• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Let's produce the genius
 Table of Contents
 Letters & New stamp for AIA...
 As others see us & St. Petersburg...
 The nature of thin shells
 Organizing large chapter area
 Architect-contractor cooperati...
 1957 FAA board holds first...
 News and notes
 Advertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Editorial: Capstone to conclus...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00032
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Let's produce the genius
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Letters & New stamp for AIA centennial
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    As others see us & St. Petersburg architects' show
        Page 7
    The nature of thin shells
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Organizing large chapter area
        Page 13
    Architect-contractor cooperation
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    1957 FAA board holds first meeting
        Page 17
    News and notes
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Advertisers' index
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Editorial: Capstone to conclusion
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.












I7hA I


February
1957










Thin Shells...
Imaginative designers in
the field of structural en-
gineering have shown again
that concrete is a wonder-
fully versatile material.
Its use in thin shells offers
apparently limitless op-
portunity for new archi-
tectural forms and new
structural efficiency . .


-0






Z. .. .


Let's Produce The Genius


Last November T. Trip Russell held a 42nd FAA Conven-
tion audience spellbound by his moving introduction of
Henry S. Churchill, FAIA. His words were not recorded;
but so many requests for them have been voiced, that
their author has consented to allow their publication here.

By T. TRIP RUSSELL, AIA


The profession of Architecture is
as old as history. Among the works
of man all things perish in time, but
it is Architecture that remains long-
est and tells us the most of the civili-
zations that have passed. Painting is
destroyed, poetry is lost, philosophy
is no longer remembered. But even
in the desert the vestiges of building
are not wholly eradicated.
When the great library at Alexan-
dria went up in flames, most of the
accumulated knowledge of the then-
known world went with it. Genera-
tions to come sought in the ruins of
the buildings a key to the civilizations
already centuries gone. The haughty
pride of Egypt, the cold logic of
Greece, the somewhat tawdry com-
mercial splendor of Rome, the mystic
fervor of medieval Europe are all mir-
rored in the buildings that survive.
So it must someday be with us.
The students of the history of
Architecture know that inspiration
has not burned with a steady flame
through the ages that have passed.
Brief periods of intense activity, dur-
ing which an almost incredible num-
ber of worthy monuments are built,
are followed by periods of relative
sterility. Like most things, an archi-
tectural age is born, struggles to reach
maturity, has a brief full flowering
and a long period of slow decline.
Those who look more closely see
that this pattern has most often taken
place over a period of approximately
four hundred years. Thus, no man
sees the beginning and the end and


genius, to reach its pinnacle, must
be born at the right time.
Such a period began in the twelfth
century and again in the sixteenth
century. Both followed periods of
great social change and burgeoning
new vigor. They ran parallel courses
differing only in detail.
The first fifty years was a period
of experiment, of groping for new
forms expressive of the inspiration of
the age. The architects were sure of
their ground, but fearful of the im-
pact of new conceptions on a world
steeped in tradition. Thus, early
twelfth century Gothic was weighted
with the outworn trappings of the
Romanesque; and the Cathedral of
Florence arose encased in Gothic de-
tail. It was a period of daring experi-
ments and rapid retreats, but at the
end the world stood ready to accept
the new Architecture as its highest
artistic expression.
Within the next hundred years, the
masterpieces of the age were built.
Clean above the Romanesque village
rose the majestic vaults of Chartres,
as four hundred years later the great
dome of St. Peters put the final cap-
stone on Rennaissance Rome. It was
a short period for so much grandeur.
And what came later in either age
never quite came up to these towers
of inspiration.
Instead, in each period, architects
became obsessed with detail, more
intricate and complex, with impossi-
ble variations on a simple problem,


with art for amazement's sake, and
the tortuous by-paths of striving for
effect. Thus, the lacy flamboyant
front of Tours excites curiosity, but
fails to move one and the curling es-
says in spun sugar in the Italian Ba-
roque evoke admiration for craftsman-
ship, but little for taste.
Later, there is a reaction from too
much ingenuity and an attempt to re-
turn to the purity of the golden age.
The results are buildings of cold per-
fection, stripped, it is true, of the
excesses of the immediate past, but
also stripped of a certain warmth that
comes from freshness of inspiration.
The archaeologic exhibitions of the
past century are cases in point.
All this discussion of the past leads
us to one inescapable conclusion -
that we today stand on the threshold
of one of the great ages of Architec-
ture. The fifty years that have pre-
ceded have been formative years. The
experiments have been impressive.
But the Gothic tracery on the Wool-
worth building, the classic abutments
of the Delaware River Bridge are tes-
timonials that the Architect was not
quite sure of himself.
The public no longer expects us
to cloak our inspiration in garments
of the past. We are free of the
shackles that have bound it. Probably
we have not yet produced a master-
piece in our age, but also probably
within one lifetime one of those mas-
terpieces that live for centuries will
arise. Never has the challenge been
greater. Let us produce the genius.


&MAIM





OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1957


President
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Secretary
H. Samuel Krus6
Chamber of
Commerce Bldg.
Miami


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
William B. Harvard Central Florida
Franklin S. Bunch . North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
DIRECTORS
Immediate Past President
G. Clinton Gamble
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
John M. Evans
Daytona Beach Francis R. Walton
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Robert H. Levison
Fla. North Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
Sanford W. Goin, FAIA
Florida North Central Forrest R. Coxen
Florida South James E. Garland
Irving E. Horey
Verner Johnson
Jacksonville . Taylor Hardwick
Ivan H. Smith
Mid-Florida ..... Hill Stiggins
Florida Northwest William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . . Harold A. Obst
Charles E. Duncan

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
FEBRUARY, 1957


7Frr




Florida Ar litent


VOLUME 7


FEBRUARY, 1957


NUMBER 2


CONTENTS


Let's Produce The Genius -
By T. Trip Russell


2nd Cover


Letters ------------.------ 2

New Architect Stamp ---------------- 2

As Others See Us .--------------------- 7
By Charles L. Farris

St. Petersburg Architects' Show--- --------- 7

The Nature of Thin Shells...........-----------------.- 8
By Don A. Halperin


Organizing the Large Chapter Area -
By Roland W. Sellew


----13


Architect-Contractor Cooperation -----------.--.----..14

1957 FAA Board Holds First Meeting ------17

News and Notes ----___.__ .------------ 18

Advertisers' Index ----------------------- -22

Producers' Council Program .....----___ _. ...24

Editorial Capstone to Confusion .-.-------3rd Cover

THE COVER
The nature of thin concrete shells permits use of such shells in a
wide range of structural forms and provides the architect with a
virtually unlimited field of design application. Here a rhythmic series
of shells forms the roof of a walkway of a high school in Dearborn,
Mich., for which Eberle Smith was architect and Alfred Zmeig was
the associated engineer . Other thin-shell applications are illus-
trated beginning on page 8.


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, T. Trip Russell. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. . Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.





