islands of the Aegean Sea.
The sponge industry began here
during the Spanish-American War,
when the Key West sponge fleet,
fearing the Spanish warships, put into
port to dispose of their cargo. The
spongers liked it and stayed, and
brought over divers from Greece.
From this nucleus has grown the
largest sponge exchange in the world,
and a slice of Old World life, with
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its picturesque customs, which has
made one section of the little City
of Tarpon Springs its own.
The spongers still cling to the type
of boat used on the Mediterranean
Sea centuries ago, except for the
modern engines with which they arc
powered. Painted white with bright
bands of color, and stencilled with
names both Greek and American, they
bob gaily at their slips along the pier,
their rigging spun like cobwcbs against
the sky.
The observance of Epiphany, with
its "Greek Cross" rites each January
6, is a higighlght of the Greek Ortho-
dox Church, center of the Commu-
nity's religious life. Visiting high
church dignitaries from all over the
nation assist in the services, which
begin early in the morning in St.
Nicholas Cathedral. At noon the
c h u r c h officials, attired in richly
colored and embroidered robes, pre-
sent a scene of Old World pageantry
as they march with the congregation,
including hundreds of school children
in Greek costume, to Spring Bayou
scvcral blocks away. The ceremony
of releasing the Dove of Peace, and
the casting of a golden cross into the
Bayou waters by the Archbishop, with
young Greek divers plunging in and
racing to retrieve it, are dramatic
sacred rites that annually draw thou-
sands of visitors from all over the land.
The youth who retrieves the cross
kneels to receive the Archbishop's
blessing for good fortune during the
coming year. It is a young Greek's
most coveted honor.
A second colorful Greek service is
the Easter blessing of the sponge
boats. The week-long Easter festival is
perhaps the holiest of the Greek Orth-
odox Church year, and all boats
return to home port for the celebra-
tion. After the Easter Sunday service
the Priest of the Cathedral performs
the blessing before the fleet sails again
on the morrow for the spon'c banks,
and many weeks away from home.
Appropriately, Saint Nicholas, in
%whose honor the stately cathedral in
the heart of Tarpon Springs is named,
is the patron saint of the sailors.


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OCTOBER, 1957


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. k Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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ADVERTISERS' INDEX

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Advance Metal Products, Inc.. 21
V. E. Anderson Mfg. Co. . 18
Associated Elevator Supply, Inc. 24
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 3
Electrend Distributing Co. . 22
Florida Home Heating Institute 14
Florida Power & Light Co. .. 20
Florida Steel Corp.. ... 4
George C. Griffin Co. . 5
Hamilton Plywood . . 19
Hollostone of Miami . 10
Ludman Corporation 3rd Cover
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Office Space Wanted . 23
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc.. 17
Sistrunk, Inc. . ... 22
Tropix-Weve Products, Inc. 18
Unit Structures .. . . 16
F. Graham Williams. . 23
Yetter Homes, Inc. 2nd Cover


Next month the FAA will hold its
annual election of officers. And by
the end of this year all of Florida's
ten AIA Chapters will also have
chosen a new set of officers. Thus,
it is at least possible that next year
the administrative staffs of both chap-
ters and the state association may
be completely new.
This should not, by any means, be
construed as necessarily undesirable.
The argument that new brooms tend
to sweep clean or the more modem
one that a new car has more git-up-
and-git than a used one is a privi-
lege which every organization has the
democratic American right to adopt.
And though some could argue with
equal logic that a certain continuity
of administrative experience provides
a good balance wheel for efficient
operation, the question of quantity of
change is not the case in point.
Of much more vital importance to
both Chapter and State Association
is the quality of whatever changes in
administrative staffs may be made.
In too many organizations there exists
a notable tendency to change officer
and director personnel merely to get
old ones out and new ones in -to
rotate the opportunities for leadership
"so that all the boys will finally get
their chance to have their say." This
tendency is not a good one. It con-
tains seeds of inertia, apathy, dis-
interest and do-nothingness. Unless
real interest, ability and energy ride
in with the new administrative slate,
these seeds can grow quickly enough
to choke out progress of an organiza-
tion within half a year.
The opposite is also true. Given
quality in leadership, both prestige and
tangible accomplishment of any group
can quickly soar to new highs.
Probably never before in the history
of the architectural profession in
Florida has the need for this quality
in leadership been more desirable.
Architectural registration here has in-
creased 20 percent within the past


year. The 10 AIA Chapters of the
State, represented collectively by the
FAA, may now be on the verge of
becoming operating units of a new
AIA Region the Florida Region.
As one direct result of now-centralized
office operation, the FAA itself is
setting its sights for a wider range of
service activity much of which will
necessarily be linked directly to in-
dividual chapter operations through
an improved committee organization.
Expanded programs are being planned
on the legislative and public relations
fronts. Much needs to be done to
strengthen our relations with the other
trade and professional elements of
the building industry with which
architects must work. And plans for
this are now under way.
But literally none of these objectives
can be reached without constant, con-
sistent, intelligent and vigorous co-
operative action on the part of the
administrative staffs of Chapters who
make up the FAA. For the Chapters
elect the Board of Directors of the
FAA. And, as in any democratically
organized body, the Board is the
strength or weakness of the FAA's
administrative program.
The By-Laws charge each director
to represent his Chapter to the

Board and, conversely to present
to his Chapter, for reaction by the
Chapter, what the Board has done.
This is a serious assignment which
should be taken seriously. Each Chap-
ter should deem it important enough
to select the very best ability and
initiative to represent it. And each
Director so elected should pledge
himself to the task of doing his very
best to serve the state-level interests
of his Chapter as well as to see that
the FAA is constantly maintained as
the constructive professional force it
was organized to be.
There seems little doubt that the
Chapters want strength and purpose
at the state level. But it is up to them
to pick the men who can develop it.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


The FAA Deserves

Your Very Best




































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