• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Regional council holds special...
 Convention speaker is internationally...
 Opportunity of a lifetime
 Law enforcement is a two-way...
 Careful study of new Lien law urged...
 Joint cooperative committee cites...
 News and notes
 Necrology - Francis H. Emerson
 Advertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00039
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Regional council holds special meeting at Jax
        Page 3
    Convention speaker is internationally famous
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Opportunity of a lifetime
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Law enforcement is a two-way job
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Careful study of new Lien law urged by general contractors
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Joint cooperative committee cites need for all-state building code
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    News and notes
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Necrology - Francis H. Emerson
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Advertisers' index
        Page 27
    Producers' council program
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.


















Con.-ention Headquarters
in Clearater \imII be the
Fort Harrison Hotel -
comfort, good food, low
prices and ecer\ facility,
for fun Better get ,our
reseration in earl'.


7Te


74e


?Zwro ..


That's West Florida, of course . and the call comes
from Clearwater, the Gem of the Suncoast and the
headquarters city for this year's FAA Convention . .
Plans for a wonderful Convention Program are virtu-
ally completed. They'll be detailed in the next issue
. Watch for them ... And don't forget the dates -
November 7, 8, 9 . The Florida Central Chapter
will be the hosts . This is a personal invitation
from every member to come early, stay late and have
the time of your life.



43rd ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 1957 FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER


- fjt-'4~



rrt~


,?all


Fou"u







OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth



Secretary
H. Samuel Kruse
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami ': 1" -" ".:


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . .. South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach .. Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South . James E. Garland
Irving E. Horsey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville . Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida . .Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . . Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
SEPTEMBER, 1957


7?e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 7


SEPTEMBER, 1957


No. 9


CONTENTS


Regional Council Holds Special Meeting at Jax_

Convention Speaker is Internationally Famous

Opportunity of A Lifetime ------
By Alexander Lewis, AIA

Law Enforcement Is a Two-Way Job ---
Know Your State Board . .

Careful Study of New Lien Law Urged
By General Contractors _-----

Joint Cooperative Committee Cites
Need for All-State Building Code -_ --

News and Notes ------------

Necrology-Francis H. Emerson

Advertisers' Index --------


Producers' Council Program


THE COVER
The AIA's Centennial Celebration Seal is still the best illustration,
by far, that we could select to re-emphasize the importance of the
FAA's 43rd Annual Convention coming November 7, 8 and 9
at Clearwater. The theme and purpose of the Convention is to assay
the future in terms of what we are doing about it today. To learn
the caliber of the speakers who will lead discussions of this theme,
turn to page 4 of this issue.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Architects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed, but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed, but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.







When You Specify


FLORIL


TE PERLITE


You Specify Perlite that's



Quality Controlled...


in America's Finest Plant . .


* i R


PERLITE.INC.


* ,


[i~


Through laboratory testing . .
A con-,tant check is made of both
process and product to make cer-
tain that Florilite Perlire meets
every point of ASTM specifications


With automatic processing . .
Newest t,,pe of expanding furnace
is adjustable to temperature and
rotation speed to accommodate var-
ious gradations of ore thus as-
sures complete ulniformt) of fin-
ished produce t.


To meet your specification . .
Florilite Perlite is separated by both
air and screen controls at bagging
bins You can be sure that the job
mix wilI contain exactly the grain
sizes and iunit weights \ou've spe-
cified


For Plaster and Lightweight Concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


,I ...
F-~-~4 .'$'t:.
.i
r


..
"









Regional Council Holds


Special Meeting at Jax


A special meeting of the South At-
lantic Regional Council, AIA, was
called by Regional Director SANFORD
W. COIN, FAIA, for August 3, at the
Green Derby Restaurant, Jacksonville.
Attending were ten delegates from
chapters in the S-A Region and five
guests in addition to the Regional
Director.
Primarily this was an organizational
meeting of the Council as indicated
by Director Coin's opening remarks.
For the first time the South Atlantic
Region is now operating under a set
of By-Laws adopted at the Regional
Conference meeting in April at At-
lanta, and published in the May,
1957, issue of The Florida Architect.
One of the Council meeting's
guests-CECIL A. ALEXANDER, presi-
dent of the Georgia Chapter during
last April's Regional Conference-
reported that the Atlanta meeting had
been financially successful and that
average Conference returns had pro-
duced enough to provide host chap-
ters with advance funds and still leave
a contingency or investment backlog
intact. The Council elected JOHN
L. R. GRAND, Gainesville, treasurer
to succeed Alexander. Under terms
of the By-Laws, Grand will serve a
term parallel to that of the Regional
Director.
In line with the By-Laws also, SID-
NEY R. WILKINSON, who had been
designated by Florida Central Presi-
dent ROLAND W. SELLEW as that
chapter's Council delegate was des-
ignated as the Council's 1957-58 Sec-
retary.
The Council voted to appropriate
approximately $2500 as an advance
against Conference expenses for use
by the Florida Central Chapter and
authorized the Treasurer and Re-
gional Director to disburse sums up
to this total as might be necessary.
A letter from ROLAND W. SELLEW
was read requesting the Council to
consider employment of GILBERT
WATERS, Sarasota P/R counsel, by
the Council. Discussion of this letter
-which was supplemented by a pro-
SEPTEMBER, 1957


posal made by Waters -indicated
Council members felt that an execu-
tive director, rather than a public
relations counsel, was needed, but
could not yet be retained on a perma-
nent basis due to lack of finances.
Also voiced was the suggestion that
until the Regional organization was
financially able to employ a full-time
Executive Director, each Conference
Host Chapter should consider employ-
ment of a Conference Manager local
to the locality of the Conference and
able to assist the host chapter in an
administrative and publicity capacity.
The meeting voted to accept the sug-
gestion as an operating policy for the
Council. Included in the motion
relative to this point was the stipula-
tion that expenses of the Conference
Manager be regarded as one of the
expenses of any regional conference.
Regional Director Goin announced
a vacancy on the Regional Judiciary
Committee created by the death of
J. WARREN ARMISTEAD, JR., FAIA,
of the Georgia Chapter. Council
members voted unanimously to name
THOMAS LARRICK, of the Florida
North Chapter to fill the vacancy.
Final business of the meeting was
authorization by the Council that the
Regional Director take necessary steps
toward incorporation of the Council
at a cost not to exceed $250.
Present as delegates at the meeting
were: MORTON T. IRONMONGER,
Broward County; HARRY M. GRIFFIN,
Daytona Beach; SIDNEY R. WILKIN-
SON, Florida Central; ARTHUR LEE
CAMPBELL, Florida North; DAVID W.
POTTER, Florida North Central;
WAHL SNYDER, Florida South; A.
EUGENE CELLAR, Jacksonville; MRS.
ELLAMAE E. LEAGUE, Georgia; WIL-
LIAM R. JAMES, North Carolina; JOHN
M. MITCHELL, JR., South Carolina-
in addition to the Regional Director.
Guests included CECIL A. ALEX-
ANDER, Georgia; HERBERT C. MILL-
KEY, Georgia; JOHN L. R. GRAND,
Florida North, GILBERT WATERS and
ROGER W. SHERMAN.


SOUND


SYSTEMS

For . .
FACTORIES ...
PUBLIC BUILDINGS
SCHOOLS .. STORES
HOSPITALS . OFFICES


S. Or any other type of
building, DuKane Sound
Systems provide complete
flexibility of use . high
and constant efficiency ...
long, dependable, trouble-
free service.
Whatever the need, there's
a DuKane Sound System
available to meet it . Ex-
ecutive intercom networks
... private telephone sys-
tems . two-way audio-
visual installations . .pro-
gram distribution, back-
ground music or simple pag-
ing systems For consulta-
tion on the specification of
modern integrated commun-
ication facilities, call Bruce
Equipment whose service is
backed by eleven years of
field experience.





( RUCE

EQUIPMENT CO.

24 N W. 36 St. Miami 37

Telephone FR 3-7496


















ALUMINUM
AWNING WINDOWS


and
WINDOW WALLS


PROVED BEST FOR

SCHOOLS HOSPITALS
HOTELS OFFICES

Heavier Sections
Stronger Alloys
No Cranks or Gears
Simple, Push-out Operation
CUSTOM SIZES

FOR ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION IN YOUR
LOCALITY CALL:


Pensacola . Call Jax
Tallahassee . Al Yates


Jacksonville . Geo. Griffin
Daytona Beach . Bob Gall
Orlando . (Call Jax)


Ocala .... .Van Akin
Tampa . Doug LaHayne


Palm Beach .Ed Kader
Miami . Ed Henderson


SWEET'S WINDOWS 17a-Br
CATALOGS WINDOW WALLS 3a-Br
Factory, Warwick, Virginia
FLORIDA SALES REPRESENTATIVE

