• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 1957 regional conference
 FAA directors to meet in Orlan...
 Residential is essential
 The art of visualization
 Chapter officers and committees...
 A.I.A. revises its P-R program
 Know your legislators
 News and notes
 State board grants registratio...
 Producers' council program
 Bridge to understanding
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00033
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    1957 regional conference
        Page 2
        Page 3
    FAA directors to meet in Orlando
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Residential is essential
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The art of visualization
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Chapter officers and committees for 1957
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    A.I.A. revises its P-R program
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Know your legislators
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    News and notes
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    State board grants registrations
        Page 30
    Producers' council program
        Page 31
    Bridge to understanding
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






..... ...... ... ...
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OFFICIAL JOURNAL of do FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ACHMiTCTS a O ATECTS


..After 100 Years......
... .. . .. ............ .





























f The Fture...

With the culmination, on February 25, of






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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South James E. Garland
Irving E. Horsey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville . Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida ..... Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . . Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
MARCH, 1957


74de




Florida Ar hitect


VOLUME 7


MARCH, 1957


NUMBER 3


CONTENTS


1957 Regional Conference


- 2


FAA Directors to Meet in Orlando --------- 4

Residential Is Essential ___ --------------- 7
By Frank E. Watson


-11


The Art of Visualization ----_
Renderings by Joseph N. Smith


Chapter Officers and Committees for 1957 ----- 15

A.I.A. Revises its P/R Program -- ---------- 18

Know Your Legislators -- -------------- 20


State Senators .----------


News and Notes ---- --_

State Board Grants Registrations --------


-.----------..------------ 21


---23

.------ 30


Producers Council Program ----------------31

Advertisers' Index ---- ---- ------32

Bridge to Understanding ---- ------------ 32
By James K. Pownall

THE COVER
The AIA's Centennial Celebration seal is by far the best illustration
available to suggest how the theme and program of the FAA's coming
43rd Annual Convention at Clearwater has been planned to serve
as a climax to this professional anniversary year. The architectural
profession undoubtedly has a tremendous future in Florida. Conven-
tion time will give an opportunity to define its challenge in practical
terms.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
S. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7226 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.





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The Convention Hall in the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel will be head-
quarters for the 1957 Conference of the AIA's South Atlantic Region.



1957 Regional Conference


The Place is Atlanta; the Sponsoring Host is the Georgia
Chapter, AIA; and the Time is April 4th, 5th and 6th.


Based on the theme "Science, In-
tuition and Architecture," the 1957
Conference of the South Atlantic
Region, AIA, promises to be one of
the most elaborate ever held, accord-
ing to the program planned by the
12-man committee of the Georgia
Chapter, sponsor of the 10-chapter
meeting. Planned highlights include
two cocktail parties, a hospitality
night open house at the homes of
host-chapter architects -a series of
sightseeing tours and an 8:30 to
2:00 A. M. windup party "in the real
tradition of the Beaux Arts ball,"
complete with prizes for costumes and
a midnight supper.
Headquarters for the Conference
is the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel Con-
vention Hall. It will be the scene of
a full, three-day conclave starting
Thursday morning, April 4, with the
opening of the Building Products Ex-
hibit at 8:30. Slated for this opening
morning are a meeting of the 15
regional Chapter presidents at 9:00
and a 10:30 meeting of the Regional
Council at which AIA Director HER-
BERT C. MILLKEY will preside.
After a luncheon at the Georgia
Tech School of Architecture, BERYL
PRICE, Chairman of the AIA Com-
mittee on Chapter Affairs, will ad-


dress a general meeting scheduled for
2:00 P.M. This will be the first of
only two regional business meetings
on the Conference program and will
include reports of the ten regional
committees chairmen with JOHN
L. R. GRAND (Chapter Affairs) the
sole Florida representative. Following
will be separate meetings for each
regional committee.
Thursday night is the open house,
including a buffet supper, to be held
at homes of host architects. The Con-
ference committee emphasizes this
fact: "You must be pre-registered to
be assured of an invitation" which,
in view of Georgia's famed hospitality,
should be sufficient incentive for indi-
vidual action throughout the region.
Friday will be a day overflowing
with food for thought. Its scheduled
start is at 8:30 A.M. with a keynote
address by WALTER MCQUADE, of
New York, which will be followed by
talks on "Color and the Human Eye,"
by HOWARD KETCHEM, "Sound," by
ROBERT NEWMAN, and "Environ-
mental Factors and Thermal Com-
fort," by ELMER R. KAISER. Each talk
will be followed by a panel discussion.
At Friday luncheon, to be followed
by the second business meeting of the
(Continued on Page 4)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































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FAA Directors Will
Meet in Orlando
March 16 will be the date of this
year's second meeting of the FAA
Board of Directors. Following past
custom, the meeting will start with
a luncheon at 12:30 and will con-
tinue through the afternoon. Location
is the San Juan Hotel at Orlando.


President Wortman is anxious that a
full roster of FAA Directors attend.
As now planned, the FAA Board
will hold at least four more meetings
this year. After March these are
scheduled for: June 8, at the Fort
Harrison Hotel, Clearwater; August
10, at Tampa; and again at Clear-
water just prior to the 43rd FAA
Annual Convention in November.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Regional Conference ...
(Continued from Page 2)
Conference, AIA President LEON
CHATELAIN, JR., FAIA, will address
the Conference. During the afternoon
DR. HOYT L. SHERMAN will conduct
a seminar on "Visual Perception,"
followed by a panel discussion and
a summary talk by WALTER MC-
QUADE. The evening starts with a
cocktail party hosted by the Atlanta
Chapter of the Producers' Council.
It will be followed by a dinner, high-
lighted by presentation of honor
awards by AIA President CHATELAIN.
Saturday morning will be equally
as full, according to the present sche-
dule. The Georgia Chapter will be
host at a "Continental Breakfast" at
7:45; and at 9:00 WALTER MCQUADE
will preside at the theme seminar of
the Conference. Four speakers will
discuss various aspects of "Science,
Intuition and Architecture," includ-
ing Louis KAHN, Philadelphia, I. M.
PEI, New York, Psychologist ALBERT
H. HASTOFF, and University of Penn-
sylvania artist-painter LAMAR DODD.
What they say will be subject to
questions from the floor and discus-
sion by a panel comprising HOWARD
KETCHEM, ROBERT L. NEWMAN and
DR. HOYT L. SHERMAN.
Various sightseeing-Atlanta tours
will be the afternoon's chief activity.
And the gala Beaux Arts Ball will
be held Saturday evening at the Pro-
gressive Club. It will start at 8:30 P.M.
will be co-sponsored by the Confer-
ence host Chapter and the Student
Chapter of the Georgia Tech School
of Architecture, and will feature "a
fine orchestra, excellent refreshments
and top-flight prizes." The first prize
will be a trip for two to Mexico City
-air transportation and hotel accom-
modations for a week included.
Registration fee of $5.00 for all
AIA corporate and associate members
includes admission to all conference
sessions and permits purchase of tick-


Georgia Chapter President Cecil A.
Alexander, above, has named Joseph
Amisano as General Chairman of the
1957 Regional Conference Committee.
Amisano heads an twelve-man group
which has virtually completed plans
for making the three-day conclave
outstanding from every point of view.
Ladies' activities, which will play an
important part in the program, are
in charge of Mrs. John Edwin Wells,
of Atlanta.

ets to such events as cocktail parties,
luncheons and dinners, the Conti-
nental Breakfast and the Beaux Arts
Ball. Wives of Conference partici-
pants are exempted from payment of
registration fees. Hotel reservations
presumably should be made directly
to the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel. Pre-
Conference registration necessary
to assure an invitation to the Host
Chapter Hospitality Night should
be made through the Conference
Committee Registration Chairman,
JOHN STEINICHEN, 391 Peeples Street,
S. W., Atlanta, Georgia.
Ladies will be invited to attend all
programmed events. In addition a
special program for them has been
planned to include a Thursday after-
noon tea at the new galleries of the
Atlanta Art Association; and a fashion
show, luncheon and theater party on
Friday.















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6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


/11_,M










Residential


Is Essential





says FRANK E. WATSON


V, -..


