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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Plans nearly complete for 1957...
 Thirty years a draftsman
 American eye in Siam
 The Miami draftmen's club
 Plans approved for new AIA headquarters...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00038
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: August 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00038
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Plans nearly complete for 1957 convention
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Thirty years a draftsman
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    American eye in Siam
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The Miami draftmen's club
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Plans approved for new AIA headquarters in Miami
        Page 17
    News and notes
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Advertisers' index
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text










IIi






August 1957


o



Looking to
November ...
With the first 100 years of
the AIA now a matter of
the history books, Chair-
men of the Florida Central
Chapter's 43rd Annual
FAA Convention Commit-
tee consider the possibili-
ties of the future as a
theme for the Convention.
The story starts on page 2.


....,,, ~_,, ........ .I ~,,,,. ~I







Is Your Chapter Using

This Newest P/R Tool?


If you're an AIA member or associate interested
in helping the public to learn about what archi-
tects are and how they work, you'll be interested
in the answer to that question. This informative


booklet was prepared by a Special FAA Committee
for your individual use through distribution by
your AIA Chapter. Ask your Chapter officers
about it ...


10


~"~s~g~Ra~~ ~P~rrr(lg~ pllPr~llmra~as~e~resPi~ C~g I






OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South .. James E. Garland
Irving E. Honey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville . Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida . .. Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Pal Beach . . Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sheman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
AUGUST, 1957


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 7


AUGUST, 1957


NUMBER 8


CONTENTS


Plans Nearly Complete for 1957 Convention 2

Thirty Years A Draftsman . . . . 7
By Frank E. Watson, A.I.A.

American Eye in Siam . . . . . 10
By Lester C. Pancoast

The Miami Draftsmen's Club . . . . 13
By John B. Ross

Plans Approved for New
AIA Headquarters in Miami ..... 17

News and Notes . . . . . . 18

Governor Names Bunch, Rogers to State Board 18

Florida State Board Registers 86 . . .. .21


Advertisers' Index . .

Producers' Council Program .


. 23

. 24


THE COVER
On the capable shoulders of these two gentlemen has been placed
the administrative responsibility for assuring the well-rounded devel-
opment of the 43rd Annual FAA Convention. They are, left, Robert
H. Levison, AIA, and Eugene H. Beach, AIA, both practicing archi-
tects in Clearwater, the 1957 Convention City. Levison is General
Convention Chairman of the Florida Central Chapter, hosts to the
fall conclave. Beach is Assistant Chairman. Between them they direct
the activities of eleven other Central Chapter members making up
the Committee which is now out to make the Clearwater meeting
a record-breaker from every angle.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Architects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.AA. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed, but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
SCommittee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed, but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.























Roland W. Sellow, AIA, president of
the Florida Central Chapter which will
act as Host to the 1957 Convention.


"After 100 Years-The Challenge
of The Future" That's the theme for
the 43rd Annual FAA Convention to
be held at the Fort Harrison Hotel,
Clearwater, November 7, 8 and 9,
this year.
Plans for the full development of
that theme indicate that the two-and-
one-half day meeting will be one of
the most vitally interesting in FAA
history. The theme will be rounded
out in terms of Design, Structure,
Materials and Techniques and Com-
munity Planning. Top-flight speakers
have already accepted assignments to
discuss these phases of our profes-
sional future. Each is an expert in
his own special field; and in a series
of four seminars the trends of expand-
ing technical opportunities will be


Plans Nearly Complete



For 1957 Convention




The FAA's 43rd annual conclave, set for November 7, 8
and 9 at Clearwater, is being planned to make FAA Con-
vention history. Themed to Florida's future in terms of
design, structure, materials and planning, it will feature
top-flight speakers, exhibits, hospitality and entertainment.


sketched on the basis of the newest
means now at hand and those shortly
to become available. Assisting each
nationally-known speaker will be pan-
elists-two for each seminar subject
-chosen from FAA membership for
their special knowledge or experience
in each particular field of interest.
As if this were not enough to at-
tract the biggest attendance ever, a
keynote speaker will set the scope and
pace of the Convention program at
the opening lunchean on Thursday,
November 7; and a seminar summary
will review the important highlights
of the meeting at the closing lunch-
eon meeting on Saturday, November
9. The keynote speaker's name will
be announced in these pages next
month. The summary address will
be given by DEAN TURPIN C. BAN-


NISTER, FAIA, of the University of
Florida.
Seminar speakers' names well in-
dicate the type of provocative session
in store for all who can attend. R.
BUCKMINSTER FULLER-whose dem-
onstrations of creative dynamics have
been of major design importance-
will lead discussion of Design. The
future of Structure will be studied by
EDWARD COHEN, member of the bril-
liant engineering firm of AMMAN AND
WHITNEY, of New York. The expand-
ing world of Materials and Tech-
niques will be explored by ALBERT
G. H. DEITz, an acknowledged ex-
pert in this field and a leader of sev-
eral special research projects at Mass-
achusetts Institute of Technology.
Knotty problems attending the future
(Continued on Page 4)