GEORGE C. GRIFFIN
P. O. Box 5151
Jacksonville, Florida


Convention Speaker Is



Internationally Famous


One of the 43rd Annual FAA Con-
vention's top-flight seminar speakers
will be a personable Parisian whose
community and regional planning
work reaches from Europe to South
America and from Connecticut to
South Africa. A veteran of two World
Wars he became a Colonel-pilot in
the French Air Force at the age of 45
--MAURICE E. H. ROTIVAL, AIA,
has properly regarded the world as
his theater of planning operations
ever since he first opened his own of-
fice in Paris almost 38 years ago. Since
that time he has executed such dream-
commissions as re-designing the an-
cient city of Baghdad, blueprinting
the virtual re-development of oil-rich
Venezuela and developing not only a
planning program, but a whole new
economy for the island of Madagas-
car.
This dynamic dreamer who has per-
fected an amazing habit of making
his dreams into realities maintains a
headquarters office on Wall Street -
which bears the inscription "Interna-
tional Planning" and currently has
branch offices in Caracas, Cairo, Paris,
Johannesburg and Madagascar. He
thinks nothing of traveling 150,000
miles per year. But he is also keenly
interested in the planning problems
of his adopted country and is cur-
rently serving as planning consultant
to more than a half-dozen American
towns and cities, including the Flor-
ida city of Winter Park. As an ex-
ample, for the past ten years the little
Connecticut city of Simsbury has
been re-building itself under his pro-
fessional guidance- offered as a la-
bor of love because Rotival become
interested in the town when his son
first went there to school-and as
a result has become a model of the
American suburban community. His
interest in New Haven resulted from
his long-term lecture tour as head of
the Planning and Research Section
of Yale University's School of Fine
Arts. Since 1951 he has been helping


Maurice E. H. Rotival, AIA, will lead
discussion on Planning in one of four
Seminars planned for November
Convention.

the city in the job of reclaiming its
waterfront and in the complete re-
development of its road system.
One of his most interesting and
profitable- commissions came from
King Feisal of Iraq who was con-
cerned with the modernization of
Baghdad. On one memorable occa-
sion in Paris the king sent for Rot-
ival, proposed the planner visit the
old city for a five-day study. If at the
end of that time he could succeed in
interesting the king with any sug-
gestions, he would be given a con-
tract. The outcome of this challenge
was a conference with King Feisal
during which Rotival presented a se-
ries of imaginative sketches hinting at
what the old city could become. He
was given a commission immediately.
This was his first large foreign com-
mission. He organized his program
for the city with teams of local archi-
tects, builders, engineers; and the all-
out success of the project brought him
a quick reputation for bold planning
and work management on a grand
scale. A list of his planning commis-
sions since that time would fill two

(Continued on Page 21)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I.-Il -N-M





























Suggesting the wide range of precast units Hollostone has made available is this industrial building for Robert Russell
Metals, now being constructed in Hialeah by Charles T. Jones, builders. Zurwelle-Whittaker, Inc., were engineers.


e( wtef zer ej J O


You can now design completely with precast units made by H-ollostone.
Today a wide range of standard members is available -- columns, beams,
wall panels, floor and roof units. Their controlled pre-casting provides a
basis for complete structural safety and economy on big or little jobs ..


SEPTEMBER, 1957 5













































Beautiful Ador Custom Handle adds distinctive note of luxury. Ador doors are found
in all types of construction from project homes to luxurious custom residences.


$10,000 Project Home offers owners indoor-outdoor $20,000 Custom Residence on the coast has
living with competitively-priced Ador sliding glass door. beautiful alumilited all-aluminum sliding units by Ador.
-.- -lrlll~r~if9


Luxury Look of


Sliding Glass Doors

Sells Buyers in '57 market

More luxury is the home buyer's greatest demand. It is the home builder's key sales
secret. Foremost among "demand extras" are sliding glass doors.
Every day more and more Americans are buying homes that offer the luxury
of indoor-outdoor living provided by sliding glass doors. These buyers judge the
sliding glass door by the quality and appearance of its handle.
Outstanding in the field is the distinctive custom hardware on Ador sliding
glass doors. The beautiful lucite grip handle, with its luxurious satin-silver finish,
is an appealing sales argument for the home buyer.
Good design is a characteristic of the Ador door. Custom details include
snap-on glazing bead for finished glass lines; rigid, tubular aluminum design;
and a lustrous alumilite finish which resists corrosion indefinitely.
Custom hardware is another example of Ador's design leadership. Yet, with all these
custom features, Ador units are priced to meet competitive conditions.

For complete information contact: Ador Sales, Gilbert A. Viola,
610-11 Biscayne Bldg., Miami, Florida


Smart Satin
Finish


Positive
Locking Action


Beautiful
Lucite Grip

Ador Hardware Design


$50,000 Luxury House features ninety-seven feet of Ador
sliding glass doors opening on a patio-pool area.




America's Foremost
All-Aluminum Sliding Glass Door


-A Ike













OPPORTUNITY


OF


A


By ALEXANDER LEWIS, AIA


LIFETIME


Are we missing the opportunity of
an architectural lifetime through our
failure to develop an architecture in-
digenous to South Florida?
Such a question leads to others:
"Is there ant architecture which is ap-
propriate for all types and sizes of
buildings and which is also uniquely
suited to South Florida's conditions?"
and, "If such an architecture may
exist, how can it be brought into real-
ity?"
To me, the only answer to the first
two questions can be an affirmative
one. There is, of course, no such
simple rejoinder to the third question.
But I am sure that means for pro-
ducing vigorous and creditable an-
swers to it lie readily at our hands.
We have but to recognize them, use
them with imagination and under-
standing and fully develop their wide
potentials to achieve what I believe
can be a tremendous improvement in
the design character of our various
practices.
Thirty years ago, our State par-
ticularly the southern half of it had
pretty generally adopted what was
called "Spanish" as its basic archi-
tectural expression. In the boom days
this style was so widely accepted that
whole communities, through zoning,
stipulated that "Spanish" and what
was later termed "Mediterranean" -
be recognized as the only acceptable
architectural style.
The style wasn't especially suited to
this area; and mostly it was done
poorly by architects who had little
knowledge or understanding of it. But
SEPTEMBER, 1957


it was at least different from what the
tourists saw at home. They liked the
red tile roofs! And, since they were
justified in expecting something dif-
ferent from this land of bright sun-
shine and high color, they accepted
the mongrel designs offered to them.
Since the "Spanish" days of two
or three decades ago, progress certain-
ly has been made. A design character
now popularly called "contemporary"
has been given to most of our larger
structures and in general we can
be justly proud of much of this work.
But we have followed a design trend
that has been national instead of off-
ering any architectural statement from
our own locality. Our greatest archi-
tectural progress has been concerned
more with physical improvements -
air-conditioning, glass walls, insula-
tion and many others -rather than
with the creation of a design char-
acter uniquely appropriate to our own
local conditions. And even these im-
provements are national in scope and
have rarely been used here relative to
providing any particularly outstand-
ing design solution to our own special
problems.
In other areas of the country -
New England, the San Francisco Bay
area, Charleston, Bucks County in
Pennsylvania there have been de-
veloped distinctive architectural char-
acters which have made the areas just-
ly famous. The architecture of such
localities has grown from the under-
standing use of materials at hand,
from a sensitive provision for living
patterns and climatic conditions -


even from the spiritual and cultural
backgrounds of the local people them-
selves.
That, of course, is as it should be.
We may not have as ancient a cul-
tural background in South Florida as
exists in other localities. But we do
have a special background of climate,
terrain and foliage against which to
develop our own unique, regional ar-
chitecture. Indeed, we have here
even more reason than most localities
for the development of a special kind
or architecture to fit our own special
combination of sun, sea, sky and semi-
tropical foliage.
It is quite proper to use such words
as exotic, tropical, brilliant, luxuriant
and colorful to describe our land.
What sort of shelter should we be
building for such a paradise and
what architecture could be glamorous
enough to justify the adjectives which
characterize its background?
Thus far it is evident that we archi-
tects are not agreed on answers to
those questions. The fact was force-
fully emphasized when the start of
"Interama" appeared to be imminent.
According to public announcements,
the architecture of our Latin neigh-
bors was to influence the designers of
the huge project; and our tropical cli-
mate, it was said, would dictate build-
ing features. Some of the published
renderings did indicate this feeling -
with canopied balconies, covered
walkways and arcades. But others in-
dicated such strange, non-tropical
(Continued on Page 8)










Serving


Florida


Architects


and


Builders...


REINFORCING STEEL
STRUCTURAL STEEL
COMPLETE ENG. &
FAB. FACILITIES
BAR JOISTS
ALUM. & STEEL SASH
STEEL DOORS & FRAMES
MISC. IRON AND
ALUMINUM
ORNAMENTAL IRON
STEEL ROOF DECK
STEELTEX
HIGHWAY PRODUCTS
CORRUFORM
SONOTUBES
METAL CULVERTS
POLYETHYLENE
PLASTIC FILM



FLORIDA STEEL
CORPORATION


"Sleel ili fou w1wt a "o
TAMPA 8-0451
ORLANDO 2-4539
MIAMI NEwton 4-6576
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


Opportunity . .
(Continued from Page 7)
shapes as pylons, spheres and hoops
rising into the sky. We are far from
certain in which architectural direc-
tion we wish to go!
But the Interama project illustrated
also the potential influence of this
area architecturally as well as eco-
nomically. South Florida is actually
the hub of the whole, huge Caribbean
area. It is the gateway to the tropical
American hemisphere. As such, our
houses, our schools, our hotels and
motels, our churches, our restaurants
in fact, all our buildings of what-
ever type- will be observed by vis-
itors as architectural interpretations of
what we think is right for our land,
our living and our climate.
What is right and suitable for this
climate would surely include many
elements, many of which have thus
far been too often neglected. For
example, our buildings need founda-
tions to lift us high and dry from the
damp earth, from insects and surface
water. We need walls substantial
enough to withstand hurricane winds,
but open to the prevailing breezes
and the exterior garden world; and
our roofs should be pitched to shed
a downpour of water quickly and with
eaves wide enough to shelter wall
openings. We need special means of
ventilation to dispose of heat; and
still other means are essential to pro-
tect us from the searing rays of both
East and West sun, to control both
sun and sky glare, to shelter walk-
ways, work and play areas and to pro-
vide us with needed privacy.
These are some of the essentials.
What better means do we have at
hand for meeting these requirements
for both indoor and outdoor living
than those which have been long-
proved for tropical use? Perhaps the
proper use of landscaping and foliage
should be listed first. But many other
design elements exist as tools for
tropical design--ready and waiting
to be used in the development of an
architecture especially suited to the
country and climate in which we live.
A partial list would include: galleries,
balconies, wide overhanging eaves,
shutters, jalousies, louvers, blinds,
awnings, canopies, hoods, covered
walkways, patios, breezeways, porch-
es, terraces, grilles, transoms, vents,
high ceilings and many, many
others.


