• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Hedge against mistakes
 Preparation seminars
 The new problem of old downtow...
 Report from Washington
 The centennial celebration, May...
 A cabinet post for art
 News and notes
 Daytona throws a ball!
 Advertisers' index
 Twenty-six gain U-F diplomas
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00036
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: June 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Hedge against mistakes
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Preparation seminars
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The new problem of old downtown
        Page 7
    Report from Washington
        Page 8
    The centennial celebration, May 13 to 17, 1957
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A cabinet post for art
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    News and notes
        Page 16
    Daytona throws a ball!
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Twenty-six gain U-F diplomas
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














I hiA


June- 1957



10




Report from
Washington...
The long-anticipated Cen-
tennial was celebrated in a
week-long round of exhib-
its, parties, dinners, pub-
licity and speech-packed
seminars ... To the relief
of a tired Institute staff it
is now history and the
AIA's second century is off
to a glorious start ...


I







...Now ready for use


Ij
* mjCbi Lm* d
I r I= I-
W216"N0% husadin M


This booklet has been prepared for the use of Florida AIA archi-
tects by a Special Committee of the Florida Association of
Architects. As a matter of public information, it is written in
layman's language about the architect and the services he can
render to those contemplating a building project... As such it
is a brief guide to better building and already six of Florida's
10 AIA Chapters are using it as part of their local public relations
program . This booklet is available in quantity only through
AIA Chapters in Florida. Single copies may be obtained for 15
cents (in coin) from the FAA Executive Secretary's office . .


I IM4....
.. ... + ..... .. !L






OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Treasure
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olh Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Goin. FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South .. James E. Garland
Irving L Horey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville .. Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida ... . Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . . Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
JUNE, 1957


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 7


JUNE, 1957


NUMBER 6


CONTENTS


Hedge Against Mistakes ..-------... ..--------- -------- 2

Preparation Seminars -------------------------------- 4
By John Langley

The New Problem of Old Downtown .......----------. 7
By Philip M. Talbott

Report From Washington ---.- ..-- ------------------ 8
The Centennial Celebration

A Cabinet Post for Art ---__..-.- .----.--- ----- 13
By Miss Lillian Gish

News and Notes ...... ------------------------- 16

Daytona Throws A Ball! ..----- ----------- 17

Advertisers Index ....-..-----... -------- ----------- 22

Twenty-Six Gain U/F Diplomas .-___-------. 3rd Cover
List of U/F June Architectural Graduates



THE COVER
President Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, achieved what was probably an
undreamed of distinction when he became the only man in the
worl to preside over the 100th Anniversary Celebration of the
world's largest professional organization for architects. He made the
most of it by acquitting himself well and by being very busy indeed
throughout the week-long AIA Convention last month. The presen-
tation and parties, seminars and speeches and politics and publicity
combined to round out an interlude which neither President Chate-
lain or any of his attendant colleagues will soon forget.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Architects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
... Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed, but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications provided credit Is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Adertisements of products materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed. but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . .Address all communications to the Editor
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.
1














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Hedge Against Mistakes


Professional Liability Insurance can help take the economic
sting out of the sometimes costly mistakes of errors or
omissions. Once difficult to obtain, it's now readily avail-
able with policy coverage and rates tailored to your needs.


"A Mistake," goes the saying, "Is
something a Doctor can bury, an Ac-
countant can' cover up, but an Archi-
tect is sued for."
That saying probes too close for
comfort as concerns the architect. Of
course, not every architect's mistake
is, in itself, an open door to a law
suit. But at best it's a source of em-
barrassment which though it may
not kill his practice--will not en-
hance his professional reputation with
his client-public.
At the worst the ugly trio of neg-
ligent acts, errors or omissions can
wipe out, almost overnight, the tan-
gible fruits of a whole career. The
covering phrase, "professional mal-
practice," driven soundly home under
a diabolical set of circumstances can
cost an architect not only his means
of livelihood and his backlog of finan-
cial security. It can also stigmatize
his professional competency to the
point of ruin. The fortunate fact
that such an extremity is rare doesn't
lessen the possibility of its occurrence.
The only complete and final hedge
against this possibility lies in top-
flight professional performance -
care and competence in every phase
of architectural practice. But in spite
of everything mistakes may occur. The
inevitable human element, teamed
with the increasing technical com-
plexities of modern construction, can
easily, and at any time, hatch an error
which can just as easily remain un-
seen until it has grown to such dimen-
sions as to finally reveal itself as a
stark example of "negligence" at a
crucial stage of the construction pro-
gram.
On one job it was a "minor" error.
A series of I-beam flanges had to be
burned smooth to provide the reveals
for which a curtain wall of expensive
granite had been designed, cut and
delivered. In another instance the
oversight was more serious. Three full
stories of a reinforced concrete apart-
ment house had been formed, poured
and stripped before either contractor


or architect or owner or building
inspector noticed that no provision
whatever had been made for either
elevators or stairways And the re-
percussions of more than one recent
structural failure are still fresh in the
minds of Florida's building fraternity.
Once such errors show themselves,
there is no way to avoid the profes-
sional impact of their existence. But
the economic consequences can, in
large measure, be guarded against. The
medium is insurance professional
liability insurance which, for the first
time ever, is now available, through a
domestic underwriter, to any AIA
architect in Florida.
That availability is the result of
more than two years of active re-
search by an AIA committee, work-
ing with a number of insurance com-
panies and underwriters. The out-
come of that research is a policy
which is unique in the insurance
field. It is also one of the most com-
plicated policies in existence so far

as the technicalities of rating and ad-
justing are concerned. But to an
architect, busy with the mounting
complexities of many and varied
projects and straining the capabilities
of his staff tightly to meet a constant
series of completion dates, it can be
an economic lifesaver the stout and
timely aid needed to prevent his
drowning in an angry sea of litiga-
tion.
In two particulars professional lia-
bility insurance is just like any other
type of insurance. First, it costs
money. Second, it appears to be a
dormant intangible until development
of conditions covered by a policy trig-
ger its provisions into active opera-
tion. But there the similarity diverges
sharply. With most insurance even
that of a "professional" character and
application both coverage and rates
are definite and specific. So much
protection for so much money for
such and such a period or under such
and such conditions.
(Continued on Page 24)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




