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Letters


IDENTIFICATION
Gentlemen:
Allow me to congratulate you on
the recent issue of The Florida Archi-
tect which covered the Convention at
Miami Beach, as well as the doings
of the various Chapters. Among these
and other things, I was interested in
seeing the picture of the FAA Con-
vention held in St. Petersburg 10
years ago. For your information and
that of FRANKLIN BUNCH, the person
numbered 18 as unidentified, is JOHN
\V. VICKERY, now deceased, who
shared an office with HENRY DUPONT
back in the early 1920's. Mr. Vick-
cry, for years, was a member emeritus
of the Florida Central Chapter.
I wish I could also identify num-
ber 7, but I do not recall him.
EImI.IOrT B. HADLEY,
St.. PtIrrsburg, Florida
Gentlemen:
Congratulations on another fine is-
sue of The Florida Architect!
With reference to the 1946 Con-
vention group picture, No. 7 is WVIL-
LIAM BLOCKER, now working in Wash-
ington, D. C., and No. 18 is the late
JOHN VICKERY, former Member Emer-
itus of the Florida Central Chapter.
JACK MCCANDLESS,
Smith, McCandless and Hamlin
Clearwater, Florida
ED. NOTE-Reference is to the pic-
ture of 25 FAA members who made
up the FAA's 32nd Annual Conven-
tion. The print was contributed from


files of Franklin S. Bunch, Jackson-
ville, and was published on page 4 of
the January issue.

COOPERATION
Gentlemen:
We want to thank you for the
publication in your January issue of
a photograph of our stained-glass
panel for the Palna Ccia Baptist
Church of Tampa. We feel greatly
honored by the citation given us by
the 43rd FAA Convention at Miami
last November.
The opportunity offered us to show
our work as an integral part of the
plans presented by PULLARA, BOWEN
AND \VATSON is the result of close
cooperation between the initiative of
the architects and the creativeness of
the artist. In our view, this is a very
important fact that we would like to
have recorded in the pages of The
Florida Architect. This merging of
the minds will result in the best ex-
pression of the ideas of the architect
and the interpretation of the artist.
Jos. D. MYERS,
Jos. .D.. Myers, Associates
Tampa, Florida

NEW SERVICE
Gentlemen:
In discussing some of the problems
of employment and placement for
architectural graduates, the students
suggested that perhaps The Florida
(Continued on Page 4)


color of which has not L "
yet been released, but
which was designed by UNIT
Robert J. Schultz, of
South Bend, Ind.-would go on sale in
New York on February 23. His announce-
ment said that the printing of 120,000,-
000 of the stamps had been authorized.
Collectors desiring first-day cancellations
of the 3-cent Architects stamp may send
addressed envelope, together with money
order to cover the cost of stamps to be


ED STif'1t POSTAGE S
affixed, to the Postmaster, New York 1,
New York. An enclosure of medium
weight should be placed in each envel-
ope and the flap either turned in or
sealed. The outside envelope to the
Postmaster should be endorsed "First
Day Covers."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


New Stamp for AIA Centennial..
You'll be seeing a lot A L
of this picture this year. I A
It's the approved design
of the 3-cent stamp be-
ing issued in honor of AMERICAN
the architects of America AME ICAN
to commemorate the .I.'I t STITUTE
100th Anniversary of the
AIA. Postmaster General OF
Arthur E. Summerfield M.,
announced last month : T .
that the new stamp-the 7


...........


1































Fourteen-unit apartment building for S. W. S., Inc., which incor-
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This brand new apartment building with its Hollostone floors and
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Precast concrete does not rust, melt or rot . .it STAYS put.


FEBRUARY, 1957 3












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(Continued from Page 5)
Architect might carry employment
notices as a service to both the stu-
dents and the practitioners.
P. M. TORRACA,
Acting Head,
Department of Architecture,
U/F College of Architecture
and Fine Arts
EDITOR'S NOTE-As an Official
Journal, The Florida Architect is pub-
lished to serve all interests of FAA
membership. Thus, its columns may
be used to carry, without charge, no-
tices from any member of any Florida
AIA Chapter, including the Student
Associate Chapter, for "Positions
Open" and "Positions Wanted."
Classified notices from other sources,
if accepted for publication, will be
subject to regular advertising rates.


FAEC MEETING
Gentlemen:
At the recent FAEC Board meet-
ing the directors selected a date and
place for the annual convention and
trade show. In order to provide Flor-
ida Architect readers the advance no-
tice they appreciate receiving on
conventions, will you kindly arrange
to carry a suitable notice embodying
the following news?
"The Board of Directors of the
Florida Association of Electrical Con-
tractors announced, after their recent
Board meeting, that the annual FAEC
Convention and 5th Electrical Trade
Show will be held this year at the
Soreno Hotel in St. Petersburg on
October 16, 17, 18 and 19th. Space
is being provided for 72 booths this
year. Looks like FAEC is out to make
this the biggest and best electrical
show yet."
Thanks for your cooperation.
STANLEY NOWAX,
Director, FAEC Public Relation
Orlando, Florida

HOUSE PROBLEM
Gentlemen:
A magazine called "The Home of
the Month' is being distributed in
Florida. It contains sketches and de-
scriptions of houses and offers blue-
prints, specification outlines and ma-
terial lists of these houses at very low
cost. In a recent issue, the sketches
were done by a firm of Detroit archi-


tccts listed as members of the AIA.
Why should the Michigan Chaptcr
supply plans to Florida people who
might become our clients? Evidently
the Michigan architects have devel-
oped some sort of small house service
which is filling an important public
demand.
Is there an opportunity for the
FAA to do something like this?
Would it not be possible for each
AIA Chapter in Florida to develop
three complete sets of small house
plans for distribution through the
FAA Executive Secretary's office?
This could serve to further our public
relations if sketches of these houses
could be regularly published in local
papers throughout the State.
I would like to know how others
feel about this idea--and if some
progress could be developed in the
Chapters toward putting the idea into
operation.
JACK W. ZIMMER,
Ft. Lauderdale
EDITOR'S NOTE-A story on what
other AIA Chapters and Regions have
done and are doing to solve the per-
renial "small house problem" is
planned for a future issue of The
Florida Architect. In the meantime,
correspondence and suggestions from
readers are invited.




REFERENCE ISSUE

FOR NEXT MONTH

The March issue of The Florida
Architect will be devoted largely
to a reporting of the various com-
mittee appointments of all ten
of Florida's AIA Chapters. Inso-
far as possible committee listings
will include committee personnel
s well a na and addresses of
chairmen. Personnel and ad-
dresses of FAA Standing and
Special Committees will also be
listed . This reference data
was originally scheduled for pub-
lication in the February issue,
but committee appointments of
all Chapters had not been com-
pleted in time to make this pos-
sible.... It is hoped that in the
future all committee information
will be available to make possi-
ble its publication in February as
a yearly reference manual.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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S.CO, T!
LAI


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ORT LAUDERD


L STEP TO
SUCCESSFUL
BU-IL1DINGr...



















I -T -C
The architect is the captain of your building
team. He is the person who draws the plans
. .specifies materials . takes bids on the
job . supervises construction and approves
payment of the bills.
An architect is an artist a creator a per-
son with the unique ability to combine art and
business, inspiration and science, imagination
and sound judgment. To become a qualified
architect calls for 10 or more years of inten-
sive study and apprenticeship, and licensing
by the state in which he practices. All this is
to prove an ability to solve whatever type
building problem you may have.
Building a home, or any other structure, is
one of the biggest investments most people
make in a lifetime. To protect that invest-
ment, consult a professional . an architect.
He is your guide to greatest value for your
building dollar.
R. H. Wright & Son is proud of its friendship
with the architectural profession in this area.
As a leading producer of concrete and concrete
products, we constantly strive to produce the
materials and render the services the archi-
tect requires for sound, successful building.