Here's the Convention City from the air Clearwater, which residents call "The Gem of the Gulf Coast." Convention head-
quarters-the large building at the left-is a scant five minutes from the white sands of Clearwater's Gulf of Mexico beach.
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Convention Plans ...
(Continued from Page 2)

of Community Planning will be dealt
with by MAURICE E. H. ROTIVAL,
AIA, a brilliant and leading figure in
this field whose work has brought him
international prominence and honors.
To every Florida architect in every
section of the State the substance of
these Convention discussions will
have a real and direct value. Attend-
ance will put each visitor in direct
touch with a wealth of knowledge,
experience and talented abilities such
as is rarely encountered, though often
wished-for. The opportunity at this
Convention is too good for anyone
to miss
Another kind of opportunity exists
also-that of having funi The lighter
side of Convention activities has re-


ceived just as much attention as any
other. Parties-real parties with top-
flight professional entertainment -
have been planned for both Thursday
and Friday evenings. Thursday will
be a Poolside Terrace buffet dinner-
an outdoors affair with a full moon
on the calendar for November 7th!
On Friday you'll enjoy a gala night-
club evening in the Skyline Ballroom
with a floor show, music, dancing and
all the rest. Cocktail parties precede
both events with members of the
Florida Central Chapter as hosts.
There'll be pleasure as well as tech-
nical profit in the Building Products
Exhibit, too. Some 50 companies have
snapped at the opportunity to dis-
play the latest developments in their
lines in 60 booths, located on the
Mezzanine of the Fort Harrison Hotel
in the very center of Convention
(Continued on Page S0)







Two more Convention
Committeemen are: Wil-
liam B. Eaton, left, Pro-
gram, and Joseph L. Cog-
gan, Publicity. Others
serving on the Conven-
tion Committee are: A.
Wynn Howell, Hospital-
ity; Edmond N. MacCol-
lin, Entertainment; Ken-
neth W. Dalsell, Jr.,
Arrangement; and Ralph
W. B. Reader, Transpor-
tation. Mrs. A. Wynn
Howell heads the Ladies
Committee.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


These members of the 1957 Convention Committee are, left to right: Ernest
T. H. Bowen, II, Products Exhibit; Anthony L. Pullara, Awards and Prizes,
and Mark Hampton, co-chairman with William B. Harvard, of the Architects'
Exhibit.






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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









It's FRANK E. WATSON again...



THIRTY YEARS


A DRAFTSMAN


...and how they flew!


This opus is dedicated to the Boys
in the Back Room without whom the
promises made by the Architect would
stretch from here to a lot of missed
deadlines.
I have been exposed to the Genus
Draftsman since my youth, which on
some days seems a long time ago. You
know, I estimate that I have drawn
close to seven million lines during
my career-with a goodly percentage
of them in the wrong place. However,
over this long period of exposure and
participation, I have decided-and
who has a better right-to catalog
the various and sundry characters I
have encountered and without
whom my days on the boards would
have been humdrum indeed.
To go back, one of the prime
requisites of a draftsman is a good
pair of legs. This is doubly desirable
in the case of the Lady Draftsman,
but more about that later.
Strong legs are not come by, as
some draftsmen may think, by stand-
ing for years bent over a hot drawing
board. To the contrary-draftsmen
can spend long years standing bent
over a drawing board only if they
have strong legs. And these have
to be developed early.
In my own peculiar case, my legs
were developed-and this is true of
most Philadelphia Draftsmen-who,
it is universally known, have the best
drafting legs in the world-while a
member of the T-Square Club Atelier
in Philadelphia. It was located just


off Walnut Street on Quince Street,
on the second and third floors, di-
rectly opposite the chorus dressing
rooms of the Forrest Theatre and
there wasn't a better place to view
the big musical shows in the alto-
gether than at the Atelier of an eve-
ning. It was really touching and
heart-warming to see how all the Old
Grads would show up when a new
show would open at the Forrest.
Why, sometimes I would run up and
down those three flights of stairs
thirty times in a night so that I
wouldn't miss a single line of a well-
rounded performance. Strong legs-
boy we had 'em.
But to get back to the characters.
At least I think we want to get back
to them.
One of my earliest recollections is
a lovable character called Old Blab-
ber Boy. He had spent twenty-five
years at the same drawing board and
it was fully equipped, including a
bottle opener, As his girth increased,
the size of the board decreased-he
kept carving out the front of the
board so he could stay real close to
his work. Eventually he became quite
a big man in the organization.

The Timid Draftsman-He draws
everything very lightly over the entire
sheet and will not bear down on the
pencil until he has checked and dou-
ble-checked with everyone in the of-
fice. :Guaranteed to give you a com-
plex..Never makes a mistake.


The Eager-Beaver or Brown Nose
-This character stays after hours-
gets everything all blocked out and
ready so that he can get approval
from the chief draftsman early in the
morning, and not waste precious
hours during the day. Ugh!
The Hatcher -He fills in all the
block, brick and tile walls completely
with cross-hatching, draws every joint
line on the elevations of brick walls,
tile, etc. But detailed, necessary, tech-
nical information is very conspicuous,
because it is missing! Beautiful draw-
ings for the Archives.
The Enthusiastl Draftsman-The
Boss gives him a job to do. Down
goes a clean sheet of paper. He at-
tacks the drawing with great enthusi-
asm, finishing it quickly and with
great zest. The Chief Draftsman
sticks his big nose into it-quote,
"The Boys up front have made a few
changes-the orientation is wrong-
flop the plan-bed rooms go in here
-change the kitchen, etc., etc., etc."
Is our man discouraged? Down goes
another sheet of paper. He attacks the
drawing with enthusiasm, finishing it
up with great zest, and so on ad infin-
itum. Everybody loves the Enthusias-
tic Draftsman.
The Upside-Downer Most of
these fellows had their early training
in Australia. They work from the top
of the board, crowding the draftsman
(Continued on Page 8)


AUGUST, 1957 7















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30 Years a Draftsman . .
(Continued from Page 7)

in the aisle in front. It is a known fact
that this man will usually sleep at the
foot of the bed.