I've always wanted to write an
article on Residential Architec-
ture, mainly because I don't do
very much of it. Residential
Architecture, that is. Come to
think of it, I don't write many
articles on the subject either.
That makes me an expert, includ-
ing all the usual wisecracks that
go with the term. Or an author-
ity. Or at least qualified enough
by this background to ramble at
length on the subject.
Over a long period of looking
at residences and brother let
me tell you there's nothing more
deadly I have reached a num-
ber of conclusions, the least im-
portant of which is that it's about
time that someone, meaning me,
took the time to define the terms
that are used in describing these
gems, so that we, the Architects,
will all be operating under the
same Code of Eth. . Rules.
Let's start with that cluttered
mess commonly called the Single
Family Residence.
A Single Family Residence -
A house built for a family having
enough money so they don't have
to share expenses or they live
far, far away from their in-laws.
A Two-Family Residence -
The same as a Single Family Resi-
dence, except that the family
does not have enough money so
they do have to share expenses -
or their in-laws live in the same
town.


A Duplex By duplicity and
cunning a family manages to
build a duplicate of their house,
opposite hand so they can quit
work and live off the sucker next
door.
An Apartment- A living unit
with a maximum number of in-
side rooms, so arranged that there
is no privacy between you and
your neighbors.
A Co-op Same as an Apart-
ment except that it costs more.
You are stuck with it longer and
you get a nice brochure illustrated
in four colors.
A Housing Project This is a
real time saver Tomorrow's
Slum Today.
So much for generalities. To
be specific, let's define the Basic
Parts of House Architecture, so
that ever again will there be
confusion on this all-important
matter.
Front Entrance This is usu-
ally on the side so that you have
a choice when entering the House
of going to the Living Area, Din-
ing Area, Kitchen, Bedroom or
the Bathroom just in case you
want to live a little, eat a little,
sleep a little, etcetera.
The Entrance Hall The
space immediately adjacent to
the Front Entrance that you have
to go through in case you want
to live a little, eat a little, sleep a
little, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.


The Foyer The same as the
Entrance Hall except that it is
usually on an upper floor- why
I will never know.
A Breezeway An open space
between two wings of a house lo-
cated so that the prevailing
breeze can blow through it so
that it will not go through the
House. Only if the orientation is
right, however.
A Patio Same as a Breeze-
way -but the two open sides
are enclosed to keep the breeze
out, so that it can go through the
house. A house without one of
these is just not there that's all!
A Screened Patio -The same
as a Patio, except that the sides
and top are covered with screen-
ing. The purpose? To keep the
insects that are already in the
house in!
A Lanai Same as a Screened
Patio, except that the Architect
spent the Winter in Hawaii.
A Florida Room Same as a
Lanai, except that the Architect
couldn't afford to go to Hawaii.
A Porch The same as a
Florida Room, except that the
bids came in too high and the
walls had to be omitted.
A Terrace Same as a Porch,
except that we had to cut some
more No Roof!
A Carport Part of the Ter-
race. The owner found money in
(Continued on Page 8)


V ,, ~. ~ .,,..-,.,, ,~.-......~..,..
MARCH, 1957 7


7


MARCH, 1957





















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Residential Is Essential ...


(Continued from Page 7)
his budget for a canvas awning
to cover the car.
A Garage Same as a Car-
port except a door and some ja-
lousies have been added so that
we can take care of an occasional
pest I mean guest for the
Winter.
A Breezeway The same as a
Garage except that it is an open
space to let the breeze blow
through so that it will . well,
well, back to that again! (See
above).
To sum it all up we have the
- Multi Purpose Room. This
is the catch all, a combination of
all the foregoing where we all can
live a little, relax a little, eat a
little, sleep a little, recreate a
little, etcetera, etcetera, etectera.
Now for some culture.
Let us review the Residential
Styles of Architecture as Pres-
ently Practiced (or is it prac-
tised?).
First and Foremost:
The Formal or Mediterranean
- Coral Gables, Florida, is the
natural habitat of this one. Its
most outstanding characteristics
are the barrel-tile roof and the
stucco facade although it has
been known to allow a little stone
or brick to creep in for accent.
This is considered daring, how-
ever, and is frowned upon by the
Purists.
Modernistic No less than
five roof levels allowed on the
true Modernistic House also
all four facades should be en-
tirely different, both in material
and intent. This style had its ori-
gin back in the doldrums and is
prevalent even to this day, espe-
cially in resort areas.
The Ski-Jump This is a long
attenuated box-like House with
a monopitch roof extending the
full length of the structure, de-
signed to completely fool the
neighbors so they will not know
which is the front or back. Very
important to the occupant, stra-
tegically. This is a rare specimen.
Examples of this type are hard
to come by.
The Bat Wing -A house of
parts two parts each with a


monopitch roof sloping towards
the other. A very clever device,
I believe, so that all the rain wa-
ter will collect in one area so that
it is easy to locate the leaks.
The Super-droop -This is a
residence where the roof over-
hangs at least three feet. It gives
that sense of shelter so necessary
in the tropics. The most inter-
esting examples of this type are
the ones where the projection is
beyond the design strength of the
rafters giving that distinctive
wavy appearance to the roof line.
This must be in great demand,
because there are so many droopy
ones being built.
The Snub-nose-Similar to
the Super-droop except that the
roof overhang has been reduced
to four inches. This one is cheap-
er, but it doesn't have that rak-
ish appearance that we have come
to associate with the Super-
Droop.
The Bird Cage -This is just
one big Screen Patio with all the
amenities that we expect from
ths type of living. This is a house
with a minimum of built-in priv-
acy and ideal for a family that
wants a sun bath in a hurry.
The Story-and-a-Half, or Split-
Level This is a very popular
item and particularly adaptable
to a site that has a slope of six
inches in the depth of the lot.
The House on Stilts, or Posts,
or Piloti This type is just be-
ginning to catch on in this coun-
try, but has been quite popular
on the Continent. In this style all
habitable areas are placed on an
upper level so that the occupants
are protected from scorpions,
snakes, bill collectors and other
friends.
Ranch Type-Any sprawling
builder's house on a fifty-foot lot.
Well that clears that up . .
I hope this lexicon of Residen-
tial Architectural Styles and
Terms will be received in the
same spirit in which it is written.
And if it is, I am sure that mem-
bership in the I.A.A. (Institute
of Architects Anonymous) will
be greatly increased.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


---- -------- - ----- ---



















TransmissiOll





CONCRETE
Concrete reaches high in
the sky'.
The new, prestressed con-
crete poles for the transmission
lines of the Florida Power Cor-
poration emphasize draniat",-
cally the amazing flexibility If
concrete Carrying the h gh
voltage I I nes that stretch be-
tween the St. John's River and
DcLand, they w 11 still be in
service 50 to 10 years from
now.
Annual maintenance expense
and the high cost of periodical
replacement are eliminated -
another striking example of
the economy of concrete.


- ~ L .ak ..-:. -


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY W
FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA *SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
MARCH, 1957 9


































Design of Edsel Ford High School

features distinctive, economical

Concrete Shell Roofs

The first concrete shell roofs constructed in
Michigan were used in the Edsel Ford High School
in Dearborn. Four shell units were built: two over
the boys' gym, one over the girls' gym, and a fourth
over an intermediate building housing the swim-
ming pool and locker rooms. All four roofs have
spans of 100 ft. and identical arches of 121-ft.
radius and a rise of 13 ft.
Concrete shell roof construction was selected
because (1) it provided unobstructed interiors, (2)
it was adaptable to the architectural design and
(3) it was economical to build.
Concrete shell roof construction is gaining
rapidly in popularity with architects and engineers
for buildings requiring large unobstructed floor
areas. Roofs with spans up to 300 ft. and more
can be built without interior columns. They are
ideal for auditoriums, exhibit halls, hangars, train
sheds, repair shops and warehouses.
Concrete shell roofs are economical to build,
need little or no maintenance, have long life and
low insurance rates. They are true low-annual-cost
construction. Write for free illustrated literature.
Distributed only in the United States and Canada.

PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 North Main Street, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement
and concrete... through scientific research and engineering field work
10


Large photo shows completed structure. Girls' gym is in foreground,
boys' gym in rear. Depressed roof between gyms covers swimming
pool and locker rooms. Small photo above shows dean, unobstructed
interior in boys' gym. Photo below shows how shell roof design was
repeated in roof over walk connecting gymnasium wing with audi-
torium. Architect, Eberle M. Smith Associates, Inc.; engineer, Alfred
Zweig; contractor, 0. W. Burke Construction Co. All are from Detroit.


i-


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











THE ART OF VISUALIZATION....