6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I







As Others

See Us...
Criticism is sometimes quite as
good for the soul as traditional con-
fession. Particularly that's true when
the criticism is constructive and is
offered by an individual whose out-
look and experience makes it practi-
cal as well. Recently, members of
the St. Louis, Mo., Chapter, AIA,
were on the receiving end of such a
critical commentary the burden of
which applies quite as forcefully to
Florida architects.
The occasion was a review of ways
in which architects can help in com-
munity planning. The criticism was
voiced by CHARLES L. FARRIS, execu-
tive director of the St. Louis Housing
Authority and Land Clearance Com-
mission. His statement the major
part of which follows was made at
the request of ARTHUR SCHWARTZ,
AIA, vice-chairman of the St. Louis
Plan Commission.

In general, architects seem to con-
sider planners as something of a neces-
sary evil. They view the city plan-
ning agencies as groups through which
subdivision plats must be processed
and, perhaps more commonly, as
groups which fail to understand the
merits of specific proposals for the
development of a building site. The
architect, it seems, has failed to rec-
ognize that specific design unrelated
to the social and economic base of a
community is as ineffective as archi-
tetural design which is unrelated to
the people for whom a structure is
erected to serve, or to the site on
which it is to be constructed.
There is an apparent tendency for
the architect to look down upon the
city planners, particularly city plan-
ners without an architectural back-
ground. This, I suspect, is a by-
product of the training received in
the architectural school.
What I have said thus far has been
critical and negative. I would like to
offer some suggestions as to where I
believe the architect can exert a very
positive support to community plan-
ning.
First of all, I believe architects
should get on speaking terms with the
city planning agencies, the redevelop-
ment agencies and neighborhood or-
(Continued on Page 2S)
FEBRUARY, 1957


Shown setting up dis-
plays for the St. Peters-
burg Society of Archi-
tects two-week design
show are, left to right,
William B. Harvard, gen-
eral chairman, Blanchard
E. Jolly, and Glenn Q.
Johnson. Above is a gen-
eral view of the exhibit
held in the St. Peters-
burg Art Club.



Architects' Show Draws 18oo


Mcnmbers of the St. Petersburg So-
ciety of Architects may have chalked
up a record as the first professional
organization to take formal notice of
the AIA's centennial year. The group
developed a design show of local
architects' work which opened De-
cember 30 and ran through January
12.
The show opened at the St. Peters-
burg Art Club on Sunday, December
30, with a reception attended by 400.
Average daily attendance was about
100. Press coverage was good. Gen-
eral purpose of the show was to ex-
plain most recent trends in architec-
ture and to emphasize the importance
to the public of good design.
To handle the affair, which it is


hoped may become a yearly event in
St. Petersburg, President HOWARD
ALLENDER appointed WILLIAM B.
HARVARD as general chainnan. Work-
ing with Harvard were: BRUCE SMITH,
chairman of the reception committee,
and CLENN Q. JOHNSON, chairman of
the display committee. Johnson was
assisted by B. E. JOLLY, ROBERT L.
ALLEN and JAMES Y. BRUCE.
Harvard credits the success of the
two-weeks' exhibition partly to the
fact that the opening event was well-
publicized. A thousand invitations
were mailed prior to the opening re-
ception which was an open house
sponsored by the Art Club. Archi-
tects and their wives held open house
on the following Sunday.

























































The thin-shell covering of the Kresge Audit
of Technology at Cambridge, Mass. has gro
which are about 175 feet apart. Cost of th
the building. Architect was Eero Saarinen, Fi
and Whitney.


8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


The Nature



of



THIN SHELLS-

By DON A. HALPERIN
Assistant Professor, U/F College of Architecture and Fine Arts






In the recent past great interest
has been evidenced in new ways of
architectural expression, which inher-
ently implies novel methods of con-
struction, and better solutions to the
problem of structural design. We
have also seen the growth of the one
story building, both in size and in
)popularit and with it, the demand
for large, clear, uncluttered space.
One of the excellent solutions pro-
posed to satisfy the desire for clear
spaces n without concern for upper store%
construction has been the shell. Prob-
ably it would be employed far more
often than it is were it not for the
fact that many dcsigncTs refuse to use
a shell form (and rightly so) until
they have the clear understanding of
what the fear to be highly complex
structural principles.
Actually,. although a rigorous mathe-
matic treatment of these curved forms
does get into high-order differential
equations, a comprehension of their
structural behavior is not too diffi-
cult. It would seem that to an ar-
chitect, and actually to a competent
e. ..... engineer, the latter is the more im-
portant aspect; so it is the one we
shall discuss here and leave the de-
torium for Massachusetts Institute tails of analysis to others.
und support at only three points Let us concern ourselves primarily
ie dome was about 10 percent of Let us concern ourselves primarily
AIA; consulting engineers, Amman with the singlcurved form, that is,
a form such that no matter where we


































take a cross section we will always
get the same simple curve circular,
parbolic, elliptic, or whatever with
the same geometry--same height,
same width, same radius or radii of
curvature. The doubly curved shells
follow the same principles of behavior
to some extent, with added stiffness
factors. But it is doubtful whether
the additional labor required in their
construction makes them economical-
ly feasible in this country, ;altlhogh1
domes will probably always be used
in our architecture.
A single -curved shell can be thought
of as a long beam, spanning from end
support to end support, with a curved
cross section. (Note that it does tiot
have vault action and is not supported
along its edges, but is carried at its
ends usually along typical cross sec-
tion). In this respect it is nothing
more than the ultimate expression of
a folded plane, which came into exist-
ence through a logical outgrowth of
interaction between trusscs, purlins,
and wind bracing, a satisfactory solu-
tion to the problem of lateral stabil-
ity by the emiplomiiint of mutual
support. The shell takes mutual sup-
port of its parts to the limit, wherein
the shell provides what the great Ital-
ian engineer NERVI has termed "form
resistance". It achieves its strength
because every particle acts with every


other particle to attain a unity of ac-
tion and purpose, so that the shape,
rather than the material, determines
its strength.
Herein lies the clue to understand-
ing--strength through form. Con-
sider first the draped cable of a sus-
pension bridge. The catenary fonr,
with uniformly dibtrubutttl load, in-
sures us that the cable sustains pure
tension, no compression, no bending.
Now assume that the cable is frozen
into its shape, and flip it upside down
into an arch form. It would now be
in pure compression, no tension, no
bending. Extend this form sidLways,
perpendicular to the plane of the
curve, and we have a shell, which
spans in the direction we have ex-
tended.
The amazing strength of the shell
form can be sinmph demonstrated.
Hold a sheet of stationery at one
edge and it will flop because the
paper has no strength as a cantilever
beam. Now hold that same sheet in
one hand with the thumb dcpri,,ing
the paper between the first two fin-
gers so that it assumes a curved shape.
Notice now how stiff and strong that
same material, which has very little
inherent strength, has become. This
is the nature of form resistance.
But the shell, unfortunately, is not
(Continued on Page 10)


The Temple Beth Sholem, at Miami
Beach, employs multiple supports
for its thin-shell roof and indicates
how such shells may be success-
fully intersected by subordinate
shells. Percival Goodman was the
architect, Herbert A. Mathes, resi-
dent supervising architect. Engi-
neers were Amman and Whitney.
All photos, courtesy of Portland
Cement Association, Orlando.


Airport Building, St. Louis, Mo.,
employs intersecting shells, 4 z-
inches thick throughout. Architects
were Hellmuth, Yamasaki and Lein-
weber; the structural engineer,
William G. Becker.


FEBRUARY, 1957 9

















































Top, gymnasium roof shell, supported by end columns, seems to float. Eberle
Smith, Detroit, architect. Above, roof of armory building in Oklahoma, Paul
Harris, architect, suggests the varied shapes possible; and armory dome below
shows possibility of piercing for vents or skylights.


Nature of Thin Shells
(Continued from Page 9)
subjected to p iu r c l compressive
stresses throughout its length and
width; it must also resist the effects
of twist and bending, the latter in
two directions. The torsion is taken
care of by adequately designing the
thickness and strength of the shell
itself. But the tendency to bend re-
quires some further considerations.
If we look at a uniformly loaded
cross section, we note that, as previ-
ously stated, unlike a vault the edges
have no supports. It is obviously
much easier for these edges to move
than for the crown to deflect. If we
had a series of shells, one next to the
other, the mutual edges would be
mutually restrained against the in-
ward, or sideward movement, but not
against the downward tendency. T'he
outermost edges of the entire series
are, of course, not restrained against
either motion.
For tlicse reasons edge beam stiffen-
ers are usually provided, so that the
profile assumes the shape of an arch
with haunches. It should be clearly
borne in mind that these beams do
not earry any load. They certainly do
not carry the shell in the usual sense;
and, in many cases, they could not
even carry their own dead load in
simple beamn action. Their only pur-
pose is to stiffen the edges of the
shell.
Another aspect of its stress distribu-
tion might best be understood by look-


or "


m


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


"'
~L~_-
-L
Ir


,~P~L






ing at the plan of a shell. The con-
tinuous support of the end, offered
by the arch rib (or end stiffener where
columns are employed at the corners)
seems to make for a stiffness at its
crown, and for longer shells (the
length is measured between supports)
can be entirely missing for quite some
distance. This lack of restraint, cou-
pled with the beam action, leaves the
center portion relatively "soft", so
that intermediate rib stiffeners might
have to be provided. They must be
thickest at the crown, but could taper
to nothing at the edges.
Having considered the form, we
might ask, "what material is best?"
There is no final answer to this ques-
tion. Plywood has been used on short
spans (short for shells, that is), nota-
bly by PAUL RUDOLPH. The French
have successfully employed corrugated
steel in some triply curved shells.
However, the plasticity of the shape
seems to lend itself best to concrete,
especially for a series of shells where
the forms would permit multiple use
on movable falsework.
Whichever material is used, certain
disadvantages are yet to be overcome.
When the curve gets steep toward its
edges, tar and gravel will not do for
a roofing, and a satisfactory cheap so-
lution is yet to be found. Where ac-
coustics are a prime consideration, it
will be necessary to provide some ad-
ditional treatment, since the smooth
curved form of the shell is terrible in
this respect. In fact, in one European
example, the answer to this vexing
problem was another interior rippled
shell (in this country we would un-
doubtedly have used plaster).
The advantages, though, are un-
deniable. As many engineers have
pointed out, effects of lighting are
greatly enhanced by the curved ceil-
ing. There is also a great reserve of
strength which permits almost limit-
less punctures for skylights, and also
permits ingenious plans, as ROBERT
MAILLART knew when he employed
a shell form in the design of a bridge
which was curved in plan, wellnigh
an impossibility with any other sys-
tem of bridge construction. We might
also cite the possibilities oL cantilev-.
ering. But above all, it should be the
architectural considerations of aesthet-
ic appeal which are our governing
criteria. The grace, the symmetry, the
achievement of a rhythmic flow of
space are possible only through the
cognizant employment of thin shells.
FEBRUARY, 1957


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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.,







Organizing the Large Chapter Area

By ROLAND W. SELLEW, AIA
President, Florida Central Chapter


'Ille membership of Florida Cen-
tral Chapter is currently drawn from
fourteen counties, all of them fairly
large in area, and including Charlotte
and Lee Counties recent maps to
the contrary notwithstanding. This
expanse covers the several principal
centers of St. Petersburg, Tampa,
Sarasota, Lakeland, Clearwater and
Fort Myers. Bradenton is omitted
only in that this is the combined area
covered by the activities of the Sara-
sota-Bradenton Association of Archi-
tects, Inc., as will be elaborated upon.
Each of the municipalities mentioned
contribute to the membership of
Florida Central in approximate ratio
to the population of each.
In spite of distances of at least 150
miles north and south and over 100
miles cast and west, attendance at
quarterly meetings (about to become
bi-monthly), has been exceptionally
good. In part this attendance per-
fonnance, as evidenced by a 45 per
cent attendance at the convention in
Miami Beach, has been due to a great
improvement in Chapter meeting
quality. It is also contributed to by
the development of local area asso-
ciations.
With the recent formation of local
associations of the Clearwater and
Lakeland architects, there are cur-
rently local groups holding regular
meetings in St. Petersburg, Tampa,
Lakeland and Sarasota-Bradenton, a
total of five potential supporters of
the work of the Chapter. The Sara-
sota-Bradenton Association of Archi-
tects has recently been incorporated.
These several local associations arc
not basically all alike in their make-
up or membership requirements. The
St. Petersburg club may be at one
end of the scale, in which only AIA
members arc admitted; and Sarasota-
Bradenton at the other, which is open
to all registered architects resident
and doing business in Sarasota and
Manatee Counties but provided
that the members must adhere to a
prescribed code of ethics (copied
nearly verbatim from the AIA code)
and must keep up-to-date in their
dues and assessments. In spite of a
rather rigidly enforced code and rcla-
FEBRUARY, 1957


tively high dues together with assess-
ments, there are but a very few clligi-
ble who are not members in good
standing; the total membership now
standing at 17.
I believe that in any community
or municipality where there are five
or more registered architects, a local
affiliation into a club or association
is of great potential value to the AIA
Chapter having area jurisdiction. I
believe also that such local groups,
while observing reasonably rigid cthi-
cal codes, should not be too discrim-
inatory in membership requirements.
To do the latter eliminates one po-
tent manner in which to inculcate
ethical standards and a full apprecia-
tion of organizational advantages oni
the part of non-members of the AIA.
An active, and not too selective
local group, can function as a feeder
for the Chapter in stimulating inter-
est in AIA activities and, with a wide-
spread Chapter area, can be far more
effective in public relations at a local
level. In line of this last item, tlhe
Sarasota Bradenton Association of
Architects has recently engaged the
services of a public relations counsel
and has just completed a two weeks'
showing of work of local architects.