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JUNE, 1957 3






Preparation Seminars


The Mid-Florida Chapter's classroom
program is proving popular and practical
as a help to candidates for registration

By JOHN LANGLEY


"If you can't get Mohammed to
the mountain, then bring the moun-
tain to Mohammed." This is the
philosophy which brought about the
series of Professional Seminars now
being sponsored by the Mid-Florida
Chapter.
These Seminars were designed to
help two groups. The first includes
those men preparing for the state
licensing exam. Men who need re-
freshing on subjects which they are
not given an opportunity to work
at in the present employment or those
suffering from "handbookitus." The
second group is comprised of men
who have come into architecture from
other fields as building construc-
tion, fine arts, etc.-and who need
basic instruction. It would have been
best for all of these men to go back
to college, but money, time and loca-
tion being what it was, Mid-Florida
Chapter has attempted to bring col-
lege back to the men.
The Seminars meet two nights a
week at Winter Park High School
(when instructors are available) and
were set up this year to cover Pro-
fessional Practice, Methods and Ma-
terials, History, Strength of Ma-
terials and Statics, Mechanical and


Electrical Equipment, Concrete, Steel
and Wood Construction. It is planned
that next fall there will be seminars
in Site Planning, Advanced Engineer-
ing and Theory of Design.
The instructional staff, as might
be expected, has presented the big-
gest hurdle. Five basic plans have
been tried, as follows:
1. One volunteer instructor per
session: This was used in the Pro-
fessional Practice Seminar with lead-
ing architects in the Chapter taking
separate chapters in the AIA Profes-
sional Practice Handbook.
2. Paid instructor for full seminar:
Pay was really only a token amount-
ing to one dollar per session per mem-
ber. With larger classes this would
work well if instructors can be found.
3. Self help: Each member took a
specific era of Architectural History
and reported to the group. Only the
outcome of the exam will tell if this
has worked.
4. Outside Vendors: In the meth-
ods and materials of architectural con-
struction seminar men from local sup-
ply houses and producers have come
and spent an evening discussing their
products. Field trips offered by this
(Continued on Page 28)


Here's a typical classroom scene as students of the Mid-Florida Chapter's
training program develops to prepare candidates for registration exams.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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JUNE, 1957







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The New Problem of Old Downtown



The problem is much the same in any city in any section of the country. What
to do about solving it was the subject of a talk by PHILIP M. TALBOTT,
president, U. S. Chamber of Commerce, at the AIA Convention session on
"The Future of the City". Published here is the conclusive portion of that talk.


Downtown is not an illusion. It
is a living, vital force in community
life.
Traditionally, America's main
streets have been, and still are, Ameri-
ca's backbone. They have been, and
exist today, as the centers of our
national, economic, social and cultural
lives. To our citizens, Downtown has
always meant the hub of our activity.
To you and me it has meant the
world's greatest shopping center, the
nerve center of our community, its
guiding influence and the heart of the
trading area. As such it is the very
essence of our enterprises.
The problems of Downtown have
become a major issue for our entire
economy, in local government and
for the public at large, because Down-
town is known for more than its great
stores. It is the hub, the lifeline of
every community and every city. It
stands as the center of our nation's
financial life, boasting the offices,
banks and business enterprises that
maintain the flow of goods and serv-
ices throughout our country.
Remember, too, it is the focal point
of all transportation systems, and the
crossroads of communications. Wher-
ever it may be, Downtown is the heart
of all activity, and from Downtown
emanate the economic impulses that
maintain our farms and factories, our
governments and industries.
No matter what the community, its
tax rolls will indicate that its major
tax income is derived from its Down-
town area. The taxes that Downtown
pays go a long way to supporting local
government and its public services.
If we could follow those tax dollars,
we would see them at work in our
police and fire departments, our school
systems, our health facilities and in
every single facet of community life.
They are a major source of the serv-
ices that make a community a good


community, and make it desirable as
a place in which to live, work and
shop.
In contrast, if Downtown suffers
as a market place, its income suffers
and the tax monies it provides must
fall. The obvious result is a detri-
mental and serious effect upon the
entire community.
Problems exist Downtown, but I
do not recognize Downtown itself as
a problem. Its problems are not in-
surmountable. Their solution is a
project in which every segment of
business and civic life must cooperate
if we are to maintain our cities in
their rightful and traditional position.
There is nothing wrong with Down-
town that the interest and joint action
of a community's leading citizens
cannot correct.
If I were to recommend to you a
check list for action on the vitalization
of Downtown, I would include these
immediate objectives.
First and of utmost importance is
the organization of a small but rep-
resentative group of business and civic
leaders to establish a program which
has as its sole objective, an economi-
cally, culturally, and socially strong
Downtown area. The committee
should be small; composed of men
with prestige standing-successful in
their chosen vocations, and with a
personal interest in Downtown.
Once organized, that small but rep-
resentative committee should devote
itself to the prime sources of the
Downtown problem itself. There are
eleven main objectives which stand
out in almost every community that
has undertaken a Downtown vitaliza-
tion program. They are:
1. By-passing highways around the
downtown district to relieve traffic
congestion.
2. Elimination and beautification
of slum sections.


3. Ways and means of providing
off-street parking facilities and garages.
4. Off-street mass transit terminals
to prevent the blocking of streets by
busses that are not moving, or loading
and unloading passengers.
5. The construction of expressways
for "thru" traffic.
6. Easing of traffic congestion
through the provision of one way
streets in congested areas.
7. The provision of fringe parking
areas outside the business districts
from which public transport to Down-
town is available on a frequent sched-
ule.
8. The existence of bus systems con-
fined to Downtown and oscillating
within major Downtown terminals to
shuttle passengers within the Down-
town district itself.
9. Traffic and pedestrian subways
under major Downtown crossings to
speed the flow of traffic.
10. Study of all building codes to
determine if parking space can be pro-
vided in new buildings, and that they
are so constructed as to provide heli-
copter landing areas.
11. Improvements made in down-
town buildings and fixtures should be
publicized-such publicity has a psy-
chological effect on property owners.
and inspires confidence in the public
as well as their own business interests
-and may suggest further improve-
ments.
In every city and town the chal-
lenge exists. But this is not a challenge
for the proverbial George. It is a chal-
lenge for everyone, because a sick
Downtown district spreads its infec-
tion into every area of community life.
When Downtown falters, all busi-
ness within its influence falters, and
so does the community itself.
Downtown is more than a business
center. Downtown is everybody's busi-
ness.


JUNE, 1957






















Here is part of the Florida AIA contingent which attended the Centennial Celebration. Left to right, back row:
Roland W. Sellew, Kenneth Jacobson, Irving Horsey, Clinton Gamble, William P. Greening, John M. Evans, John
Stetson. Front row: Maurice E. Holley, Hilliard T. Smith, William B. Harvard, Edgar S. Wortman, Anthony L.
Pullara, Thomas Larrick, Sanford W. Goin, FAIA., W. Kenneth Miller and Dr. Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA .....
Other Florida architects attending the Convention included: Joseph L Wilkes, John L. R. Grand, Robert B.
Murphy, Richard B. Rogers, Morton T. Ironmonger, Horace H. Hamlin, Elliott B. Hadley, Archie G. Parish, FAIA,
William R. Gomon, Walter B. Schults, Scott B. Arnold, James Deen, James E. Ferguson, H. Samuel Kruse, Robert
M. Little, Edwin T. Reeder, Herbert Savage, Jerry P. Simmons, Robert Fitch Smith and Wahl J. Snyder, II.




REPORT


FROM



1i WASHINGTON


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














The Centennial Celebration


MAY 13 to


17, 1957


The long-hcraldcd AIA Centennial
Celebration-the Institute's 89th An-
nual Convention-made professional
history in more ways than one. It
was probably the most publicized
gathering in the profession's experi-
ence. It was certainly one of the best
organized. And it assembled, for
edification of a near-record atten-
dance, a roster of top-flight brains
from the varied fields of arts, tech-
nology, government and business. The
Institute staff and the \\ashington-
Metropolitan Chapter as hosts outdid
themselves to justify the advanced
billing of the once-in-a-century meet-
ing. The week of May 13 to 17, 1957,
will undoubtedly be long remembered
by all who were fortunate enough to
spend it in Washington.
Unlike the Los Angeles Convention
last year, each convention day had
been planned to treat with only a few
specific subjects. It was therefore pos-
sible for conventionees to attend each
scheduled meeting without the fear
they might be missing some other
seminar of special interest or signifi-
cance. As one result, the audience at
almost every session was substantial.
This year, too, the Convention was
organized differently than in former
years. Registration started at 2:00
P.M. on Sunday, May 12, and the


Centennial Celebration program
opened officially Monday evening,
with President LEON CHATELAIN, JR.,
FAIA, presiding. The Convention's
keynote address was presented by ED-
WARD A. WEEKS, JR., editor of the
Atlantic Monthly, who will be re-
membered as the keynoter of the In-
stitute's 88th Convention at Boston in
1954. The title of Mr. Weeks' talk
was "Buildings Which Shape Our
Lives," but much of it was taken
up with sonmwchat nostalgic comments
on the centennial observation which
the Atlantic itself is planning for the
fall of this year.
The host chapter had arranged a
series of aerial and bus tours of Wash-
ington and its environs during the
day. Sunday afternoort had given an
opportunity to tour the National
Cathedral; and Wednesday afternoon,
following the business session, the host
chapter had also arranged for i cruise
down the Potomac. Otherwise tlhe
four active Convention days were
packed with speeches and business
sessions some at the Shoreham.
official headquarters, but jumping to
the Sheraton-Park, the National Gal-
lery of Art-for the President's Re-
ception and opening of the architec-
tural exhibit on Tuesday evening-
and Constitution Hall for the "Future


of the City" session Thursday after-
noon.
This shuttling about caused un-
avoidable inconvenience. For one
thing transportation was somewhat
spotty; and for another the weather
was something less than the per-
fection we know in Florida. Spring
in Washington is marked by sudden
and gusty rain squalls; and during the
week most everybody got wet at least
once. But the weather put no damper
on speeches Eighteen of these had
been scheduled-not including the
keynote address nor the inevitable
"remarks" incident to presentation
and acceptance of honors and awards
and -the extemporaneous courtesies of
introductions.
The general session of Tuesday dis-
posed of "The New World of Tech-
nology" in a generalized address by
Dr. DETLEV W. BRONK, president of
the National Academy of Sciences,
and "The New World of Ideas" as
visioned by PXUL G. HOFFMAN, U. S.
Representative to the U. N. General
Assembly. This last turned out to be
a 14-page discussion of our policy to-
wards Russia and a plug for foreign
economic aid-which Mr. Hoffman
stated was a "very modest" request
for 3 billion, 900 million dollars
(Cuotiinued on Page 10)


JUNE, 1957 9








Parish Awarded

Fellowship


Archie Gale Parish, FAIA


At the Annual Dinner of the AIA
Convention, held May 16 in Wash-
ington, ARCHIE GALE PARISH, of St.
Petersburg, was elevated to Institute
Fellowship for public service and serv-
ice to the Institute. This year, as last,
only one architect from Florida was so
honored.
The selection of Archie Parish for
that honor is as welcome to his pro-
fessional colleagues as it is justified by
the record of his service. Born in
Minneapolis in 1898, he came to
Florida during the great depression
after scholastic training which in-
cluded courses in Dunwoody Institute,
University of Minneapolis and the
Beaux Arts Institute. His headquar-
ters became St. Petersburg; and for
almost 25 years he has unselfishly
utilized his professional training and
experience for the benefit of that
community. He was a member of the
Board of Zoning Appeals, has been
a member of the Materials Board since
1935, Chairman of the Code Commit-
tee since 1945. For many years he
has been a member of the State
Board of Architecture and served as
that body's president in 1946-47 and
again in 1952-53. He is a member
of the Florida Central Chapter, was
its Secretary for five years and presi-
dent during 1945-46.


Centennial Celebration ...
(Continued from Page 9)
Tuesday's opening luncheon at the
Shoreham Terrace (wet and windy)
was all President Chatelain. He pre-
sided, saw to the introduction of dis-
tinguished guests and delivered an
address. His subject, "Housing Our
New Society," must have touched
a familiar chord in those who at-
tended the merchant housing seminar
of the Los Angeles Convention-or
even those at home who have whipped
up a reading acquaintance with
"House and Home." He looked gen-
erally at the housing market, the ex-
tent of its potential, the broad pos-
sibilities of its development by archi-
tects working side by side with mer-
chant builders and the industry of
prefabrication. He found all of them
promising, shed a brief tear over the
thought that "we must reluctantly
abandon the idea of designing for in-
dividual needs and tastes" and called
on architects to adapt their charges
and professional services to the exe-
gencies of the "residential housing
field" and thus "satisfy the high ideals
of our profession, the needs of our
home builders and our responsibilities
to the American people."
The Centennial Celebration went
on in that same general vein through
Friday! Tuesday afternoon the topic


was "Environment and the Indi-
vidual" chairmanned by DR. JOHN
E. BURCHARD whose superlative key-
note address was by far the high point
of last year's convention, DR. GEORGE
H. T. KIMBLE, director, the 20th Cen-
tury Fund Survey of Tropical Africa,
drew a grim outline of increasing
wastages and dwindling natural re-
sources.DR. PAUL TILLICH, University
Professor at Harvard, offered a some-
what esoteric comment on the psy-
chological influences of environment.
DR. MILLICENT C. MCINTOSH, presi-
dent of Barnard College, briefly
sketched the paradox of apparently
insoluble problems facing an age and
country of unprecedented opportun-
ity and privilege.
Wednesday morning Miss LILLIAN
GISH and DR. HOWARD MITCHELL
plumped for wider Federal recognition
of the Fine Arts. And Thursday after-
noon's discussion centered on "The
Future of the City" with cogent com-
ments by CARL FEIss, FAIA, PHILIP
M. TALBOTT, President, Chamber of
Commerce of the U.S., and U.S. Sen-
ator JOSEPH S. CLARK-which, hope-
fully, may appear in these pages in
due time.
Came Thursday evening and the
Annual Dinner. Announcement of
election returns indicated all present
officers had been retained for another
(Continued on Page 2)


President Eisenhower appears slightly incredulous upon receiving from AIA
President Leon Chatelain, Jr., FAIA, a Gold Medal as a special commemoration
of the Institute's Centennial Celebration and 89th Annual Convention. Later
the President told reporters he wondered what he had done "to deserve the
medal."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


~cE~








A Cabinet Post for Art



Miss LILLIAN GISH, famed for her movie, stage and TV
roles, was one of many top-flight Celebration speakers. Dur-
ing the seminar on "The Arts in Modern Society," she pro-


posed that architects support
Secretary of Art and Science


I believe the Government should
play a definite role in encouraging the
arts in America. To date our coun-
try's official interest has been out-
standing by its absence. Such neglect
could not have been the intention of
our Founding Fathers, else our first
president would not have commis-
sioned the French architect Pierre
Charles L'Enfant to draw plans for
this city. As you know, he only
worked one year when he was dis-
missed because of his "untoward dis-
position" though his plan was in gen-
eral followed. Our third president,
Jefferson, supervised the building of
his own beautiful home and our love-
ly University of Virginia.
In France, Napoleon the III with
the help of Haussman planned Paris
as it exists today. Without the Greek
S statesman, Pericles, who was a patron
of the arts, the Acropolis could not
have been planned and rebuilt after
the Persian War. The Greek popula-
tion was brought up to be sensitive to
it, to criticize it and to be proud of it.
This new nation, growing so swiftly,
had better pause and look to its future
here at home. Since 1917 we seem to
have concentrated on other lands more
than on our own. We have given
away many billions to others while
our own shrines come down one by
one for lack of funds to care for them.
Why? Because the artist has no Court
of Appeals as the Laboring Man, the
War Lord or the business man. They
all have a Secretary in the President's
Cabinet; but not the Artist, not the
Scientist. He does not exist in our
Republic.
When they opened the George
Washington Bridge, that dream of
beauty over the Hudson in New York,
President Roosevelt came up from
Washington, the Governors from all
the States around, the Mayors and
bands played for hundreds of thou-
JUNE, 1957


a movement to include a
in the presidential cabinet.


sands of people. But they forgot to
ask the Architect! Of all the hundreds
of people I have asked if they knew
the name of the man or men who
created this beautiful bridge, only one
person knew and he was an architect.
When the brochure was prepared for
cornerstone laying of New State De-
partment Building, all participating
officials, all responsible government
officials, contractors, etc. were listed,
but not the architects.
You architects are not entirely
blameless. You remind me of my own
family, who believe a lady should have
her name in the public print just
three times-when she is born, when
she is married and when she dies. In
my lifetime I have heard of only two
architects: Frank Lloyd Wright, God
bless him for what he has done to
make even the word "Architecture"
known to us; and the other is a mem-
ory of my childhood, Stanford White,
who got shot. A prizefighter gets
more publicity and in some instances
a truck driver is better paid. It would
seem that our system of values has
reached an Alice in Wonderland ab-
surdity, worthy only of satire.
A nation is great only, when the
essence of its mind and spirit is great.
We judge every ancient culture by its
Works of Art. Why should we not
judge ourselves by the same standard?
Think for a moment what we would
be like without the contribution of
our Rockefellers, Ford, Mellons, Car-
negie and others of our great philan-
thropists. Where will we find the
great, generous and farsighted men in
the future? Who will have enough
private capital to restore Williams-
burg? Where will we get our art col-
lections to equal Widener, Krcss,
Chester, Dale and Cone. Our enor-
mous taxes make it less likely that
we shall have men and families like
these in our future. Such great sums


of money are going to the Federal
Government. Billions for arms and
armies to defend this country and not
one cent for the background and
beauty which these arms and men
defend. Why should our government
not take some responsibility and give
us a Secretary of Fine Arts indepen-
dent of the party in power, who would
devote himself solely to getting the
best possible assistance to help and
advise each branch of the Arts? This
is really one of the most essential
things for a Government to consider.
For Art, the most lasting product
of a Civilization, had no value that
can be assessed in money. Imagine
trying to sell the Parthenon, a Mozart
Mass, or Paradise Lost today. Yet Art
is the only lasting aristocracy. Kings
come and go; Countries, Governments
come and go-only Art remains. You
and you and you, more than any
other, are the unsung artists of our
'time. You have the ways and means
to reach every part of this Nation.
Nothing lasting is ever put into
construction without a plan and solid
structure. You devise the plan and let
the Government put up the structure
which is recognition and some au-
thority in your case. You have to look
ahead since you build for tomorrow.
You are the future. As an Artist you
come pretty near to working in eter-
nity. You start with a plan for a
Church, a House, or a Bridge. Then
why not a plan for our Cities that
will enrich living by placing all the
needs of the populace within harmoni-
ous reach in beautiful surroundings?
That could end the confusion of run-
ning in narrow streets, many of which
originally were cow-paths from one
end of town to another looking for a
(Continued on Page 14)








































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Cabinet Post ...
(Continued from Page 13)
hairpin. Does this sound fantastic?
As you move through the United
States, growing so swiftly, it is not too
late for planned cities instead of those
that "just growed" like Topsy.
Every town or city place has some-
thing of which it is proud and would
like to keep lovely or make beautiful.
At Phoenix, where we were playing
a few weeks ago, the natives pointed
with pride at their camel-backed
mountain, but told us it was being
ruined and would soon look like any
hillside dotted with houses. You are
the ones to preserve our landmarks,
the parks we already have, and to see
to it that other parks are made in this
swiftly expanding land, But for this
you must have authority and help.
If you agree that we need a Sec-
retary of Art and Science, will you
not devise a plan to be submitted
with the plans of all the other
branches of the Arts and Science so
that we may take it to the White
House. Our President has already gone
on record and said that something
should be done for the Arts. Now it
is up to us to tell him what that
something is. Since he gave us a Sec-
retary of Health, Education and Wel-
fare, because he believed it was a
good thing for the Country (and by
the way since then there has been one
grant alone of half a billion dollars)
if we can persuade him that our
cause has an equal value to the future
of America, we have every reason to
hope that this dedicated man will sup-
port us in every way. Canada has its
Minister of Fine Arts. The British
Government is a Patron of the Arts.
In 1950-51 their expenditure was $81,-
998,000. Sweden, France, Italy-
In Austria the summer before last,
we were looking at one of Fisher Von
Erhlick's (an Austrian architect of
several centuries ago) lovely buildings
when two school children, around 11
or 12, came by and told us that if we
liked his work we could find a much
better example two blocks further
down the street. All the cultured
nations of the world look to their
artists to help build and preserve their
civilizations. Every nation in the world
except ours! If you share my belief
that we need this recognition, please
work on your plan and make the
artists of our country at long last be-
long to our country.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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News & Notes

Three Native Sons
Win AIA House Awards
Of the 12 architects whose residen-
tial designs won them "Homes for
Living Awards" at the AIA Centen-
nial Convention, three were from
Florida. And of these, one took two
of the four honors for custom-built
houses.
The awards were given for the best
architect-designed houses both in
custom-built and mass-produced cate-
gories completed in the East from
1954 through 1956. MARK HAMPTON,
of Tampa, won first awards in Class A
-houses under 1600 sq. ft.-and in
Class B-between 1600 and 2800 sq.
ft.-for private residences in Lake
Wales.
An award of merit went to GENE
LEEDY, of Winter Haven for a mer-
chant-built house in Bartow in the
Class B category (cost, $15,000 to
$20,000). ROBERT C. BROWARD of
Jacksonville won an honorable men-
tion for his design in the Class C mer-
chant-built category for houses costing
above $20,000.
It is hoped that these prize-winning
designs can be published fully in a
forthcoming issue of The Florida
Architect.


Chapter Seminar Can
Offer Profitable Fun
The May meeting of the Florida
South Chapter featured a program
which might well prove both popu-
lar and profitable elsewhere. Sitting
as a guest panel after the Chapter's
dinner meeting were a decorator,
JAMES MERRICK SMITH, an engineer,
AL OBLER, JOHN AVANT, a contractor
and OTIS DUNAN, representing the
viewpoint of the material suppliers.
Moderator of the panel was FRANK
E. WATSON. And the idea was to get
the guests talking about what arclu-
tects weren't doing that they should
do and vice versa.
In spite of Watson's needling to
get the barbs slinging across the table,
general good humor prevailed
though a number of pointed sugges-
tions were offered by each panelist.
Obler made a plea that designers call
in an engineer early, preferably when
(Continued on Page 19)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























Grouped around the head table are, left to right, Joel Sayers, Mrs. A. H.
Thurman, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Stupka, Mr. and Mrs. Sig Greene,
Edgar S. Wortman, FAA president, Mrs. Francis R. Walton, Francis R.
Walton, William P. Greening, president of the Daytona Beach Chapter,
Mrs. Hazel Mason, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pyle.



Daytona Throws A Ball!

It was a Beaux Arts Ball with all the traditional costumes and trim-
mings for more than 100 couples the night of Saturday, April 27.
The Bath and Tennis Club was the site of the party in which the
revelers had fun at not being themselves. The affair was sponsored
by members of the Daytona Bcach Chapter and was counted enough
of a success to become a anannual event.


Costumes which won Mr. and Mrs.
Sylvan Wells a trip to Nassau, were
identified as Raggedy Ann and Rag-
gedy Andy, left.


Second prize went to Nancy Butts
Stevens, right, who won the abstract
sculpture she is holding. Third prize,
a Matisse print, was won by J. B.
Sullivan for his costume inspired by
the scope and technicalities of archi-
tects' work, far right.
JUNE, 1957







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News & Note
(Continued from Page 16)
the client's physical needs are being
developed. This, he said, would avoid
possible later complications and might
result in substantial money savings in
many cases.
Smith's comments were similar in
character. He stressed the point that
planning is often made easier if client,
architect and decorator can discuss
the furnishing needs before space
limitations have been frozen. And
he said that decorator consultation on
a time basis could accomplish that
result. He named a consultation fee
of $25 per hour and combined voices
from the architects murmured, "I'll
work for that rate any day!"
Avant touched on possible improve-
ments in bidding procedures and asked
the architects to give contractors
more time to prepare bids properly.
He also suggested bidders lists should
be grouped according to skill and size
of organization.
For the material men Dunan plead-
ed with architects to find out whether
or not the materials wanted are avail-
able locally before a specification is
finally completed. He stated that
specifications left open to such mat-
ters as color, texture and price were
increasing building costs unnecessarily.
No world-shaking conclusions came
from the panel discussions. But as the
evening wore on it was evident that
the give-and-take between the archi-
tects and the guest-representatives of
the men and groups with which they
work had been constructive and a
lot of fun as well.
At the same meeting the Chapter
unanimously endorsed a resolution by
SAMUEL KRUSE, FAA Secretary and
former Florida South Chapter presi-
dent, that the Chapter approve the
principle of county home rule and
the Greater Miami metropolitan char-
ter.

Award to Miss Manley
Miss MARION I. MANLEY, FAIA,
won added honor early last month for
her contribution to the field of archi-
tecture in Dade County. The Coconut
Grove architect was given the Bertha
Foster Award from the Chi Omega
Alumnae Association of Miami. The
award is a gold medal presented an-
(Continued on Page 20)
JUNE, 1957


Memo To:


Your Specs Writer


Subject:


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SSpecify that all doors shall be edge-sealed or prime-
coated by supplier prior to delivery at job.

Schedule job delivery after plastering has dried.
Require doors to be stored flat in dry, ventilated
area and protected with covering blanket of plastic
vapor-barrier or equivalent.


3.


Require all doors to be two-coat edge-sealed after
fitting, but before hanging.. Cover this by clause
in both carpenter's and painter's specs.


Have job supervisor check on all points in sequence.
Use small mirror to check proper sealing on vital
top and bottom edges of all hung doors. Lack of
*0 such sealing is most frequent cause of moisture
penetration resulting in warping, sticking, eventual
damage from rot.


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 19)
nually by the Association to the
woman selected as having made out-
standing contributions to the Fine
Arts in Dade County. For a number


of years Miss Manley has been a mem-
ber of the Coral Gables Architec-
tural Board, the Coral Gables Zon-
ing Commission and the Miami Plan-
ning Board. She was elevated to AIA
Fellowship last year for distinguished
service to the Institute.


PLHaza 6574
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Camera-caught at the April meeting of the Florida Central Chapter held in
the Orange Blossom Hotel at Sarasota, left to right, Frank J. Rooney, past
president of the AGC; Edgar S. Wortman, FAA president; Roland W. Sellew,
president of the Florida Central Chapter, and Sanford W. Goin, FAIA, newly
elected AIA Regional Director. Mr. Rooney was guest speaker at the meeting.






New FAA Committee Named
FAA President EDGAR S. WORT-
MAN has named a three-man FAA
Historical Record Committee. It in-
cludes DR. TURPIN C. BANNISTER,
FAIA, chairman, GUSTAV MAAs, and
FRANKLIN O. ADAMS, JR., FAIA.

Palm Beach Meeting
Speaking at the May 9 meeting of
the Palm Beach Chapter, U/F Dean
TURPIN C. BANNISTER forecast that by
1970 Florida would have a shortage
of 800 architects. He based his state-
ment on projected construction vol-
umes required to fill the State's build-
ing needs based on current and antici-
pated growth trends.
The speaker also sketched a pro-
gram of building research for the pro-
fession which would be initiated at
the U/F in a Bureau of Architectural
Research.

New Address ...
The Miami Beach firm of PAN-
COAST, FERENDINO, SKEELS & BURN-
HAM has announced a change of ad-
dress as of June 1. The firm's new
location will be at 2575 South Bay-
shore Drive, Miami 33. Telephone
at the new address will be Highland
4-6518.



CHANDLER COX YONGE
Throughout the State friends will
be saddened to learn of the death,
May 8, at Pensacola, of CHANDLER
Cox YONGE. A native Floridian, Mr.
Yonge was born in Pensacola in 1888,
received his degree in architecture
from Alabama Polytechnic Institute
and later studied at Columbia Univer-
sity under a post-graduate scholarship.
He was registered to practice in Ala-
bama, Florida and New York and was
formerly associated, among others,with
JAMES GAMBLE ROGERS of Winter
Park, and R. DANIEL HART of Pensa-
cola. At the time of his death he was
senior member of the Pensacola firm
of YONGE, LOOK AND MORRISON.
Mr. Yonge had been a member of
the AIA since 1926. He had been
active in professional affairs for many
years and served as a member of the
Florida State Board of Architecture
from 1934 to 1937.


JUNE, 1957


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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OFFICES AND YARD


PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"
STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS
ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. H13-6554
MO 1-5154








, BUILDERS' ROSTER,


Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in their
locality or are trade association members of recognized standing. AGC-Associated General
Contractors. FAEC-Florida Association of Electrical Contractors. ACI-Amer. Concrete Institute;
NCMA-Natl. Concrete Masonry Assoc.. NRMCA-Natl. Ready-mixed Concrete Assoc., FCPA-
Florida Concrete Products Assoc. C-Person to contact.


- CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John L. Avant, Pres.-AGC

Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC
- DUVAL COUNTY
INDUSTRIAL & HEAVY
Henry G. Dupree Co.
1125 Kings Ave., Jacksonville
Phone: FL 9-6622
C-Henry G. DuPree, Pres.-AGC

- PALM BEACH COUNTY
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC


Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W.Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.
CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501 Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Pres.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
- PINELLAS COUNTY
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC
-- VOLUSIA COUNTY -
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C-Hugo Quillian, Partner-AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI
- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


Centennial Celebration
(Continued from Page 10)
year. The Gold Medals were present-
ed, one to Louis SKIDMORE, another
to RALPH WALKER, both AIA Fellows.
And by far the best speech of the
Convention waS given by HENRY R.
LUCE, editor-in-chief of Time, Inc.,
on the "Architecture of a Demo-
cracy."
The Convention closed on Friday.
The morning session was highlighted
with a long, but informative speech
on "The New World of Economics"
in which DR. EMERSON P. SCHMIDT,
director of economics, CC of the
US, shook a verbal finger at organized
labor and lashed out vigorously at
socialism and communism. In the
afternoon, PIETRO BELLUSCHI, FAIA,
Dean, School of Architecture and
Planning, MIT, peered dimly and
pedantically ahead to "A New Cen-
tury of Architecture." The day and
Convention ended with cocktails and
a reception sponsored by the National
Asosciation of Home Builders.
And the AIA business? It was all
disposed of in two brief sessions under
the streamlined procedure of cut-and-
dry inaugurated last year.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Ador Sales, Inc . . 6
Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc. 15
Associated Elevator Supply,
Inc. .. . ... 20
Blumcraft of Pittsburgh . 11
Bruce Equipment Company 2
Builders' Roster . . .22
Electrend Distributing Co. . 23
Executone Distributors . 23
Florida Foundry & Pattern
Works ........ 14
Florida General Supply Corp. 5
Florida Home Heating Institute 12
Florida Power & Light Co. . 18
Florida Steel Corp. . . 24
George C. Griffin Co. 4 and 20
Horst Gunther . 20
Hamilton Plywood . . 18
Hollostone Co. of Miami . 3
Interstate Marble & Tile Co.. 20
Mr. Foster's Store . . 16
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. . 19
Sistrunk . .. 14
Tropix-Weve Products, Inc. 15
F. Graham Williams .. 21


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


E L E C DITRIC HEATOMAN





(Continued from Page 4)
group have proved very effective.
5. One volunteer instructor for the
full Seminar. The Chapter has been
very fortunate in having MALCOLM
McQUAIG of JAMES GAMBLE ROGER'S
office and JAMES WINDHAM, III, AIA,
of Orlando, volunteer to carry eight
once a week sessions each in Steel and
Concrete Design.
Evaluating the different methods of
instruction is difficult. It would be
best to have regular paid instructors,
but they are not always available. Out-
side vendors provide the mechanics'
view point and local limitation very
well, but the backbone of any course
of this kind will always be those
men who are willing to give of their,
in some cases, not-so-free time to
help others. In this area it should be
noted with a good deal of professional
pride that in no case has any archi-
tect refused to help either personally
or with members of his staff because
of any feeling of aiding the "com-
petition." The members of Mid-Flori-
da Chapter have seen beyond their
personal advantages to the better-
ment of professional service in general
in their attitude toward taking part
in the Seminars.
As to cost, to date a total of $127.00
has been collected from the members
of theSeminar. A total of $52.00 paid
out for instruction and $59.00 for ad-
ministrative expenses, with the re-
mainder held to start the program
next fall. A total of 135 Seminar Units
will have thus been given at an aver-
age cost of 36c per pupil unit.
Speaking personally as a member
of the Seminars and as "Administra-
tor," two points seem to be eminently
clear: First, both members and in-
structors have acted in the highest
professional sense in their participa-
tion. This can do nothing but advance
the standing of all architects in the
area. And second, the cooperation and
enthusiasm of many minds bent on
better understanding of their chosen
task in life has proved more than
justifying the time and effort needed
to bring these Professional Seminars
into being!
It is my hope that the State or-
ganization can act as a clearing house
of ideas, methods and achievements
for more Chapters taking part in the
program.
JUNE, 1957


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that should utilize intercom or sound, you should be
familiar with these four important Executone services:


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Hedge Against Mistakes
(Continued from Page 2)
But a professional liability policy
is based on not one, but several con-
tingencies. It says, in oversimplified
effect, if an architect makes an im-
portant mistake (commits a profes-
sional error, omission or negligent
act); and if that results in liability on
the architect's part (either legal or
financial); and if that liability entails
payment of damages or the expenses
of litigation, the insuring company
will foot the bills to the extent of the
policy even though the mistake
may not have been made by the
architect himself, but by someone in
his employ.
Thus the new type of policy can
become operative under a very broad
set of possible conditions. Under its
terms the insuring company will:
1 . Pay sums for which an archi-
tect may become liable as a result of
his mistakes, 2 . Act for him in
defending any suit which might be
instituted as a consequence of his mis-
take; 3 . Pay costs of such suits;
and, 4 . Reimburse the architect
for expenses, incident to such suits
when incurred at the request of the
insuring company.
Broad as these terms are, however,
the field of professional liability cov-
erage is delineated within narrow lim-
its. And understandably so. Such in-
surance is not concerned with other
fields of insurance such as those of
personal liability or property damage.
It is emphatically not a substitute for
any other form of insurance. But to
the extent that it offers coverage in
a very special field of liability in
which the architect heretofore could
find little or no protection, it is sup-
plementary to other forms of insur-
ance and thus provides a definitive
solution to a professional problem of
increasing practical importance.
At present that solution is not a
particularly cheap one--though the
question of cost is only a relative one
at best. Professional liability insur-
ance is rated individually in every in-
stance. Though base rates will run
from about 25 to 35 cents per $100,
the full cost may rise sharply above
the higher figure, depending upon the
relative importance of various factors
which must be considered in develop-
ing a rate for each professional situa-
tion.
Some of these factors are: the size