From the days of Piranesi, architectural renderings have been a bridge of
visual communication between a designer and his patron, an architect and
his client. Today, in an area of expanding technology and architectural
creativeness, the art of visualization is more than ever an important one.
Last month, at the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, one of that
art's acknowledged masters exhibited sixteen examples of his work, seven of
which are shown on this and the following two pages. He is JOSEPH NEWTON
SMITH, III, of Miami; and the exhibition of his work was part of Georgia
Tech's Architectural School program of stimulating students' ability to draw.


Study for Miami's Dodge Island Port
Development, for which Weed, Rus-
sell, Johnson, Associates are architects
and engineers. The original drawing
measures 30 by 40 inches.


It is certain that the Smith exhibition provided both example and inspira-
tion to its viewers. It was created by an architect who has specialized in
the pictorial phase of his profession so successfully that in 1954 he was
awarded a Special Commendation for Rendering from the FAA-and in the
same year was formally recognized as the nation's top architectural delineator
through the Birch Burdette Long Memorial Award.


MARCH, 1957




"Cit; .


This proposed 1,000,000-vol-
ume library for the University
of Miami was designed by Wat-
son and Deutschman, architects
and engineers, with whom Jo-
seph N. Smith was formerly
associated. The original render-
ing measured 20 by 40 inches.


rPo
-4


-a


Measuring 20 by 34 inches in
the original, this rendering
shows the maintenance hangar
for National Airlines as designed
with a folded plate concrete
structure by Weed, Russell,
Johnson, Associates. The build-
ing is 'now in process of con-
struction.


Resort Hotel for the Caribbean,
designed by Watson & Deutsch-
man. Proposed for construction
on a cliff, this is the oceanside
view embodying banquet hall,
casino and cabanas. The orig-
inal drawing measured 25 by
36 inches.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


;~lir


i ,






























Above, U.S. Post Office and
Garage facilities proposed for
Seattle, Washington, by Watson
and Deutschman, architects and
engineers. This drawing meas-
ured 20 by 40 inches. Right:
Twenty-story, ocean-front co-
operative apartment building in
Ft. Lauderdale designed by
Charles F. McKirahan, the orig-
inal drawing of which measured
30 by 40 inches. The design
incorporates extensive under
ground parking facilities.





This parking garage, designed
for a Miami Beach location by
Watson and Deutschman is a
four-level structure, faced with
precast concrete wall panels.
The rendering, measuring 20
by 34 inches, is considered by
the artist as one of his best and
won for him the Birch Burdette
Long award.


MARCH, 1957







perfect indoor weather...


for homes, stores, offices


SON


i ~ ~ J.. ~Y~^: --j klYI:_


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through the two-way thermostat, "thinks" for itself
to provide completely automatic operation . For
homes, WEATHERTRON is the answer to safe, clean,
dependable and quiet all-weather air conditioning. In
stores and offices it improves working conditions, pro-
tects products, cuts cleaning, keeps workers healthy.


WEATH E RTRON is General Electric's air
source heat pump a fully automatic, all-electric
unit that uses a single mechanism for both heating
and cooling. It is NOT just another combination of
conventional fuel-burning furnace and air conditioner.
WEATHERTRON does away with the need for such
usual parts of a conventional system as fuel storage
tanks, cooling towers, piping. It needs only air ducts,
electric wiring and a small drain for condensation
for full-time, all-season operation.

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North, Central and West Florida:
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Telephones: 4-7701 and 4-7711


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1310 Flamingo Way,
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Telephone: TUxedo 7-5568


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For perfect indoor weather
in any type of interior, all
you need do is simply set
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automatically, to maintain
desired temperature range.


EATH ERTRON

The General Electric All-Electric Heat Pump


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


S.1


I-


!E7


~f~







Chapter Officers and Committees for '57

Material on this and the following pages lists Committee Chairmen for all
standing and special committees of all Florida's ten AIA Chapters. Note
that in smaller Chapters, many committee functions are grouped under a
single heading. Customarily, work on various phases of such combined
committees is assigned to individual committee members.


BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
Officers
President: Morton T. Ironmonger
Vice-President: Donald H. Moeller
Secretary: John M. Evans
Treasurer: Joseph T. Romano

Chapter Directors
Robert E. Todd, William G. Crawford, George C.
Weisman, C. Cranford Sproul.
FAA Directors
John M. Evans, William F. Bigoney
Committee Chairmen
AIA-AGC Joint Cooperative: Robert G. Jahelka
Annual Architects' Dinner: Robert Todd
Architectural Practice: A. Courtney Stewart
Building Codes: John M. Evans
Centennial Observance: William F. Bigoney
Chapter Affairs: Cedric Start
Collaboration with Design Professions:
Joseph Romano
Hospitals & Public Health: W. A. Gilroy
Legislative: James K. Pownall
Preservation of Historic Buildings: B. C. Lukens
PuBlic Relations: Jack W. Zimmer
Rep. to Technical Secretary, A.I.A.: B. C. Lukens
School Buildings: V. W. Knox, Jr.
Education, Awards, Scholarship & Exhibits:
Robert E. Hansen

DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER
Officers
President: William P. Greening
Vice-President: Walter Smith
Secretary: Ralph Spicer
Treasurer: Edwin Snead
FAA Director
Francis Walton
Committee Chairmen
Chapter Activities (includes Chapter Affairs,
Program, Membership, Centennial Observ-
ance) : Joel W. Sayers, Jr.
Community Development (includes Community
Development and Preservation of Historic
Buildings) : Francis Craig
Education and Practice (includes Education,
Office Practice, Awards and Scholarships):
Ralph Spicer
Industry Relations (includes Home Building, Const.
Industry, Collaboration w/Design Professions):
Harry Griffin
MARCH, 1957


Public Relations (includes Public Relations and
Government Relations) : Francis Walton
Special Design (includes Research, School Build-
ings, Hospitals and Health) : Craig Gehlert

FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
Officers
President: Roland W. Sellew
Vice-President: A. Wynn Howell
Secretary: Sidney R. Wilkinson
Treasurer: Jack McCandless
Chapter Directors
Mark G. Hampton, Richard E. Jessen, Archie G.
Parish
FAA Directors
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II, Robert H. Levison
FAA Alternate Directors
Anthony L. Pullara, Thomas V. Talley
Committee Chairmen
Anniversary Meeting: Ernest T. H. Bowen, II,
Anthony L. Pullara
Centennial Year Observance, Franklin O. Adams,
Jr., FAIA.
Chapter Affairs-Membership: Blanchard E. Jolly
Collaboration with Design Professions:
John M. Crowell
Education, Awards and Scholarships: Wm. B. Eaton
Ethics and Professional Practice: Thomas V. Talley
Government & Legislative-Const. Industry Rela-
tions: Anthony L. Pullara
Home Building Industry: Howard F. Allender
Hospitals & Health: Martin P. Fishback, Jr.
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: A. Wynn Howell
Public Relations-Community Development:
Elliott B. Hadley
Research: Kenneth W. Dalzell, Sr.
School Buildings: Felix Benton

FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
Officers
President: Arthur L. Campbell
Vice-President: McMillan H. Johnson
Secretary: Lester N. May
Treasurer: John B. Marion
Chapter Directors
Robert Crosland, Robert Bittner, William
Breidenbach
FAA Directors
Sanford Goin, FAIA, Turpin Bannister, FAIA
FAA Alternate Directors
Gordon Dirkes, David Reaves
(Continued on Page 16)
15






Committee Chairmen
Chapter Activities: John L. R. Grand
Community Development: Gordon Dirkes
Education and Practice: Wm. Breidenbach
Industry Relations: Myrl Hanes
Public Relations: M. H. Johnson
Special Design: David Reaves
SPECIAL COMMITTEES AND CHAIRMEN
Auditing: Robert Crosland
Program: Neil Webb