Indiscriminate use of such tropical
devices will not make a building de-
signed, let us say, for Toledo become
automatically suited to our South
Florida climate. Nor will their use
necessarily transform a poor piece of
architecture into something superior.
However, buildings planned for Mi-
ami regardless of size or style -
could include adaptations or modifica-
tions of many of these features to the
benefit of the building and to the
increased pleasure and comfort of
those living or working in it.
Those features could be safely in-
cluded in the design because they are
not cliches borrowed from elsewhere
or lifted directly from the magazine
"Great Masters". They are tropical,
local even "cracker house" and
as tested devices have already proved
their worth as practical aids to bring
greater measures of physical comfort
and esthetic value to building designs.
As specific examples, we need only
remember the "El Panama Hotel" de-
signed by Edward Stone, or the re-
cently-much-publicized and excellent
work being done in Hawaii.
This recent Hawaiian work is the
best indication of what can be accom-
plished. There a small group of ar-
chitects have found a new inspiration.
The evidence of it exists in such re-
freshing work as a bank, obviously
tropical and clearly planned to pro-
vide a shaded, relaxed working en-
vironment. It is found in a simple,
cleanly contemporary church with a
garden approach; in multi-story ho-
tels and apartments with sheltered
galleries overlooking pools and tree-
shaded terraces; and in modest store
buildings made glamorous through
skillfully featured sunshades, cano-
pies and landscaping.
If Hawaiian architects can do this,
so can we and with equal success.
Local architects will maintain that
their work does fit South Florida's
climate; and that they do develop
their design ideas in terms of local
environment. And, of course, some
are doing so in an intelligent and
skillful manner. However, they are,
unfortunately, exceptions to the rule;
and the lack of skill and understand-
ing in fitting a building to its site
and climate is more prominent than
otherwise. We can all agree that good
and practical design would involve
means for screening from sun and sky
glare yet there are many, many
(Continued on Page 27)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










'4
S-* ,, ~r

f
i C-:
4 ~ '1
s rS 9;i: 4, '


Irnlatinn

IN


CONCRETE


Somewhat unusual in architectural
design, the All Souls Episcopal
Church in Miami Beach attractively
demonstrates the versatility
of concrete.
Exterior walls are concrete slump
brick . roof is cement tile . porch
and steps are exposed aggregate
concrete . and concrete arch beams
are used on the interior.
Concrete, with its design flexibility,
offers a wide variety of
construction units all fire safe,
storm safe, termite safe, and
assuring low annual upkeep and
insurance costs.


Architect: Charles S. Symonds, A.I.A., Miami


.I ", "" ,.. ..^ ;.- ,^i L''

GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY '
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA. SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
SEPTEMBER, 1957 9







Know oau State BaNdd. ..







LAW ENFORCEMENT IS


A TWO-WAY J





When plans now being formulated
by the Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture are completed in the near fu-
ture, the law-enforcement activities of
the Board will have been materially
strengthened to the benefit of both
public and profession in all sections
of the State. These plans involve ex-
the first of a num- pension of the Board's investigative
articles planned for facilities. And this, in turn, means a
issues on various stepped-up program to enforce pro-
of State Board visions of the Florida statutes relating
is. Purpose of the to the practice of architecture.
The ultimate result of this program
is to clarify the
will be a substantial increase in the
ns, duties, respon- number of disciplinary actions against
s and authorities violators of the architectural registra-
lorida State Board tion law. This will undoubtedly be
hitecture so that welcome news to practising architects
ng architects may who have seen this law being openly
ter informed on flouted both within as well as with-
iey can help the out the ranks of their profession. But
Board in policing it would be unrealistic for them to
policies of their believe that the Board has suddenly
discovered any new formula either to
ion.
automatically stop all violations of the
law or to bring more speedily to bay
all of the existing professional wrong-
doers.
Even in a Utopia such could hardly
be imagined; and actions of the State
Board are, and must necessarily be,
as far removed from a dream-state as
possible. That is true for the very
mundane reason that the Board oper-
ates under two sets of definitely lim-
iting circumstances. One is the fact
that its regulatory functions must be


OB





maintained through due process of
law. The other is financial. It costs
money to administer any law. And
when funds are limited by a set num-
ber of registration fees and the mani-
fold duties of the Board call for a
strict budgeting of thinly-spread funds
(as is the case with all of Florida's
minor regulatory Boards of which the
State Board of Architects is but one)
it should be obvious that some activi-
ties of the Board must be subject to a
practical measure of curtailment.
Current plans for expanding the
Board's regulatory program have been
made possible partly through good
management of funds received from
registrations and partly because these
funds have been increased during the
past few years. In part this increase
has been due to the fact that registra-
tion fees have been raised slightly. But
mostly it has been due to the substan-
tial gain in total registrations within
the last four years. Today there are
over 1300 architects registered in the
State as compared with some 20 per-
cent less than that in 1953; and last
year registration- renewal fees were
raised from $21 to $25 per year.
Even this added income is little
enough to mount the kind of enforce-
ment program which many architects
in Florida seem to feel should be un-
dertaken as a continuing policy of
Board operation. Of approximately
200 violation cases considered by the
Board during the 1956-57 fiscal year


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


This is
ber of a
future
phases
activities
series
function
sibilitie
of the I
of Arcl
practice
be bet
ways tl
State
the p<
professi









a substantial number required on-
the-spot investigation by one of the
two attorneys employed by the Board.
In all such cases this involved time
and travel; and others variously in-
volved the collection of technical evi-
dence necessary to prove a violation,
the assembly of witnesses, the service
of subpoenas by county sheriffs, the
taking of sworn testimony all con-
suming sources of time, money and
human energies.
To some the net results of this
activity net so far as legal conclu-
sions are concerned may appear
somewhat less than spectacular. So far
this year the record stands as two li-
censes revoked by agreement or Board
action; one permanent injunction
granted; three other injunctions now
pending; two more prepared and
ready for court action. But in view of
all the facts controlling the results,
the record does not show too bad a
face. For every one case actually in-
vestigated, prepared and brought to a
successful legal conclusion, a score or
more warning letters or interviews
have been filed in the Board's records
- actions which in a large number of
instances have either prevented viola-
tions of the law or have brought a
continuous series of violations to an
abrupt halt.
Part of the large volume of corre-
spondence is conducted by Board
members. But much of it is under-
taken by the Board's attorneys -
MARKS, GRAY, YATES and CONROY, of
Jacksonville, who act as legal consult-
ants in the person of HARRY GRAY,
and BENMONT TENCH, JR., of Gaines-
ville, who serves as the Board's legal
counsel and doubles as a case investi-
gator. In coming months this legal
staff will be augmented by an investi-
gative assistant, according to the
Board's present plans. He will work
with Tench in securing evidence and
taking sworn testimony toward the
hoped-for end of enabling the Board
to prosecute more quickly the viola-
tions brought to its attention.
How much more quickly? And how
many more injunctions can be issued
as a result of this increased activity
during the coming year? The ques-
tion may seem reasonable to a pro-
fession impatiently anxious to see



SEPTEMBER, 1957


evildoers chased out of the temple.
But the fact that they cannot be an-
swered in any specific terms is a
measure of the manner in which
Board must necessarily conduct its af-
fairs. And that is a plain matter of
Democracy.
The Board is not a Gestapo. It is
a responsible administrative body
obliged under our time-honored jurid-
ical custom to regard even an alleged
violator as innocent until an assembly
of all the facts can prove him guilty.
The Board has no staff of roving se-
cret agents, no undercover men, no
private eyes. It depends on members
of the architectural profession to bring
instances of possible violation to its
notice. Further, it must depend
heavily on architects to obtain legally
sufficient proof that violations are, in
fact, taking place; and though it will
help to obtain that proof to the ex-
tent of its limited resources, it must
necessarily stand on its judgment as
to whether the facts presented to it
seem to be as alleged and whether
material offered as "proof" carries
sufficient legal weight to justify court
action.
It is precisely on this point that
Board activities have found disfavor
in the eyes of some architects. Not
realizing how, and within what strict
limitations the State Board of Archi-
tecture must act, some members of
the profession have voiced impatience
- even acid criticism -at what they
deem to be a bumbling, methodless
approach to situations which they see
as dangerous local problems requiring
immediate and decisive solutions.
Also, lacking the legal background to
discern the important difference be-
tween the knowledge of a fact and the
ability to prove in legal terms that the
fact in truth exists, they have been
quite as acid in their commentary of
the Board's enforcement program and
the manner in which it is being con-
ducted.
Neither of these positions can be
successfully defended on any com-
monsense grounds. The fact of the
whole matter is that the Board is
acutely aware of many situations
which now exist some of which
they have had under a constantly
watchful eye for five years or more.