The Lady Draftsman This item
is a great morale booster; and there
should be one in every office. The
only difficulty is that if the Drafts-
lady happens to be good looking, she
usually ends up in the front office.
This is decidedly unfair and some-
thing should certainly be done about
it. Speaking of front and back-and
I believe we were-I have some tips
for the ladies about their position in
the Drafting Room. I refer, of course,
to their location on the production
line of drawing boards. Ladies you
have heard of putting up a good
front-straight up and light-two to
a customer and all that. Why wait to
be up lifted? Forget it! Develop the
posterior; accentuate the Backward
Look. Look good facing away from it,
and you will end up at the head of
the room. Ladies, in the Drafting
Room, behindsight is much better
than foresight.

The Operator -He naturally fol-
lows the Lady Draftsman. This guy
is the Bilko of the trade. He has more
side lines than a moored ship-he
runs the office pools-takes bets on
the horses-starts all the rumors-
can get you things wholesale-han-
dles the prize money for the bowling
team-arranges the office annual out-
ings, etc.-all to his own advantage.
This promoted is indispensable, for
without him the job would always get
out on time.

Meticulous Hush-The Quiet One
-Really neat. He covers the entire
drawing with sketch paper, leaving
open only the few square inches on
which he is working. He hates to erase
anything and does a lot of drawing
on the back of the sheet to avoid
messing it up in case he has to make
a change. This Draftsman got his
early training working in a printer's
office putting pieces of tissue paper
between calling cards.

The Aggressor This character
really bears down-using a 3B pencil.
He turns out a real strong black draw-
ing. When told there isn't much use-
ful information on the drawing he


invariably retorts, "I know, but it
sure makes a good print."
The Clock Watcher or Govern-
ment Man I have seen this one
with his coat on and his hand on the
rolled-up plastic board cover ready to
slide it down as the clock strikes five.
It is amazing the coordination that
can be developed over a number of
years in exercising this manoeuvre.
He hasn't been late for supper in
twenty years.
The Hot Shot- Fresh out of col-
lege where he was a big wheel-
this boy knows everything-can do
everything-clever sketches-right up
to date-has the latest design cliches
at his fingertips-falls asleep every
night listening to the Reynold's Alum-
inum Company's record on the Hi-Fi.
Considers the drafting room an inter-
lude until he can take the State Board
and open his own office. This boy
will go far-we hope
The Griper-The humidity buckles
the sheet-too much tooth to the
paper-the mechanical department is
stupid-what a lousy building-slave
wages-nobody tells me anything-
those guys up front really must be
cleaning up. Now back in Detroit we
had ideal working conditions! If any-
body knows the whereabouts of this
character, we will be glad to pay his
fare one way back to General
Motors.
The Gooferoffer You have to
make allowances for this necessary
evil in all production schedules.
Bland, urbane, popular with the
Boss's daughter. This guy can make
more smoke and less fire than any-
one in the office. Recently established
a new record of thirty-six consecutive
days on the same drawing and never
changed a line. Always manages to
wangle the schedule sheet.
The Plodder-Works to a schedule
-so many hundred lines per day, no
matter what the pressure-one speed.
He starts methodically in the upper
left hand corner of the sheet and
working from left to right he finishes
as he goes so that when he reaches
the lower right hand corner on goes
the title block and he is done. No
coffee break -never looks at the
World Series-a real square.
The Boss's Son NOI NO! Not
that-Anything but that!ll
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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AUGUST, 1957







American Eye In Siam...





During a month in Thailand as part of

a round-the world trip, the author was

asked by Thai architects to record his

r impressions for their architectural

magazine This article resulted.



By LESTER C. PANCOAST
Sketches by the author


From the plane I could see that
Bangkok is in an Everglades of water.
Thousands of small buildings off the
water, off the ground, and countless
organic water paths running from the
one great serpent river. From the air-
port road I saw happy people bathing
from their houses, sitting on their
bridges to watch the sunset, paddling
easily home in narrow shells. The
shabby spacelessness shared by most
Asian cities was qualified by com-
mercial waterways jammed with
round-covered sampans.


Within a day of arriving I stood
as excited as a child before the
Temple of the Emerald Buddha mak-
ing color photographs, realizing I was
for that hour living in a Western
child's dream of splendorous Far
East. And I squinted at the glittering
glass mosaic buildings, at glazed mul-
tiple-pronged roofs and unequivocally
gold satupas. I had never seen large
flat surfaces of gold.
Returning from excited child to
sober architect, a process of three
days, I was aware of a disappointment


with Bangkok. Against the satupas
and temples and against the quanti-
ties of uninspired buildings men pro-
duce everywhere in the world, there
was very little contrast of contempo-
rary architectural expression to speak
for today. I looked for it, as an archi-
tect automatically does, hoping to
meet new individualism. I found
many large, new building structures
in Bangkok, though not one percent
seemed to me to make architectural
sense.
I know of the struggle to accom-
plish a clean, strong expression where
either clients or engineers or con-
tractors or laborers do not want to
-or can not-bend under the stress
of a new approach. This is a struggle
of building new culture instead of
running to the old, which architects
have always faced.
The compromise architecture in
Bangkok is painful to see, especially
as it is being committed. Unless one
unfortunate man designed them all,
there seems to be agreement among
their designers that new university
buildings, a huge new hotel, a railroad
office building should look exactly
alike stale European carry over
Beaux Arts concepts and 'Thai' in
certain details. I was shown one huge,
cream-colored, rather Gothic-looking
barn of a building with Thai appur-
tenences and was reminded of an
architectural students' word, ginder,
which to us meant, "a curious thing
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
































added to the roof to distract from
a bad building." If Thai ginders are
expression of nationalism, they are
bad expression. As I traveled to Cheng
Mai I began to realize that Bangkok
is not the only unfortunate city to
have compromise buildings.
Another harmful architectural spirit
is working in the ruins of Sukethai
and Ayudyha, over-restoring ancient
monuments with modern materials
to the point where they lose the
identity and beauty of their great age.
The over-zealous had finished several


"ruins" I would like to have seen, but
they were rapidly lost to Siam at
great public expense. I pray there is
not ever enough money allotted to
have them all "re-destroyed." That
anyone would want to exchange a
genuine, ancient, crumbling satupa
for a hard, new, white-washed plaster
one, is more than I can understand.
Surviving old Thai architecture has
many gifts for modern Thai, but I
think only the unintelligent senti-
mentalists will duplicate even parts
of it in modem building, or rebuild


the old like new.
Japan has extraordinary surviving
ancient architecture, yet today she is
sensible enough to desert it in most
of her building solutions. However,
she imports hard-to-digest ideas from
Western countries rather than trying
for her own new Japanese expressions.
I think it would be poor for Siam
to import designs like foreign cars,
regardless of the foreign degrees of
her architects. World architecture is
becoming more similar as the world
(Continued on Page 22)


AUGUST, 1957











Beautiful leaded glass is used in Ador sliding
glass door in this dramatic church Installation.


Sliding Glass Door opens church conference
room to patio area in this Ador installation.


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USE SLIDING GLASS DOORS

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Among the most novel installations of sliding glass doors
are those seen in new churches. The benefits of sliding
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today's booming $600,000,000 construction market in
church and religious buildings.
Outstanding example of broad application of sliding
glass doors in this field are the Ador all-aluminum doors.
Church builders and architects list the advantages of
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Ability to handle crowds easily through sliding glass
entries as wide as 2r,
Provide maximum flexibility in extending and combining
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Churches and religious buildings are only one of many
fields in which Ador sliding glass doors are being speci-
fied in increasing numbers.
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Study room gains maximum natural light plus
easy access to courtyard through Ador door.


Kichen-dining area is open to patio through
sliding glass doors for special church and
social events.











The Miami





Draftsmen's Club



By JOHN B. ROSS
President, 1957


The history of The Draftsmen's
Club of Miami is actually the story
of how architectural shop-talk was
boot-strapped into an institution. The
institution is now a membership, not-
for-profit corporation with 120 active
participants and enough vision, pur-
pose and energy to look forward to
acquiring its own, permanent club-
house. The conversational germ from
which this institution has grown was
first hatched some ten years ago.
It took shape from the propensity
of the ambitious draftsman to study,
to speculate on his future, to probe
the opportunities of the profession
to which he is a party, to evaluate the
extent of his experience. And, of
course, to talk. Ten years ago there
were four such draftsmen FRAN
LORENZE, HAROLD A. McKINLEY,
HANK BROWN, ROBERT TODD. All


were employed by Miami architects.
All were touched with the same urge
toward conversation and self-better-
ment. So naturally they drifted to-
gether. At first it was just talk-dis-
cussions of architecture, of office
problems, of what the future held.
Then suddenly it was more than that.
The germ of the institution had come
to life; and at a memorable meeting
of those four conversationalists on
October 30, 1947, the foundations of
the present Institution were laid.
In May, 1949, the Draftsmen's
Club of Miami was incorporated: "To
provide draftsmen with educational,
cultural and social activities . and
to promote the general welfare of the
membership." Since that first meet-
ing the Club's membership has in-
creased thirty-fold. Growth has been
so rapid, in fact, that the original


Constitution and By-Laws became
outmoded and were revised to meet
present requirements this year.
The success of the Club has been
due to more than one factor. First,
of course, was the drive of its found-
ers and early membership. Next, per-
haps, have been the efforts of each
successive president linked with the
individual interests of the Club's
growing membership. But most im-
portant have been the unselfish and
constant cooperation and understand-
ing help of many of Miami's top-rank
architects and engineers. These men
have consistently offered-and freely
given-their encouragement and ac-
tive help. Through them the Club
has truly realized the purposes set
forth in its charter; for with their ac-
tive cooperation the Club's educa-
(Continued on Page 15)


Here are the 1957 officers
of the Draftsmen's Club of
Miami, Inc. Left to right:
William Andrews, secre-
tary; Ray C. Biggerstaff,
treasurer; John B. Ross,
president; Kenneth C.
Braidman, vice-president;
and Richard Betty, record-
ing secretary.


AUGUST, 1957









"This one's for me-it has

FLAME TYPE HEATING!" /


I

I


%b 41 AM am de d& 0
40 AI


\ii
F. .~. .._~In 1~sa~l\rI-


This recently-arrived prodigy has apparently grasped some of the more pertinent
facts of life in our sunny state.
He wants Papa and Mama Homebuyer to remember:
That babies and grown-ups need dependable home heating during the cold
snaps we have every winter ...
That a compact Flame Type "Florida
furnace," circulating warm air through
every room, is the best and least expensive W
answer to our home heating problem . .


And that the most economical time to
install Flame Type heating is when the
house is being built.


Let's Face It-Florida homes do need heat.
So when you buy your new house, be sure
to check for built in Flame Type heating.


PLO RID A HOME '6, HEATING INSTITUTE
1827 S. W. 8th STREET, MIAMI


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


s






Draftsmen's Club...
(Continued from Page 18)

tional courses have proved to be one
of its most popular features. It must
certainly be a source of personal satis-
faction to these men to realize that
through their help, many of the
Club's members, both past and pres-
ent, have become registered architects
in the State of Florida.
This helpful interest has now
achieved almost the status of a form-
alized school. This year three courses
are being offered-Basic Structures,
Advanced Structures and Architect-
ural Design. Engineers BILL WEAVER
and JIM POWERS are conducting the
courses in structures; and architects
FRANK E. WATSON, ROBERT M. LIT-
TLE, FRANCIS TELESCA (and, until
his untimely death, JOHN E. PETER-
SEN) are generously demonstrating the
fine points of architectural design.
All these courses have been accorded
an enthusiastic acceptance.
The Club's first Founder-President
was FRANK LORENZE. Since then the
following men (many of whom are
now practicing architects) have


helped further the progress of the


Draftsmen's Club:
CHARLES ABELE
CLARENCE HAMER
CHARLES S. BROWARD
BoB MILLER
MAx GRUEN
HODDY HORNE
DON L. BROWN


1949-1950
1950-1951
1951-1952
1952-1953
1953-1954
1954-1955
1955-1956


The Club is still much concerned
with its original aims of providing
members with the educational, cult-
ural and social activities spelled out
in the articles of incorporation. But
it is now reaching beyond those spe-
cific aims. As befits an institution
which has grown from a conversation-
al germ in the short space of a decade,
it has set for itself a number of long-
term objectives.
Some of these are truly ambitious;
others can be realized more quickly.
Among them is the wish to consoli-
date membership and to stabilize the
program of educational courses. An-
other is the sponsorship of a local
charity-the idea being that collec-
tively members of the Club can be of
real help to those who need and can
use their interests and activities. Still
another aim-toward which the Club


has already seen signs of hopeful
progress-is closer association with
Miami's AIA Chapter. Finally, all
Club members are looking ahead
toward the time when they can
meet in their own clubhouse. Plans
are now under way to promote a
building fund with a view to acquir-
ing or building a permanent club-
house for courses, lectures and social
events.
In the meantime the Club meets
every second Monday of each month.
Headquarters is in the Miami Build-
ers Exchange Building through the
courtesy of that body. The meetings
are varied; and many of them are
sponsored by organizations interested
in the Club and willing and able to
help it progress. They may range from
a film show on architecture at the
Builders' Exchange to a dinner-dance
at some hotel-or to a gathering at
which Frank Watson will unburden
himself on "what draftsmen really
are."
So there is still plenty of conversa-
tion in the Club-plenty of the orig-
inal germ from which the present in-
stitution has developed. And mem-
bers hope it will always be so.


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AUGUST, 1957








A1 arie to Heat, oCod, $Vapor and 'Vermen

That's ALUMISEAL the
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(not foil) that-reflects up to 97
per cent of radiant heat. The
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us- for specification facts, en-
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FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
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Plans Approved for New

AIA.Headquarters in Miami


If construction progress continues
on its present schedule, the FAA will
have a new office about the time the
New Year rolls around. In conjunc-
tion with the Florida South Chapter,
AIA, space has been set aside in the
DuPont Plaza Building, now under
construction on a marvelous site in
Miami, fronting on the Miami River
and overlooking Biscayne Bay. When
plans have been fully developed by
the end of this year, Florida's archi-
tectural profession will have one of
the finest headquarters in the entire
country.
This headquarters will be a com-
bined office-lounge-exhibit area con-
taining some 2500 square feet and
located on the mezzanine floor of the
unique, triple-purpose building for
which FRANK H. SHUFLIN and the
late JOHN E. PETERSEN are architects.
The space is one of several areas set


aside for use of professional and trade
groups of the construction industry
by CLINTON T. WETZEL, president
of the Architects' Bureau of Build-
ing Products and Executive Vice
president of the DuPont Plaza
Building.
Development of the area into a
well-planned, appropriately equipped
and professional headquarters has
been handled ably by a Committee
of the Florida South Chapter includ-
ing BLAIR WRIGHT, HERBERT JOHN-
SON, FRANK SHUFLIN and EDWIN T.
REEDER. Cooperating fully with the
FAA Executive Secretary relative to
office needs, the Committee has come
up with an excellent plan which pro-
vides-in addition to compact, effici-
ent office space for the FAA-a cen-
tral area which can be variously used
for Chapter meetings, lectures, lounge
space or exhibit area. Adjacent to it


will be a large room for Executive
Board meetings, press conferences or
inter-professional committee meet-
ings as may be required.
The area will be fitted with ade-
quate facilities for refreshment and
entertainment. Storage areas will
provide space for portable exhibition,
lecture, and slide and moving picture
equipment. A combined office for
the Florida South Chapter and the
FAA will be located near the corridor
entrance to both the Architects' Bu-
reau of Building Products and the
DuPont Tarleton Hotel. In the hotel
lobby will be constructed a large win-
dow display arear with museum light-
ing for the constant display of archi-
tectural or fine arts exhibits.
The entire space will be completely
air-conditioned; and lounge-and-ex-
hibit areas will be fitted with special
ceiling lights for complete flexibility
in setting-up for adequately lighted
displays. Entrance to offices will be
separate from entrances to the lounge
areas.