FLORIDA NORTH WEST CHAPTER
Officers
President: Hugh J. Leitch
Vice-President: Anker Hansen
Secretary: Roger G. Weeks
Treasurer: James H. Look
Chapter Directors
Samuel Marshall, Frank Sindelar, Thomas Daniels
FAA Director
William S. Morrison
Committee Chairmen
Chapter Affairs: Roger G. Weeks
Education & Research: R. Daniel Hart
Governmental Relations: William S. Morrison
Historic Buildings: Chandler Yonge
Membership: Samuel Marshall
Program: Ula L. Manning
Public Relations: F. Treadway Edson
Relations with Construction Industry:
Frank J. Sindelar

MID-FLORIDA CHAPTER
Officers
President: Joseph M. Shifalo
Vice-President: James B. Windham
Secretary: Robert B. Murphy
Treasurer: John T. Hart
Chapter Directors
F. Earl DeLoe, Alex Hatton, Ralph Lovelock
FAA Director
Hill Stiggins
FAA Alternate Director
John Burton
Committee Chairmen
Awards, Scholarships: Laurance W. Hitt
Chapter Affairs: George Spohn
Collaboration with Design Professions:
James Windham
Collaboration with Departments of Education
& Research: L. Alex Hatton
Community Developments: John Thomas Watson
Education & Registration: Richard B. Rogers
Governmental Relations: James Gamble Rogers
Home Building Industry: James Windham
Hospitals & Health: Ralph Lovelock
Membership: Hill Stiggins
Office Practice: F. Earl DeLoe
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: Henry Whitworth
Public Relations: John T. Hart
Relations with Construction Industry:
Charles Hendrick
Research: Francis Emerson
School Buildings: Robert B. Murphy
Urban Design & Housing: John Burton


JACKSONVILLE CHAPTER
Officers
President: A. Eugene Cellar
Vice-President: Robert C. Broward
Secretary: Albert R. Broadfoot, Jr.
Treasurer: Thomas E. Ewart, Jr.
Chapter Directgrs
George R. Fisher, James A. Meehan, Walter B.
Schultz.
FAA Directors
Taylor Hardwick, Ivan H. Smith
Committee Chairmen
Awards, Scholarships & Allied Arts:
Norman Freedman
Centennial: Herbert Coons
Chapter Affairs: Willis Stephens
Civic Improvement: Robert C. Broward
Collaboration with Design Professions:
Stanley Gordon
Education & Registration: S. Ralph Fetner
Fee Schedule: Taylor Hardwick
Governmental Relations: J. Brooks Haas
Home Building Industry: Cecil B. Burns
Hospitals & Health: Lee Hooper
Membership: H. Lamar Drake
Office Practice: Warren C. Hendry
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: Robert E. Boardman
Programs: Walter M. Lee
Public Relations: Robert A. Warner
Relations with Construction Industry:
Roy M. Pooley, Jr.
Research: Fred W. Bucky, Jr.
School Buildings: F. Duane Fullerton
Urban Design & Housing: Jefferson D. Powell
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
Officers
President: Wahl Snyder
Vice-President: Irvin Korach
Secretary: Edward G. Grafton
Treasurer: C. Robert Abele
Chapter Director
T. Trip Russell
FAA Directors
James E. Garland, Irving E. Horsey,
Verner Johnson
FAA Alternate Directors
M. Blair Wright, Jerome Schilling, Thomas Madden
Standing Committee Chairmen
Chapter Affairs: Wahl Snyder
Collaboration w/Design Professions: John A. Tripp
Education: Jerry P. Simmons
Hospitals & Public Health: Emory L. Jackson
Membership: John O. Grimshaw
Office Practice: Theodore Gottfried
Preservation of Historic Bldgs.: Herbert H. Johnson
Public Relations & Competitions: Herbert R. Savage
Relations w/ Construction Industry: Lewis M. Hitt
Research: Verner Johnson
School Buildings: Frank E. Watson
Urban Design and Housing: William A. Russell
Special Committee Chairmen
Citation & Awards: C. Robert Abele
Dining, Refreshments & Attendance:
R. A. Anderson, Jr.
Legislative & Political Action: Andrew J. Ferendino
(Continued on Page 17)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





(Continued from Page 16)
Program: Irvin Korach
Scholarship & Student Loan: Edwin T. Reeder
Special Messages & Gifts: Edward G. Grafton

Committee Chairmen
(Continuing Temporary for Special Purposes)
Centennial Observance: Robert M. Little
Civil Defense: Howard Dunn
Contracts: Frank E. Watson
Compilation of Special Building Regulations of
Dade County Municipalities: Wm. H. Guerin
Design & Bldg. for F.S.C., A.I.A. Headquarters &
Florida Architect Office Space:
Murray B. Wright, Jr.
Preparation F.S.C. Membership Roster: Irvin Korach
Preparation of Budget: Verner Johnson
Publication and Distribution "Presenting Your
Architetct": H. Samuel Kruse.
Unified Code: Igor B. Polevitzky

PALM BEACH CHAPTER
Officers
President: Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
Vice-President: Frederick W. Kessler
Secretary: Kenneth Jacobson
Treasurer: Donald Edge
Executive Committee
Frederick W. Kessler, David S. Shriver, Jefferson
N. Powell, John Stetson, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


FAA Directors
Charles E. Duncan, Harold A. Obst
Committee Chairmen
AGC Committee on Ethics and Bidding Practices:
Frederick W. Kessler and Raymond H.
Plockelman
Awards: Byron Simsonson
By-Laws Revision: Raymond H. Plockelman
Fellowships: Robert M. Nevins
Historical Buildings: Belford Shoumate
Legislative: George J. Votaw
Joint Cooperative Committee: Donald Edge
Practice: David Shriver
Program: Frederick W. Kessler
Public Relations and Centennial Observance:
Jefferson N. Powell

FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL
Officers
President: David W. Potter
Vice-President: C. Ernest Daffin
Secretary-Treasurer: Forrest R. Coxen
FAA Director
Forrest R. Coxen
Committee Chairmen
Chapter Activities (includes Chapter Affairs, Mem-
bership and Education) : James A. Stripling
Public Relations (includes Centennial Observance) :
Albert P. Woodard
Community Development: Prentice Huddleston


7 L 8YuaL Tk diKo (Ji%. Wi


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MARCH, 1957 1






The AIA Revises Its P-R Program


Henry J. Kauffman r Associates, the AIA's new P/R
counsel, reports on seven P/R "problems" and lists the
objectives of a program looking toward their solution ...


As of January 1st, the AIA, through
its national headquarters, retained
the firm of HENRY J. KAUFFMAN &
ASSOCIATES, of Washington, D.C., as
public relations counsel in place of
KETCHUM, INC., the Pittsburgh, Pa.,
firm which held that position for the
last two years. In mid-January the
new counsel's account executive,
ROBERT R. DENNY, rendered the first
report of his firm's work to the steer-
ing committee on public relations of
the AIA. That report has now been
released by AIA Executive Director
EDMUND L. PURVES, accompanied by
a statement of the AIA committee.
This committee, headed by JOHN
W. RooT, of Chicago, reports that
it is "extremely pleased and impressed
with the activities of counsel to date".
Its statement stressed the current im-
portance of the AIA's Centennial


Observance program and indicated
that the new P/R Counsel's general
program would necessarily be deferred
until after the AIA's Centennial Con-
vention in May.
However, a careful reading of Mr.
Denny's report even the abridged
version released by the AIA sug-
gests that P/R activities will be
generally focused on attempting to
solve a number of problems isolated
as conclusions drawn from a 13-city
survey by tho Kauffman firm. The re-
port lists these problems in two
categories problems of "external"
public relations and those involving
what is called the "internal field".
In the first category the report
named four as presumably the basis
for concentrated P/R activity. They
are: 1 . The threat of the package
dealer notably "certain commercial


groups" operating in the field of pre-
fabricated buildings; 2 ... Professional
competence the unfortunate fact
that the public is not generally aware
of the function and skills of the archi-
tect or "of his merit in terms of eco-
nomic worth to the community";
3 . Government encroachment -
the tendency toward establishment of
architectural bureaus on the local
level; and 4 . Limitation of Design
- resulting from the policies of such
bureaus and from "the caution and
reluctance of business interests and
investors to place their faith in archi-
tectural advice".
P/R counsel's report listed three
problems under the heading of the
"internal" category: 1 . Lack of
orientation of the architect, in many
cases, with the wants and needs of
his community with a resulting
void currently being filled with com-
mercial interests and package dealers;
2 ... Lack of effective communication
between AIA and its members-stated
primarily as failure of AIA members
to "appreciate the extent of the work
performed and accomplishments real-
ized by the AIA committees, officers
(Continued on Page 28)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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MARCH, 1957 14


FURNACE


FLOOR






Know Your Legislators

Your State Representatives are your link between home Community
and your State Government. This current roster is published in the
interests of better mutual acquaintance.

COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES


Alachua
RALPH D. TURLINGTON,
113 No. Main St., Gainesville
J. EMORY CROSS,
Box 411, Gainesville
Baker
JOHN J. CREWS, JR.,
Macclenny
Bay
DEMPSEY J. BARRON,
Box 1241, Panama City
WILLIAM E. HARRIS,
Box 578, Panama City
Bradford
DOYLE E. CONNER,
Drawer 631, Starke
Brevard
RICHARD B. MULDREW,
Box 546, Melbourne
Broward
ANDREW J. MUSSELMAN, JR.,
412 N. E. 18th Avenue,
Pompano Beach
A. J. RYAN, JR.,
219 S. W. 8th St., Dania
Calhoun
EDWIN H. PETERS,
Box 267, Blountstown
Charlotte
JOHN M. HATHAWAY,
SBox 638, Punta Gorda
Citrus
ALLISON R. STRICKLAND,
Route #1, Inverness
Clay
S. D. SAUNDERS,
Box 31, Middleburg
Collier
JAMES LORENZO WALKER,
Naples
Columbia
B. D. WILLIAMS,
1160 E. Dade St., Lake City
Dade
GEORGE L. HOLLAHAN, JR.
7210 Red Road, So. Miami
JOHN B. ORR, JR.
228 N. E. 2nd Avenue, Miami
W. C. HERRELL,
173 Navarre Drive,
Miami Springs
De Sota
S. C. SMITH,
Arcadia
Dixie
HAL CHAIRS,
Oldtown
Duval
JOHN E. MATHEWS, JR.
630 Lynch Bldg., Jacksonville


HARRY M. WESTBERRY,
152 Tallulah Avenue, Jacksonville
WILLIAM H. MANESS,
704 Fla. Theatre Bldg.,
Jacksonville *
Escambia
J. B. HOPKINS,
314 So. Baylen St., Pensacola
GEORGE STONE,
Star Route B, Box 596,
Atmore, Alabama
Flagler
W. L. WADSWORTH,
Box 396, Bunnell
Franklin
MRS. BRYANT PATTON,
Apalachicola
Gadsden
W. M. INMAN,
Quincy
C FRED ARRINGTON,
Havana
Gilchrist
HOWELL LANCASTER,
Trenton
Glades
JOE H. PEEPLES, JR.,
Moore Haven
Gulf
CECIL G. COSTIN, JR.,
221 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe
Hamilton
J. W. MCALPIN,
White Springs
Hardee
G. W. WILLIAMS,
Wauchula
Hendry
ELBERT L. STEWART,
Clewiston
Hernando
JOHN L. AYERS,
Box 125, Brooksville
Highlands
HOWARD LIVINGSTON,
Box 246, Sebring
Hillsborough
JAMES S. MOODY,
Plant City
ROBERT T. MANN,
309 Wallace S. Bldg., Tampa 2
SAMUEL M. GIBBONS,
918 1st Nat'l Bank Bldg., Tampa 2
Holmes
WAYNE O. MANNING,
Ponce de Leon
Indian River
L. B. VOCELLE,
Vero Beach


Jackson
J. TROY PEACOCK,
600 No. Green St., Marianna
JOHN S. SHIPP, JR.
525 No. Russ St., Marianna
Jefferson
GEORGE H. ANDERSON,
Monticello
Lafayette
HOMER T. PUTNAI,
Mayo
Lake
WELBORN DANIEL,
Box 703, Clermont
C. E. DUNCAN,
Tavares
Lee
WALTER O. SHEPPARD,
1410 Dean St., Ft. Myers
Leon
MALLORY E. HORNE,
Box 725, Tallahassee
RICHARD O. MITCHELL
107 Midyette-Moor Bldg.,
Tallahassee
Levy
FRANK MARSHBURN,
Box 69, Bronson
Liberty
LJ. ALEXANDER,
Bristol
Madison
OTIS R. PEAVY,
Box 204, Madison
Manatee
WVILLIAM C. GRIMES,
Palmetto
J. E. PRATT,
401 12th St., W. Bradenton
Marion
WILLIAM C. O'NEILL,
Box 253, Ocala
WILLIAM V. CHAPPELL, JR.
4 So. Magnolia St., Ocala
Martin
MARVIN H. ROWELL,
Box 1271, Stuart
Monroe
BERNIE C. PAPY,
1021 Washington St., Key West
J. Y. PORTER,
906 Johnson St., Key West
Nassau
T. H. ASKINS,
5th & Alachua, Fernandina Beach
Okaloosa
CHARLES D. STEWART,
Box 643, Ft. Walton Beach
JAMES H. WISE,
302 E. Cedar Ave., Crcstview
Okeechobee
NATHAN ZELMENOVITZ,
Box 98, Okeechobee
Orange
HENRY W. LAND,
Apopka
JOHN A. SUTTON,
64 E. Central Avenue, Orlando
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Osceola
J. J. GRIFFIN, JR.,
435 Florida Avenue,
St. Cloud
Palm Beach
RALPH J. BLANK, JR.
321 Pan-A Bldg.,
West Palm Beach
EMMETT ST. ROBERTS,
636 S. E. 2nd St., Belle Glade
Pasco
J. R. A. WILLIAMS,
Dade City
Pinellas
FRED C. PETERSEN,
3663 First Avenue- No.,
St. Petersburg
THOMAS M. CARNEY,
268 Belleair Drive,
Snell Isle, St. Petersburg
B. E. SHAFFER,
R # 2, Box 996, Clearwater
Polk
ROY SURLES,
Box 1375, Lakeland
RAY MATTOX,
1207 5th St., N. E., Winter Haven
BEN H. GRIFFIN, JR.,
Box 368, Frostproof
Putnam
JAMES N. BECK,
1000 Division St., Palatka
St. Johns
F. CHARLES USINA,
Box 177, St. Augustine


NATHAN I. WEINSTEIN,
Box 526, St. Augustine
St. Lucie
RUPERT J. SMITH,
206 Raulerson Bldg., Ft. Pierce
Santa Rosa
MORRISON KIMBROUGH,
Route #2, Milton
Sarasota
GEO. E. YOUNGBERG, SR.
Venice
HENRY S. BARTHOLOMEW,
Box 646, Sarasota
Seminole
MACK N. CLEVELAND, JR.,
Box 220, Sanford
GORDON V. FREDERICK,
204 No. Park, Sanford
Sumter
E. C. ROWELL,
Webster
Suwannee
HOUSTON W. ROBERTS,
Live Oak
Taylor
O. W. JONES,
Perry
Union
C. A. ROBERTS,
Lake Butler
Volusia
FREDERICK B. KARL,
1510 Crescent Ridge,
Daytona Beach


JAMES H. SWEENY, JR.,
Box 958, DeLand
Wakulla
BOBBY Russ,
Rt. #2, Crawfordville
Walton
THOSE. D. BEASLEY,
Box207, DeFuniak Springs
Washington
SAMUEL MITCHELL,
Vernon


STATE SENATORS
District
I . NEWMAN C. BRACKIN,
Crestview
2 . PHILIP D. BEALL, Fla.
National Bank Building,
Pensacola
3 . HARVIE J. BELSHER,
Bonifay
4 . JOHN RAWLS, Citizens
State Bank Bldg.,
Marianna
5 . T. DREW BRANCH,
Sumatra
6 . DEWEY M. JOHNSON,
Quincy
7 . SCOTT KELLY, Box 1651,
Lakeland
(Continued on Page 22)