Also, the Board has a method for en-
forcing the law. It may appear to be
a slow and cumbersome one in view
of the limitations under which it must
operate. It is admittedly a method
which prefers the gloved hand to the
mailed fist and regards astute cau-
tion as a virtue rather than a sin of
inaction.
But it is nonetheless a method.
And proof that it works is the grow-
ing record of successful court actions
undertaken during the four years since
the Board was granted the power to
institute civil action to enforce the
law it is charged with administering.
Architects who have worked with the
Board in bringing violators to the bar
can attest that the method is prac-
tical and reasonably productive -
even though it may appear to be in-
tolerably painstaking and patient.
The Board's method could easily
be outlined. Though it is flexible
enough to handle any situation that
may be encountered, it is subject to
a detailed description a step-by-
step documentation of the hows and
whats and whys of obtaining legally
sufficient evidence necessary to con-
vict a violator by confronting him
with final proof of his own actions.
But to do so would be to write a
recipe for crime. The preferable
thing to do is to urge that every sus-
pected violation of the law be brought
to the Board's notice; that the archi-
tect doing so place himself at the
Board's disposal; that he follow im-
plicitly the Board's counsel and in-
structions as to further action; and
that he earnestly attempt to under-
stand the central fact that wrongdo-
ing must be proved before it can be
prosecuted--and that in the mat-
ter of proof the lawyer, not the archi-
tect, is the qualified technician.
It is possible that ignorance of what
the State Board is set up to do has
made it the target of criticism on the
part of some members of the profes-
sion it serves. Briefly, the Board's
sole function is to administer the pro-
visions of Chapter 467., of the Flor-
ida statutes, popularly known as the
architects' law. Beyond that it can-
not move. It can have nothing to do
with controlling the practice of archi-
(Continued on Page 13)


* :.. . ./t:'" ** *' .. .'. ~. ~'il A. ..' : :

















GLAZETTES . small, hard-glazed tile with a tough, vitreous
ceramic body fused with a crystalline surface rugged enough
for hard use on walls, floors or counters indoors or out . .
Twenty deep glowing colors, mounted in standard or custom
patterns of 2"x2", 2"xl" and I"xl", 1i-in thick.


IStylonI


Sl,l.:.n 4 x-I' br~,~ht cr mall -gla e.Jd ll11 r.le: a d cr. ral-
glazed floor ile- are made irh St,.lon Sure-Space lugs wh'ch
project on all four sides. These projectrons make proper setrtng
and true alignment auromat-c, thus assure uniform lo|nts for
grouting . Stylon's Florida distributors .nvte ,ou to see the
complete Stylon line- tiles which can be specified with con-
fidence and which suggest unlimited new areas of design for
architects . .


STYLON OF MIAMI 1400 N. W. 54th Street, Miami
STYLON OF TAMPA- 3813 Grand Central Avenue, Tampa
STYLON TILES-815 N.W. 8th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Law Enforcement . .
(Continued from Page 11)
tecture through county or municipal
ordinances. And it is not the guard-
ian of ethics for the architectural pro-
fession.
Misunderstandings on these two
points alone has, in the past, caused
local pockets of dissatisfaction with
the Board's program. But they could
be easily cleared up by a careful read-
ing of the architects' law and the
most recent (1955) Circular of In-
formation issued by the Board as
charged by law and containing the
Board's By-Laws, Rules and Regula-
tions and Standards of Practice. Both
documents can be obtained by appli-
cation to the office of the Florida
State Board of Architecture, 1261
East Las Olas Boulevard, Fort Laud-
erdale. They should be required read-
ing by every practicing architect at
least once each year!
Also, some of the barbs that have
been directed toward the program
and methods of the Board have actu-
ally been expressions of dissatisfaction
with the statute under which the
Board operates. It is generally agreed
that Florida's law regulating the prac-
tice of architecture is not ideal. But
few statutes are, since they are in-
evitably a compromise to resolve con-
flicts between several and often
many divergent opinions or polit-
ical attitudes. The original law dates
from 1915; and some clauses in it
have never been revised. Others have
been changed -in 1941, 1945, 1949,
1951 and 1955-but in some in-
stances there still exists unfortunate
ambiguity; and in the opinion of
many, certain clauses or sections do
not now reflect the conditions they
were designed to control when orig-
inally written.
Thus the State Board must steer
its policy ship between the shoals of
imperfect legislation on the one hand
and the rocks of a basically unin-
formed public and profession on the
other. That it succeeds in doing a
sound job of administration, sets and
maintains high standards of technical
competence and acts decisively to
curb violations where and when
proved is a commentary of credit on


the men who serve on it. Some of
the credit brushes off on those archi-
tects who have bothered to study the
law, have learned the various strict-
ures under which the Board must op-
erate and have cooperated fully in the
essential task of assisting the Board's
investigative tasks through the medi-
um of their own professional inter-
ests and activities.
Two cases brought to recent con-
clusions will indicate how this co-
operative program can work. One in-
volved a court action against a man
in Orlando who was practicing ar-
chitecture without a license in viola-
tion of Section 467.09. The other
concerned an individual in Palm
Beach who, though a registered archi-
tect, was proved guilty of plan-
stamping in violation of Section
467.14.
The Orlando case is typical of sev-
eral actions already taken and others
now pending against unregistered in-
dividuals. The Board's file shows that
this man was warned in a letter from
the Board's secretary as early as No-
vember, 1948. But no action was
taken by the Board until early 1956.
At that time evidence was collected
to show that this unregistered man
was actually practicing architecture,
having made plans for two warehous-
es, one costing $100,000, in addition
to many other smaller jobs all out-
side the statutory exemptions with
respect to building type and costs.
Though legal aspects of this case
were handled by the Board's attor-
neys, local architects were of invalu-
able help in documenting the facts
which finally proved a series of viola-
tions and resulted in issuance of an
injunction against this man. The case
was not won without vigorous opposi-
tion from an aggressive counsel re-
tained by the unregistered operator.
But local architects had cooperated so
closely with the Board's attorneys that
evidence was clear and conclusive. In
commenting on the case Benmont
Tench said,
"This case underlines the import-
ance of local architects in matters of
this kind and points out particularly
the increased speed with which the
Board can move if it has such coop-
eration."


As a matter of record, the Board,
in this particular instance, wished to
move much sooner than it actually
did. Some five or six years ago, Or-
lando had been marked as an area
of first priority on the Board's pro
gram of law enforcement. But on sev-
eral occasions when the Board felt
ready to move, it withheld action in
deference to wishes of the local ar-
chitects who were then involved with
considerations of civic character in
both Winter Park and Orlando. The
case was finally brought to a head at
the Board's insistence.
The Palm Beach matter involved
illegal use of an architect's seal to
stamp plans which had not been pre-
pared by the architect or under the
architect's responsible supervision. It
was brought to the Board's notice
first in January, 1952. The Board fol-
lowed its usual initial procedure of
writing the architect. But the corre-
spondence was unsatisfactory either
as a means of ending the practice that
had been alleged, or as a means of
obtaining sufficient evidence of mis-
conduct to justify legal action.
Architects in the Palm Beach area
were alerted to these facts. But in
spite of a broad knowledge of the
situation, actual substantiation of
charges could not be obtained
throughout the next two years. In
February, 1955, through cooperation
of a town official in the Palm Beach
area a deposition was taken after ser-
vice by a sheriff from a man who had
indicated that an "arrangement" for
plan stamping had been made be-
tween him and the architect involved.
The record shows this deposition to
be a masterpiece of double-talking -
and the net result of it was to leave
the Board still in the uncomfortable
position of not being able to prove
what it now knew to be true.
Finally, in May, 1956, two Palm
Beach architects came to the Board
with what appeared to be adequate
evidence. Arrangements were made
for a hearing of the architect before
the Board. Subpoenas were prepared
for nine witnesses; sheriffs were alert-
ed as to where each could be found;
arrangements were made for a hear-
ing room; and a court reporter was
(Continued on Page 20)


SEPTEMBER, 1957







Careful Study of New Lien Law

Urged by General Contractors


The 1957 version of the mechanics'
lien law was allowed to become law
without the Governor's signature. In-
troduced originally as Senate Bill 573,
it is now on the books as Chapter
57-302, Florida Statutes, 1957.
Though this law does not subject
owners to liabilities of an "unreason-
able" character, as did the 1953 ver-
sion, its interpretation is still open to
serious question, according to PAUL H.
HINDS, Executive Manager of the
South Florida Chapter, AGC.
In a recently issued statement,
Hinds warned "Architects, engineers
and owners" who will be awarding
contracts amounting to more than
$3,000 to "carefully read, study and
secure competent legal advice" on pro-
vision of the new law. The basis of
the AGC manager's concern is his
considered opinion that the "20 per-
cent provisions" which the lien law
still contains may be subject to ques-
tion in view of the Supreme Court's


decision declaring the 1953 lien law
unconstitutional. The Court's opin-
ion was filed April 10, 1957, in case
No. 27,285, styled Morris J. Green-
blatt, et al, vs: Richard Holding. A
description and commentary on this
case was the subject of an article
"Decision Softens Lien Law," by W.
L. BLACKWELL, JR., Miami attorney,
which was published in the August,
1956 issue of The Florida Architect.
The remainder of Hind's statement
follows:
Both laws, 1953 and 1957, stipu-
late that if the Owner does not re-
quire a surety bond in at least the
amount of the original contract price
($3,000 or more), conditioned to pay
all laborers, subcontractors and ma-
terialmen, the Owner shall not pay
any money prior to the visible com-
mencement of operations, and any
money so paid shall be held improp-
erly paid, and shall withhold twenty
percent of each payment when it be-


comes due under the direct contract.
In no event shall the Owner pay
more than 80% of the contract price
if the (surety) bond is not furnished
until the contract has been fully per-
formed and final payment is due and
the contractor has furnished the Own-
er statement under oath required by
Sec. 84.04(3). (Note: other parts of
the law require this statement from
the contractor: showing amount of
contract as finally adjusted; payments
properly made; any amounts due to
laborers, subcontractors and or mate-
rialmen; balance due contractor, etc).
The law gives a laborer a first
claim of lien prior to any other claims
of lien.
In the 1953 law and again in the
new 1957 law, there are certain lia-
bilities for Owners who fail to comply
with these requirements. These will
be discussed separately. The 1953
law stated . If for any reason the
Owner fails to comply with the re-
quirements of this section, he shall be
liable for, and the property improved
shall be subject to, a lien in the full
amount of any and all outstanding
bills for labor, services, or materials
furnished for such improvement re-


*t. > *-.'.. ..