of an architect's office, the volume of
work done, the size and type of proj-
ects, the character of the office or-
ganization- and, of course, the his-
tory of office operation relative to
litigation, claims and the frequency
of the negligent acts, errors and omis-
sions, the effects of which the new
insurance policy is designed to cover.
Since all these matters are subject to
as much variation as there are offices,
the rate must necessarily be tailored.
For the same amount of coverage it
may even vary substantially between
two offices of the same apparent size.
And it might well be higher for a
smaller office doing a certain class of
work than for a larger office doing
work of different character but great-
er volume.
Right now the minimum premium
runs about $150 for a minimum cov-
erage of $25,000. Top coverage is
presently set at $250,000; and in
every case there is a deductible clause
involved, with the minimum set at
$500 and the top deductible figure
subject to negotiation depending on
individual preference relative to the
amount of coverage and premium
costs involved.
Insurance men readily admit that
these premium costs are higher than
those for other forms of insurance.
But they point to the lack of experi-
ence relative to claims in the profes-
sional liability field. Involved also is
the newness of the field itself. As ac-
ceptance of this form of insurance
grows, re-insurance now a usual
practice with many common forms of
underwriting will develop, thus
serving to spread risks and tending to
progressively lower premium costs.
Thus, lower carrying costs for this
important new type of insurance pro-
tection can be generated by architects
themselves. First, of course, is the
sheer force of numbers. As more and
more offices buy policies, risks are
spread, the incidence probability of
claims reduced. Eventually, servicing
costs go down and premiums can be
reduced.
The other means for lowering
premium costs is technical from an-
other viewpoint. The more compe-
tent and careful an architect's office
operation becomes, the less chance
there is of mistakes growing into
large and costly errors. And with
fewer claims to service, the premium
costs of any insurance company can
quickly and profitably be reduced.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












Twenty-Six Gain U-F Diplomas


This month the 26 young men
listed below will graduate from the
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts at the University of Florida at
Gainesville. They will be assured of
a warm welcome by the architectural
profession to which their diplomas
have given each a probationary mem-
bership. They are fortunate in the
existence of that welcome and in the
professional activities which go to
make it a practical opportunity as
well. Practicing architects are also
fortunate in the opportunity to but-
tress their office staffs with the fresh
talent and enthusiasm these young
men offer. The world of architecture
needs good talent. Florida needs good
architecture more than ever before.
ALFORD, JAMES DONALD
P. O. Box 13
Bunnel, Fla.
c/o Mr. O. F. Alford
ANSON, HERBERT L.
2630 Monroe Street,
Hollywood, Fla.
BAILEY, JACK McGEAR
623 North O Street
Lake Worth, Fla.
c/o Mr. Merle Bailey, Sr.
BORGOS, RAFAEL LuIS
Bow Street
Corozal, Puerto Rico
CANNELLA, JOHN FRANK
8112 Delaware Avenue
Jacksonville, Fla.
c/o Mr. John Frank Canella, Sr.
CHIARELLA, ANGELO JOSEPH
189 Navy Street
Brooklyn, New York
c/o Mr. John Chiarella
DANIEL, ROBERT JON
1525 Jefferson Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
c/o Mr. Otto Daniel
DUGAND, ROBERTO E.
Carrera 15, #36-40
Bogota, Colombia, S. A.
c/o Ormando Dugand
ENGEL, SOLOMON, JR.
Route #2, Box 344
Homestead, Florida


Morton T. Ironmonger,
FAA treasurer and presi-
dent of the Broward
Chapter, presents the
FAA's Annual Scholarship
Award to Don Abernathy,
of West Palm Beach dur-
ing the awards luncheon
at the annual Student's
Home Show at the U/F.
The Award was a check
for $250; and Abernathy,
a fourth year architec-
tural student, won it for
his design of a housing
unit for married students.





c/o Mr. Solomon Engel, Sr.
ESCOBAR, MANUEL
Calle 9 Norte #3-11
Cali, Colombia, S. A.
c/o Alfonso Escobar Potes
GIDDENS, IRBYE GERALD
Box 542
Lakeland, Fla.
c/o Mr. I. D. Giddens
GOLDMAN, SANFORD M.
1205-22 Avenue N.
St. Petersburg, Fla.
c/o Mr. Edward Goldman
GREENE, STANLEY IAROLD
1336 Pennsylvania Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla.
c/o Mr. Jack Greene
HENDRICKS, RAYMOND L.
3211 Swann Ave., Apt. 25
Tampa, Fla.
c/o Mr. Yaro L. Hendricks
LAWRENCE, CLIFFORD E. JR.
510 Kelson Avenue
Marianna, Fla.
c/o Mrs. C. E. Lawrence
LEWIS, HOWARTH L. JR.
1525 Florida Avenue
West Palm Beach, Fla.
c/o Mrs. Edith B. Lewis
MITCHELL, JOSEPH I. JR.
2930 S. Pallanza Drive
St. Petersburg, Fla.
c/o Mr. Jesse Luley Ruel


PATTILLO, CHARLES EVANS
3116 San Carlos
Tampa, Florida
c/o Mr. Charles E. Pattillo Jr.
PEACOCK, ROBERT CARROLL
801 Ardmore Road
West Palm Beach, Fla.
c/o Mr. R. C. Blair
RANDALL, NORMAN L. JR.
Bradford on River
Ft. Myers, Fla.
c/o Mr. Norman Leroy Randall, Sr.
SCOTT, JACK MANNER
Route 4, Box 298X
Ft. Pierce, Fla.
c/o Mr. Karl Lee Scott
SENIZ, REFAH
Zafer sok No. 18/4
Istanbul, Turkey
SPENCER, JAMES BRUCE
115 E. Canfield St.
Avon Park, Fla.
TORRES, ALVARO GERMAN
Carrera 21 39A 22
Bogota, Colombia, S. A.
TURNER, JACK LOUIS
809 Melton Avenue
Auburndale, Fla.
c/o Mr. Luther Milton Turner
WEDDING, CHARLES R.
2901 Lealman Avenue
St. Petersburg, Fla.
c/o Mr. Charles Reid Wedding


I ".- ., U I'. ., .' -: 4.4


.*.I: 'r I


,4 .1 - ,''







*
Wfort"oon ?ouard, To--





That's the 43rd Annual Convention of the FAA! This year it will be held
in Clearwater, gem of Florida's western sun-coast on the beautiful Gulf of
Mexico... It will be worth every minute and every penny of your time
and money. At this fitting climax to the AIA's Centennial Anniversary
year, you'll reap a profit from pleasure and a dividend from professional
duty ... Plan now to attend sure!

















Convention Headquarters
in Clearwater will be the
Fort Harrison Hotel -
comfort, good food, low
prices and every facility
for fun. Better get your
reservation in early ....




43rd ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 1957 FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER




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