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AUGUST, 1957


Available in
12". 14". or
16" sctuares.
16" x8' Panels.
oat 4' 8' ran-
dom "V"
groove panels.
In 3/16, a.
3/8. %a. and
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t. Dutch Cedar paneling is
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The Change
Has Come . .


News & Notes


See it on Page 6 ...



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pl za 8- 11


Governor Names Bunch,
Rogers to State Board
Governor LEROY COLLINS has filled
two statutory vacancies in the State
Board of Architecture by re-appoint-
ing RICHARD BOONE ROGERS, of Or-
lando, for an additional four-year
term and by naming FRANKLIN S.
BUNCH, of Jacksonville, for a similar
period.
The vacancies in the Board were
created through expiration of the term
appointments of Rogers and S. RALPH
FETNER, of Jacksonville. Rogers, who
is now serving as the Board's presi-
dent for the second year, was first
appointed to the Board in 1954 by
the then acting Governor CHARLEY
JOHNS. Fetner has devoted eight years
of able service to the State Board,
having been first appointed in 1949.
Prior to 1956 he had served two terms
as the Board's president.
As a newly-appointed Board mem-
ber Franklin S. Bunch will contribute
a well-rounded experience of profes-
sional practice and public and profes-
sional service. A native of Jackson-
ville and an architectural graduate
of the University of Florida, he has
been a principal in the firm of KEMP,
BUNCH AND JACKSON since its forma-
tion in 1946. A member of the AIA
since 1945, he has long been active
in Florida professional affairs, having
been president of the FAA in 1947-48
and a four-year chairman of the
FAA's important Legislative Commit-
tee. He is currently serving his sec-
ond term as an FAA District Vice-
President.

FAA Board Meeting
Set for August 10
All FAA Officers and Directors
have been notified of the fourth 1957
meeting of the FAA Board of Direc-
tors scheduled for August 10, at the
Tampa Terrace Hotel in Tampa. Ac-
cording to custom the meeting will
start with a luncheon at 12:30 p. m.
President EDGAR S. WORTMAN has
listed committee reports on the agen-
da of the meeting. These will be in-
terim reports to indicate current prog-
ress of committee assignments. Most
of them will probably not be pre-
sented in person by committee chair-


rranKll.n .uncn, AIA


Richard Boone Rogers, AIA
man, but will be briefed for consider-
ation of Board members.
However, it is anticipated that a
progress report of the 1957 Conven-
tion Committee of the Florida Cen-
tral Chapter will be made fully by its
Chairman, ROBERT H. LEVISON, who
is also an FAA Director from that
Chapter.
Prior to the Tampa Director's
meeting the newly appointed FAA
Convention Committee will hold its
first meeting. All members are cur-
rently also FAA Directors. They are
ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II, VERNER
JOHNSON, and FRANCIS R. WALTON.
The Committee will meet with the
FAA President and the Executive Sec-
retary to make preliminary plans for
the 44th Annual FAA Convention in
1958 and to develop methods for
selecting Convention sites and de-
termining broad policies for Con-
vention programming for several years
ahead.
(Continued on Facing Page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 18)

Sarasota Firm Expands
Effective as of the middle of last
month the architectural firm of SEL-
LEW AND GREMLI, Sarasota, acquired
a new general partner and was reor-
ganized as "The Architectural and
Engineering Offices of Sellew, Gremli
and Smith." The new partner, Louis
H. V. SMITH, will do the new firm's
mechanical engineering as well as
continuing to provide individual con-
sultation. Prior to his full-time asso-
ciation with the Sarasota architectural
firm, Smith maintained a consulting
engineering practice in Miami with
a branch operation in Sarasota.
Smith holds a master's degree in
engineering and is licensed to prac-
tice in four states. The new firm will
continue to maintain offices in the
Commercial Court Building in Sara-
sota.



Chotas Comments on
The Role of The Critic
Writing in the current (July) issue
of Progressive Architecture, N. E.
CHOTAS, Associate Professor of De-
sign, U/F College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, considers the role of the
critic in the esthetic evaluation of
architecture. He cites two types of
critics-the absolutists who measure
esthetic values in terms of emotional,
individual and unreasoned responses;
and relativists whose judgements are
based largely upon a serious, reasoned
discrimination between good and bad.
Though he recognizes the existence
of these two general categories of crit-
ical appraisal, Chotas makes evident
his belief that the first type of critic
has but insecure ground on which to
base his philosophy of judgement.
"Can we say," he asks, "that there
really exists an abstract ideal of beau-
ty, a certain pattern of lines, geomet-
rical figures, colors, etc., that is etern-
ally acceptable?"
In developing the viewpoint of the
relativist Chotas answers his rhetori-
cal question in the negative. He
points out that "relativist standards
are considered more as empirical cri-
teria than rigid rules-standards that
are flexible and that may even be
revised."
AUGUST, 1957


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vault doors, steel and formica partitions and a full
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Convention Plans ...
(Continued from Page 4)


Jack McCandless has taken on the
double job of acting as Convention
Treasurer and Registration Chairman.
His address is 20 Beach Drive, St.
Petersburg.