Whereas newspaper articles as to
architects and architectural subjects
have been conspicuous by their ab-
sence in the past, such has not re-
ccntly been the case. Newspaper
coverage of the activities of individu-
ual architects, of the local group as a
whole, of Chapter affairs and even
of the FAA, has been greatly en-
hanccd.
This local group has recently of-
fcred its specific aid and support to a
local administrative board and stands
ready to make a group contribution to
an important item of County-wide
importance. Through these means it
is hoped, and with every expectation
of success, that public appreciation
of the architect and his functions will
be immeasurably improved. It might
be added that this group has taxed
themselves at the rate of $25 each,
in the form of an assessment, to cover
this public relations program cost for
the next three months' trial period.
Through this development of local
groups, Florida Central Chapter will
automatically benefit. Through them
the Chapter can reach much more
effectively into all of the municipali-
ties which it encompasses than it
could possibly hope to do in any other
manner. As the membership of the
Chapter reaches a membership which
will make feasible its further division,
as in the case of the split-off of the
Mid-Florida Chapter, there will be
available vehicles which can logically
become full-fledged Chapters.


Officers of the Florida Central Chapter for 1957 are, seated, left to right:
A. Wynn Howell, vice-president; Roland W. Sellew, president; Jack McCandless,
treasurer. Standing, left, is Sidney E. Wilkinson, secretary.










h'at does



SERVICE







TO YOU?

At the very least it should mean
good workmanship good mate-
rials properly installed. That's min-
imum. And you have the right
to expect it from any electrical
contractor worthy of the name.
But with Satchwell. Service means
something more.
It means the diversified technical
knowledge needed to complete any
job given us from repairing a
lamp (our smallest) to the layout
and installation of the complex
electrical services and controls for
a huge paper mill. This, a recent
job, was one of our largest, with
the electrical work alone running
over $1,500,000.
Then there's experience. Our com-
pany has been in business continu-
ously for 39 years-since 1917.
Our technical staff represents an
aggregate of more than 100 years
in their special fields of electrical
work. We know what quality is,
how to get it, how to build it into
all our jobs.
There's good organization, too.
That means team work, coordina-
tion between staff and field men,
keeping pace with schedules--
and keeping job performance high
and job costs low at the same
time.
That's what Service means to
Satchwell. It can mean the same
for you if you'll let us figure your
next job.



SATCHWELL

ELECTRIC
CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY, INC.
2922 Old St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
P. O. Box 5777 Phones FL9-1643-4-5


Architect-Contractor Cooperation


Joint discussions can clear the air of misunderstandings, pave
the way for smoother, more efficient working relationships.


Inter-industry discussions toward
the end of smoothing differences and
solving mutual problems are valuable
to all concerned. One took place re-
cently at a meeting of the West Vir-
ginia Chapter, AIA. It started as a
question-and-answer program between
member architects and contractor
guests. The result, as reported in
"Chapter Chatter," official publica-
tion of the West Virginia Chapter,
contains suggestions that might well
be taken to heart by both groups of
building professionals in Florida.

The contractors opened the first
round by asking, "Why is there more
and more tendency to award separate
contracts for mechanical work, rather
than to include them with general
work?" Architects answered by say-
ing that separate contracts gave a
lower overall cost due to the tax struc-
ture of tax-on-tax. Also, it gave bet-
ter control over sub-contractors, both
as to supervision and the selection of
qualified subs.
The contractors conceded the point
of tax-on-tax, but pointed out that sep-
arate contracts tend to delay the com-
pletion date and that they should
have control over sub-contractors.
They recommend that, if architects
want separate contracts, there be set
up either a fixed fee or a percentage
for supervision and coordination by
the general contractor. This would
enable the general contractor to move
all work in the same progression. As
it is now, the general contractor is
asked to coordinate the job with no
compensation.
The conclusion by both groups was
that one contract gives a better con-
trol, but that the problem might be
in not having better-qualified super-
visors from both offices.
Next question was by the archi-
tects: "Should sub-bids be made to
a bid depository to eliminate delay of
prices to the general contractor and
also the shopping of bids?" Con-
tractors agreed that shopping of bids


was definitely a problem, but more
of an individual problem of ethics and
morals. The bid depository idea is
being used with some degree of suc-
cess, but there is still the stumbling
block of competition forcing the use
of a low price from a bidder who is
not quite as qualified as a slightly
higher bidder.
At the present time there is no
visible solution to these problems. But
if the architect were stricter in his
supervision, it would force the gen-
eral contractor to do more of the
work now being sub-let. As a result,
better quality of work would be pro-
duced. This again brought up the
problem of better-qualified supervisors
from both offices.
The architects asked the question:
"How can continuity of contractor's
superintendent be assured for dura-
tion of the project?" The reply point-
ed out that contractors have no con-
trol over men leaving one job for an-
other. Also, the size of the project
often dictates the shifting of men for
a better end result. One man might
be better for sub-structure, another
for the follow-up and finish.
An especially noteworthy point was
made. If, at the beginning of each
project, the architect and his super-
visor would have a conference with
the contractor and his superintendent,
the completed work could be greatly
expedited. This conference should
cover the qualifications of sub-con-
tractors involved, consideration of
materials and equipment, the sched-
uling of work, the superintendent's
qualifications, shop drawing routines,
etc.
The final question was: "What
about the idea of split retainage?"
Three ideas were discussed: first, a 10
percent retention until project is 50
percent complete, then a 5 percent
retention; second, a 10 percent reten-
tion until project is 50 percent com-
plete, then no retention; and third,
10 percent retention for 100 percent
of the project, with a reservation that
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






the contractor could make applica-
tion at the 50 percent complete stage
for no retention. Interest centered
around the third idea as providing
the contractor with more incentive
to do better quality work.
Comments by panelists and chap-
ter members at large indicated a trend
toward the following conclusions:
1 ... Because mechanical work at
present represents 30 to 35 percent
of the contract, architects should re-
tain competent engineers for design
- and also equally competent super-
visors in these fields. The con-
tractor should send into the field su-
perintendents who are as skilled in
mechanical work as they are in gen-
eral building trades.
2... Due to stiff competition in
the construction industry, un-quali-
fied sub-contractors are being used.
Stronger emphasis by the architect on
strict adherence to plans and specifi-
cations would ultimately eliminate in-
ferior sub-contractors.
3... A pre-project conference be-
tween involved parties could arrest
many problems that arise in the field.
4... Bonding companies should be
forced to be more discriminating in
the selection of contractors with whom
they write payment and performance
bonds.

Sherman Marches ...
M. TONY SHERMAN & Associates,
architects and engineers, have moved
from their offices at 625 N. E. 78th
Street, Miami, to larger quarters at
1101 N. E. 79th Street.
The office telephone number--
PLaza 4-9591 -will remain tlhe
same.

Other address changes are:
In St. Petersburg, the firm of
SMuITH. MCCANDLESS AND HAMLIN
established their main office at 20
Beach Drive North, St. Petersburg.
Fonner main office of the firm was at
213 Myrtle Avenue, Clearwater, which
will be maintained as a branch. The
new arrangement became effective the
first of this year.
In Sarasota, J. WEST and ELIZA-
BETH B. WATERS announce forma-
tion of a new firm, WEST AND WAT-
ERS, Architects, with offices at 1342
McAnsh Square, Sarasota. Their
phone is RIngling 6-2341.
FEBRUARY, 1957


Memo To:


Your Specs Writer


Subject:


Care of Fine Doors

Fine hardwood doors are quality-crafted like fine furniture. But
too often their careless handling on the job results in damage or
neglect that shortens their useful life, lessens the trouble-free per-
formance for which they were designed. Here are four ways to avoid
damage and insure performance:

SSpecify that all doors shall be edge-sealed or prime-
coated by supplier prior to delivery at job.

Schedule job delivery after plastering has dried.
Require doors to be stored flat in dry, ventilated
area and protected with covering blanket of plastic
vapor-barrier or equivalent.


3.


Require all doors to be two-coat edge-sealed after
fitting, but before hanging.. Cover this by clause
in both carpenter's and painter's specs.


Have job supervisor check on all points in sequence.
SUse small mirror to check proper sealing on vital
4 top and bottom edges of all hung doors. Lack of
such sealing is most frequent cause of moisture
penetration resulting in warping, sticking, eventual
damage from rot.


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and a two-inch thickness. You can also
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veneers and in addition call for special
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1957 FAA Board
Holds First Meeting

The River Club, on the 19th floor
of Jacksonville's Prudential Life Build-
ing was where President EDGAR S.
WORTMAN brought the meeting to
order after luncheon on Saturday aft-
ernoon, January 12. The Board's guest
was LAMAR SARRA, Chairman of the
Governor's Committee of Schoolhouse
Construction who asked for architects'
cooperation in establishing standards
of adequacy for both school facilities
and construction. As one result of
his talk, SANFORD V. COIN, FAIA,
was appointed as coordinating chair-
man of a committee to provide Mr.
Sarra with information requested.
The Treasurer's report, presented
by Secretary SAM KRUSE in the ab-
sence (at the State Board of Architec-
ture meeting) of MOTRON T. IRON-
MONGER, indicated that several Chap-
ters were not current with dues. They
are requested to forward dues checks
to the FAA treasurer immediately.
Among other reports, that of SAN-
FORD W. GOING, FAIA, on Education
and Registration indicated that the
new building for the College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts at the Univer-
sity of Florida now enjoys a high pri-
ority. Need for it is well known by
legislators and an appropriation for
its construction is expected during
this legislative session.
Discussion of a legislative commit-
tee report from JAMES K. POWNAL
culminated in a decision by the Board
that the FAA Executive Secretary be
named as a resident representative for
the FAA during the 60-day session of
the legislature assisted by BENMONT
TENCH, JR., FAA legal counsel.
President Wortman named the fol-
lowing committee chainnmen with
full committee rosters to be named
in the near future: Legislative, JAMES
K. POWNAL; Education and Registra-
tion, SANFORD \V. GOIN, FAIA; Joint
Cooperative Committee, JOHN STET-
SON; Building Codes, JOSEPH SHIFALO;
Membership, ROLAND W. SELLEW;
Professional Practice, MELLEN C.
GREELEY, FAIA; Budget, EDWIN T.
REEDER; Publications, H. SAMUEL
KRUSE; Centennial Observance, WIL-
LIAM B. HARVARD; Planning and Zon-
ing, WILLIAM T. ARNETT; Resolu-
tions, ARTHUR LEE CAMPBELL; and
Loan Fund Bd. of Trustees, JOHN
L. R. GRAND.
FEBRUARY, 1957


an
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News & Notes


Florida South
The traditional Inaugural Ball, fea-
turing installation of newly-elected
officers was held this year at the La
Gorce Country Club, Miami Beach,
on Saturday evening, January 19.
Though somewhat smaller in number
than last year's Vizcaya party, Chair-
man JAMES DEEN counted the affair
an unqualified success.
ICOR B. POLEVITZKY, FAIA, acted
as emcee for installation of the Chap-
ter's new officers; and President VAHL
SNYDER receive one mention for a
Centennial Observation Panel. J.
ROBERT SWARTBURG took the other
mention. Chapter hostesses cited for
table decorations were MRS. IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, and Mrs. FRANCIS
TELESCA.
Among guests of honor were: FAA
President EDGAR S. WORTMnAN and
Mrs. Wortman; AGC President FRANK
J. ROONEY and Mrs. Roonev; and
Miami Producers' Council President
NICHOLAS NORDONE and Mrs. Nor-
done.
Palm Beach
1957 plans of the Palm Beach
Chapter Board of Directors indicate
a reversal of the trend current in most
other Florida AIA Chapters. Whereas
the general tendency is toward increas-
ing the number of yearly meetings,
Palm Beach has decided to hold only
six meetings this year instead of
the ten which have been customary
for several years past.
Moreover, wives of Chapter mem-
bers will be invited to attend at least
three of these meetings at which
considerations of Chapter business af-
fairs will presumably be held to a
minimum. First meeting of the year
will take place on Saturday, February
23rd. It will be a dinner-and-evening
affair and plans call for an outstand-
ing speaker as part of the entertain-
ment. The Board is planning to make
each of the five succeeding meetings
of the year equally outstanding.
The Palm Beach Board also revised
the Chapter's dues structure. Cur-
rent dues schedules do not include
prepayment for dinners on scheduled
meeting dates as formerly.

Two Palm Beach Chapter members
and a Ft. Pierce architect were pre-
sented with citations for "outstanding


professional accomplishment" by R.
O. BROWN, president of the Florida
East Coast Chapter, AGC, as one
highlight of that group's annual meet-
ing at the Sailfish Club, Palm Beach,
Tuesday evening, January 22nd. Those
honored were, FAA President EDGAR
S. VORTMAN, FAA V-P JOHN STET-
SON, and KENDALL P. STARRAT. The
awards, now an annual event, are se-
lected by the AGC membership by
informal secret ballot.
Emcee of the meeting was FRED O.
DICKINSON, JR. FRANK J. ROONEY,
national AGC President, introduced
R. B. FULLER, Executive Director of
the Florida Development Commission
as speaker of the evening. At an elec-
tion of new officers, G. E. MAALE was
chosen Chapter president.
Mid-Florida
Last fall the Chapter initiated a
program of professional seminars to
aid those interested in becoming reg-
istered as architects. Included as sub-
jects of the seven courses are mechani-
cal theory, construction, history, con-
crete engineering, wood construction,
steel construction and mechanical and
electrical equipment. The first three
started last fall, will extend through
this month. The other four will begin
in March and extend through May.
President JOSEPH M. SHIFALO re-
ported that interest has been encour-
aging; but that some difficulty has
been experienced in obtaining com-
petent instructors for all courses. It
is too early, he says, to assay the full
worth of this Chapter project. But
as an experiment in professional self-
training it will undoubtedly be
watched with interest by all Florida
Chapters. Tuition costs are small,
with some courses being free of any
expense except cost of textbooks.
Student Associate Chapter
DoN ALFORD, fifth-year student of
the U/F College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, won first prize from 109
entries in the competition for the dis-
play. house to be built for the Stu-
dents' Annual Home Show this spring.
Subject of the competition was "A
weekend retreat" a design to be
built by students in the Department
of Building Construction.
Other design winners were: CLAUDE
MADDOX, JR., second; STAN GREENE,
third; and CHARLES PATTILLO, fourth.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Regional Conference
Slated for April 4, 5, 6
Plans for the 1957 Regional Con-
ference of the AIA South Atlantic
District are rapidly maturing and
promise pleasure as well as profit for
all who attend, according to GEORGE
T. HEERY, in charge of Conference
publicity. Site is Atlanta, headquar-
ters, the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel, the
Theme, "Architecture Science or
Intuition?" which DR. VWALTER
GROPIUs is credited as regarding
"most intriguing indeed." The pro-
gram will highlight regional affairs,
tours, lectures, gala social affairs. Pub-
licity promises "no dull last-night din-
ner Beaux Arts Ball with students,
instead; with two trips to Mexico City
for costume prize."

Jacksonville Architects
Win Civic Victory
The last half of 1956 was packed
with matters of paramount interest to
citizens of Jacksonville. Proposed
last spring was a gigantic civic im-
provement program, including, in ad-
dition to both road and sewer exten-
sions, a new city hall, a sports arena
and a municipal auditorium. Among
those most interested were members
of the Jacksonville Chapter, AIA.
Their interest was aroused not mere-
ly because of the proposed buildings.
But an idea, hatched presumably by
an economy-minded public official
and nurtured by a feature-hungry seg-
ment of the Jacksonville press, galva-
nized the Chapter into an action
which plunged architects into the
very middle of the $30-million civic
controversy.
The story of how Jacksonville archi-
tects fonned a committee, studied
the pros and cons of the City Com-
mission's economy block proposal,
presented a report condemning it-
and then backed up their action
through smart public relations work
with many civic groups and individual
citizens was reported in a story
on page 20 of The Florida Architect
for October, 1956. At that time no
one could say whether the architects'
intervention for the sake of better
civic planning and long range values
would be successful in halting progress
on the part of a short-sighted oppo-
sition.
(Continued on Page 21)
FEBRUARY, 1957


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 19)

Last month, however, the answer
was provided at two civic meetings in
Jacksonvillc. One, held January 3,
was a public hearing on the huge im-
provement program at which was
voiced overwhelming approval of the
kind of program approved and sought
by the architects. The other was a
meeting of the Jacksonville City Coun-
cil, January 8, during which the pro-
gram cleared its final hurdle when the
Council unanimously passed the nec-
essary enabling legislation.
This whole affair and particular-
ly its recent successful conclusion -
has significance far beyond its local
boundaries. Proposals for civic im-
provements follow a well-defined pat-
tern which sometimes becomes dreary.
Hardly a one has evcr seen comple-
tion without overcoming the force of
"practical politics" larded with arro-
gant stupidity and shortsighted ig-
norance. Too often such opposing
forces warp a civic project of basic
cxccllence into a travesty of good
planning and saddle both town and
taxpayers with a monumental and ex-
pensive obstacle to both efficient util-
ity and future civic progress.
But in Jacksonville architects did
more than raise a lhu and cry. By
means of a well-planned and adroitly-
conducted public relations effort, they
assumed the civic conscience of their
city. They studied the facts, docu-
mented their reasons for opposing
anything less than their knowledge
and experience showed was sound
and adequate for their city. And they
carried these facts and reasons not
only to the city fathers but to the
tax-paying public of Jacksonville--
the people who stood to gain or lose
the most.
Though many members of the Jack-
sonville Chapter put their shoulders
strongly to this significant public re-
lations wheel, the Chapter's Civic Im-
provements Committee should be
especially credited with most of the
hard work and study which produced
the Chapter's decisive report. Includ-
ed were: MELLEN C. GREELEY, FAIA;
THOMAS E. EWART, JR.; WILLIAM
STANLEY GORDON; HERBERT COONS,
JR.; and TAYLOR HARDWICK.
The Committee's Chairman, ROB-
(Continued on Page 22)
FEBRUARY, 1957


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Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in their
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- CHARLOTTE COUNTY -
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John' L. Avant, Pres.-AGC

Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC
-DUVAL COUNTY -
INDUSTRIAL & HEAVY
Henry G. Dupree Co.
1125 Kings Ave., Jacksonville
Phone: FL 9-6622
C-Henry G. DuPree, Pres.-AGC

- PALM BEACH COUNTY -
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC


Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W. Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.
CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501 Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Pres.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
PINELLAS COUNTY -
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC
VOLUSIA COUNTY
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C-Hugo Quillian, Partner-AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI
- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


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News & Notes___
(Continued from Page 21)
ERT C. BROWARD, had this to say
about the final results of the Jackson-
ville civic improvements affair:
"The Jacksonville Chapter of the
AIA feels that the work it performed
in 1956 had much to do with the
final form of the program and its ac-
ceptance. However, the credit due
our group is that of acting as a civic
catalyst to push the reaction which
finally defeated the combination
building idea. The civic leaders and
officials took more time to study the
pros and cons of the issue after it
was brought to their attention that
study was needed.
"The acceptance of the program in
its final form was the result of Democ-
racy at work, with all groups and in-
dividuals being given a chance to speak
for or against the procedure. To those
of us who attended the public hear-
ings, it was quite revealing to witness
how strongly citizens will voice their
opinions on the needs of a commu-
nity, once these needs are brought be-
fore them and properly focusedd'



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Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc. 20
Armor-Flex Products, Inc. 2
Associated Elevator Supply, Inc. 18
Bruce Equipment . . 4
Builders' Roster . . 22
Electrend Distributing Co. . 21
Executone Distributors . 19
Farrey's Wholesale Hardware
Co., Inc. . . 18
Florida General Supply Corp. 12
Florida Home Heating Institute 5
Florida Steel Products, Inc. 24
Florida Power & Light Co. .. 20
Gas Institute of Greater Miami 16
George C. Griffin Co. . 11
Hamilton Plywood
& Lumber Co. . . 16

Hollostone Co. of Miami . 3
Interstate Marble & Tile Co. 17
Magic City Shade & Drapery Co. 19
Miracle Adhesive Sales Co. 24
Palmer Electric Co. . .22
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 15
Satchwell Electric Const. Co. 14
Sistrunk . . . 21
F. Graham Williams Co., Inc.. 23
R. H. Wright & Sons Co. . 6

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Stetson Heads

Joint Coop. Comm.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pros. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pros.





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John Stetson, Central District Vice-
President of the FAA and past-presi-
dent of the Palm Beach Chapter, AIA,
was elected Co-Chairman of the Joint
Cooperative Committee, FAA-AGC-
FES, at its fall meeting last November.
Apologies are due Mr. Stetson for an
erroneous report of this meeting which
named Clinton Gamble as the winner
of the Committee's election. Mr.
Gamble, who served two terms as
the Committee's Co-Chairman is also
due apologies for the mistake.



As Others See Us ...
(Continued from Page 7)
ganizations established to improve
communities. Only by constant con-
tact with these agencies can the archi-
tect become aware of the total prob-
lem of community growth and effect
a positive influence on civic design
and development.
Secondly, I believe that the arclii-
tect should develop a consciousness
that anything he creates will be view-
ed not as an isolated structure, but
as it is related to its surroundings in
the community, and its impact social-
ly and economically on the com-
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Thirdly, I believe architects should
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planning agencies more adequate
budgets in order that these agencies
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are established to undertake.
And, lastly, I believe architects
should exert an influence upon the
architectural schools to provide archi-
tectural trainees with something more
than a perfunctory course in com-
munity planning.
FEBRUARY, 1957


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Producers' Council Program


The first Infonmational Meeting of
the Miami Chapter's 1957 season was
staged at the Coral Gables Country
Club on Tuesday evening, January
22 just in time to squeeze by this
month's publication deadline The
affair was sponsored by the Arcadia
Metal Products Co.-Council mem-
ber from the sovereign state of Cali-
fornia and represented in Miami by
ROBERT SAFFELL.
The gathering was one of the larg-
est in the Chapter's experience--
more than 150 guests, not to speak of
a substantial quorum of Miami Chap-
ter members. The pleasant routine
was as in the past a cocktail hour
beginning at 6:30, then a roast-beef
dinner. After dinner President NICH-
OLAS NORDONE introduced the spon-
sors; and Bob Saffell performed the
welcoming courtesies. He introduced
Mr. CHARLES B. LEBON, III, vice-
president and chief engineer of the
Arcadia organization, who gave a brief,
well-presented and interesting talk -
outlining the engineering aspects of
Arcadia's current aluminum door line
and tracing the company's past
growth.
Mr. LcBon surprised his audience
with at least one statement. In Phoe-
nix, Arizona, and Fresno, California,
there exists a mysterious antipathy
toward aluminum, he said. It is so
strong among building officials, archi-


Tench Still Serving
As FAA Legal Counsel
Notice in the December issue (page
25) that BENMONT TENCH, JR., would
not be serving this year as resident
representative of the FAA at Talla-
hassee during legislative sessions ap-
parently furnished the basis for an
erroneous conclusion. Careless read-
ers took the notice to mean that
Tench had severed his connections
entirely with the FAA and was no
longer serving the organization as its
legal counsel.
This emphatically is not the case.
Neither Tench nor the FAA Board of
Directors has given indication of any
desire to sever the connection which


tects and contractors that neither his
company or any aluminum product
manufacturer has sold a single alum-
inum door in those two cities! Rea-
sons for this marketing phenomenon
was not revealed.

Report of the December meeting
of the Jacksonville Producers' Coun-
cil arrived too late for publication in
the January issue. It was a fun night
- the occasion being a testimonial
dinner for F. S. "SCOTTY" BoGcs,
veteran material man and Florida rep-
resentative for the Truscon Steel Co.
since 1923. The affair took place
at Abood's Steer House on Route 90,
was attended primarily by Chapter
membership but included some con-
tractors and architects, all of which
had known and worked with "Scotty"
for many years.
The man for whom the dinner was
staged to honor was retired by his
parent company the first of this year.
However, he immediately became as-
sociated with the Jacksonville office
of the Florida Steel Products, distrib-
utors for Truscon.
The Jacksonville Chapter staged its
annual architects' party in January.
The first Informational Meeting of
the year is scheduled for mid-Febru-
ary. It will be a combined affair,
sponsored jointly by the Truscon Steel
Co. and Ceco Steel Products Corp.


has developed during the ten years
Tench has been concerned with FAA
affairs. On the contrary, growth of
the FAA, especially during the last
three years, has brought Tench an in-
creasingly close contact with FAA ac-
tivities, a situation which will un-
doubtedly continue in view of the
FAA's plans for the future.
The Gainesville attorney empha-
sized recently that his inability to at-
tend legislative sessions at Tallahas-
see was primarily a result of the
growth of his law practice. This and
personal family matters have com-
bined to make his absence from
Gainesville impractical during the
two-month period of the legislative
sessions.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-I '1


I











Capstone


for



Confusion


To at least this humble observer, it appears that
Frank Lloyd Wright has handsomely succeeded in
putting his architectural foot into his professional
mouth. The instance is the recent publication, in
Architectural Forum of "Illinois" an office building
with 528 floors reaching a full mile in height and
planned to accommodate "in spacious comfort" 130,-
000 people.
The contention is not that the venerable sage of
Taliesen's most recent structural dream cannot be
built. Mr. Wright has been conspicuously successful
in confounding engineers and wheedling fantastic
performance from a long line of financial people,
contractors and product suppliers. The technicalities
of the project can probably be granted even though
tenants of the 528th floor might have to wear safety
belts in their office chairs and arrange for a constant
supply of a reliable air-sickness remedy as a term of
their office lease!
The point is, should it be built? Or, at least,
should it be built in Chicago- or in any other city
in our land which is already cursed with the modern
plagues of increasing population density and mount-
ing traffic complexities?
That is the frightening point that dogs this soaring
proposal. To one who has fought traffic along Chi-
cago's Michigan Boulevard- or even the Lake Front
Drive--during the rush hour (or, closer to home,
has ever crawled along U.S. 1 at any hour!) it is
terrifying to imagine 130,000 people pouring at day's
end from all four ports of the Illinois and rushing
to clog every imaginable means of transportation in
efforts to get home.
At the unveiling of his project to a group of
Chicago business men who helped him celebrate His
Day last fall, Mr. Wright characterized his design as
being . socially, just what cities need, inaug-
urating a new move to centralization that would free
men to decentralize their homes." It was a curious


statement from a man who has spent years of effort
and reams of printed paper inveighing against cen-
tralization and extolling the virtues of a coordinated
suburbia with the one-acre homesteads clustered about
civic centers and ranged cheek by jowl alongside of
decentralized, local industries.
Twenty years ago Broadacres City was Mr. Wright's
answer to most of our country's growing urban ills.
On many occasions since then his remarks about
these ills have been pointed, often acid, sometimes
downright pugnacious. But they have at least been
consistent. In a word, cities were congesting them-
selves into obsolescence; and those urbanites who
questioned the practical inevitability of Broadacres
City were at the best stupid fools, doomed prisoners
in love with their choking chains and rotting masonry!
Of course, it is the perogative of genius, no less
than the feminine gender, to change its mind. But
with such a sweeping about-face, Mr. Wright poses
questions more difficult of solution than even those
embodied in his idealized surburbia. A population
of 130,000 is a city in itself. Is it socially possible
to superimpose the services necessary for such a pop-
ulation on any urban location already struggling under
a burden of increasing inadequacy?
It seems quite possible that there are investors
courageous enough to put up the $100-million which
Mr. Wright says his Illinois would cost to build. But
let them build this structure as the core of a new
city. Let the tremendous new traffic problems be
solved from the start. Let the. lines run from this
super-centralization to the benign scatteration of Mr.
Wright's suburbia. Then, we might see a new day
for both the working and living environment of our
people.
But it must be done in total, we think. And until
that is possible, the Illinois is a frightening thing to
contemplate. In any city we have ever visited its
construction would cap confusion with catastrophe.


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7i tfear It learwcatt---

P.

I


Already underway are plans for making the FAA's 43rd Annual Con-
vention a magnificent climax to Florida's year-through observance of
the AIA's Centennial Anniversary . Site is Clearwater, gem of the
sun-coast on the beautiful Gulf of Mexico. Headquarters is the
Fort Harrison Hotel, with every facility at your command . And
the dates are November 7, 8 and 9 . Plan now to attend and
bring the whole Chapter with you ..


43rd ANNUAL FAA CONVENTION
NOVEMBER 7, 8, 9, 1957 FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER


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