St Mark's Lutheran Church, Hollywood, Pla.
Architect: Mr. James Hartley, Hollywood, Fla


SALES OFFICE:
Walter & Johnson
502 Kanuga Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida Phone-Temple 2-4956


a I C"!!


No other building medium equals the
inherent beauty of wood. Unit Laminated
Arches allows the architect full freedom
of expression toward the creation of
inspirational church interiors.
Panel Graded Unit Deck, a 3" x 6" and
4" x 6" structural interlocking wood deck-
ing, provides unobstructed ceilings with
all the warmth and pleasing appearance
of wood which tends to accent the beauty
of the sturdy Southern Pine laminated
structural members.


UNIT STRUCTURES, INC.
PLANTS & OFFICES PESHTIGO, WISCONSIN & MAGNOLIA, ARK.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


LUrisi lr






gardless of the time element set forth
in this chapter".
The Supreme Court decision is on
the above points in the 1953 law, and
we quote:
. Accordingly we hold UN-
CONSTITUTIONAL AND
VOID the following provisions
of Sec. 84.05(11)(A): 'If for
any reason the Owner fails to
comply with the requirements
of this section, he shall be li-
able for, and the property im-
proved shall be subject to, a
lien in the full amount of any
and all outstanding bills for la-
bor, services or materials fur-
nished for such improvement
regardless of the time element
set forth in this chapter."
And, the Court went further in
their decision -which we leave for
debate by the legal profession in
raising certain points as to "how" and
"when" there was a "proper' payment.
.. The deletion of the penalty
clause carries with it the re-
mainder of Sec. 84.05(11) (A),
under the rule of . This is
so because the portion left is
not a 'complete and workable
statute' unless we assume that
the Legislature intended that
the other and previously exist-
ing provisions of the Mechan-
ics' Lien Law respecting "Prop-
erly Paid' payments by the
Owner should be applied in
determining the rights of lien-
holders against the Owner on
account of improper payments
made under the Act, should
the penalty provision therein
prescribed be held invalid. This
would be pure conjecture on
our part, since there is nothing
in the Act to evidence such an
intention. Moreover, the exist-
ing provisions do not provide
a clear answer to some of the
questions that might arise un-
der the remainder of the Act.
For example, if the Owner
failed to withhold 20 percent
of a progress payment, would
he be answerable to the lien-
holders for the full amount so
paid or only 20 percent there-
of? The existing provisions
were not intended to and do
not provide an answer to that
question. For the reasons stat-
ed, we hold that Chapter
(Continued on Page 16)
SEPTEMBER, 1957


z0t 44 /


MARLITE MARBLE



Versatile Marlite panels can stretch the build-
ing budget without sacrificing color and
richness of architectural treatment. Prefin-
ished with all the dignified beauty of true
marble, Marlite panels are sized up to 4 by
8 feet in Verdi Antique, Black and Gold,
Jaune Benou, Rose De Brignoles and Skyros-
the figure used in the office corridor above ..




S A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
RC 71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI - -FRanklin 3-0811
TLNCI / Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto ..
Call Palmetto 2-1011


...No it's Not...........
O * J






Lien Law...
(Continued from Page 15)
28243, Laws of Florida Acts
of 1953, appearing as Sec.
84.05(11) (A) Fla. Stat. 1955
is void and of no effect."
Notwithstanding that the Florida
Supreme Court had declared the law
unconstitutional, void and of no ef-
fect and the Court had raised ques-
tions of doubt as to what liability
would attach IF the Owner failed
to withhold 20 percent of a progress
payment (if no surety bond is pro-
vided); the proponents came right
back in the Law they presented and
which was passed by the Legislature
with the same conditions excepting
personal liability and time element and
merely stated a right for filing a lien
which has been and continues to be
a part of the basic Law in Sec. 84.16
and would apply even if the new 1957
law had not been passed. We quote
that part of the 1957 law:
"When the bond is not furnished
nor the twenty percent of each
payment withheld and dis-


bursed as required by this sub-
section, the property improved
shall be subject to a lien in
the full amount of any and all
outstanding bills for labor, ser-
vices, or materials furnished
for such improvement; provid-
ed a claim of lien is filed of
record within three months as
required by Section 84.16, and
action to enforce it is com-
menced within one year from
date of filing, in accordance
with Section 84.21, or the
lienor has been made a party
dependent in an action involv-
ing the real property described
in the claim of lien within the
same period of time and upon
disposition of such action the
lienor's claim shall be dis-
charged."
Having discussed the legal aspects
of the law and the questions raised by
the Florida Supreme Court in declar-
ing the former Act unconstitutional,
void and of no effect; we post the fol-
lowing points for the attention of
Owners and the construction Indus-
try. While AGC seriously questions


the motives and needs for this Law,
we were overruled by the Legislature
- but we do point out that the Gov-
ernor could probably have some
doubts as he failed to sign the Act.
(1) It increases cost to Owner up
to 1% for Surety Bond written
by Surety Companies authorized
to write bonds-if the Owner
wants to be absolutely certain to
overcome many technicalities and
liabilities of this law.
(2) It prohibits the right of the
Parties to contract under terms
and conditions best suited to
their needs; without eliminating
rights guaranteed by the basis
law; (a) laborers a first lien and
(b) lienors protection under
either "cautionary-notice lien" or
"regular claim of lien". These
rights are further protected if
the Parties to the contract (Own-
ers and Prime Contractor) disre-
gard the conditions of "proper
payment" procedures outlined in
the law.
(3) This change in the law raises
a question as to whether or not a
(Continued on Page 26)


NOT JUST A GARAGE... IT'S PART OF THE HOME


... with a GRAHAM B&tendecd VDe4g' DOOR

What chrome trim does for an automobile... what color does for photography . what landscaping does for the yard ...
that is what Graham "architecturally-correct" garage doors do for the home. Remember . the attached garage can repre-
sent up to 40% of the front elevation. This means that the garage door is a major factor in the over-all beauty of the home.
Graham custom designing facilities make it possible to achieve a *'blended" front elevation. This is accomplished simply by
specifying that design features used on the front entrance door and window shutters be repeated on the flush surface of the
Graham garage door. In any home, the use of a dramatically-styled Graham door will eliminate the "warehouse appearance"
created by ordinary panel doors.


6901 Carnegie Avenue Division of
Cleveland 3, Ohio GRAHAM INDUSTRIES, INC.
"YOU GET SO MUCH MORE WITH A


892 N.E. 30th Court
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
GRAHAM DOOR"


---Attention-
GARAGE DOOR
SPECIALISTS
Distributorships available in
some areas.
Write for full information
TODAY!

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Graham Garage Doors














































MUTSCHLER


KITCHENS


featured in Florida

homes by Color Craft

Construction

When you're building homes in the $100,000.00
bracket, as do Color Craft Construction of
Deerfield Beach, Florida, it's obvious the
kitchen must be equal to the rest of the home.
That's one of the reasons they rely on
Mutschler cabinetwork ... the quality is apparent.
Built from choice Northern hardwood, these
cabinets are fabricated in Florida for complete
climate stability. And they are superbly
finished in a choice of natural-grain tones and
decorator colors. The availability of specialized
planning services for architects and builders
is another important reason for their choice of
Mutschler "design original" kitchens. If
you are planning or building quality homes,
why not investigate. Send coupon.