activity. As in former years, there
will be award placques for excellence
of product displays and booth repre-
sentation. And prizes for exhibit at-
tendance by conventioneers will be
very much in evidence again this
year.
An amazing array of such prizes
is now being developed. It ranges
from two fabulous, all-expense Carib-
bean tours-for two-through such
luxury gadgets as TV sets-portable
and otherwise-to such useful home
appliances as electric fans and toast-
ers. A unique method of awarding
these prizes has been developed. It
involves fanfare, fun and feminine
beauty; and full details will be pro-
vided at the time of registration.
The business matters of the FAA-
the important reason for an annual
Convention-will be handled during
three business sessions on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday mornings. A
special breakfast meeting Friday
morning will be devoted to Chapter
business also. It will be a two-hour
session for Chapter presidents and
Chapter Affairs Committee chairmen.
Presiding Moderator will be BERYL
PRICE, AIA, formerly Chairman of
the important AIA Chapter Affairs
Committee. The meeting will be pat-
terned after the highly successful
one held at the Los Angeles AIA
Convention in 1956 and will be con-
cerned with practical ways of improv-
ing Florida AIA Chapters'- programs.
(Continued on Facing Page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Plans for another traveling ex-
hibit of "Florida Architecture by
Florida Architects" are now nearing
completion by FAA Vice-President
WILLIAM B. HARVARD and MARK
HAMPTON, double award winner in
the 1957 AIA Convention's Better
Housing exhibit. The architects' ex-
hibit program is now being printed
and will be mailed soon. It will invite
entries of all types of completed
buildings-represented by either ren-
derings or photographs. From those
shown at the Convention, an award
jury-to be named at a later date-
will select a number to make up an
exhibit which will go on tour for a
public showing in several cities in this
country and Latin America.

Florida State Board
Registers Eighty-six
Forty were granted registration for
practice of architecture by State
Board examinations held June 10-13.
Of these, only one from Georgia, was
from out-of-state.
Newly registered Florida architects
are:
Bartow
Leslie G. Pickett
Bradenton
Douglas E. Croll
Louis F. Schneider
Clearwater
Frank H. Morris
Donald S. Williams
Coral Gables
Kenneth Triester
Crestview
James C. Ridgeway
Daytona Beach
Charles T. Phillips
Delray Beach
George C. Davis
Ft. Lauderdale
Richard A. Baker
Robert E. Hall
Frank E. Mero
Carl A. Peterson
Ft. Myers
Charles G. Asklof
Donald E. Nick
Ft. Pierce
Robert E. A. Terry, Jr.
Goldenrod
Clifford W. Wright
Jacksonville
Caleb L. Kelley
Lakeland
James R. Dry
Miami
Harold C. Decker
Harold Edelstein
(Continued on Page 22)
AUGUST, 1957


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Board Registers 86...
(Continued from Page 21)
Walter S. Klements
Geoffrey B. Lynch
Kenneth R. Miller
Henry A. Pawlicki
Paul L. Reiner
Miami Beach
Rudolf Mikuta
Neptune Beach
Louis C. Holloway
Orlando
Lawrence L. Anglin
William A. Cox
Donald O. Phelps
Palm Beach
Wililam R. Upthegrove
St. Petersburg
James E. Thurman
Sarasota
Berthold A. Brosmith
Tallahassee
Lawrence B. Evans
Tampa
Frank A. Alfano
Demetrios J. Athan
Ivor M. Farnell
Winter Haven
Harry C. Merritt
In addition to the above, forty-six
were granted registration by exemp-
tion and one was re-instated.




American Eye in Siam...
(Continued from Page 11)
grows smaller, but regionalism will
always mean special, deserved, sensi-
tivity and response to a people and
a land.
In Siam, I feel that the life of
the people and the land call for a
strong, very Thai statement, which
can be built on the feeling, not the
techniques or picturesque details, of
long existing native architecture.
Around Cheng Mai I saw multi-level,
off-the-ground dwellings which dis-
play real native imagination. Many
small units are well arranged, and
they are made beautiful by the rich-
ness of woven, hand-fashioned hum-
ble materials. I think these buildings
should inspire Thai architects.
There is in this age little agree-
ment, even within a small country,
on what contemporary architecture
should be. And so there is little hope
of achieving in new Thai building
the splendid visual unity given to so
(Continued on facing page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall
be to unite the architectural profession within the State of
Florida to promote and forward the objectives of the The Amer-
ican Institute of Architects; to stimulate and encourage con-
tinual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters
of general public welfare, and represent and act for the archi-
tectural profession in the State; and to promote educational
and public relations programs for the advancement of the pro-
fession.






much of this country by its native
architecture. However, there are ele-
ments here which should inspire
twenty Thai architects to arrive at
twenty different, but valid, building
expressions: warm open tropical space,
beautiful cool-looking water areas,
floating boats and flowers and all
kinds of bridges, great tropical trees
and bright-color plants, and the fil-
tered light of tropical sun. These can
romanticise the most humble native
Bangkok shack but in alliance with
clean, honest, direct, spirited design,
the full charm and meaning of life in
Siam would really come alive
I am no less critical in other places,
including my own country, which is
Florida. I have this criticism on first
impression; I have been in Siam two
weeks. When I return to the United
States and am asked by architects
what was worth seeing in Siam, I
think I will describe to them a true
highlight in this long trip: seeing the
thatched houses and their skinny
bridges, late one afternoon in brilliant
yellow light, reflected in the water
along the road to Ayudyha. Siam has
thrilling country.