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Wauchula
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1.200 Magnolia St.,
New Smyrna Beach
29 . THOMAS ADAMS, Box 215,
Orange Park
30 . THEODORE CABOT, 309
First Federal Bldg,
Ft. Lauderdale
31 . VERLE A. POPE, Box 519,
St. Augustine
32 . W. A. SHANDS, 2401 N.
W. 23rd Road.,
Gainesville
33 . IRLO O. BRONSON,
Kissimmee
34 . PAUL KICKLITER, 5012
Franklin St., Tampa
35 . FRED O. DICKINSON, JR.,
3020 Vincent Rd.,
West Palm Beach
36 . JOSEPH W. ROOD, 2322
7th Ave., W. Bradenton
37 . DOUGLAS STENSTROM,
Sanford
38 . J. C. GETZEN, JR.,
Bushnell
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







News & Notes


Centennial Anniversary Is
Observed by Three Chapters
Of Florida's ten AIA Chapters,
Palm Beach, Florida North and Flori-
da Central are known to have cere-
moniously observed the 100th Anni-
versary of the AIA, Saturday, Febru-
ary 23. Each Chapter event was
marked by substantial gatherings and
after-dinner speeches stressing the im-
plications of the AIA's anniversary
year theme, "A New Century
Beckons".
In Gainesville, nearly 80 people -
chapter members, their wives, and
local honor guests filled the dining
room of the U/F Student Activities
Building at a luncheon to hear Dean
TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA, sketch
the background of architects' profes-
sional organizations and comment on
the particularly rapid and strong
growth of the AIA nationally and in
Florida. Chapter President ARTHUR
LEE CAMPBELL presided at the meet-
ing; and WILLIAM F. BREIDENBACH
introduced Dean Bannister as a former
classmate at Columbia University.
Among his audience, and seated ap-
propriately as an honored guest at the
speaker's table was MRS. RUDOLPH
WEAVER, widow of the man who, in
1925,* established a college of archi-
tecture at the University of Florida
and served as its dean until his death.


The Polo Club at West Palm Beach
was the scene of the Palm Beach
Chapter Celebration. It was a cocktail
and dinner affair attended by more
than 80, including many civic notables
of the Palm Beach area among
them the architect-mayor of West
Palm Beach, Hon. MAURICE E. HOL-
LEY. The program included a short
comment by Chapter president HIL-


LIARD T. SMITH on the Chapter's
plans for remainder of the Centennial
year and a brief address by FAA Pres-
ident EDGAR S. WORTMAN on the
background and rapid current growth
of the FAA. The main speaker was
C. HERRICK HAMMOND, FAIA, form-
erly (1928-30) president of the AIA.
Speaking without script, Mr. Ham-
(Continued on Page 24)


Winners of U-F Architectural Student Competition


Awards in two design competitions for U/F architectural Jr., Miami, first prize; B. G. Mclntyre, Jacksonville, second
students were presented at Gainesville February 12th by prize, and P. L. Hawes, Miami, third prize.e.rizes for the
other competition were presented by 0. G. Dedmon, right,
officials of the Florida State Conference of the Bricklayers, BMPIU state conference vice-president. Students are, left
Masons and Plasterers' International Union, sponsors of the to right: G. P. Rice, Treasure Island, third prize; Pat
competitions. Left is T. D. Harris, secretary-treasurer of the Sanabria, Queens, N. Y., second prize, and P. J. Araneo,
organization and, left to right, students W. W. Baggesen, Jacksonville, first prize.
MARCH, 1957 2


RECEPTION FOR BANNISTER Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA, new dean of the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts at the University of Florida, met about
250 citizens of the Gainesville area during a reception given in his honor at
the Hotel Thomas in Gainesville Sunday afternoon, February 17. The Florida
North Chapter sponsored the affair as starting Gainesville's Centennial Week
Celebration. With Dean Bannister (center) are Arthur Lee Campbell, president
of the Florida North Chapter, left, and Sanford W. Goin, FAIA.












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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 23)
mond gave his listeners a wealth of
remeniscence, tracing his contact with
the development of the AIA since the
first convention he attended in 1911.
Largest and most elaborate of the
three ceremonial conclaves was that
of the Florida Central Chapter. It was
planned as an all-day, special meeting
of the Chapter's Executive Committee
and membership and was climaxed by
a cocktail party and buffet dinner at
the Tampa Terrace Hotel. The din-
ner was attended by more than 150,
including a host of civic notables
from Tampa, St. Petersburg, Clear-
water and Sarasota. Among the visitors
was J. DAVID McVoY of Gainesville,
representing Dean TURPIN C. BAN-
NISTER, FAIA, and the faculty of the


1957 Florida South Chap-
ter officers, above, are,
left to right: FAA Direc-
tor Verner Johnson;
Wahl Snyder, president,
Irvin Korach, vice-presi-
dent, and T. Trip Russell,
chapter director who was
1956 president.


In Jacksonville, 1957
Chapter officials, right,
are, standing, left to
right, Thomas E. Ewart,
Jr., treasurer, and Albert
R. Broadfoot, Jr., secre-
tary. Seated are: Robert
C. Broward, vice-presi-
dent, and A. Eugene Cel-
lar, president.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


U/F College of Architecture and
Fine Arts.
Special honor guest and main speak-
er of the evening was THOMAS H.
CREIGHTON, editor of Progressive
Architecture. His speech was provoca-
tive of both personal and professional
interest and will be printed in these
pages for the benefit of the entire
FAA membership.
The Centennial meeting started at
10:00 a.m. when the executive com-
mittee met in the newly-completed
Tampa Chamber of Commerce build-
ing. Luncheon for the Committee was
followed by a technical forum on pre-
stressed concrete moderated by JOSEPH
RUSSELI-O and highlighted by movies
(Continued on Page 26)






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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 24)
and talks by LLOYD HILL, research
engineer of the John A. Roebling &
Sons Co. and PAUL S. GILLAN, chief
engineer of the Florida Prestressed
Concrete company.
The Chapter's business session was
held at mid-afternoon. Attendance
was about 80; and Chapter rolls were
increased by admission of six new
corporate members and a large group
of associates among them ELIZA-
BETH B. WATERS and CORA L.
WELLS, as the Chapter's first women
members.
Among other reports, the P/R com-
mittee chairman, ELLIOT B. HADLEY,
noted that Chapter plans for a speak-
ers' bureau had been completed and
that a roster of 16 (each on a volun-
teer basis) was now available for
speaking engagements in various com-
munities of the chapter area.
The Chapter Auxilliary held its
meeting in the afternoon. It was high-
lighted by a showing of the film
"Architecture, USA" and a discussion
of plans for active Auxilliary partici-
pation in the 43rd FAA Convention.
Following a recently-developed cus-
tom, an all-day exhibit had been set
up as part of the meeting program.
The committee, headed by MARK G.
HAMPTON had assembled an excellent
"Art in Architecture" exhibit to show
the work of Florida craft artists in
fabrics, wood and ceramics.

Mid-Florida Auxiliary
Meeting at Winter Park
First meeting of 1957 for the Mid-
Florida Chapter Auxiliary was held
January 24th at the Winter Park
Country Club. MRS. JAMES GAMBLE
ROGERS was hostess for the meeting
at which MRS. ROBERT B. MURPHY,
president, announced appointment of
the following committee heads: MRS.
ALEX HATTON, publicity; MRS. JAMES
GAMBLE ROGERS, program; MRS.
GEORGE BAGLEY, historian; and MRS.
LAWRENCE ANGLIN, parliamentarian.
The program was in keeping with
the current aim of the new auxiliary
to educate its membership concerning
the AIA. MRS. RICHARD BOONE ROG-
ERS gave a brief report of the FAA
42nd Annual Convention at Miami
Beach. MRS. ROBERT B. MURPHY
presented an introductory report on
the development and ideals of the
AIA; and MRS. HUGO BROLEMAN ably
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes-
(Continued from Page 26)
sketched the history of the Octagon,
national AIA headquarters in Wash-
ington, D.C., and displayed pictures
of that historic structure. Concluding
the program, Mrs. Rogers showed a
collection of books, brochures and
magazines of special interest to women
whose husbands are engaged in the
professional practice of architecture.

Plans Promise Tip-Top
Convention for 1957
This year's FAA Convention, slated
for November 7, 8 and 9 as the State
organization's 43rd Annual conclave,
was the subject of a day-long com-
mittee meeting held February 8 in
the Fort Harrison Hotel at Clear-
water. Purpose, according to ROBERT
H. LEVISON of Clearwater named
by Florida Central Chapter president
ROLAND W. SELLEW as General Con-
vention Chairman was to discuss
convention policies and to build the
framework of a 43rd Annual Conven-
tion program which would furnish the
basis for what the Florida Central
Chapter expects will be "the biggest
and best" FAA annual get-together
in the organization's history.
Present at the meeting were,
besides the chairman, EUGENE H.
BE4CH, assistant chairman; WILLIAM
B. EATON, program; JOSEPH L. COG-
CAN, publicity; ANTHONY L. PULLARA,
awards, ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II,
who, with Pullara, will head up the
important task of seeing that the
nearly 60 product exhibit booths are
filled, and JACK MCCANDLESS, Chapter
treasurer, who has been named also
as Convention Treasurer and head of
the Convention Registration sub-com-
mittee. Also present were WILLIAM
B. HARVARD and MARK G. HAMPTON
who will act as co-chairmen in charge
of architectural and student exhibits.
The meeting was attended also by
Chapter president ROLAND W. SEL-
LEW and ROGER W. SHERMAN, FAA
Executive Secretary.
Though many details still remain
to be settled, the meeting forged the
outline of a dynamic Convention pro-
gram, geared to the fact that it will
occur as a virtual windup of the AIA's
Centennial Observance year. Theme,
as unanimously accepted by the Com-
mittee is "After 100 years-The Chal-
lenge of the Future". The serious side
(Continued on Page 28)
MARCH, 1957


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 27)
of the Convention program is being
built about this theme; and a series of
seminar talks and panel discussions
will deal with four general phases of
Florida's architectural future in
design, in construction, in materials
and in planning. As now planned the
theme will be keynoted at the Con-
vention's opening day luncheon by
a nationally-known speaker. It will
be developed in seminars during the
two following afternoons; and a brief
summation address will highlight the
final session at a Saturday luncheon.
The Committee has planned the
Clearwater Convention as a full three-
day affair, with a ceremonial opening
of its Building Products Exhibit at
9:00 A.M. Thursday morning, fol-
lowed at 10:00 A.M. with the first
business session. Business sessions
have been planned for each morning
of the Convention; but each has been
scheduled for only an hour and one-
half's duration to give conventioneers
plenty of opportunity for viewing the
building products exhibit. As at the
past two conventions, there will be a
free hospitality bar in the exhibit area.


P/R Program ..
(Continued from Page 18)
and staff"; and, 3 .. Lack of practi-
cal liaison with building industry
groups primarily a problem "at the
field level" where "prime evidence of
this is seen in the home-building
field" and, in addition, a situation
wherein "the architect is losing his
contact with the masses which,
through membership on school boards,
church vestries and building com-
mittees, exert a substantial influence
upon the practice of architecture."
The report listed three broad ob-
jectives toward the end of developing
solutions to the problems listed. They
are:
"1 ... Create public understanding
of the architect as a professional per-
son who is of both esthetic and eco-
nomic worth to his community. Im-
press upon the public that the archi-
tect is an intensely practical person
who should be consulted, rather than
by-passed, when money matters; em-
phasize that there are important eco-
nomic advantages in hiring an archi-
(Continued on Page 29)
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(Continued from Page 28)
tect. Only by creating this climate of
public opinion can we effectively
meet the challenge of the package
dealer.
"2 ... Maintain and improve pro-
fessional competence, both as it is
demonstrated in individual building
design and community development,
and as it is engendered in the schools.
"3 . Improve all lines of com-
munication between the professional
society and its members. Make and
keep them conscious of what the AIA
does and is striving to do for them.
Keep all AIA members informed of
their society's programs, activities
and plans."
Though not specifically stated in
either Mr. Denny's report or that of
the P/R steering committee, the im-
portance of pursuing these objectives
actively in the local area of each AIA
Chapter was presumably recognized.
Mr. Denny touched briefly on the
need for "preparing a flow of materials
and aid to the chapters"; and the
P/R steering committee noted a de-
cision to continue "regional workshop
and appearances by public relations
counsel" and stated that "prepara-
tions for a broadened series of such
seminars will be started immediately."
It, is probable that every Chapter
president and P/R Committee chair-
man would agree completely with the
new AIA P/R Counsel's statement
of the problems involved and the ob-
jectives of a P/R program looking to
their solution. But what is necessarily
vital to Chapter officials is the me-
chanics to be employed to reach the
objectives. To them the what of a
local P/R program is often as clear
as crystal from a local point of view.
What they need most is help in work-
ing out the how of such a program.
The steering committee's report
indicated that some material prepared
by the former P/R counsel as aids for
local chapter activities may be con-
tinued, though subject to possible re-
vision. This refers especially to the
P/R Handbook and Speakers' Aids,
a full kit of which has been newly
prepared for Centennial celebrations.
It was also announced that a new
film on architecture is now in prepara-
tion by Time, Inc., in cooperation
with the AIA. When completed,
prints will be distributed to Chapters,
free of charge.
MARCH, 1957


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN P. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS

ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. HI 3-6554
MO 1-5154






mllll Hllr H I I i HiillilfIllllllll llll

* BUILDERS' ROSTER *
II IIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII li llHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIII IIIIIIIIIIt ll um
Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in the;r
locality or are trade association members of recognized standing. AGC-Associated General
Contractors; FAEC-Florida Association of Electrical Contractors; ACI-Amer. Concrete Institute;
NCMA-Natl. Concrete Masonry Assoc.; NRMCA--Natl. Ready-mixed Concrete Assoc.; FCPA-
Florida Concrete Products Assoc. C-Person to contact.


- CHARLOTTE COUNTY -
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John L. Avant, Pres.-AGC
Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC
- DUVAL COUNTY
INDUSTRIAL tr HEAVY
Henry G. Dupree Co.
S1125 Kings Ave., Jacksonville
Phone: FL 9-6622
C-Henry G. DuPree, Pres.-AGC
- PALM BEACH COUNTY
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC


Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W.Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.
CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501 Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Pres.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
PINELLAS COUNTY
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC
VOLUSIA COUNTY
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C--Hugo Quillian, Partner-AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI
- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


State Board Grants
Registrations to 79
Applicants; 26 of
Which Are Residents

Seventy-five licenses (including two
reinstatements) to practice architec-
ture have been issued since July 1956,
according to the office of the Florida
State Board of Architecture. Of
these, 49 were granted to out-of-state
architects. Distribution of these are:
New York, 14; Illinois, 6; New Jersey,
4, Ccorgia, No Carolina and Ohio, 3
each; Alabama, Indiana, Louisiana,
Michigan and Pennsylvania, 2 each;
and one each from California, Con-
necticut, Kentucky, Maine, So. Caro-
lina and Tennessee.
Newly registered Florida residents,
total 26 and are:
Belleair Beach
John Randal McDonald
Cocoa
Edwin C. A. Bullock
Clearwater
Donald W. McNulty
Daytona Beach
Wm. C. Hardwick
Deland
Arthur F. Deam
Ft. Lauderdale
Karl A. Rauschert
William Henry Peck
Ft. Myere
Robert H. Matts
Gainesville
Fred. Wm. Schlotterlwin
Dexter N. Webb
Jacksonville
Thomas L. Dawsey, Jr.
Leesburg
Leland A. Fisher
Miami
Stephen M. Davis
Milton C. Harry
James W. Junkin, Jr.
Walter J. Stanton
Miami Beach
Abbott Harle
Orlando
Theodore G. Andrew
Sarasota
William H. Kerfoot
St. Petersburg
Richard C. Vogler
Stuart
Paul Wm. Groth
Herbert P. Rosmarin
Tampa
Alfred T. Floyd
Robert J. Robbins
Gene Thompson
Winter Park
John T. Hart
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Thin-set method is the jet-age


way of setting Ceramic Tile. It


saves time, money and space...

Florida Distributor:

MIRACLE ADHESIVE SALES COMPANY
Lake Worth Phones: JU 2-6846, JU 2-6848










Producers' Council Program


The Producers' Council role in the
forthcoming Centennial Convention
of the AIA will, appropriately enough,
be one of the largest on record. As
now planned, the Product Exhibition
of this 89th Annual Convention will
be held in the Exhibition hall of the
Sheraton-Park Hotel in Washington,
D.C., where 107 booths will present
a comprehensive display of new build-
ing products. In at least 23 of the
exhibits, displays will have an his-
torical character, indicating the pro-
gressive developments of the products
shown.
The Products Exhibition will be
open for four days during the Cen-
tennial Celebration, thus providing
each visiting architect ample time for
informative visits. This year the ex-
hibits will be staffed by technicians
rather than salesmen; and it will there-
fore be possible for visitors to obtain
at first hand answers to a wide range
of technical questions.
As in the past, this Product Exhi-
bition is co-sponsored by the AIA
and the Producers' Council. The two
organizations are also joint sponsors
of the Building Products Literature
Competition, now a well-established
part of the exhibit phase of AIA an-
nual conventions. The 1957 Compe-
tition is the ninth of its kind and was
originally started in an effort to im-
prove the overall usefulness of manu-


Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc. 18
Armor-Flex Products, Inc. .. 2
Associated Elevator Supply, Inc. 28
Bruce Equipment Company .. 24
Builders' Roster ... 30
Dunan Brick Yards . Third Cover
Electrend Distributing Co. 28
Executone Distributors . 8
Farrey's Wholesale
Hardware Co., Inc. . 28
Florida Foundry & Pattern Works 26
Florida General Supply Corp. 14
Florida Home Heating Institute 19
Florida Portland Cement . 9
Florida Power & Light Co. . 25
Florida Steel Products, Inc. . 31
Gas Institute of Greater Miami 21
George C. Griffin Co. . . 5


facturers' product-literature. Officials
of both AIA and Producers' Council
credit the annual program with ma-
terially raising the standards of adver-
tising directed to architects through
the professional press as well as cata-
logs of both a reference and current
informational character.
One of the chief purposes of the
competition is to encourage manufac-
turers of building materials and equip-
ment to adopt a more technical ap- .
proach in preparation of building
products literature and advertising in-
tended primarily for architectural au-
diences. For this reason judgement of
all submissions is by a five-member
panel of architects. Announcement of
the panel and the results of its judge-
ment in the four award classifications
of the competition is customarily
made during the early part of an AIA
Convention program. Award winners
will be on display throughout the Cen-
tennial Celebration.


The March Informational Meeting
of the Miami Chapter of the Pro-
ducers' Council will be held at the
Coral Gables Country Club on Tues-
day evening, March 26th. Sponsoring
host will be The Anderson Company;
and the subject of the meeting will
be "Wood Windows with Architec-
tural Appeal".


Hamilton Plywood . .. 25
Hollostone Co. of Miami . 3
Interstate Marble & Tile Co. . 27
Magic City Shade & Drapery Co. 4
Miracle Adhesive Sales . 30
Mutschler Kitchens of Florida, Insert
Portland Cement Asso. . 10
Prescolite Mfg. Co. . . 31


A. H. Ramsey
& Sons, Inc.


2nd Cover


Sistrunk . . .. 26
Stylon of Miami 6


Thompson Door Company
Unit Structures . .
F. Graham Williams .


22
S 17
S. 29


The fixtures illustrated above, and many others
too, employ "DieLux"* diecastings as an integral
part of the unit. . for STRENGTH, DURABILITY,
APPEARANCE. 1. No. 1015-6715 Recessed. 2. No. A-14
Swivel Unit. 3. No. WB-25 Wall Unit. 4. No. 8585
Hospital Light. Write for your free copies of
current PRESCOLITE literature.
*Prescolite's trade name for precision diecast products.

PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP
Berkeley, California Neshaminy, Pennsylvania


SERVING FLORIDA

ARCHITECTS & BUILDERS

REINFORCING STEEL
BAR JOISTS
ALUM. & STEEL SASH
JALOUSIES
STEEL DOORS & FRAMES
MISC. IRON AND
ALUMINUM
ORNAMENTAL IRON
STEEL ROOF DECK
STEELTEX
HIGHWAY PRODUCTS
COMPLETE ENG. &
FAB. FACILITIES
CORRUFORM
SONOTUBES


FLORIDA STEEL
PRODUCTS, INC.


TAMPA 8-0451
ORLANDO 2-4539
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


MARCH, 1957


I ADVERTISERS' INDEX











in conference...


Bridge to


Understanding


By JAMES K. POWNALL
Chairman, FAA Legislative Committee


I'm going to propose an idea for a program which I
hope will find enough favor to be adopted by every one
of Florida's ten AIA Chapters. Briefly, it's this: As county
and community representatives, our State Legislators
should know what architectural services can mean to
the progressive development of our State. And the best
way for them to get that knowledge is to understand
what architectural service is through friendly contact with
the professional men whose job it is to provide it.
* To some that may smack of politicking. Others might
dignify it in terms of improving public relations. Depend-
ing on the circumstances and the results, it could be
both. But to me it signifies just plain helpful common
sense. When you make friends with a man, you can talk
to him. And when you can talk to him a lot of mis-
understandings can be cleared up and a lot of new under-
standings created as a result of conversational give and
take based on mutual respect and sincerity.
Let's face it. When you elect any man to an office,
you change him. You make him your emissary, give him
new and varied duties, charge him with unfamiliar re-
sponsibilities. And not just you alone. Everybody in your
community-including the individuals with axes to grind,
groups with a public mission, blocs with private interests.
It's understandable, indeed necessary, that our State Rep-
resentatives become wary of proposals, cautious about
commitments. Public office burdens any man of con-
science with the lonesome responsibility for decision. The
only basis on which he can discharge his representative
obligations to his community is the basis of facts-an
understanding of needs and the means for filling them.
I've always felt that understanding was a two-way
street. I don't believe you can get any man to take much
interest in your affairs and problems unless you're willing
to demonstrate an equally sincere interest in his. In com-


mon with most professional men, architects have gained
a reputation for living pretty much in a world of their
own. They haven't been very vocal about matters outside
a pretty narrow professional sphere-particularly with
respect to many public questions that concern their
legislators. So it's easy to understand why legislators
haven't appeared too much interested in them.
This situation can be easily changed, I think. But I
also think it's up to the architects to make the first move.
As a start, therefore, I suggest that each member of every
one of Florida's ten AIA Chapters get to know each
State representative in his community and county. It
would be an excellent idea for each Chapter to hold a
legislators' meeting at least twice a year. Let every local
representative be made welcome. Plan a program which
will include discussion of mutual interests-and be sure
to allow time for plenty of informal questions-and-answers
from legislators as well as architects. I'm certain that both
groups would be surprised to discover how much solid
good would come out of a regular series of such state-
wide meetings.
One point relative to this suggestion needs emphatic
clarification. This should certainly not be a self-seeking
program on the part of the architects-nor a political
effort on the part of the legislators. The sole object is
to build a bridge of mutual understanding between people
who are importantly instrumental in the physical develop-
ment of their communities and the people who repre-
sent those same communities in the State Legislature.
The common ground on which both architects and
legislators must surely meet is the safety and welfare of
the public which each group serves. Each can improve
his service to the public by better knowledge of what the
other does. Together they can do even more. And that
fact alone is all the justification needed for the immediate
development of a friend understanding between them.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
















Marble


Mosaic


Tiles ...


They come from Italy in three sizes and a
wide range of color and chip patterns.
Three of the five series "Ciottolo",
"Piastrina" and "Scaglione" may be
ordered in the 12"x12" (shown here)
and 16"x16" sizes from 31 different
color-patterns. Series "G", large chips, and
Series "F", small chips, include 38
varied styles and are made in the 8"x8"
size. Samples of all 69 color-textures are
at hand to choose from. But time must
be allowed for order-delivery from Italy.


-14-P



BRICK

ff_13-P


Specialists


DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS
FOR WALLS, WALKS and FLOORS

DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INCORPORATED
MIAMI, FLORIDA-Phone TU 7-1525


17-S










1-C










W&o4th To'u 't d 75--



That's the 43rd Annual Convention of the FAA! This year it will be held
in Clearwater, gem of Florida's western sun-coast on the beautiful Gulf of
Mexico... It will be worth every minute and every penny of your time
and money. At this fitting climax to the AIA's Centennial Anniversary
year, you'll rea a. profit from pleasure and a dividend from professional
duty ... Plan now'to attend, syre!
















Convention Headquarters
in Clearwater will be the
Fort Harrison Hotel
comfort, good food, low
prices and every facility
for fun. Better get your
reservation in early ....



43rd ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 1957 FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER


-I-,I~I I I~ ,




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