Home of Mr. & Mrs. C. P. Prosser,
Deerfield Beach, Florida
Designer and Builder:
Alvin Bossenberry


PANEE, INDIANA


e 1You are cordially Invited
to visit our display rooms

MUTSCHLER KITCHENS OF FLORIDA, 2959 N.E. 12th Terrace
Oakland Park, Florida Phone: Logan 4.-154
Subsidiary of Mutschler Brothers Company, Nappanee, Indiana
Please send us complete information about your kitchens and
planning services. 947

name
firm
address
city, state


SEPTEMBER, 1957






Joint Cooperative Committee Cites

Need for All-State Building Code


Steps necessary to the formation of
a state-wide building code and the
problem of high construction costs
were the main topics of discussion at
the meeting, on July 27, at the San
Juan Hotel in Orlando, of the Joint
Coop. FAA-AGC-FES Committee.
The increasing need for a unified
code on the state level was emphasized
during a general discussion of code
activities in various sections of the
state. Also emphasized was the need
for some official body- such as a
"State Building Commission"-which
could act as an agency to unify all
the now-separate interests of the con-
struction industry in administering
inter-industry regulations and state
code provisions.
W. W. ARNOLD, AGC, president
of the Florida State AGC Council
acted as chairman of the meeting;
and discussion relative to the proposed
new code and building commission
was lead by JOHN STETSON, FAA Vice-


President and JCC Co-Chairman.
"This is necessarily a long-range
program," Stetson said. "It will re-
quire much study by organizations
which are now members of this joint
committee as well as by other groups
whose interests will be directly affect-
ed. But the idea of unifying all regu-
latory provisions in a single code so
that all elements of our industry will
be talking about the same thing is
important to all of us."
Discussion brought out the desir-
ability of tieing-in examining boards
with the job of administering pro-
visions of a state code. Paul H. Hinds,
executive manager of the South Flori-
da AGC chapter, cited the fact
that a trend toward this had already
been established in Dade County,
which now has a unified code and
where the new Metropolitan Govern-
ment will have a single examining
board for building contractors, engi-
neering, marine and heavy construc-


tion contractors, plumbing contractors
and electrical contractors. Certificates
of competency issued by this board
will be accepted by all cities in the
county.
The group finally voted that each
member organization would appoint
members to a study committee to
research a plan and program for
establishment of a state-wide building
code and a coordinating agency to
administer it. A report of this com-
mittee was called for the next meeting
of the group just prior to the opening
of the FAA Convention at Clear-
water, November 7. Presumably the
Committee would then take action
in drafting a proposal for presentation
to the Governor.
A discussion on the mounting costs
of construction involved a number
of topics, among them the fact that
increased labor rates were not being
matched by increased production on
the part of labor. Agreement was
general that unionization efforts, with
parallel efforts toward wage increases,
could be looked for in the building
trades as new industries (such as air-
craft, for example) which were already
(Continued on Page 20)


FITS

.. ". ALMOSTT ANY SPACE...



AN ELECTRIC

WATER HEATER

For flexibility in planning... specify
... ELECTRIC water heaters. They
tuck away anywhere . need no
special flues or vents. They elimin-
ate heat radiation . designed to
heat the water, NOT the house. Im-
portant, too... electric water heaters
are clean, safe, fast and economical.








FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
:";"jji~iiiiiiii~tii rI~............ .......:::sp cil lesorve ts he eim n
.......... ....................:::::::::::::~i~
..............~~,: ea hewte, O tehos. m
%::::::::~::::::~:::
.... ... .................iij~iiiiiiiiiiiii p rtn~to..ee trcw trh atr
..... ........ N ,:::::ii~i
:;::::::;::::::::::~,:~j~iiii~iji ~ y~ -~::::::::::::::* .......... ..........onomcal
......... 6 is: ~ '~:':w'~::`! ~~:::::
::.I;::::::~.:::::~:::::: :: :: :: 0:

FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT'COMPANY::i~i~
:::'::':"'::':':::'~i::::::::::::THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT:.::

































JC *ne Co reai ..u In ia a ols In.


... economical for structures of any size or purpose


The photographs above showing six different kinds
of buildings illustrate how well adapted reinforced
concrete frame and floor construction is for struc-
tures of any size or purpose.
Whatever the building size, function or location,
you can make important savings in construction
costs by using reinforced concrete frames and floors.
These savings are possible in buildings of six stories
or less as well as in tall structures of all types.


Reinforced concrete frame and floor buildings are
sturdy, durable and firesafe. Moderate in first cost,
requiring little or no maintenance and giving long
years of service, they are low-annual-cost struc-
tures. These structural and economical advantages
are gratifying to owners, investors and taxpayers.
For help in designing and building reinforced con-
crete frames and floors, write for free literature.
Distributed only in the United States and Canada.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 NORTH MAIN STREET, ORLANDO, FLORIDA
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete through scientific research and engineering field work
SEPTEMBER, 1957 19


a ~~










FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


TRINITY 6-1084
LONG DISTANCE 470


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI3-6554
MO 1-5154


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


Joint Coop.Committee ...
(Continued from Page 18)
unionized moved to Florida. Though
no formal action resulted, the con-
sensus was that building trades should
be urged to intensify apprenticeship
training programs and to take steps
to see that the production of me-
chanics kept pace with their increased
wage scales.
In addition the Committee voted
to make a formal request to the
Governor that payments for public
work be expedited. Cited as part of
this discussion was the wide variation
in documents used by various State
agencies. A committee was named to
study these matters toward the end
of developing greater standardization
of forms to eliminate existing con-
fusion.


Law Enforcement . .
(Continued from Page 13)
contacted. The entire file had been
referred to an architect and two en-
gineers who were prepared to testify
as expert witnesses. Charges against
the architect were prepared and filed;
and with no loose ends left hanging,
the Board set a date for the hearing
which would lead finally to suspen-
sion or even revocation of the archi-
tect's certificate to practice.
But the hearing was never held.
Just prior to it the seal of the archi-
tect was voluntarily turned in and the
architect's registration canceled. No
objection to the charges against the
architect were made and no defense
action was taken. Thus the Board
could write finis to another annoying
and long-drawnout affair.
The foregoing suggests the sort of
situations which must be constantly
handled in the course of the Board's
law-enforcement program. Of the
two, architectural practice of unreg-
istered individuals is the more com-
mon. Most of the cases now pending
involve such situations. But several
other instances of plan-stamping are
now known to the Board; and it will
undoubtedly be merely a question of
time and effort before these illegali-
ties are likewise ended. But as in the
cases cited, the interest and active co-
operation of local architects will be
heeded to bring future actions against
violators to the successful conclusions
evidenced in the past.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ATLANTA

GA.







Convention Speaker...
(Continued from Page 4)
legal-sized pages, single-spaced! Many
of them have been carried over a two
and three-year's period; and at least
two have spanned a full decade. Roti-
val's fees for consultation range from
$25,000 to $100,000. His yearly re-
tainers for supervising the develop-
ment of his plans have reached as high
as $100,000 with several projects
going happily forward at the same
time.
Though born in Paris and educated
at the Sorbonne where he graduat-
ed with three degrees, a BA in Phil-
osophy, a BS in Mathematics and an
MS in Civil Engineering he has
been a resident of this country since
the late 1930's. His home is a 200-
year old house in Woodstock, Con-
necticut. But he knows Florida, hav-
ing married the daughter of a one-
time president of Rollins College, and
since 1956 has been working on a
traffic re-development study for Win-
ter Park.
Visitors to the 43rd Convention
Seminar of "Planning" at which Mau-
rice Rotival will be the principal
speaker will listen to no novice of the
lecture platform. Rotival was an Assor
ciate Professor of Planning at Yale's
School of Fine Arts for five years
and since 1950 has been visiting lec-
turer at the Yale University School of
Law. He has authored innumerable
reports, articles and monographs since
1931 and since 1950 has been work-
ing on a book entitled "Equilibrium".
It will develop his theory, in terms of
realistic reports and commentary, that
effective planning involves social and
economic as well as physical problems.
There must be a well-balanced rela-
tionship between all phases of plan-
ning Rotival believes-an equilibrium
of all the forces which shape a com-
munity. Thus, truly effective plan-
ning must necessarily be regional in
idea if not in scope; and the planner's
job is to make certain that progress
in one phase of planning matches
that in others.
The Seminar session at which
Maurice Rotival will be the chief
speaker has been scheduled for Friday
afternoon, November 8, 1957. Mod-
erator of the session will be FRANKLIN
S. BUNCH, FAA Vice-president; Rus-
SELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA, and SIDNEY
CARTER will act as local members of
this Community Planning panel.
SEPTEMBER; 1957


I--











H-
i-













I--
L0
Q-


. I











-i
L...
1--











LU-
I-


OFFICE FURNITURE

with FLAIR and

DISTINCTION

At Mr. Foster's Store, the architect willfind
specialized service to meet specific office design
requirements. Custom designed desks and formica
work is only part of this all-inclusive service.
At Mr. Foster's Store the architect willfind steel
lockers, steel shelving, bookcases, steel counters,
vault doors, steel and formica partitions and a full
line of the nation's most beautiful office furniture.
Our sales representatives and interior
m unn I m ent await your pleasure


10,o85 W.pMace at
835 WEST FLAGLER ST. MIAMI, FLORIDA PHONE FR 9-7673









/' Don't forget to ask if it has N

* FLAME TYPE HOME HEATING! J
_...