ADVERTISERS' INDEX
A or Sales, Inc .... . .12
Advance Metal Products, Inc. 21
Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc. 16
Associated Elevator Supply,
Inc. . . 18
Bruce Equipment Co. . 8
Electrend Distributing Co.. 22
Florida Foundry &
Pattern Works .. 20
Florida General Supply Corp. 5
Florida Home Heating Institute 14
Florida Power & Light Co. . 16
Florida Steel Corp. .24
George C. Griffin Co. .6 and 18
Horst Gunther . .. 18
Hamilton Plywood . . 17
Hollostone of Miami . 3
Interstate Marble & Tile Co. 22
Leap Concrete, Inc. . 4
Ludman Corporation 3rd Cover
Miami Window Corp. 4th Cover
Mr. Foster's Store . . 19
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 9
Sistrunk, Inc. . . 20
Tropix-Weve Products, Inc. 15
F. Graham Williams . . 23

AUGUST, 1957


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Pres. & Treasurer
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres. and Secretary
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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Producers' Council Program


The June 25th meeting of the
Miami Chapter was different. The
occasion was the traditional inaug-
uration of newly-elected officers for
the year 1957-1958. According to past
custom, also, it was a party night,
with attendance open to wives of
Council members and their guests.
Scene of the affair was the Coral
Gables Country Club; and inaugura-
tion ceremonies were preceded by the
customary cocktail hour and excellent
dinner.
What made this meeting different
from past inaugural meetings was the
presence of all but two of the Miami
Chapter's past presidents. They had
been invited for a special ceremony-
the presentation to each of a placque,
commemorating their service to the
Chapter. Placques were of walnut on
which was super-imposed an emblem
of the Producers' Council. Each was
engraved with a past-president's name
and years of office.
Newly elected officers were: FRED
CONNELL, President; CABOT KYLE,
vice-president; ALAN KERN, secretary
(elected to succeed himself); and JOE


Fred W. Connell, newly-elected Presi-
dent of the Miami Chapter of the
Producers' Council.
FARRINGTON, treasurer. The new pres-
ident succeeds NICHOLAS NORDONE.

The Producers' Council 36th An-
nual Convention and Chapter Presi-
dents' Conference will be held at the
Brown Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky,
September 25 to 27 this year.


All but two of the Miami Chapter's past presidents were on hand at the Chap-
ter's June 25th meeting to receive a placque commemorating their past services.
Seated, left to right, are: John F. Mitchell, Ed. O. Henderson, Henry J. Pitman,
R. Hurley Mitchell and Carl Slack. Standing are: Frank R. Goulding, Gosper
Sistrunk, Nicholas Nordone and Fred W. Connell. The two past presidents not
shown are Charles A. McEwen and the late George J. Haas.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





































BROOME COUNTY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
Binghamton, New York
Curtain Wall with Projected Windows
Architect: A. T. Lacey & Sons, Binghamton, N. Y.
Contractor: Nikula Construction Co., Inc., Binghamton, N. Y.


the architect's vision sets the pace for the future..

by Lawrence Field


The plans an architect draws today may well
determine the architecture of the future.

When an architect does project the future
in his plans, he must find the materials with
which to implement that vision.

For example, within very recent years, cur-
tain walls have introduced new dimensions
of freedom in design and given the architect
a new fluidity of line, and a cleanness of
structural concept and mobility.

Eminently practical, ingeniously adaptable,
curtain walls have enlarged the architect's
horizon and, at the same time, achieved
a valuable saving in construction time
and costs.

The Ludman Corporation was one of the
first to pioneer in the engineering develop-
ment and successful installation of curtain
wall in hundreds of buildings of every kind.
Its engineers are constantly formulating
new methods of treatment, new ways of


handling curtain wall design. As a result,
Ludman Curtain Walls offer practical ex-
pression of architectural concepts ... allow
the architect almost unlimited extension of
his ideas.

Ludman Curtain Walls match architectural
vision with superb window engineering that
reduces construction time and costs, yet is
always beautiful, efficient and flexible. They
combine window and wall in one easily
handled, quickly fastened, labor saving unit.
Maintenance is virtually nil.

Ludman Curtain Walls are easily adaptable
to any wall treatment desired, offering a
wide range of materials, color and texture
for interior and exterior walls.

Patented Auto-Lok aluminum awning win-
dows, intermediate projected windows, or
other Ludman windows, co-ordinate with
curtain wall treatment to increase the grace
and effectiveness of the proposed structure.


Furthermore, an architect can always rely
on the Ludman Engineering Division to
keep pace with his vision, from proposal
drawings through completion. This service
is available to the architect at all times
through his nearest Ludman Engineering
representative.
Ludman know-how, based on years of actual
curtain wall experience, has proved of aid
to architects the country over.
Ludman engineers are glad to be of assist-
ance at any stage of planning or construc-
tion, or to help solve structural problems
connected with curtain walls or window
treatment. Ludman is on the job through-
out the actual installation.
In Ludman Curtain Walls lie the means by
which the architect may well set the pace
for the future. Write to us for full, detailed
information on our curtain wall system.
The Ludman Corporation Founded 1936
Miami, Florida.



























Maine School for the Deaf ,
Mackworth Island, Falmouth, Maine
Architect: Stevens & Saunders A.l.A.
Contractor: Consolidated Constructors, Inc.



WVO 0 3 EID 3V WA. Lj .:



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