Thanks, Rover. But Papa isn't likely to forget that every Florida home needs heat during
the shivery cold snaps we have every winter.
And most home buyers and builders know that built-in Flame Type heating is the
cheapest and best permanent solution
to Florida's home heating problem.
That's why you'll find an economical "0C . ',
Flame Type "Florida Furnace" already
installed in most all of the fine neMr and Mr Homebuyer are checking for
installed in most all of the fine new Flame-type heating nowadays. Homes with
homes on the market this year. built-in Flame-Type equipment sell faster and
easier. t


FLORIDA HOME'i 1 HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th STREET, MIAMI
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes


Florida South
Approximately 100 members and
guests attended the August Chapter
meeting at the Pub Restaurant, Coral
Gables, Tuesday evening, August 13.
The chief attraction was a seminar on
office practice-for the Chapter busi-
ness session was brief and to the
point. President WAHL SNYDER re-
ported on the meeting of the South
Atlantic Regional Council in Jackson-
ville; and announced that the Chapter
would be represented to the new
Metropolitan Government of Dade
County by a Committee. As a guest
of the Chapter the FAA Executive
Secretary outlined the program for
the 1957 FAA Convention at Clear-
water and urged full attendance by
the Chapter.
But the Seminar was the highlight
of the meeting. THEODORE GOTT-
FRIED acted as moderator for a panel
composed of ROBERT MILLER-who
spoke for the "younger" practising


architect-T. TRIP RUSSELL, FRANK
E. WATSON and RUSSELL T. PAN-
COAST, FAIA. Miller lead off the dis-
cussion-after introduction by IRVIN
KORACH-and voiced his opinion that
young men start in practice on their
own because of "lack of opportunity"
in the larger offices where they have
been employed. He admitted that
this often happens too soon-and for
that reason he urged young practi-
tioners to be ready "to take suffering
for the first five years." He said that
during that time the best achievement
for a young architect was good work,
not good fees. This will bring growth;
and growth, Miller said, was the essen-
tial thing-but "hardest to achieve
on the basis of economics."
Trip Russell spoke on ethics -
which are morals, he said, and thus
every man's own business. The prac-
tice of ethics must include "the thor-
oughly unethical client"; and friendly
contact between professionals often


can resolve a question of "competi-
tion" before it becomes any sort of
a problem.

Florida Central
The now-famous "seminar" meet-
ings of this chapter took a new turn
on August 17, when friends, wives
and youngsters joined chapter mem-
bers in an afternoon and evening of
fun and relaxation at the Bath Club,
Redington Beach, St. Petersburg. In
place of the usual panel discussion,
ELLIOTT HADLEY had arranged for a
showing of the film Architecture USA;
and the program committee had
arranged for a cocktail party and bar-
becue dinner followed by dancing.
As usual the chapter riembership
was well represented. But the timing
was off slightly due to an unusually
lengthy meeting of the Chapter's
executive committee. Some of the
discussion centered on the. fact that
(Continued on Page 24)


SPECIFY...


DOORS OF GENUINE





utch Cedar
for the client who demands the best.

Take, for example, the handsome Vroludor illustrated
here. Its warm, honey-brown coloring and distinctive
grain pattern add up to client satisfaction Its louver
construction combines striking design with practical
ventilation Your dealer has size and price informa-
tion.

SPECIAL SIZES
Your Dutch Cedar dealer can supply you with interior or
exterior doors of any size for any purpose. Prompt delivery,
quotations on request.
DISTRIBUTED BY:
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF ORLANDO, INC.
924 Sligh Blvd. ORLANDO Ph. 5-4604
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF ST. PETERSBURG, INC.
2860 22nd Ave. N. ST. PETERSBURG Ph. 5-7627
HAMILTON PLYWOOD OF FT. LAUDERDALE, INC.
1607 S. W. 1st Ave. FT. LAUDERDALE Jackson 3-5415

SEPTEMBER, 1957








































Custom -Cast Placques





















We can fill all your design needs for any type,
/ size or shape of cast bronze or aluminum placques,
name panels of decorative bas reliefs .


LORIDA FOUNDRY 3737 N. W. 43rd Street
& PA ERNMiami, Florida
SPATPMTERN WORKS A P




/& PATTRN WORKS


News & Notes
(Continued from Page 28)
the Florida Central Chapter will act
as hosts for the April, 1958, AIA
South Atlantic Regional Conference
which this year will be held in Sara-
sota. Part also was concerned with
approval of several resolutions which
the Chapter will submit for considera-
tion of the FAA membership at the
43rd Annual FAA Convention at
Clearwater.


News Letter Questionnaire

To test reaction to a suggestion
that the FAA issue a "Confidential
News Letter" to its membership, a
questionnaire was sent by the FAA
President to AIA Corporate Members
on June 17, 1957. As reported at the
FAA Directors Meeting August 10,
results were:
1 . Of the 398 questionnaires
sent, 127, or about 32 percent, were
returned. No replies were received
from the remaining 271 which rep-
resents 68 percent of those sent.
2 . Of those replying, 25, or
about 20 percent, opposed the pro-
posal.
3 . Of the 102 replies indicat-
ing approval of the proposal, 41, or
about 40 percent indicated a belief
that material for the "Confidential
News Letter" should be edited before
being issued. Replies from 51, or
about 50 percent of those approving
the proposal, indicated a belief that
material submitted should be issued
.without editing.
4 . Answers to questions as to
type of content, frequency of issue,
and whether submission should be
published with or without names of
authors, were so varied that no de-
tailed tabulation was made.


In search of an architect

The Manatee County Board of
Public Instruction is searching for an
architect or architectural draftsman
Sfor full time employment. According
-'to PAUL R. KRONE, Manatee County
School Architect, the work will con-
sist of preparation of plans and spe-
oifications for small projects and the
general supervision of a new school
building program now being planned
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes
(Continued from Page 24)
for future development.
Those interested in investigating
this opportunity should contact Mr.
J. HARTLEY BLACKBURN, Superintend-
ent of Public Instruction, P. O. Box
1197, Bradenton.

Personal . .
In Tampa, Mayor NICK Nuccio
has appointed ANTHONY L. PULLARA
to a three-year term as a member of
that city's Board of Examiners for
Electrical Contractors. Also appoint-
ed by Mayor Nuccio was ERNEST T.
H. BOWEN, II, partner, with Pullara
in the Tampa firm of Pullara, Bowen
and Watson. Bowen's appointment
was for a two-year term as one of a
five-man Board of Condemnation Re-
view.
In Miami, JOSEPH G. RENTSCHER
and EARL M. STARNES have associat-
ed and have opened an office for the
practice of architecture at 1150 S. W.
First Street.


FRANCIS H. EMERSON
On August 12, death came to
FRANCIS HORTON EMERSON, 52, of
Winter Park. On July 4 Monk Emer-
son had been caught in an accident.
The inboard motor of a boat he was
in exploded at the Sanford dock.
The boat burned and Monk was
rushed to the Sanford hospital, grave-
ly hurt. He never recovered conscious-
ness. He leaves a wife, Ellen, and
four sons, ranging from two to four-
teen.
Born in Gainesville, he graduated
from the University of Florida, later
studying at the University of London.
His first job was as draftsman in the
office of SANFORD W. COIN, Gaines-
ville. Later he was associated with
JAMES GAMBLE ROGERS, II, and with
JOHN THOMAS WATSON; though he
had maintained his own office in
Winter Park since 1948. He was
active in Winter Park civic social af-
fairs, was a Rotarian, and a member
of the Winter Park Planning and
Zoning Board and the Building Code
Board of Appeals. He had been a
member of the AIA since 1946 and
had served variously as a chapter of-
ficer, also serving as a director of the
FAA.


SEPTEMBER, 1957


Make SURE of the



Hidden Values...


"t-e' Ae - "5 -WAY GRIP CLIP"


SGreater safety . Posi-
1go tive, five-surface grip elim-
l01 inmates need for dangerous toe-
ihree sizes to m-f. d i nailing.
meet design
irement of Q Increased rigidity . Heavy metal,
structural lumber five-surface anchorage provides solid
seat, prevents torsion or creeping of
joists or rafters.
Higher strength . Laboratory tensile tests show 50 percent
greater holding power ... And five-surface design eliminates need
for double-clipping, to save material, time and labor on the job.

For Safer and Better Construction Specify ADVANCE

Exclusive Distributors:
A. N. BRADY HARDWARE PENINSULAR SUPPLY COMPANY
Miami Fort Lauderdale West Palm Beach

KISSAM BUILDERS SUPPLY
Orlando


Dealers:

Alexander Hardware
Construction Products


MIAMI
Bailey's Lumber Yards
N. Miami Hardware Co.


FORT LAUDERDALE
Causeway Lumber Co.
Pacific Lumber Co.


/ \- itdtort' I


METAL PRODUCTS, Inc.
2445 N.W. 761h STREET, MIAMI
Manufacturers of Specialty Building Products



























The fixtures illustrated above, and many others
too, employ "DieLux"* diecastings as an integral
part of the unit . for STRENGTH, DURABILITY,
APPEARANCE. 1. No. 1015-6715 Recessed. 2. No. A-14
Swivel Unit. 3. No. WB-25 Wall Unit. 4. No. 8585
Hospital Light. Write for your free copies of
current PRESCOLITE literature.
*Prescolite's trade name forprecision diecast products.

PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP
Berkeley, California Neshaminy, Pennsylvania


THE WALSH


"LOCTOR"


The most expensive
Access Panel on today's
market but there's
a reason

Patented Invisible Hinging
Full 1800 opening
12 gauge construction

See catalog in Sweet's

FLORIDA REPRESENTATIVE
Associated
Elevator & Supply
Company
501 N. W. 54th St.
MIAMI, FLORIDA


Contractors Urge Careful

Study of New Lien Law
(Continued from Page 16)
"cautionary-notice lien" has cer-
tain prior rights; as the new pro-
visions stipulate that the claim
of lien must be filed in accord-
ance with Section 84.16.
(4) This law affects Owners not
dealing with a Prime (General)
Contractor. For example: If the
Owner awards separate contracts
for parts of the work and if these
separate contracts are for $3,000-
.oo or more, each of the specialty
contractors are bound by the
same terms and conditions.
(Continued from Page 8)
A.G.C. condemns diversion of any
funds received by any Contractor or
subcontractor on any construction
project. We believe that payments
made as the work progresses should
be strictly in accordance with proced-
ures for "proper payments" required
by the Law. And further, we believe
that such payments received should be
treated as "trust funds" for the prop-
er payment of all labor (first) and for
materials and or services furnished by
others.
But the conditions of this new 1957
Law are such that the General Con-
tractor is placed in a very awkward
and confused legal position. Upon the
Owner's failure to require or provide
a bond (up to 1% of contract
amount): the General Contractor
could possibly incur a liability by
using his own funds to pay any sub-
contractor, specialty subcontractor or
materialman more than the percent-
age amount (80%) which he has re-
ceived from the Owner. Many instanc-
es could be cited where Attorneys for
General Contractors have advised
their clients to follow this procedure.
A.G.C. believes that a solution to
the problem exists--but not in the
form of this re-enacted 1957 law. If,
between now and the 1959 session of
the Legislature, all segments of the
Construction Industry in Florida will
voluntarily agree to discuss and draft
an equitable Mechanics Lien Law-
we are ready and willing to assist. As
this matter is of primary importance
to the Billion Dollar construction in-
dustry in Florida, maybe the present
'State administration acting through
the Governor will assume the leader-
ship?
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall
be to unite the architectural profession within the State of
Florida to promote and forward the objectives of the The Amer-
ican Institute of Architects; to stimulate and encourage con-
tinual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters
of general public welfare, and represent and act for the archi-
tectural profession in the State; and to promote educational
and public relations programs for the advancement of the pro-
fession.


WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
2433 Central Ave. St. Petersburg, Fla. Phone 5-49005






Opportunity ...
(Continued on Page 8)
buildings which embody huge walls
of glass facing toward both east and
west.
Apparently, then, it will take time
and education to establish any con-
sistent pattern of tropical work which
can be generally recognized as espe-
cially fitting our environment. It can
be established only through a step-
by-step, profession-wide, conscious
effort. Effort to obtain the tropical
character appropriate to our area
should be applied to every project-
all work, large or small, public or pri-
vate, monumental or informal and
in spite of contrary-wise ideas by
either client or architect!
The first step--and the longest
one-would be our own recognition
of the possibilities which lie in such
a combined effort. Would we dare
try it?
The result of such an effort would
be sure: The character of local archi-
tecture would show an inevitable im-
provement. The improvement might
be something wonderful.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Ador Sales, Inc . . 6
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 25
Associated Elevator Supply,
Inc. . 26
Bruce Equipment Co. . 3
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co. 26
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works . . 24
Florida Home Heating Institute 22
Florida Portland Cement . 9
Florida Power & Light Co. . 18
Florida Steel Corporation .. 8
Graham Industries, Inc.. . 16
George C. Griffin Co.. .. 4
Hamilton Plywood . . 23
Hollostone of Miami . 5
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Mr. Foster's Store . . 21
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida 17
Perlite, Inc . . ... .2
Portland Cement Association 19
Prescolite Mfg. Co. ..... .26
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 15
Sistrunk, Inc. . ... 24
Stylon of Miami .. .12
Thompson Door Company . 27
Unit Structures .. . 14
F. Graham Williams . . 20


quality


Guaranteed...


Fine materials and fine
workmanship are the basic
guarantees behind every
Thompson quality door ..
In beautifully figured gum,
lauan and birch, Thompson
flush doors can be speci-
fied for both exteriors and
interiors in both standard
and special sizes.


7 PLY CONSTRUCTION
Lightweight, but sturdy, Thompson flush
doors are noted for their rigidity and
resistance to warping and twisting. This
quality is the result of high manufacturing
standards that include: cores of wood ribs
spaced 4-inches apart and butted against
stiles on alternate sides to provide continu-
ous vent space; stiles of a 1 1/8-inch
minimum width; rails of a minimum 2'/2-
inch width; panels of 3-ply, cross-banded
plywood, hardwood faced; and lock-blocks
4-inches wide, 20-inches long centered on
both sides. Only non-shrinking, craze-re-
sistant adhesives are used to produce inte-
grated bonding that is highly resistant to
both moisture and mildew.
In addition to 11 standard sizes-1/6 x
6/8 to 3/0 x 6/8 interior and 2/6 x 6/8
to 3/0 x 7/0 exterior-Thompson flush
doors are obtainable in special sizes.


DOOR C4 DISTRIBUTED IN FLORIDA BY:
Fi w .un


SEPTEMBER, 1957





~ I~~2~'~~" ~ ~ " ~ .......~a~P


Producers' Council Program

Jacksonville Chapter to Stage

Day-Long Seminar on Curtain Walls


What has been called one of the
"hottest ideas in construction" will
be the subject of a day-long informa-
tion program to be held at the Roose-
velt Hotel, Jacksonville, on Tuesday,
September 24. That subject is Cur-
tain Walls; and the intensive sem-
inar meeting will be conducted by
the Jacksonville Chapter of the Pro-
ducers' Council for the benefit of the
local architects and engineers with
whom Council members work. Since
much of the discussion will be of
practical application to problems of
field construction, general contract-
ors will also be invited to attend.
The seminar program, as announced
by GEORGE C. GRIFFIN, Chapter sec-
retary, will constitute an almost com-
plete course in curtain wall design
and specification. It has been divided
into six discussion sessions, two in the'
morning and the remainder after
lunch. These discussions involve some
ten speakers who will be expert in
their subjects and who will be fur-
nished from membership ranks by the
Producers' Council headquarters in
Washington.
The meeting will open with a gen-
eral talk on the background, technical


Emmett H. Jones, President


aspects, and application range of cur-
tain walls. Then five experts will con-
sider the matter of panel materials in
terms of the six primary factors which
control both design and application.
Curtain walls of glass, steel, masonry
and aluminum will be considered.
The afternoon program will be di-
vided into four sessions to cover the
following subjects: Joints and Flash-
ings; erection; design and fabrication;
and a report on specification studies.
Each subject will be covered by a
highly qualified speaker and each
session will include a period for ques-
tions and comments from the floor.
The Council has emphasized the
fact that this seminar has been de-
signed to provide practical, authorita-
tive information toward the end of
stimulating better construction and
design practices. None of the sessions
will involve any attempt to "sell"
anything except the technical in-
formation necessary to improve cur-
tain wall design and extend the useful
range of application for this method
of construction.
This is the first time that either
the Jacksonville or Miami chapters of
the Producers' Council has attempted


George C. Griffin, Secy-Treasurer


an information meeting of a scope be-
yond the usual evening presentation
sponsored and managed by one or two
individual members representing spe-
cific firms. Should this Curtain Wall
Seminar prove successful as its spon-
sors hope, it may be the forerunner
of other Producers' Council seminars
on other subjects of an equally im-
portant design and construction char-
acter.
This seminar will be the start of the
Jacksonville Chapter's yearly program.
The Chapter now numbers 31 mem-
bers (excluding alternates) who col-
lectively represent some 46 national
manufacturers of quality building
products. Officers for the coming year
were recently elected to include the
following: EMMETT H. JONES, presi-
dent; F. H. BAUMER and TOM E.
HIGHSMITH, vice-presidents; GEORGE
C. GRIFFIN, secretary-treasurer. The
Chapter's liaison with the Jackson-
ville Chapter of the AIA is E. L.
WOLF; and RICHARD P. RORICK was
elected as publicity chairman for the
group.
The Curtain Wall Seminar will
also be presented by the Miami Chap-
ter next year as part of the Chapter's
1957-58 information program, accord-
ing to JOHN R. SOUTHWOOD, Chapter
publicity chairman. The year's pro-
gram will also include four informa-
tional evening meetings and a "table-
top" presentation planned to be held
in Fort Lauderdale.


Tom E. Highsmith, Vice-President


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~a:. :
28


, ; ., . . -. ..



























Elements Ornamentales....

That's the name of the really beautiful grille tile we import from the Caribbean.
They're of hard-burned red shale, with the occasional kiln marks and slight color
variations which make for just the right amount of texture in the finished wall.
The one used in the Miami building shown above is one of several patterns made
in Panama. Another series of patterns somewhat lighter in color and more
delicate in scale is imported from Venezuela . .


I Ai


BRICK

DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INCORPORATED
Phone TU 7-1525 MIAMI, FLORIDA














this


SCtAOOLS our-..

and out plenty...

It's out dollars ... plenty of dollars annually in
needless window maintenance expense: Too many ,
school boards overlook the importance of window
maintenance costs in annual budgets. In working with
your architect in specifying MIAMI windows the
savings effected in maintenance costs could enable him
to provide additional school facilities.
MIAMI the "top" all-aluminum window in the school
field, represents the nation's outstanding
window investment. Superbly engineered
and designed, and expertly built, its installation in
schools throughout the country has proven over the
years that maintenance costs are practically non-existent.
The exclusive MIAMI balance bar operator is built to
function perfectly and to withstand years of the
hardest usage. MIAMI window's triple weatherstripping
and tight locking vents eliminate air infiltration, greatly
reducing heating and air conditioning expense. Every
MIAMI WINDOW is fully guaranteed in writing .. .
your assurance of complete satisfaction.

IT 4 TO SPECIFY imiami WINDOWS

St. Michael's Catholic School
Miami, Florida
Architect Stuart and Skinner





The Miami Balance
Bar Operator designed
and engineered for years
of efficient, trouble-free
operation.

miami window corporation
P. 0. BOX 877 INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BRANCH, MIAMI 48, FLORIDA




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs