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 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00029
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32-33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Page 65
        Page 66
Full Text
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Especially in a Rapidly
Growing Young Area

To design, manufacture and distribute the
basic building material; that go into the
actual building of a community, its homes,
office buildings, stores schools, churches
hospitals, industrial plants, its roods and
streets, is a gra.e responsibility. W e
accepted this responsibility *:ver four
decades ago, because v,.e, too, al.-.oys have
and shall continue to .-.ork for a greater
South Florida and, the safety, comfort
and security of our people.





5220 Biscao,re Boulevord, .;arrmi, Fl.orida

Miami PL 1-6631 Ft. Lauderdale LOgan 4-1211
South Dade, Homestead 1432, 1459


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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch . North
John Stetson . . South
William B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
Daytona Beach . William R. Gomon
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II


Florida North .

Fla. No. Central
Florida South


Jacksonville


. Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
Albert P. Woodard
Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland
George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz


Mid-Florida . Francis H. Emerson
Northwest Florida William S. Morrison
Palm Beach . Frederick W. Kessler
George J. Votaw

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
NOVEMBER, 1956


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 6


NOVEMBER, 1956


NUMBER 11


CONTENTS
Letters 2
A New Approach to Education 9
By Dr. Turpin C. Bannister, FAIA
The Future Runs on Wheels 12
FAA Committee Reports: 19 to 44
Planning & Zoning-By William T. Arnett 19
Relations with the Construction Industry-
By John Stetson 21
Education and Registration-
By Sanford W. Goin, FAIA 22
Centennial Observance-By William B. Harvard 23
Building Codes-By Joseph M. Shifalo -----41
Student Associate Chapter
By Alan Green & Roy Henderson ------ 41
Board of Trustees, FAA Loan Fund-
By John L. R. Grand 44
Public Relations-By Frederick W. Kessler -- 44
The FAA Checks On Its Organization ------- 24
By John L. R. Grand
42nd Annual Convention Program ------27 to 34
FAA Constitution and By-Laws -- ------ 35 to 38
From The Executive Secretary's Desk -------46
News and Notes -------------------48
2nd Annual Roll-Call-1955-1956 -------- 56, 57
Florida Northwest Chapter Launched -------- 60
Advertisers' Index 62
Producers' Council Program 63
Editorial in conference 64
Prologue to Progress-By T. Trip Russell

THE COVER
Pictured here is one of the nation's biggest headaches-automobile
parking in cities which came of age before America ran on wheels.
This is a part of Miami's bayfront plaza, where automobiles are
destined soon to be replaced with new traffic generators in the
form of hotels, banks and office buildings. Photo is from files of
Miami's City Engineer.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Kruse, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.






VNe I4

4&eewtc&


Letters


BLOCK CRACKS
Gentlemen:
The September issue of The Florida
Architect was most interesting to me,
as in fact, arc all of the issues. It is
a very good and useful publication
and the editors are to be compli-
mented.
In the September issue the article
on wall cracks in concrete block walls
is of particular interest to all of us
because of the almost universal use
of this material in our work in Flor-
ida. Some of the subject matter con-
tained in the article appears to be at
variance with what I have observed
in my many years of experience with
this material, since emphasis is placed
on the shrinkage of the block as the
underlying cause.
Steam curing of blocks has been in
use for many years in some sections.
I first saw it used in New York City
in 1926. There is a very definite shrink-
age in a green concrete block during
the time of the chemical reaction of
the cement and water, for a week or


so after which the block is dimen-
sionallv stable, and cannot shrink suf-
ficiently for cracks to appear in the
finished wall. If the footings are prop-
crly designed and built and if the soil
conditions are proper, they will not
fail, and the blocks will not be sheared
to show a crack.
The crack which appears is almost
invariably at the junction of the ver-
tical mortar joint and the block.
Mortar is soaking wet when it is
placed in the joint by the mason.
All concrete and mortar must shrink
during the setting process and mortar
is no exception. Horizontal cracks do
not appear because the wall units
settle to accommodate the shrinkage
of the horizontal joints. The mortar
in the vertical joints shrinks also and
the blocks are fixed in position, so
the bond is broken in some places
and a vertical crack appears, at the
junction of block and mortar.
The proper method for the cor-
rection of this troublesome defect is
the use of a non-shrinkage mortar. As
(Continued on Page 4)


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BELMAR DRAPES replace
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WRITE FOR DEALER NEAREST YOU

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1727 N.W. 28th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA


The Profession and The Press ...


Herbert Rosser Savage, AIA, chairman of the Florida South's public relations
committee, was one of the judges in a "Florida Home" contest sponsored by
the Miami Daily News in conjunction with National Home Week. He is
shown here, left, with Ben Schneider, News real estate editor, and Paul Mar-
tin, chairman of the NHW committee of the Home Builders Association of
South Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






































Roof of this South Miami patio is framed with precast T-joists on 5' centers, 16" deep and spanning 35', which support a
combination of pumice planks and screened panels. T-joists with depths up to 24" and spans to 50' are precast for use with
lightweight pumice planks, fiber board panels or poured concrete decks and are adaptable to many structural designs.










That important ingredient is part and parcel of the Hollostone idea.
For any type of building, pre-cast, standard units enlarge the archi-
tect's vocabulary of design. And their imaginative use is bringing new
construction efficiency, lower job costs to both owner and builder. ..


NOVEMBER, 1956 3











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Fine performance is the
result of fine equipment,
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tems properly laid out and
installed . Intercoms by
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long, dependable and
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Executive intercom net-
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systems . two-way audio-
visual installations these
modern communication fa-
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whose service is backed by
ten years of field experience
with all types of electronic
sound equipment.

Authorized
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D UKANE PRODUCTS
Ask for A.I.A. File No. 31-i-51






6 RUCE
EQUIPMENT CO.

24 N. W. 36 St. Miami 37

Telephone FR 3-7496

I lIIIIIIIIIll IIIIIIIIIIIIll IIIIl lllIIIllIIIIIIll IIIIII1l11ll lll l llll ll l
4


Letters


(Continued from Page 2)
a substitute for this, V-tooling all
of the joints with considerable pres-
sure about 45 minutes after the block
has been laid will eliminate most of
the cracks.
WM. M. HIssON
Architect-Engineer
St. Augustine, Fla.
According to the Portland Cement
Association, a shrinkless mortar,
though rare, can be developed
through admixture of iron filings to
a good standard formulation. It has
been produced also through addition
of a proprietary admix of German
origin. Apparently formulation varia-
tion, with additions of various plasti-
cisers and air-entraining agents can
have effect on shrinkage. Though
only 5 percent of the wall area, mor-
tar joints account for some 30 per-
cent of the shrinkage.


GOOD WILL
Gentlemen:
I am sending you a copy of a letter
that we received from John Stetson
in Palm Beach.
The growth of this company since
it was established in 1929 has been
greatly influenced by the architects'
interest in the products that we make
and handle. "The Florida Architect"
enables us to pin-point our advertis-
ing to this most important profession.
I would like to extend my compli-
ments to you and to the Publication
Committee for the very excellent
presentation that I note in each issue
of "The Florida Architect."
Oris DUNAN
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
Miami, Fla.
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
Gentlemen:
It was with considerable interest
that I noted your advertisement in
"The Florida Architect." Like most
Architects I find my time very limited
and must confine my magazine read-
ing to just scanning the pictures in-
most. But, being particularly inter-
ested in our publication, as all mem-
bers of the Florida Association of
Architects are, I spend enough time
to not only look at the pictures, and
read the editorial matter, but to note
which dealers and manufacturers are
using our magazine to carry their


message to the Florida Architect.
There are so, many periodicals
flooding our mails that almost all now
find their way into the waste basket
without being seen by any one but
the secretary. Averaging out the
printed page as to number of words
and reading time, then applying this
to the number of pages of literature
we receive each month, we once de-
cided it would take one and one half
men to cover this matter alone. Not
feeling so philanthropically inclined,
we use file No. 13 as the only way
out.
Having watched "The Florida
Architect" grow from a mimeogra-
phed bulletin to its present format,
and being vitally interested in the
profession and its problems, you can
rest assured that I will continue to
read every word and watch for the
name of every advertiser. Mcst other
Architects of the state feel the same
I'm certain, and speaking for them
I commend you.
John Stetson
(Thanks to both an active, inter-
ested professional and a good friend
of many like him for welcome expres-
sions of notice and good will.-ED.)

REPRINT REQUEST
Gentlemen:
We were very impressed with the
article "A New Attitude Toward
Fees" which appeared in the October
issue of The Florida Architect. It is
certainly a timely recapitulation of
problems which have vexed the archi-
tect for many years.
We would like to have your per-
mission to reprint the article in our
Chapter Bulletin-and if permission
is granted, we would like to know
the author's name so we can give him
full credit.
MAY B. HIPSHAM
Editor,
Northern California
AIA Bulletin
Unless otherwise noted, any editor-
ial material appearing in this publica-
tion may be reprinted freely by any
other publication which is owned
and published by any AIA Chapter
or duly authorized AIA group or
organization. The only obligation en-
tailed is that credit for prior publica-
tion be accorded to The Florida
Architect and also to the author as
by-lined in the magazine.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Look... Perite's att auowad aou /


from fire-proofing


120i


hi


Th: Sev lie Hatel at Miami B: -ch was
dc ..gned by Meli,n Gro min, architect
Mialne Flailering Co dd IhE plastering,
and Stewirt Tile Co, the tile wonk

Florida Pe;"&te...
it was selected because . .
1 ... It's Lightweight
Perlite plaster is 60 per cent
lighter than sanded g',psum
saves 2,000 pounds deadload per
100 square yards of plaster
surface.
2 ... It's Easy to Handle
Perlite's bagged conveniently,
thus can be easily stored and
mixed at point of use. As an
aggregate in cement or plaster
it's 1/12 the weight of sand.
3 ... It's Insulating
Perlite has four times the heat
insulation value of sanded plas-
ter. That means a lower initial
capacity for air-conditioning in-
stallations and a perpetual
saving in operating costs.


to finish


I,


Y


In the Seville Hotel at Miami Beach,
Florida Perlite helps provide safety, comfort
and beauty for Convention guests . .
As fire-proofing for steel it gives a 4-hour rating
with a one-inch thickness . In plaster
it makes possible smooth, sound-absorbing,
heat-insulating surfaces . And, indoors
and out, all ceramic tile including the
beautiful Jo Ceramics are set in easy-to-
handle, resilient Florida Perlite tile mortar.
\ \ Your guide to
ASTM quality
L-- lightweight
Z th aggregate is
-this certificate


NOVEMBER, 1956


- S


dlr









Architectural
Mosaic...
no two installations
alike













and Cthfl UpQ



A superb media for unlimited
creativity... giving the architect and
decorator a free hand in the achievement
of decorative designs as distinctly
different as his own signature.


JORDAN MARSH Weed, Russell & Johnson, Arct
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


AMERICANA HOTEL Morris Lapidus & Assoc., Arch.




COLUMBUS HOTEL
, Pancoast, Ferendino,
Skeels & Burnham, Arch.
(Renovating)


PAN AMERICAN BANK BLDG. Carl H. Blohm, Arch.


beautiful ...



individual


.-, I
-a
- fininU3mu.~i. *1 ~u -,
- ~ UUUIUUUI Np,,-, y.. *
IttIIE~3Uinw,,..,~~. V
- j gEuuuuvuuuhwIug p..
m
- inwwm.q~ ** U 'I a
- ~D~~!!1L ~
~t


MlMI 11 HIl \( iI iEDI. R .-\NK
I.,l" in I R i-.ed r a % ),.. \rch.
i(_RIITIN.M( Glass Mosaics


FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL Morris Lapidus & Assoc., Arch. Colors) insure to specy (soRIGINAL or blended
of the CREATORS... the only genu-
ine JO-GRESITE, ceramic tiles,
from Milan, Italy. Stock on hand:
111 colors, textures and shapes.







UP UP CERAMICS
Exclusive U.S. Dist. -Ralph Torres, Jr. 241 Pan American Bank Bldg, Miami 32, Florida Phone FR 9-1663
WAREHOUSE-1350 N.W. 74th Street, Miami Phone PL 1-8214


NOVEMBER, 1956





Mrs. Florida used to say...


ANY KIND OF
HOUSE HEATING
WILL DO







Now she says...



I WANT

FLAME TYPE
HOUSE HEATING
IN MY HOME!


E- '
loridians have discovered that built-in heating means built-in comfort.
And Mr. and Mrs. Florida want built-in economy, too. That's one of the reasons they're
giving a landslide vote to inexpensive flame type equipment today. But another
big reason is even more important: Only flame type combustion heaters can flood
a house instantly with positive, circulating warm air heat. So when you include a low-
cost flame-type "Florida furnace" in the floor, wall, or closet of a new home, you're
building-in a welcome bonus of modern comfort, maximum economy, and long term
customer satisfaction.
You are cordially invited to take full advantage of our consulting service.


FLORIDA HOME HEATING I INSTITUTE
INCORPORATED
1827 S.W. Eighth Street, Miami, Florida


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






A New Approach to Education







The architectural school needs the architect as
much as he needs the products of its curriculum.
Out of closer cooperation between the two can
come better preparation for practice and oppor-
tunities for architectural research to the ben-
efit of the student, the practitioner and the public.







By Dr. TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA
Turpin C. Bannister, MA, PhD, FAIA


It is a pleasure to accept the invi-
tation of The Florida Architect to
discuss with members of the FAA
those objectives and conditions of
architectural education which the pro-
fession and the schools must embrace
if they are to fulfill their creative
potentialities and social responsibil-
ities during the next decade.
It is difficult to appreciate the
amazing transformation which the
profession has undergone in recent
years. Only 150 years ago the new
nation hesitated to use even a mere
handful of more or less trained archi-
tects. Talbot Hamlin has piognantly
described Latrobe's bitter struggle to
practice on a profesisonal level. By
1850, although the census enumerated
591 "architects," probably no more
than a hundred were practitioners in
any modern sense. Perhaps a score
had studied in European schools; the
rest experienced varying degrees of
apprentice training. Nevertheless,
from this tiny group came the dream
of a profession organized for higher
service. In 1857, with the formation
of the American Institute of Archi-
tects, the attainment of true pro-
fessional status became possible.
In 1900, the census reported 10,581
"architects." It is interesting to note
that only 27 resided in Florida. Of
the total, perhaps a third were actual
practitioners. Only about 1,000 were
NOVEMBER, 1956


members of The Institute. Only one
state had enacted a registration law.
The nation's nine schools of archi-
tecture enrolled less than 400 stu-
dents.
In the 1950's the profession has
come of age. Registration, now uni-
versal, gives precise definition to its
membership. Last year, 21,965 archi-
tects were so certified. Of these 681
were residents of Florida. Of the total,
more than 10,600, 48.4 per cent, were
members of The Institute. Fifty-nine
schools, spread throughout the coun-
try, enrolled 11,199 students for the
first professional degree and 229 for
advanced degrees. Thus it is apparent
that American architects are at last
attaining as a group the strength, sta-
bility, cohesion, and momentum nec-
essary to inaugurate and sustain a
systematic and comprehensive pro-
gram calculated to raise new stand-
ards of professional knowledge and
skill.
The profession is fortunate in
possessing at once a great tradition
and the constant challenge of excit-
ing, dynamic renewal. It is obvious
that we should cherish and build
upon the rich tradition which passes
on to us the hard-won experiences
of our predecessors. But, at the same
time, having gained an expanding
and unprecedented wealth of new
resources, we stand on the threshold


of new usefulness and accomplish-
ment.
To grasp such opportunities will
require courage and insight. But al-
ready there are indications that a
new professional spirit and pattern
are emerging. In response to rising
demands, the Institute is now foster-
ing increasingly valuable seminars on
both the national and regional levels.
The idea of concerted research in
architectural problems is slowly com-
ing to focus. And we are gradually
recognizing the need for a reinte-
gration of all agencies of the building
process in order to discuss, attack,
and solve together those recurring
problems which will otherwise remain
unfathomable. The State of Florida
should rejoice that it is served by a
profession which is already proving
that it understands, and has begun
to work toward, this new concept of
architectural organization and service.
In this new context, no greater
problem confronts the profession
than the recruitment and training of
its future members. Its solution is, in
fact, one of the most searching tests
of professional vitality. In the long
run, failure in solving it will bring
decline, cancellation of status, and
the transference of functions and op-
portunities to other less qualified
agencies. We recognize today that
(Continued on Page 11)






perfect indoor weather ...


for homes, stores, offices





V^, -r r rWt a W-.... . -i" I- l .
e. -'".; '.


J \. WE. THERTRON is a full-time weather machine that
Sheats v.ithout burning fuel, cools without using water.
It operates on electricity and air alone and
,- through the two-way thermostat, "thinks" for itself
S to pro'.'ide completely automatic operation . For
ho,' me, WEATHERTRON is the answer to safe, clean,
S..' .;.: dependable and quiet all-weather air conditioning. In
11 9. -.:orrcs and offices it improves working conditions, pro-
recrt products, cuts cleaning, keeps workers healthy.


W EATH ERTRON is General Electric's air
source heat pump a fully automatic, all-electric
unit that uses a single mechanism for both heating
and cooling. It is NOT just another combination of
conventional fuel-burning furnace and air conditioner.
WEATHERTRON does away with the need for such
usual parts of a conventional system as fuel storage
tanks, cooling towers, piping. It needs only air ducts,
electric wiring and a small drain for condensation --
for full-time, all-season operation.

Exclusive Wholesale Distributors in Florida


North, Central and West Florida:
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Air Conditioning Division, Sales Dept.,
900 Orange Avenue, Winter Park, Florida
Telephones: 4-7701 and 4-7711


Southeast Florida:
THE FLORIDA GENERAL SUPPLY CORP.,
1310 Flamingo Way,
Hialeah, Florida
Telephone: TUxedo 7-5568


This is the two-way
thermostat that practically
thinks for itself!
For perfect indoor weather
in any type of interior, all
you need do is simply set
the desired temperature for
heating and cooling. The
Weathertron "remembers"
it . and the thermostat
turns the unit on and off,
automatically, to maintain
desired temperature range.


EATH E RTRON

The General Electric All-Electric Heat Pump


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






A New Approach ...
(Continued from Page 9)

preparation for professional practice
is a life-long process in each stage of
which the profession is intimately and
inextricably involved. On the one
hand, recruitment, candidate training
and guidance, and post-registration
development arc obligations for which
it must assume primary responsibil-
ity.
On the other hand, the profession
has, for good and sufficient historical
reasons, delegated the functions of
basic education and training to a
number of academic partners, the col-
legiate schools of architecture. The
advantages of this system are the
release of practitioners from the duties
of elementary instruction, the possi-
bility of concentrated and systematic
study, and the opportunities to share
in the general educational and cul-
tural life inherent in a university. The
chief hazard is the postponement of
initiation into and participation in
work connected with actual practice.
Despite this drawback, those schools
which have had the sympathetic and
active support of the profession have
usually been able to prepare their
students to make the transition to the
offices without serious difficulties. Far
from being antagonistic, school and
office are indispensable complements
in the formidable task of converting
raw recruits into' competent members
of a complex profession. It is clear
that the success of the collegiate sys-
tem depends in large measure upon
the close and understanding coopera-
tion of the profession it serves.
To recompense such help, if need
be, the school should be able to
assist the profession in its organiza-
tion and operation of candidate train-
ing and post-registration development.
But the most important opportunity
for collaboration seems to lie in the
formulation and conduct of profes-
sional research. For the profession, the
school must surely be the logical
center for such investigations. For the
school, such activities would serve as
a continuous contact with current
practical problems and, therefore, as
a powerful stimulus for both students
and faculty.
In. an age which has profited so
richly from the methodical expansion
of pure and applied new knowledge,
(Continued on Page 59)
NOVEMBER, 1956


The trend to tile for
institutional use in schools,
public buildings, factories,
hospitals and other highly
trafficked building areas
is making national news.

Everyday more and more
architects are learning
about CERATILE Ceramics
for wainscot and floors.
Here's a fresh, clean
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resists scratching and
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no maintenance!

Specify CERATILE or any
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variety of tiles for
every building purpose.

Visit INTERSTATE's show
rooms and see a selection
of split-faced stone,


structural marble, crab
orchard and slate flagging.
Samples, colors and textures
can be obtained by writing
or phoning this office.


*
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t ? .Y
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P.O. BOX 428 BUENA VISTA STATION

DISTRIBUTORS





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~-


rri


Indicative of how
closely Florida's future
development is tied
to facilities for in-
creased automobile
traffic are the plans
for ambitious high-
way projects in almost
every section of the
State. Shown here is
a proposal by the
State Road Depart-
ment for an ultimate
expressway develop-
ment linking the
Greater Miami area to
the east coast toll
road now under con-
struction. Visioned for
this scheme are two
huge downtown park-
ing structures and
new expressway link-
ages with Miami
Beach.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


J__ .-







K__


It is no longer news to anybody
that traffic is a 50-million-vehicle
national headache. But what may not
be so obvious to even the architects
who design what civic engineers call
"traffic generators" is that this na-
tional problem, localized in every
community in the land, is rapidly
becoming a Number One factor in
building design. In various ways, and
to varying degrees, it is having a
more and more direct influence in
the placement, the economic limi-
tation, the structural character-even
the appearance-of buildings.
Particularly is that true of Florida.
By and large, the growth of this state
has far exceeded national averages in
every category of measurement. Ex-
perts say that in 20 years U. S. vehicle
registration will be double the present
50-million. Right now there is an
average of one car for every 2.3 dwell-
ing units, nationally. But as of August,
this year, using Dade County as an
example, Florida must deal with an
average of over four times that con-
centration 1.4 vehicles for each
dwelling unit, and almost one reg-
istered vehicle for every licensed
driver.
That is as bad an average, year-
round condition as any traffic engineer
wishes to contemplate. But it is made
even more intense during the peaks
of the tourist seasons. In addition, the


growth of both permanent population
and the tourist trade is making a bad
condition progressively worse. If we
are now faced with a bursting-at-the-
seams condition, trafficwise, we will
shortly come face-to-face with a situ-
ation in which the State's vigorous
efforts to expand and attract will be-
come a gigantic boomerang bringing
an intolerably congested confusion to
its residents and an understandable
desire to avoid such on the part of
its future potential visitors.
Unless, of course, something can
be done about it. Efforts are being
made in that direction. Statewide,
some of the much-publicized express-
ways are under construction. Cities
are frantically busy with experiments
at control, with one-way streets, four-
way stops, no-parking ordinances and
innumerable traffic lights as some of
the more obvious signs.


Acknowledgement, with thanks, is due
the Department of Engineering of the
City of Miami for compilation of ma-
terial on which this article is based,
and especially to Arthur E. Darlow,
Department Head, and Andrew P.
Crouch, head of the Research and
Planning Section. Photographs were
furnished through courtesy of the
Department and the City of Miami
News Bureau.


But even with Florida's generous
slice of the $33-billion Federal road
program, experts say the State cannot
hope to solve all, or even most, of
her present local, urban traffic jams.
With the cost of urban expressways
running up to an astronomical $50-
million per mile (in Boston and in-
cluding property-condemnation costs),
there is an economic limit to the
luxury of the Los Angeles look. And
with Florida's present State Consti-
tution so far an effective bar to
possible benefits of the Urban Rede-
velopment Program for Florida cities,
the clearing away of civic deadwood
for the sake of better civic service,
has, in most instances here, become
such a tangled problem as to so far
defy practical solutions by the very
experts who have defined it.
Thus, current efforts to throttle the
traffic demon hinge largely on matters
of expediency. In some other States-
Pennsylvania, Texas, Massachusetts,
New Jersey, California, New York, to
name a few-there is coming to be
a general realization that our future
will run on wheels and that to cap.
italize it, firm, even ruthless, action
must be taken now. Witness the Penn-
sylvania, New Jersey and Connecticut
turnpike systems and the redevelop.
ment projects planned-and in some
cases even underway-for Pittsburgh,
(Continued on next page)


NOVEMBER, 1956 13



















Experience has shown provis-
ion of adequate parking facili-
ties in central business districts
tends to maintain, even in-
crease, property values. This
is one of several ramp garages
in downtown Miami. It has a
rated capacity of 539 cars, was
built in 1949. Robert Law
Weed & Associates were the
architects.


.4

if;.


Detroit, Los Angeles and, most lately,
Ft. Worth.
Creative proponent of the Ft.
Worth project, Victor Gruen, is now
engaged in a preliminary survey of
Miami's problem. In a recent issue
of Architectural Forum he commented
on the "fabric pattern" of a city.
"The main fault in this pattern,"
he said, "is that roads, streets and
highways are used for two purposes:
first to serve as a track for automo-
biles; and second, to serve as the pat-
tern, or guiding element for struc-
tures.
"The diabolical thing is that the
two uses are so diametrically opposed
that each nullifies the other's value."
It is a nut-shell statement of the
problem faced in common by two in-
dividuals who have. important hands
in the shaping of a city. These are the
Traffic Engineer and the Architect.
Formerly they have had little contact
with one another. But working to-
gether they can do much to take some
of the curse from expediency and
even, perhaps, to mold it into an
objective approach to a better func-
tioning urban pattern.
The initiative for this rests essenti-
ally with the architect. It is he-or at
least he as the creative agent of an
ownership entity who plans the
various urban facilities which either
serve, or must be served by, the auto-
mobile. Traffic engineers justifiably
regard all buildings as "traffic gen-
erators"-more or less intensive ones
depending on the function, character
14


and size of the buildings themselves;
and particularly depending on the
relative location of each.
Thus it is inevitable that the prob-
lems of the traffic engineer-or, more
accurately, the practical solution to
such problems-should become quite
as important a factor of building design
as does the economic determination
of a building's layout and three-di-
mensional envelope. Indeed, the day
is already here when the factor of
traffic volume and control has had a
ruling influence on the basic question
of land location and use and thus the
economic determination of the entire
building project.
Because this is so-as witness the
growth of "satellite communities,"
suburban shopping complexes and the
whole question of urban renewal and
redevelopment-any architect who is
interested in the ultimate betterment
of his own civic environment would
do well to add another rule to his
book relative to the traffic engineer.
It is: "Communicate; cooperate; co-
ordinate." Conscientiously followed,
it can produce results to the benefit
of every one concerned with any sort
of building project.
Granted this, what are some spe-
cific points of planning and design
on which the traffic engineer can
advise the architect and help mold
the proposed structure into a well-
functioning element in the urban
pattern? There are four main ones:
Traffic volumes and street capacities;
existing traffic congestion; future traf-


fic plans; and proposed parking re-
quirements. No particular order of
importance exists. With one project
plans for the future may be a ruling
influence; in another the provision for
on, or nearby parking may take ob-
vious precedence. But all exist to
greater or less degree; and adequate
allowance for their influence can not
only increase the functional efficiency
of the building itself, but also that
of the city of which it is a part.
Traffic volume and street capacities.
It is surely clear that such factors
should have-even if they have not
in the past-a major influence on
building size and function. Heavy
volume is a welcome asset for an
automobile service station on, say, a
parkway location. It is a nuisance of
congestion to workers in an office
building located in the central busi-
ness district. Thus, if the building is
to become a prime traffic generator-
as a department store, shopping arcade
or office building-it behooves the
architect to learn at first hand the
traffic conditions which now exist.
More importantly, he must determine
to what extent the volume of traffic
will be increased through the use of
a proposed building; and if this use
will tax the capacity of the street
beyond a practical possibility, his
scheme-and the investment of his
client-is in danger.
Disregard of this one basic consid-
eration, say the experts, has been' one
of the greatest single causes of central
business district congestion-a con-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT































gestion that in many urban instances
has been the instrument to start a
progression of business removal, de-
creasing land values, area decay and
finally urban blight. Statutory limita-
tion of building height has been one
attempt to solve the problem. It has
rarely been successful, chiefly because
it has not struck at the traffic core
of the situation and has set only one
physical factor of building-not use,
nor land coverage, nor density of
working population-as a criterion.
Existing traffic congestion. Traffic
rules-one-way streets, limited turns,
parking prohibitions, etc. are the
means used by the engineer to avoid,
or at least mitigate, congestion. But
they can become of first importance
to a building owner or tenant opera-
tor. Cases exist wherein reversal of
traffic flow has visited a very real
hardship on commercial establish-
ments; and the pattern of traffic
flow is of particular importance to
such buildings as hotels, where con-
stant egress and ingress to a street is
involved. For example, this element
of congestion has caused a complete
redesign of a hotel projected for a
downtown Miami location. Originally
planned to front on an east-bound
arterial street, it was revamped to face
on an adjacent west-bound street in
the interests of better vehicular serv-
icing resulting from less congestion
and better entrance-exit facilities.
Future traffic plans. To their credit,
traffic engineers in city, county and
(Continued on Page 16)
NOVEMBER, 1956


P F 0 ol
so .100


Newest of Miami's parking garages is this structure opened last summer in
the heart of the central business district. Designed by Stephan Zachar,
architect, it has a rated capacity of 274 cars, is planned for more floors.


This open-air, ramped parking structure, built in 1949, and designed by
Steward and Skinner, architects, has a rated capacity of 505 cars. It is located
on the edge of Miami's congested downtown area, is somewhat difficult to
reach due to one-way street regulations.


............ .









TEXTURE


I.


Finely wrought surfaces can do
much to give that final touch of
elegance to a carefully designed
interior. That's why Magic City
Woven Wood fabrics were first
created to provide designers
with a fine material that em-
bodies the warmth and intimacy
of fine woods with the color and
surface possibilities of various
natural, metallic and synthetic
fiber yarns.

Specify Magic City Woven Wood
for your finest jobs. Choose
from a wide selection the pat-
tern to provide just the degree
of colorful texture your interior
design may need. Or, if you
wish, design the pattern your-
self and our expert wood-
weavers will produce it espe-
cially to your order.


MAGIC CITY
SHADE & DRAPERY CORP.
297 N. E. 67th St., Miami, Florida


1.'W
"ai'a "t -'.&>-, l-
..~x '* .. ; .'V:


~


In Miami's 79th Street Shopping Center, for which Robert Fitch Smith was
architect, the need for adequate parking directly influenced the building
design. Note bridge over driveway connecting parking lots and the outdoor
stairway which serves second-floor offices directly from parking area.


Future on Wheels . .
(Continued from Page 15)
state departments are constantly striv-
ing to improve street patterns. Some
of their efforts are short-range; others
are long-range, geared to collective
agreement relative to master traffic
plans. Such plans may, or may not
affect the actual design of a building.
But they can have a potent influence
on the economic justification of a
project. In St. Petersburg the force of
this is clearly evident along Fourth
Street North. Once the main traffic
artery from Tampa and the North
along Route 41, the motels which line
it are now languishing. Since the com-
pletion of the Skyway over lower


Tampa Bay and the four-laning of
Route 19, most of the traffic has
moved 30 blocks to the west.
Parking requirements. WVith subur-
ban rapid-transit facilities still a gleam
in the eye of a few promoters, and
with bus systems more in the stage
of a makeshift rather than a well-
integrated transportation utility, the
business population of most Florida
cities is in direct proportion to the
traffic volume. Where to put the cars
is probably the toughest question traf-
fic engineers have to answer. They
have attacked it through local ordi-
nances requiring off-street parking fa-
cilities for new buildings; and through
zoning ordinances which prescribe
(Continued on Page 63)


Congestion caused by narrow streets carrying both private and bus transporta-
tion coupled with high density business population is evident even at low peak
traffic periods. It's the reason behind many traffic regulations and the
increasing need for pre-planned off-street parking facilities.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


4-










window Walls



with COLOR



MWb1"
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H1-i:.J.j a, : j.,- .r.1- t 3, i ,1 .t l I ..I r,: I. ;r r,,. : .r, 1 .1 . b I'.. r |:
P.1,rph , B1 ar,:n, rh c: c ..:h r k : r. rr.,i r :.r, ; 1,.-. n r.,i _1.:r

You can no% sipecift, B & G Windo%%
Walls with a permanenr-it porcelain face
bonded to ins-ulation board UPLi to 2
thickness \,rh a U-factor as Io',, as 16
Face of inside panels can all's: be porcelain
or a \ariet, of other flat-sheet mater-
ials such as pl',. :cjd formica asbestos,.
board, galkaneal steel or aluminium
And the price is about the same or at
most slightly higher than a good paint
job .
When \our design inlrol1es a problem
such as concealed supp..:..rts pro ison for
heavier rind loadings, inr-tegral door
frames or if \ou viarrt budget estimates
or data on a special design condition -
please call us
A representative %v.ill be glad to come in
sit down with you and help solve the
problem. Chances are that the problem
you have today was someone else's on a
previous job and we probably have a
solution for it already worked out . .


II


MIAMI-Ed Henderson
PALM BEACH-Ed Kader
DAYTONA-Bob Gall
TAMPA-Doug LaHayne


OCALA-Van Akin
JACKSONVILLE-George Griffin
TALLAHASSEE-Al Yates
PENSACOLA-S. L. Davis


NOVEMBER, 1956






CAMDEN, N. J.

"I'*


326,000 sq. ft. of Cofar on 6' 6" spans were used on the
Parkade, a new parking deck and office building.


TOLEDO, OHIO


229,000 sq. ft. of high-strength Cofar steel units on Wheeling's Wharf Municipal
Parking Deck. 32 -inch concrete slabs-on spans of 6' 9"-were used on this job.


62,000 sq. ft. of Cofar forms and reinforces 3" con-
crete floor slabs in City Hall Realty Parking Deck.


Cofar concrete slabs make


parking decks pay off sooner


Combining form and reinforcing in one operation, Cofar
eliminates the labor and high cost of conventional form
work, offers savings to parking-deck designers, builders
and owners. Cofar is deep-corrugated galvanized steel
with T-wires welded across corrugations. Units make a


tight form for wet concrete, provide main positive rein-
forcement when concrete sets. T-wires supply tempera-
ture reinforcement, interlock concrete to steel units. Neg-
ative steel is set over structural members for continuity.
After concreting, a fire-resistant concrete floor results!


Pre-cut for immediate use. Cofar comes to
your job shop- cut to length and in marked
bundles to reduce sorting and handling.


Immediate working deck. Cofar forms a safe,
solid working deck for trades. Units are
welded in seconds to steel framing members.


YOU'RE INVITED! Be sure to drop bythe Granco booth
-No. 21-when you attend the 42nd Annual
Convention of the Florida Association of Architects.
GRANCO SALES REPRESENTATIVE:
Robert C. Kany, 2651 Euston Road, Winter Park, Fla.
GRANCO DISTRIBUTORS:
Florida Steel Products, Inc., Orlando Tampa Jacksonville
Bushnell Steel Products, Inc., Miami


Attractive ceiling. In parking decks, exposed
Cofar steel units may be painted for a light-
reflective finished ceiling.
IS


7GRANCO -



GRANCO STEEL PRODUCTS COMPANY
A Subsidiary of GRANITE CITY STEEL CO., Granite City, III.


18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Committee Reports





Planning and Zoning


By WILLIAM T. ARNETT


The Committee on Planning and
Zoning was established this year "to
act as liaison with the Florida Plan-
ning and Zoning Association," an
organization which deserves the active
interest of every Florida architect.
Community Planning-In a recent
publication the Chamber of Com-
merce of the United States gives
emphasis to the fact that American
businessmen are realizing more and
more that intelligent and enlightened
planning offers the most logical
approach to solving community prob-
lems arising from growth and devel-
opment, as well as from changing
conditions affecting the older parts
of the community.
The National Chamber points out
that businessmen are feeling that at
least as much foresight and coordina-
tion should be devoted to the im-
provement and expansion of their
communities as to their own busi-
nesses. As taxpayers in the munici-
palities in which they operate, they
want the vital guidance that proper
planning can and should give. As
businessmen, the National Chamber
has found, they want to operate in
communities that are both efficient
and attractive.
Because architects have an impor-
tant stake in the growth and devel-
opment of Florida, it is natural that
they should want to know what they
can do to promote realistic and prac-
tical planning, and what are the
mechanics of setting up and main-
taining an effective city-county plan-
ning commission.
The FPZA-The Florida Planning
and Zoning Association provides at
least a partial answer. The FPZA,
now in its seventh year, is a non-
profit association to encourage orderly
physical anid economic development
in the communities of the state. Mem-
bership is open to all interested indi-
viduals and organizations.
NOVEMBER, 1956


The purpose of the FPZA is five-
fold: 1 -to promote cooperation
among official planning and zoning
boards or commissions, civic bodies,
citizens, technicians, and students
interested in planning and zoning in
the State of Florida; 2-to cultivate
and stimulate an interest in planning
and zoning by local governments;
3-to encourage the observance of
sound planning and zoning practices;
4-to exchange information, advice,
and assistance among its members,
and 5-to engage in research and
issue publications on planning and
zoning matters.
FPZA maintains an excellent cir-
culating rental library at its head-
quarters in Auburndale and issues a
monthly Newsletter of Florida Plan-
ning and Zoning, holds an annual
Planning and Zoning Conference,
and publishes the proceedings of the
Conference.
Legislation for Planning-Florida
is without a comprehensive and
proper set of basic planning laws.
For the past several years, FPZA has
been active in sponsoring a general
legislative act which would enable
Florida communities, cities and coun-
ties to establish planning and zoning
commissions, zoning regulations and
subdivision controls to guide the
orderly growth and development of
the state. Because Florida lacks such
general legislation, many commun-
ities have had to secure special acts,
and, even worse, many communities
are without the necessary authority
to enact regulations and controls
when the need arises.
The enabling act proposed by the
FPZA is permissive and not manda-
tory. It gives any city or county the
opportunity to adopt ordinances pur-
suant to the legislation, but it does
not make the enactment of any
ordinance compulsory. Furthermore,
unlike the special acts now in effect,


it provides a method for cities and
counties to work together in estab-
lishing planning and zoning as the
need for such joint cooperation be-
comes necessary.
In communities actively interested
in the problems of growth and devel-
opment, planning has become an
integral part of the democratic proc-
ess. It is a matter, primarily, of
planning for the common good in-
stead of allowing haphazard growth
for the temporary benefit of a few.
Florida needs adequate permissive
planning legislation now; we have
needed it for a long time. As one
eminent authority points out, "In
the American business society of today
there is more need than ever to
reconcile individual aspirations and
community needs, to prove that they
are not necessarily antagonistic, and
to revitalize the democratic ideal
through increased cooperation of all
citizens and their institutions."
Recommendations: 1 That the
FAA give serious consideration to
affiliation with the FPZA as an orga-
nizational member. Organizational
memberships are $10 a year, with
Newsletter subscription $3 each in
addition. Chapters of the The Insti-
tute are likewise eligible for organi-
zational membership.
2-That Florida architects give ser-
ious consideration to affiliation with
the FPZA as individual members. In-
dividual memberships, including a
subscription to the Newsletter, are
$5 a year.
3-That the FAA authorize and
direct its Legislative Committee to
work with similar committees of the
FPZA and other organizations inter-
ested in an adequate basic set of
planning laws for Florida to the end
that our cities and counties-singly
or jointly, as the need may arise-may
have proper tools to guide the orderly
growth and development of the state.
WVILLIAM T. ARNETT, Chairman
19












Horiz ons...


in


concrete


Florida's newest and one of its most
spectacular attractions is the Citrus Tower
at Clermont -another impressive example
of all-concrete construction
From its observation decks high in the
sky the far horizons are visible-North,
South, East and West. The vision of the
men who planned and built this imposing
structure symbolizes the aggressive de-
velopment of Florida.
Here is a monument to modern Florida-
and also a monument to the strength,
beauty and durability of concrete.

Aichaiect Thomas A Russell, McKeesport, Pennslvamani


iuniuiv~viiiin o nii11 ~Uh l'


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA* SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
20 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


TSB. W I it
' 1 9
41,^.


1.0

-- ; '* .' ,


000*





Committee Iteports


Relations with the Construction Industry

By JOHN STETSON


The year 1956 produced less effort
on the part of the subject committee
than has been experienced in past
years. Gains made in the cooperation
between the AGC, Engineers, etc.
were consolidated; and since little in
the way of problems presented them-
selves, the committee was not called
upon to make any momentous de-
cisions.
Members of the committee met
with representatives of the AGC, the
FES, the State Realtors Association
and the Home Builders Association,
in April, in West Palm Beach. At this
time several recommendations were
made which were adopted. The AGC
asked that the Architects and Engi-
neers indicate their interest in the
State Contractors Licensing Law; that
the Joint Cooperative Committee go
on record with the State Board of
Health, urging them to give closer
consideration to the notification of
all members of the Industry of any
further contemplated changes in the
State Sanitary Code; that the Joint
Cooperative Committee and the Sur-
ety Companies of the State of Florida,
through a working special committee,
evolve a set of standard specifications
for industrial and public works con-
tracts; that the FAA and the FES
repeat their opposition to Senate Bill
1644; and that MR. FRANK J. ROON-
EY'S observation in the March, 1956
edition of The Florida Architect indi-
cating the need of an overall plan
for the State of Florida, be referred
to the Joint Cooperative Committee
as a future project.
In addition to the above, this meet-
ing adopted two resolutions:
RESOLUTION No. 1-Whereas, the
Joint Cooperative Committee and its
sponsoring organizations have, since
the inception of this program, indi-
cated a strong interest in improving
the ethics, and in particular the bid-
ding process of the Construction In-
NOVEMBER, 1956


dustry; Now Therefore Be It Resolved
that the sponsoring organizations shall
carry back to their respective groups
the following recommendation for
amendment to the Recommended
Bidding Procedures:
"The owner may furnish a list of
invited major sub-contractors to the
general contractor prior to bidding
and such list of sub-contractors shall
be adhered to and no bids accepted
from others. The general contractor
agrees to accept responsibility as
though he had made the selection
himself or decline the invitations to
bid."
RESOLUTION No. 2 Whereas, in
increasing numbers throughout the
State of Florida, architects and engi-
neers are not receiving their due fees
for architectural or engineering serv-
ices when owners and others are
either subsequently refusing to pay
the agreed fees or where by subter-
fuge the services of an architect or
engineer are being evaded, though
by law provided for in the interest
of the health and welfare of the
public; Now Therefore Be It Resolved
that the members of the three spon-
soring groups will not bid into a
contract for a project over ten thou-
sand dollars ($10,000.00) in value
where the architect or engineer does
not have a prime contract direct with
the owner covering their services.
Resolution No. 2 was re-written to
include the following: That the AGC
will notify the Secretary of such prac-
tices, and the FAA members and
FES members will notify their local
building inspectors of the State law.
The FES finally adopted the agree-
ment prepared by the Architect-
Engineer Committee covering recom-
mended fees and professional stand-
ards for the two organizations. Prev-
ious issues of The Florida Architect
have covered this agreement.
In addition to the above, the Palm


Beach County area has had contin-
uing successful cooperation with all
segments of the construction industry
in furthering the adoption of the
State Building Code for all construc-
tion within the county, a project
begun last year and pretty well com-
pleted this year. This effort has had
spreading influence on adjoining
counties and we trust will eventually
receive such statewide notice as to
merit its becoming a project for the
other chapters.
There is under way a plan to set
up uniform licensing laws for all con-
tractors within the county. This work
was begun and is being carried forward
by the "Building Officials Forum"
(a group organized through the efforts
of the Joint Cooperative Committee)
and the Joint Cooperative Commit-
tee itself. The latter part of September
produced an effort on the part of the
Electrical Contractors Association to
improve the standards of plans and
specifications to include more details
and thereby better protect the owner
both at the time of the bidding and
at the time of construction. A local
architects' committee met with repre-
sentatives of this organization and
heard their complaints, and will now
carry this forward through the Joint
Cooperative Committee and eventu-
ally through the FAA State Commit-
tee.
It is recommended that the Com-
mittee on Relations with the Con-
struction Industry of the FAA work
very closely through the coming year
with the State Committee on Public
Relations. There was never a greater
need for better understanding by the
public and by the rest of the con-
struction industry of the necessity for
good architectural services. To further
indicate that, considerable effort could
be exerted in our own organization
to produce a guiding committee to set
(Continued on Page 22)





Committee Reports


Construction Industry ...
(Continued from Page 21)
up standards of performance, which
might in some manner assist certain
designing architects to improve their
plans and specifications and thereby
improve their reputation and the repu-
tation of the entire profession. Other
professions, such as medical and law,
do not tolerate slipshod or poorly
presented professional efforts. Certain
of us feel that a better standard of


The activities of the Committee
on Education during the past year
have primarily been concerned with
carrying out the directives contained
in a resolution on professional train-
ing passed at the 1955 Convention.
With reference to an interim pro-
gram of architectural education as
mentioned in the 1955 Resolution,
your Committee wishes to report that
it was able to provide a series of
visitations to the College of Archi-
tecture at the University of Florida
for the purpose of having practition-
ers meet with the students for a full
day of discussion of various subjects
selected by the visiting practitioners.
The Committee is grateful to the
following architects for giving their
time and traveling to Gainesville at
their own expense to spend a day at
at the University with the students
in architecture:
CLINTON GAMBLE, Fort Lauder-
dale; EDWIN T. REEDER, Miami; Rus-
SELL T. PANCOAST, Miami Beach;
FORREST M. KELLEY, JR., Tallahassee;
JOHN STETSON, Palm Beach; WILLIAM
D. KEMP, Jacksonville; ARCHIE G.
PARISH, St. Petersburg. The series ex-
tended from early in March through
the first part of May.
During the past year the Associa-
tion held a student competition for
the FAA scholarship to be awarded
to fourth-year students of architecture
at the University of Florida. The sub-
ject of the competition was "A Build-
ing for Architects." Twenty-two en-
tries were submitted; and five were
considered in the final judgment by
22


professional performance on the part
of our own practicing profession would
go further in necessitating the use of
an architect in all planning, than all
the legislation we might produce in
the next five years.
JOHN STETSON, Chairman
DAVID P. REAVES II
LOYD F. VANN
GEORGE J. VOTAW
HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR.
ANTHONY L. PULLARA
WALTER B. SCHULTZ


a jury consisting of FRANKLIN S.
BUNCH, Jacksonville; JOHN STETSON,
Palm Beach, and JAMES GARLAND of
Miami. Final judgment resulted in
first place being awarded to MR. J.
R. BLAIS of Daytona Beach, and a
first mention to Miss ELLEN POFFEN-
BARGER of Orlando. The award of the
scholarship was made at the Student
Field Day luncheon at the University.
With reference to the other di-
rective contained in the 1955 Reso-
lution, your Committee wishes to
report that early in 1956 President
Gamble offered the services of our
Association to DR. J. WAYNE REITZ,
President of the University of Florida,
in any matter concerning architec-
tural education about which Dr. Reitz
might consider the thinking of the
members of the professional organi-
zation to be helpful.
At the invitation of Dr. Reitz, rep-
resentatives of our Committee met
on three separate occasions with Pres-
ident Reitz and others at the Uni-
versity.
Your Committee is particularly
appreciative of the extreme care
evidenced by the University Admin-
istration in its selection of candidates
for positions of responsibility at the
University and wishes to compliment
Dr. Reitz on his selection of DR.
TURPIN C. BANNISTER, FAIA, as Dean
of the College of Architecture and
Fine Arts at the University of Florida.
SANFORD W. GOING, FAIA Chairman
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, FAIA


1857-1957


Centennial


Observance

By Wm. B. HARVARD

Inasmuch as the Centennial Cele-
bration will be a great opportunity for
the architectural profession to receive
simultaneous publicity all over the
country, it is believed important that
all chapters place an appropriate em-
phasis on the Chapter Centennial
Committee, and give it all the sup-
port necessary for making this ob-
servance a complete and resounding
success.
1-All Chapters in the Florida
Association should adjust their meet-
ing dates to occur on February 23,
which is the 100-year anniversary date
of the Institute, and that the dinners
and meetings have prominent local
governmental and educational leaders
invited to speak on appropriate sub-
jects.
2-In addition to the Governor
proclaiming "Architect's Week" dur-
ing the week ending February 23, a
similar request for a proclamation
from local governmental officials be
made, and that this request be made
through a local committee appointed
in as many localities as possible.
These committees should see that
exhibits are placed in various hotel
lobbies and department stores, etc.,
and also that speakers be made
available for various civic groups to
to be active as possible during this
week.
3-This is to elaborate on item 2
above. It is believed necessary that
in order for this celebration to be
thoroughly effective, the Chapter
Centennial Committee chairman
should have on his committee key
members to thoroughly prosecute the
public relations, exhibits, speakers,
and civic participation at the city or
town level.
WILLIAM B. HARVARD, Chairman
JOHN L. R. GRAND
FRANKLIN 0. ADAMS, FAIA
ROBERT M. LITTLE


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Education

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The FAA Checks on Its Organization


With ten AIA Chapter-Members, the FAA is in better shape, geograph-
ically and organizationally than ever before. Here's a view of both set-ups
and a timely comment on adjustments that may be needed in the future-


"Designing for the Automobile,"
the Convention theme, could almost
be a theme for the organizational
structure of the FAA. A look over
the more than 40 years of FAA
development will show the automo-
bile as having had a steadily increas-
ing influence. A look ahead to com-
pletion of new roads would reveal
increased urbanization, a decreasing
compass of chapter territories, and
a resulting need for new chapters.
This pattern began its emergence
with the integration of the FAA and
the AIA early in World War II.
Prior to that time the three Florida
chapters, North, Central and South
held quarterly meetings and had
almost a regional character, not un-
like some of the smaller state chapters
today. Since then the tendency has
been toward a more localized, com-
munity-centered chapter activity re-
quiring more frequent meetings, which
in turn demanded decreased travel
time. And because travel has been
mostly by automobile, this has meant
decreased distances. Five chapters now


cover the territory that was Florida
North's; three the territory that was
Florida South's, and two fill the
area that was Florida Central.
A study of the map will show that
currently a radius of 20 miles appears
to be the practical limit for member
participation in the more congested
metropolitan areas, and a radius of
75 miles is the approximate limit over
the highways and through the coun-
tryside. These are maxima, and with
increased congestion they may be
expected to decrease in magnitude.
Geographically, the FAA is in
pretty good shape. Shown on the
map is the latest demarcation of
territories (and by extension the ter-
ritories of the three sections of the
FAA) as set forth by The Institute
Board. It is worthy of note that ter-
ritories of Florida Northwest, the Mid-
Florida and Palm Beach chapters are
exactly as proposed by the Redistrict-
ing Committee in its report to the
Palm Beach Convention in 1954.
The Association may ultimately be
concerned with two territorial prob-


By JOHN L. R. GRAND
Member, AIA Chapter Affairs Committee



lems. The distance criteria stated
above suggests that Dixie county
which lies beyond the 75-mile radius
drawn from Tallahassee, the "seat"
of Florida North Central, be reas-
signed to Florida North, inasmuch
as it lies well within range of Florida
North's orbit. Flagler county, on the
other hand, while it lies within range
of Florida North, should be assigned
to Daytona Beach since most of its
larger communities fall within a 25
mile radius of Daytona Beach.
The need for one or more new
chapters along the lower Gulf Coast
can be foreseen as population ex-
pansion develops to warrant them. All
of Lee County and considerable areas
of Highlands, Charlotte, Glades, Hen-
dry and Collier Counties lie beyond
the orbits of chapters to which they
are now assigned. However, because
such areas are so sparsely populated,
this problem is one for the future.
As it studies its functions and per-
fects its organization, the FAA be-
comes increasingly able to contribute
to Institute development. Following


F.A.A.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
A.I.A.
REGIONAL
DIRECTOR
PAST EXECUTIVE
PRESIDENT SECRETARY PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY
I I


JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


STUDENT
SECTION





a recommendation of the Board of
Examiners, The Institute Board re-
quested the Committee on Chapter
Affairs "to study the phenomena of
decentralization of existing large
chapters, considering the advantages
and disadvantages of the breaking up
of such chapters, and of retaining the
large chapter and establishing 'divis-
ions' within them allowing such
divisions autonomy in handling local
problems, thereby increasing member-
ship participation." As the Chapter
Affairs Committee's study is still in
progress, the opinions expressed are
the writer's.
For present conditions of travel
by automobile in Florida, FAA geo-
graphical criteria appear generally


reasonable and satisfactory. Criteria
which need to be established are those
concerning minimum membership in
the several membership classes in order
to function effectively as a chapter.
These criteria can, and should, be
developed from studying needs of
chapter operation. To function ef-
fectively a chapter needs officers,
directors, a State director, committee
members and chairmen to man the
minimum list of chapter committees
required by the Institute's "vertical"
chapter, regional, national committee
organization, and some "troops" or
replacements so that the same men
will not have to be "on the line"
all the time.
Organizationally, the FAA is in


pretty good shape, too. As may be
seen on the organization chart, line
and staff relations are clearly demar-
cated, well balanced, and provide a
framework for effective operation and
development. The FAA has embarked
upon a policy of coordinating its com-
mittee organization into the "verti-
cal" system so that it will function
somewhat as a sub-region. Under this
policy, chapter committee chairmen
automatically become members of the
state committees; and thus selection
and coordination are greatly simpli-
fied. This leaves in the hands of
the Board of Directors the all-im-
portant task of selecting state com-
mittee chairmen, a task it is best
equipped to do.


FLORIDA NORTH WEST


FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL JACKSONVILLE




FLORIDA NORTH



DAYTONA BEACH

State-wide operation of the FAA, the newly-formed sectional
divisions and the strengthening of vertical committee arrange- F I
MID-FLORIDA
ments are aiding coordination of Chapter activities to per- ..
mit Florida's AIA organization to function as a sub-region.


FLORIDA CENTRAL

This map, documented by John L. R. Grand from official infor-
mation supplied from AIA Headquarters in Washington, shows in-
formation relative to Chapter boundaries that may not reflect the
understanding currently held by at least five of Florida's ten Chapters.
For example, Hamilton County, once regarded as in the jurisdiction
of Florida North Central, appears here in the Florida North area; and PALM BEACH
Flagler County, which some may have regarded as being the responsi-
bility of Florida North, is shown in the Jacksonville Chapter's terri.- \
tory. Okeechobee County is shown here assigned to Palm Beach,
though formerly regarded as in the Florida Central area. Also within BROWARD COUNTY
the Palm Beach sphere are Glades and Hendry Counties, both of
which had been formerly included with the counties within Florida j1
South limits. Florida South has gained two other counties, however,
in Lee and Charlotte, both of which were formerly shown within the FLORIDA SOUTH ]
Florida Central boundaries. However, the boundaries of the North,
Central and South Sections are as included in the revised FAA Con-
stitution and By-Laws. . The chart opposite indicates the FAA os '
organizational structure under the new sectional set-up adopted last ,
year. ... ...
NOVEMBER, 196I


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


_7








nd Annual Convention

OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


NOVEMBER 1956
8th, 9th, 10th


MIAMI BEACH - FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS SEVILLE HOTEL


CONVENTION MESSAGE FROM THE FAA PRESIDENT


G. CLINTON GAMBLE, A.I.A.
President,
Florida Association of Architects


What has happened during the two years I have been privileged to
serve the FAA as president can, I think, be reasonably regarded as prog-
ress. Since the 40th Convention at Palm Beach we have completed our
program for redistricting, have enlarged our AIA Chapter roster by three,
and have started to work out an improved three-sectional organization.
The FAA is now operating under a completely new and more broadly
effective constitution and by-laws. The office of the FAA Executive Sec-
retary has become an accomplished fact and is already proving its antici-
pated worth. Our official journal, The Florida Architect, has rapidly
become an important means of inter-chapter and intra-industry commun-
ication with plans for even greater service now under way.
As the scope and activities of our Association have grown, so the local
effectiveness of its member-chapters has: been widened and strengthened.
In all sections of the State indications are that the architectural profes-
sion is, at long last in Florida, coming to be regarded as an integral part
of local community life. And with that regard is coming a better under-
standing and a wider acceptance of the varied functions and basic values
of our profession.
This overall progress of the FAA is only a foundation on which to build
an even more progressive future. But to bring that structure to reality,
the interest and vigorous action of every member of every one of Florida's
ten AIA chapters is vital. Progress can be initiated by a few; but it must
be sustained by the many. Thus, I urge every chapter member, of what-
ever classification, to show his willingness to participate with enthusiasm
and effectiveness in any field of professional service to which he may be
called.
For there is much to do. Legislatively, for example, there is need for
a continuation of our "watch-dog" policy to act cooperatively with our
engineer and contractor friends in the protection of our collective inter-
ests; and to act on our own when and as necessary, to maintain and
strengthen our own position as an independent practicing profession. We
must continue our efforts toward public acceptance. We need improved
contacts between individual chapters, a strengthening of chapter, sectional
and state liaison. Only through aroused interest and active efforts of each
member can we accomplish our plans for future progress. With these,
there can be hardly a limit to the realization of the FAA's full potential.


NOVEMBER, .1956 27






"Designing for the Automobile"



SWith the experts forecasting double the present 50-million
automobile registration within the next twenty years, the theme
of this Convention could hardly be more practical nor timely.
Automotive transportation may possibly prove to be one of the
most vital of all the various forces which are shaping the future-
and changing the pattern of our land and our current method of
living with breath-taking rapidity.
Thus it should prove profitable-as well as interesting-to
consider, collectively, what influence the automobile is having
on architectural design. Logically, that involves the question of
what type and character of design can best serve a people dedi-
cated to the automobile.
These are the bases for this Convention's seminar discussions.
And here are those who will participate in them.


HENRY S. CHURCHILL, F.A.I.A.

Architect, Planner, Author,
Philadelphia, Pa.
Keynoting the Convention's theme, "Designing for the
Automobile", Mr. Churchill will be the principal speaker
at Friday's luncheon meeting and will take a leading part
as a member of the panels in seminar meetings scheduled
for both Friday morning and afternoon. He will speak
from a long background of experience with planning prob-
lems and intensive research in urban design. He has been
a consulting architect for the USHA and the N. Y. State
Division of Housing, is a member of the American Institute
of Planners, and author of "The City is the People", pub-
lished in 1945. He is a member of the Philadelphia Chap-
ter, AIA, and served as Chairman of the AIA Committee
on Urban Design and Housing. His Fellowship dates from
1951.





VICTOR D. GRUEN, A.I.A.

Architect and Planning Consultant,
SNew York City, N. Y.

As a member of the discussion panel during both seminar
sessions, Mr. Gruen's contribution will be the more pointed
Sand valuable since he has just completed a preliminary
survey of Miami's central business district in terms of the
Convention theme. Born and educated in Austria, Mr.
Gruen came to this country in 1938, formed his present
firm, now with offices in four states, in 1951. His recently-
completed study for the re-development of the central
business district of Fort Worth, Texas, has brought him
international prominence and has placed him in the front
rank of urban redevelopment consultants. Mr. Gruen be-
came a member of the Institute in 1948 and is now affili-
ated with both the New York and So. California chapters.
28 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








GEORGE A. DEVLIN
Vice-President, National Garages, Inc.
Detroit, Michigan
As a specialist in the economic operation of structures
designed for the automobile, Mr. Devlin will bring a long
and intensive experience to seminar discussions of Friday
morning and afternoon. A native of Michigan and trained
as an engineer at Cornell, Mr. Devlin has spent most of
his business life in close contact with the design and
operation of parking garages. He was associated with
the Garage Code authority of NRA in 1933, was an
official of Detroit Garages, Inc., from 1934 to 1947;
and has enjoyed his present position with National
Garages since 1947. He has been a member of the
Highway Research Board of the National Research
Council and the Traffic and Communications Depart-
ment of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce.


























Panelists from the South Florida H-lost Chapter


IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A. FRANK E. WATSON, A.I.A.


A former two-term President of the
FAA, chairman of numerous FAA
committees and an active proponent
of technical design progress, he will
act as moderator of the two seminars
on the theme of the Convention. Ed-
ucated at Pennsylvania University, he
has been a practicing architect in
Miami since 1935, a member of the
Institute since 1941, a Fellow of the
AIA since 1955. He has intimate
knowledge of Florida's problems and
has done much to develop cooperative
action among architects, engineers
and contractors toward the solution of
many problems which will concern the
Convention's seminars.
NOVEMBER, 1956


As a panel-member of Friday's seminar
meetings, Mr. Watson contributes a
wide and varied experience with prob-
lems of architectural and economic
design dating from 1935. His expe-
rience as associate and principal of
Miami architectural firms has been
varied and broad; and his former as-
sociation with the Public Buildings
Administration and the Air Transport
Command has provided a background
of problems in design linked closely
with automotive transportation. An
AIA member since 1947, he has been
President of the Host Chapter and a
vice-president of the FAA. He is a
partner in the Miami firm of Watson
& Deutschman.


HERBERT H. JOHNSON, A.I.A.

Born a Texan, and educated in archi-
tecture at Rice Institute, 'he holds a
certificate also in Naval architecture
from the University of Michigan. He
is a member of the Miami firm of
Weed, Russell, Johnson and Associates
and has had a long and intensive ex-
perience in building design and office
management. As a panel member of
the Convention's seminar sessions he
contributes a background contact with
many building types in which the
automobile is an important controlling
element of design. These include
downtown stores, warehouses, housing
projects. He is noted for his sound
economic approach to the solution of
building design problems.






The Convention's Honored Guests



LEON CHATELAIN, JR., F.A.I.A.

President, American Institute of Architects,
The Octagon, Washington, D. C.

As the AIA' 3thirty-sixth chief administrative officer, Pres-
ident Chatelain will be one of the honored guests of the
FAA's 42nd Annual Convention. He will greet delegates,
guests and visitors at the Convention Banquet, Friday eve-
ning, November 9, and will comment briefly on current
AIA affairs. Elected to his present office from the post of
AIA Treasurer at the AIA Convention in Los Angeles last
May, President Chatelain has had a long and distinguished
record of both civic and professional service. Head of
his own architectural firm since 1932, he has been an
AIA Corporate member since 1930, and served as president
of the Washington-Metropolitan Chapter for two years.
His AIA Fellowship dates from 1935.




HON. WILLIAM A. SHANDS

32nd District, Florida State Senate,
Gainesville, Florida.

The Convention will be privileged to hear Senator Shands
deliver the principal address at the Convention Banquet,
November 9th. As one of Florida's senior senators, he has
many times demonstrated his keen interest and basic
understanding of professional activities. Elected to the
State Senate in 1941, with prior service as a Gainesville
City Commissioner and a member of the State Road
Department, Senator Shands was voted the most valuable
member of the Senate in 1949 and has held chairmanships
N, in the important Appropriations and Finance and Taxation
S.- Committees. He is a staunch advocate of better school
planning and improved educational facilities.




Edmund R. Purves, F.A.I.A.
AIA Executive Director
Among honored professional guests
is the AIA Executive Director whose
distinguished record of service to
the Institute has been instrumental
in raising the profession to its cur-
rent high level of public acceptance.

Herbert C. Milikey, A.I.A.
Director, South Atlantic District
As an active Institute officer and
good friend to Florida architects he
is especially welcome at his third
FAA Convention after presiding at
the Charter-presentation ceremon-
ies for three new FAA Chapters.
30 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Welcome to Miami and Miami Beach


Welcome to Greater Miami! Your
Hosts at the 42nd Annual FAA Con-
vention are members of the Florida
South Chapter. From the oldest Cor-
porate to the newest Junior Associate,
each Chapter member is glad you
could attend the Convention and sin-
cerely hopes you will enjoy your stay
and take full advantage of all oppor-
tunities for professional profit and
personal pleasure which have been
planned for you.
These plans have been almost a
full year in the making. In January
President T. TRIP RUSSELL of Florida
South appointed EDWARD G. GRAF-
TON as General Convention Chair-
man. Immediately selected were
eighteen assistants to assume responsi-
bility in various phases of Convention
activity. During the Convention all
Convention Committee Members
will wear red ribbons on badges.
These are the Committee Mem-
bers representing your Hosts:
EDWARD G. GRAFTON, General
Chairman; FRANCIS E. TELESCA, As-
sistant Chairman; ROBERT L. WEED,
Treasurer; IGOR B.POLEVITZKY,FAIA,
Program; SAMUEL H. KRUSE, Publi-
city; ALFRED B. PARKER, Hospitality;
WVAYNE F. SESSIONS, Entertainment;
EDWARD GHEZZI, Arrangements; MAX
GRUEN, Transportation; FRANK H.
SHUFLIN, Products Exhibit; LEONARD
H. GLASSER, Architectural Exhibit;
JAMES L. DEEN, Student Exhibit; IRV-
IN KORACH, Exhibition Awards; and
EDWIN T. REEDER, Architects'
Awards.
Further representing the Florida
South Chapter as Hosts to various
types of Convention visitors are: T.
TRIP RUSSELL, AIA Chapter Presi-
dents; ROBERT M. LITTLE, Honored
Guests; and GEORGE H. FINK, Civic
Officials.
The Ladies Program is in charge of
MRS. HERBERT H. JOHNSON. Registra-
tion is being handled through the of-
fice of the Executive Secretary of the
FAA, ROGER W. SHERMAN.
Although your Host Committee,
working closely with the FAA Offic-
ers and Board of Directors, has plan-
NOVEMBER, 1956


-


Edward G. Grafton, AIA, General Con-
vention Chairman, is a member of
the Miami Beach firm of Pancoast,
Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham.

ned a fairly full program for the
greater part of the three-day Conven-
tion period, you may find time for
some sightseeing or recreational
jaunts. As an attendant at the Con-
vention you are, of course, privileged
to enjoy all the recreational facilities
of the Seville Hotel the TV Room,
the comfortable cocktail lounge, the
magnificent ocean-side pool, the Se-
ville's private stretch of sandy beach.
If your taste and well-being craves


T. Trip Russell, AIA, President of the
Host Chapter, is a principal in the
firm of Weed, Russell, Johnson and
Associates, of Miami.

golf or tennis, arrangements can be
made for guest cards at local clubs
through WAYNE F. SESSIONS in charge.
The ladies, particularly, may wish
to visit such worthwhile Miami at-
tractions as the Lowe Art Gallery, in
Coral Gables; Vizcaya, Dade County
Museum and "A Quick Trip to Eu-
rope"; or the new Seaquarium, on Key
Biscayne. MRS. HERBERT JOHNSON,
MAX GRUEN or WAYNE F. SESSIONS
can help you make arrangements.


Chiefly responsible for the outstanding exhibit of quality building products
are Frank H. Shuflin, AIA, left, of the Miami firm of Frank H. Shuflin and
Associates, and Clinton T. Wetzel, president of the Architectural Bureau
of Building Products, Inc., who handled all details of exhibit space sales.














Program


- 42nd


Annual


Convention


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


SEVILLE HOTEL, MIAMI BEACH


- NOVEMBER 8, 9, 10,


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
9:00 A.M.-Registration starts for Chap-
ter Members, Guests, Students and
Exhibitor personnel. Registration
desk is located in the Seville Hotel
Lobby. Identifying badges will be
required for admission to all FAA
Business Sessions and other sched-
uled Convention meetings.
10:00 A.M.-Fourth-quarterly Meeting of
the Joint Cooperative Committee,
FAA-AGC-FES, Madrid Room. Clin-
ton Gamble, FAA Co-Chairman,
presiding.
12:30 P.M.-Joint Cooperative Commit-
tee Luncheon. Visiting architects,
engineers and contractors are
cordially invited. Tickets for the
luncheon may be purchased at the
Registration Desk; and announce-
ment of the luncheon meeting room
will be posted in the hotel's bulletin
board.
1:00 P.M.-Opening Ceremony-Build-
ing Products Exhibit, Alhambra Ball-
room, T. Trip Russell, President,
Florida South Chapter, AIA, presid-
ing.
2:30 P.M.-First Business Session, Flor-
ida Association of Architects, Madrid
Room, Clinton Gamble, President,
FAA, presiding.
Meeting of the FAA Board of
Directors
Reports of FAA Officers
Reports of FAA Committees
5:00 P.M.-Visit Product Exhibit.
6:30 P.M.-Cocktail Party, Pfoduct Ex-
hibit Area, Alhambra Ballroom.


7:30 P.M.-Buffet Dinner, followed by
Swimcapades, Hotel Seville Poolside
and Cabana Areas.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
9:00 A.M.--Registration continues,
Seville Hotel Lobby.
9:30 A.M.-Second Business Session,
Florida Association of Architects,
Madrid Room. Clinton Gamble, Pres-
ident FAA, presiding.
Old and New Convention Business.
11:00 A.M.-First Seminar Session, Ma-
drid Room. Igor B. Polevitzky,
FAIA, presiding. Panelists: Henry S.
Churchill, FAIA; Victor G. Gruen,
AIA; George A. Devlin, Frank E.
Watson, AIA; Herbert H. Johnson,
AIA. Theme: "Designing for the
Automobile."
12:30 A.M.-Luncheon Meeting, Alham-
bra Ballroom. T. Trip Russell, Presi-
dent, Florida South Chapter, AIA,
presiding.
Welcome of Convention Attendants.
Introduction of Convention's Honor
Guests.
Keynote Address.
Henry S. Churchill, FAIA.
2:30 P.M.-Second Seminar Session, Ma-
drid Room. "Designing for the Auto-
mobile." Igor B. Polevitzky, FAIA,
presiding.
5:00 P.M.-Visit Products Exhibit,
Alhambra Ballroom.
6:30 P.M.-Cocktail Party, Products Ex-
hibit Area, Alhambra Ballroom.
Florida South Chapter, AIA, hosts.
7:30 P.M.-Annual Convention Banquet,
Alhambra Ballroom. Clinton Gamble,


President, FAA, presiding, and intro-
ducing Honored Guests.
Address by Hon. William A. Shands,
Florida State Senate.
Presentation of Awards:
For the Building Products Exhibit,
Frank H. Shuflin.
For the Architectural Exhibit,
Edwin T. Reeder.
For the Student Exhibit,
James L. Deen.
Drawing for Product Exhibit Attend-
ance Prizes, Irvin S. Korach.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
9:30 A.M.-Final Business Session, Flor-
ida Association of Architects, Madrid
Room. Clinton Gamble, President,
FAA, presiding.
Report of Resolutions Committee.
New Business.
Election of Officers.
Selection of 43rd Convention
Site, 1957.
11:00 A.M.-Visit Building Products
Exhibit.
12:30 P.M.-Luncheon, open. Check Hotel
Bulletin Board for announcement of
possible group meetings.
2:00 P.M.-Building Products Exhibit
Closes.
Saturday Hospitality Night.
Architects and their wives are cordi-
ally invited to be guests at the homes
of Host Architects of the Florida
South Chapter. FAA members will
be assigned Hosts at the Registra-
tion Desk; and arrangements relative
to transportation, etc., will be an-
nounced.


CONVENTION NOTES:


Eligibility for Building Products Exhibit prizes
can be established by obtaining signatures from
all exhibit booth attendants on the card provided
at the Registration Desk. Prizes will be awarded
by drawing, in charge of Irvin S. Korach, at the
Friday evening Banquet.
Exhibitor Booths will be judged by an award
jury composed of FAA Chapter presidents. Basis
of award will be excellence of display, educa-
tional emphasis and conduct of representation.
Certificates of excellence in design will be
awarded entrants of both architects and students
exhibits by an award jury composed of James E.
Branch, James D. McVoy and William A. Stew-
art, all of whom are associated with the field of
architectural education. Three certificates will be
awarded to architect exhibitors, one to student
exhibitors.
Ladies of the Convention are cordially invited
to attend all business and seminar sessions of
the Convention if they so desire. A waterway
tour of Miami Beach has been arranged for
Friday afternoon following the FAA Luncheon
meeting. Time and starting point will be
announced.
All Delegates must be registered prior to
voting on all Convention business requiring
formal action as covered in the FAA Constitu-
tion and By-Laws.
The Florida State Board of Architecture will
meet Tuesday and Wednesday, November 6 and
7, from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M., and on Thurs-
day morning, November 8, from 9:00 A.M. to
12:00 noon. Meetings will be held in the Hotel
Seville TV Room on the Lobby floor.


1956







Exhibit of Building Products and Materials


1 ... Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.
2 ... Stylon of Miami and Stylon of Tampa
3 . Rotolite Distributor
4 Builders Hardware Co.
5 ... Benjamin Moore & Co.
6 ... Florida Laboratories
7 ... Holcomb & Hoke Mfg. Co.
8 ... Florida Power & Light Co.
9 ... The Mosaic Tile Company
10 ... Modernfold Door Distributors of Florida
11 . Arcadia Metal Products
12 . Joe Farrington, Inc.
13 . Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.
14 ... Dunan Brick Yards
15 . Acousti Corporation of Miami and
Acousti Engineering Co. of Florida
16... Same
17 ... Same
18. .. Electrend Distributing Co.
19 .. Electrend Distributing Co. and
Ware Laboratories, Inc.
20 ... Ware Laboratories, Inc.
21 ... Granco Steel Products Co.
22 ... Monostructure, Inc.
23 . The Superior Electric Company
24... Same
25 ... Prestressed Concrete Institute
26 ... Florida Concrete Products Assn.
27... Same
28 . Clarke A. Hogan, Mfg. Rep.
29 ... Interstate Marble & Tile Co.
30 . Same .
31 ... Gate City Sash & Door Co.
32 ... Brown & Grist Inc.
33 . The Hayward Equipment Corp.
34 ... A. M. Byers Company
35 . Hunter-Douglas Aluminum Corp.
36 . Sistrunk, Inc.
37 . F. Graham Williams Company, Inc.


Between areas where
architects meet and
architects eat is the
mo s t comprehensive
Product Exhibit ever
shown at any FAA
Convention. Time
spent here will be
rewarding on three
counts: It will provide
a wealth of technical
information; it will
give opportunity to
discuss problems with
men who can ease
the task of writing
proper specifications;
and it will prove to
be a pleasantly con-
venient place to greet
old friends . The
Free Bar will be open
throughout the Exhibit
period and is for the
enjoyment of all Con-
ventioneers. . .


38 ... American Hardware Corp.
39 ... The Hayward Equipment Corp.
40 ... The Florida General Supply Corp.
and General Electric Company
41 ... Ludman Corporation
42.. Giffen Industries
43 . Unit-Structures, Inc.
44 ... American Hardware Corp.
45 . E. G. Koyl, Mfgrs. Rep.
46 ... Cement Enamel of the Caribbean, Inc.
47 . Tropix-Weve Products, Inc.
48 Levelor-Lorentzen, Inc.
49 Miami Metal Weatherstrip Co.
50 ... Hotpoint Appliance Sales Company
51 American Coolair Corp.
52 Lotspeich Flooring Company
53 ... Miami Window Corp.
54 ... T-Square Miami Blueprint Co.
55 ... Porterfield Industries, Inc.
56 ... Hotpoint Appliance Sales Company
57 . John J. Nesbitt, Inc.
58 ... Lotspeich Flooring Company
59 ... Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Co.
60. . Davis Double Seal Jalousies, Inc.
61 . Morehouse Supply Company
62 ... Hotpoint Appliance Sales Company
63 . John J. Nesbitt, Inc.
64 ... Glenn D. Robertson Co.
65.. Same
66 ... U. S. Plywood Corp.
67 . Glass Doors, Inc.
68. . Lowry Electric Company, Inc.
69 ... Jones-Sylar Supply Co., Inc.
70 ... Crane Company
71 .. Flamingo Wholesale Distributors, Inc.
72 . Rowell-Van Atta Acoustics, Inc.
73 ... Miracle Adhesives Corp.
74 ... P. 0. Moore
75 ... Schlage Lock Company
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'- 9 10 [ I LJ 12 13 14 +
-e FREE BAR

7 32 33 3435 36 37 16
6 38 39 40 I 41 42 43 17
S--- -- -- ARCHITECTS
5 44 45 46 47 48 49 IB DINING ROOM
4 50 51 52 53 54 55 19
56 57 58 59 60 61 20 I
2 62 63 6465 66 67 21
i 22
31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 ....


ARCHITECT TS
MEE TIN.3


5..


L:0. B Y7.


- 74-

70 73








Constitution


and


By-Laws


(As revised and approved to March, 1956)


FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


ARTICLE I.-NAME OF SOCIETY
SECTION 1
(A) The NAME of this organization shall be the
"FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS," herein-
after referred to as the "Association," which is a non-
profit incorporated State organization duly chartered
by the American Institute of Architects and the State
of Florida.
(B) Application of terms. All reference in the
Constitution and by-laws to "Association," "board,"
"committee," "officer," "members," "meeting," or other
similar designations shall pertain or refer to the Florida
Association of Architects of The American Institute of
Architects.
ARTICLE II.-THE OBJECTS OF THE
ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
SECTION 1
(A) To unite the Architectural profession within
the State of Florida to promote and forward the objects
of the American Institute of Architects.
(B) To stimulate and encourage continual improve-
ment within the profession, cooperate with other pro-
fessions, promote and participate in the matters of gen-
eral public welfare, and represent and act for the
architectural profession in the State.
(C) To promote educational and public relation
programs for the advancement of the profession.
ARTICLE Ill.-ORGANIZATION
SECTION 1
The Association shall be a non-profit organization
composed of members of classifications and with quali-
fications, dues, and privileges as set forth in these
Articles.
ARTICLE IV.-MEMBERSHIP
SECTION 1
(A) The Association shall consist of all corporate
members and all associate members of all Florida Chap-
ters of The American Institute of Architects. Every
registered architect in the State of Florida is assigned
to the jurisdiction of the Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects which covers the area in which
he practices or resides.
(B) A corporate member shall be defined for use
throughout this document to be a bonafide member in
good standing of the American Institute of Architects.
A corporate member shall have all of the rights, privi-
leges and obligations embodied in full membership in-
cluding the right to vote, hold office and represent the
Association as a delegate or otherwise.
An Associate member shall be defined for use
throughout this Constitution and By-Laws as any other
classification of Chapter membership recognized by the
Institute, including Unassigned Corporate members,
members Emeritus, Associates, and Junior Associates.
Student Associates shall consist of under graduate
and graduate students in Architecture in Colleges and
Schools of Architecture in the State of Florida who are
members of a Student Chapter of the American Institute
of Architects.
(C) The Association may sponsor .Student Asso-
ciate Branches in Colleges and Schools of Architecture
NOVEMBER, 1956


in the .State of Florida as may be recognized by the
Association.
Student Associate Branches may function under
the sponsorship of Chapters or under the direct spon-
sorship of the Association. When they function under
Chapters, their relationship to the Association shall be
through the sponsoring Chapter. When they function
directly under the Association, their relationship shall
be directly with the Board of Directors of the Association
who shall be authorized to approve the Constitution and
By-Laws under which the Student Associate Branch
operates.
SECTION 2
Corporate and Associate members of the Chapters in
North Florida shall constitute the North Florida District
of the Association, those in Central Florida shall consti-
tute the Central Florida District, and those in South
Florida shall constitute the South Florida District
Student members of the Student Chapters shall constitute
the Student District of the Association.
The Districts shall include the counties in the State
of Florida as follows:
North Florida District: Escambia, Santa Rosa, Oka-
loosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Cal-
houn, Gulf, Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla,
Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Hamilton, Suwannee, La-
fayette, Dixie, Columbia, Gilchrist, Levy, Baker, Union,
Bradford, Alachua, Marion, Putnam, Clay, Duval, Nas-
sau, St. Johns, and Flagler.
Central Florida District: Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Pinellas, Hillsboro, Manatee, Sarasota, Sumter, Polk,
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands, Lake, Volusia, Seminole,
Orange, Osceola, Brevard.
South Florida District: Indian River, Okeechobee,
St. Lucie, Martin, Glades, Hendry, Palm Beach, Brow-
ard, Dade, Monroe, Collier, Lee, Charlotte.
SECTION 3
Each year the Association shall promote Corporate
or Associate membership in The American Institute of
Architects for all Registered Architects in Florida who
are not then Corporate or Associate Members. Applica-
tions, as received, shall be referred for action to the
respective Chapter to which the applicant would be
assigned.
SECTION 4
HONORARY MEMBERSHIP: Any person of good
character who is in sympathy with the objects of this
Association and who has rendered meritorious service
to it or the profession of architecture or its allied arts,
shall be eligible for Honorary Membership, without the
right to vote.
SECTION 5
The Secretary of each Florida Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects shall file with the
Secretary of the Association the names of all corporate
members and associate members in good standing at
the beginning of each year and shall keep said list
up-to-date at all times. The Association shall issue to
all persons, who have been thus certified, cards indicat-
ing their membership in the Association.
SECTION 6
The grant to and the exercise and use by a member
of each and every right and privilege granted by the
Constitution and By-Laws shall be conditioned upon
the professional conduct and by payment of Association
and Chapter dues of the member in his Chapter.




CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a
President; Vice-Presidents, one from each District; a
Secretary and a Treasurer. The immediate Past Presi-
dent automatically becomes a member of the Board of
Directors, which is not an elective office. All elective
officers shall be corporate members of the Institute.
(B) All Officers with the exception of the Vice-
Presidents shall be elected for terms of one year. No
officer shall be eligible for re-election to succeed himself
more than once, except the Secretary or Treasurer, who
may not hold office longer than two consecutive years,
unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at the annual
Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be
elected for a term of one year, one for a term of
two years, and one for a term of three years. There-
after, one Vice-President shall be elected each year
for a term of three years.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or
members of the Board for at least one year shall be
eligible for the office of President.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until
their successors have been elected and qualified. If a
vacancy occurs in any office of the Association, other
than the expiration of the term of office, then such
vacancy shall be filled for the unexpired term by the
Board of Directors.
(F) Officers of the Association shall take office
at the beginning of the fiscal year.

SECTION 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and of the Board, shall exercise general
supervision of its affairs, and shall perform all the
usual duties that are required to be performed by him
by law and by the Constitution and By-Laws, incidental
to his office.

SECTION 3
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of the affairs
of his District. The Vice-Presidents in their order of
election shall, in the absence of the President, preside
and perform all the duties imposed upon the President.

SECTION 4-THE SECRETARY
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall act as its recording
and its corresponding secretary and as secretary of
meetings of this Association and of the Board of Di-
rectors. He shall have custody of and shall safeguard
and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge
of the Treasureasurer. He shall issue all notices of this
Association, keep its membership rolls, have charge and
exercise general supervision of the Offices and employees
of this Association, sign all instruments and matters
that require te the attest or approval of this Association,
except as otherwise provided in this Constitution; keep
its seal, and affix it on such instruments as require it,
prepare the reports of the Board of Directors and this
Association, in collaboration with th e President, have
charge of all matters pertaining to the meetings of this
Association and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The Secretary may delegate to an assistant
secretary or other assistant employed by this Association
the actual performance of any or all of his duties as
recording or as corresponding secretary, but he shall
not delegate his responsibility for the property of this
Association, or the affixing of the seal of this Associa-
tion, or the making of any attestation or certification
required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
SECTION 5-THE TREASURER
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative


officer of this Association. He shall have charge and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs
and keep the records and books of account thereof. He
shall prepare the budgets, collect amounts due this
Association, and receipt for and have the custody of its
funds and monies and make all disbursements thereof.
He shall have custody of its securities and of its instru-
ments and papers involving finances and financial com-
mitments. He shall conduct the correspondence relating
to his office and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The Treasurer shall make a written report to
each annual meeting of this Association and a written
report at each meeting of the Board of Directors. Each
of said reports shall set forth the financial condition
of this Association, the state of its budget and appropria-
tions at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures for the period of the report, and the
treasurer's recommendations on matters relating to the
finances and general welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person
to sign any order, statement, agreement, check or other
financial instrument of this Association that requires
his signature, unless such delegation is expressly per-
mitted in this Constitution.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring
treasurer shall turn over to his successor a copy of the
closing financial statement and audit of the treasury,
all the records and books of account, and all monies,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belong-
ing to this Association that are in his custody and posses-
sion. The incoming treasurer shall check the same, and
if found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer
his receipt therefore and a complete release of the
retiring treasurer from any liability thereafter with
respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer, personally, shall not be liable
for any loss of money or funds of this Association or
for any decrease in the capital, surplus, income or
reserve of any fund or account resulting from any
of his acts performed in good faith in conducting the
usual business of his office.

ARTICLE VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SECTION I-MEMBERSHIP OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS
(A) The membership of the Board of Directors
shall consist of the same officers, with the same terms
of office, as of the Association, the immediate past
President of the Association, and one or more Directors
elected from each Florida Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects as provided in these articles.
Directors shall be Corporate Members of The American
Institute of Architects.
B) Each Florida Chapter having up to 19 Institute
Members, as listed in the current Membership Directory
of the Institute, shall have one Director. Each Florida
Chapter having from 20 to 59 Institute Members so
listed shall have two Directors. And each Florida Chap-
ter having 60 or more Institute members so listed shall
have three Directors.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall
be represented on the Board by a Student Representative
whose duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the
Association and the Student Chapter.

SECTION 2-AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD
The Board shall be vested with the authority to
manage, direct, control, conduct and administer the
property, affairs and business of the Association, and
in the interim between Annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directions and instructions adopted at a meeting
of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems
expedient, and shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations, supplementing but not in conflict with this
Constitution and these By-Laws, to govern the use of
the property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of
the Association, to govern the affairs and business of
the Association. Each director (and alternate director
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


in the absence of the director) shall convey to the
Chapter which he represents all decisions and actions
of the Board and shall convey to the Board the actions
and requests of the Chapter he represents.
SECTION 3-VACANCIES ON THE BOARD
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled
by the Chapter so affected.
SECTION 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall
hold at least four regular meetings each year and shall
fix the time and place of its meetings. One meeting
shall be held immediately prior to the opening of the
Annual Convention of the Association and one meeting
within thirty days after the beginning of the fiscal
year following the adjournment of said convention.
Ten members of the Board shall constitute a quorum,
and all decisions shall be rendered by concurring vote
of not less than the majority of its total membership
present, unless otherwise required by this constitution
and these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meet-
ing of the Board may be called by the President, or
on the written request of a majority of the Officers
of the Association, or of six members of the Board,
at time and place so designated by Party or Parties who
called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting
of the Board shall be sent in writing by the Secretary
to each member of the Board not less than five days
before the date fixed for the meeting. Minutes of the
meetings of the Board shall be recorded by the Secretary
and approved by the Board in its succeeding meeting.
ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
SECTION 1
(A) The President, at least thirty (30) days before
the annual Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Com-
mittee, composed of a Chairman and a member from
each District, whose duty is shall be to nominate mem-
bers qualified to hold office in the Association for each
of the Offices about to be vacated. I
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by
the Nominating Committee, other Nominations for any
or all of the offices about to become vacant may be
made from the floor in the Convention. Elections may
proceed by acclamation or ballot at the will of the Con-
vention.
SECTION 2
The President shall appoint qualified members to
the yearly Standing Committees created by the Associa-
tion or the Board, whose duties and term of office shall
have been fixed when the Committee was created.
SECTION 3
Special Committees may be appointed at any time
for any specific purpose by the President, whose duties
shall be determined at the time of the creation of the
committee. Such committees shall not be established
for longer than the term of office of the President
appointing the Committee.
SECTION 4
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with the right to request and receive all information
in possession of the Association and all records necessary
to discharge the duties imposed upon them.
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the
Chairman and/or the members of the various committees
of their committee assignments, and furnish them the
names and addresses of all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member
of all committees, and the secretary may act as secretary
for the committee if so selected by the committee. The
majority of members of the committee shall constitute
a quorum. Committees shall report their findings,
recommendations and actions to the body which created
it. Decisions, recommendations and other actions of
the Committee shall be made in accordance with the
concurring vote of the majority of members present or
by a majority vote of a letter ballot.
NOVEMBER, 1956


(D) Appropriations: The chairman of any com-
mittee requiring appropriations shall submit written re-
quest to the Board for the amount required and the
reasons thereof, and if granted, file with the final report
of the Committee a detailed statement of all monies,
if any expended.
ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
SECTION 1-FISCAL YEAR
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on
the first day of January and end on the thirty-first
day of December of the same calendar year.
SECTION 2-COLLECTION OF DUES
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually
from each corporate member and associate member
assigned to that chapter, and shall remit promptly to
the Treasurer of the Association, an amount for the
succeeding year, to be determined by the Association
at its Annual Convention which shall be contributed
by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expense of
every kind of the Association.
SECTION 3-CONTRIBUTIONS
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate
the privileges and rights of any member.
SECTION 4-DEPOSITS AND WITHDRAWALS OF
MONEY AND SECURITIES
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all
monies of this Association in the name of this Associa-
tion, when, as, and in the original form received by
him, in one or more depositories designated by the
Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Every disbursement of money
of this Association, except from the petty cash, shall
be by check of this Association, signed by the Treasurer
and countersigned by another officer designated by the
Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall
establish petty cash accounts as authorized by the Board
which may be disbursed for the usual petty cash pur-
poses by the person designated in said authorization
of the Board. No such petty cash account shall exceed
$25.00 at any time and statements of the petty cash
expenditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and
the expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the
cash is replenished.
SECTION 5-ANNUAL BUDGET
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual
budget, by the concurring vote of not less than two-
thirds of its membership present, showing in detail the
anticipated income and expenditures of the Association
for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial
liability of the Association and every expenditure of
money of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or persons properly authorized to incur the expense,
liability or expenditure, except a petty cash item as per
paragraph (c) of Section 4, Article VIII.
(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed
to do so at an annual Convention or Special Meeting
of the Association, the Board shall not adopt any
budget, make any appropriations, or authorize any ex-
penditures or in any way obligate or incur obligation
for the Association, which, in the aggregate of any
fiscal year, exceeds the estimated net income of the
Association for such year.
SECTION 6-AUDITS
The Board shall authorize the Treasurer to employ
a Certified Public Accountant to audit the books and





CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


accounts of the Treasurer for report at the annual
Convention.
ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1-ANNUAL MEETINGS
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold
an Annual Meeting, herein called the Annual Conven-
tion; the time and place shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors if not fixed by the preceding Annual Con-
vention.
(B) Reports: The President, the Secretary and
the Treasurer of the Association shall each make an
annual report in writing to the Annual Convention.
(C) Election of Officers: New Officers for the
ensuing year shall be elected to succeed those whose
terms of office are about to expire.
SECTION 2-SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a
meeting of the Association or is voted by the Board
upon the concurring vote of two-thirds of the Board,
or is voted by not less than one-half of the Florida
Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of the respective govern-
ing boards thereof, or by a written petition to the
Board, signed by not less than twenty-five percent of
the total number of members in good standing of the
Association.
SECTION 3-NOTICE OF MEETINGS
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association, by letter or in official publication
of the Association, stating time and place of meeting
thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention shall be
served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less
than fifteen (15) days before such meetings.
SECTION 4-VOTES
A concurring vote of the majority of the members
qualified to cast a vote or a ballot shall decide the
question unless otherwise required by this constitution.
A vote by ballot not being requested the voting shall
proceed accordingly. NOTE: Only corporate members
may vote on Institute matters in accordance with In-
stitute Constitution and By-Laws.
SECTION 5-PROXIES AND LETTER BALLOTS
(A) Proxies: There shall be no voting by proxy
at a meeting of this Association.
(B) Letter Ballots: No vote of the membership
shall be taken by letter ballot.
SECTION 6-DELEGATES TO AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS CONVENTION
The Association shall have delegate representation
at Annual American Institute of Architects Convention
in accordance with American Institute of Architects
By-Laws relating to State organizations.

ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS
SECTION 1-AMENDMENTS BY MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION
(A) This Constitution and its By-Laws may be
amended at any meeting of this Association, provided
that a notice stating the purpose of each proposed
amendment and the reason therefore and a copy of the
proposed amendment is sent to every member and
associate not less than thirty (30) days prior to the
date of the meeting at which the proposed amendment is
to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the total number of corporate
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend this Constitution or its By-Laws relating to
matters of Institute affairs.
(C) It shall require a roll call concurring vote
of not less than two-thirds of the total number of
members present at a meeting of this Association to


amend this Constitution or its By-Laws on matters that
do not relate to Institute affairs.
(D) Every resolution of this Association amend-
ing this Constitution or its By-Laws shall state that
the amendment will become effective only if and when
it is approved by the Institute. Immediately following
the adoption of such a resolution, the Secretary shall
submit a copy of the amendment and the adopting
resolution to the Secretary of the Institute for such
approval. Upon receipt of said approval the amend-
ment shall become effective and the Secretary shall
enter the amendment and the approval at the proper
place in this Constitution or its By-Laws, with the date
of the amendment and approval.
SECTION 2-AMENDMENTS BY THE INSTITUTE
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may
amend any provision of this Constitution or its By-Laws
that the Association fails to amend after due notice
so to do from the Institute. Each amendment made
by said Board shall have the same force and effect as
if made by this Association in the manner hereinabove
provided, and shall be effective immediately on receipt
of the notice of the Secretary of The Institute con-
taining the amendment, and the Secretary shall enter
the amendment at the proper place in this Constitution,
with the date it was made.
SECTION 3-TITLE AND NUMBERING
From time to time and without further action of
the Association, the Secretary may rearrange, retitle,
renumber or correct obvious errors in the various
articles, sections and paragraphs of the Constitution and
By-Laws as becomes necessary.
BY-LAWS
(1) AMENDMENTS
These By-Laws may be amended in the same manner
as the Constitution.
(2) SUSPENSION OF BY-LAWS
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting,
for the transaction of any special business by a two-
thirds vote of the members present. When the special
business has been disposed of, the By-Laws shall im-
mediately be in force again.
(3) RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any
vote or statement of its officers or members nor be
pledged or bound in any manner except by the approval
of the Board, in conformity with the Constitution and
By-Laws.
(4) MEETING NOTICES
Date, Time and Place of all meetings shall be
stated in the notice therefore.
(5) RULES OF ORDER
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance
with Robert's Rules of Order.
(6) RETIRED MEMBERS
A member who ceases to practice architecture as a
gainful occupation and further ceases all other gainful
occupation shall be eligible for "Retired Membership."
(7) OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIPS
Other types of memberships may be created as the
necessity arises in accordance with American Institute
of Architects chapter By-Laws.
(8) ELECTION OF OFFICERS
(A) Officers shall be elected at the annual meeting
of the Association by a majority vote of the Corporate
members present at said meeting.
(B) The Vice-Presidents, one from each district,
shall be designated as First, Second, and Third Vice-
Presidents by ballot at the Annual Meeting.
(C) The Directors, one or more from each cor-
porate Chapter as provided in Article VI, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting. An
Alternate Director, one for each Director, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting to
function for the Director in case of his inability to
serve.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






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Committee Reports


The following is a report of our
committee's activities for the year;
and, as you can see, some areas have
been quite active in code revisions,
while others have not. The report is
broken down into Chapter areas in
order to let you see more clearly the
picture in the separate areas, rather
than the State as a whole.
Palm Beach Area: This area began
a concerted effort last year to have the
Southern Standard Code with num-
erous revisions adopted for all unin-
corporated areas. It is my understand-
ing that this has been accomplished
to a degree but not completely. Lake
Worth has adopted the Code as
revised and Palm Beach County is
in the process of setting up County
Zoning with their own Building De-
partment.


Daytona Beach Chapter: Mr. Craig
Gehlert, our committee member from
the area, reports that after many re-
visions of the Southern Standard
Code it has been adopted. An effort
is being made by the Chapter mem-
bers to serve on County committees
in order to influence their thinking
so that the new revisions are adopted.
County zoning in this area is almost
assured.
Florida North Chapter: Mr. Myrl
Hancs reports that the Southern
Standard Building Code has been
adopted. Architects, City Manager and
others served on the committee to
bring this about.
Florida North Central Chapter: I
have received no report from this area.
Florida South Chapter: Mr. Ed
Grafton reports that the County Zon-


Building Codes

By JOSEPH M. SHIFALO


Student Associate Chapter- FAA-AIA

By ALAN GREEN and ROY HENDERSON


Since the convention last fall at
Daytona Beach, the Chapter has en-
joyed a very full year. With an increas-
ing interest on the part of the students
in the AIA, we found ourselves with
a growing membership, new and
broader activities and responsibilities,
and last, but by no means least, new
financial problems. Under the able
leadership of our officers, President
BILL HUNTER, Vice-President RICK
DAVIDSON, Secretary ALAN GREEN and
Treasurer B. T. JONES, we moved
through the year with vigor.
The convention, as usual, proved
most interesting and beneficial to the
large student delegation attending. A
student exhibit of work done here at
the College created much interest and
we in turn were highly impressed by
the speakers, forums and professional
exhibits. Needless to say, the friendly
atmosphere and fellowship extended
to us by the members of FAA and
their associates were greatly enjoyed
and appreciated by our group.
By late fall plans for the Spring
Home Show had begun to formulate.
NOVEMBER, 1956


The dates of April 26, 27 and 28
were selected and the problem of
procuring the stadium was tackled.
Through the help of several FAA
members, we were able to persuade
the Athletic Department to permit
us to use the stadium concourse for
the construction projects. Committees
were selected and exhibitions, speakers
and lecturers were contacted. The pro-
gram for the Home Show House Com-
petition was proposed and possible
methods of construction were investi-
gated.
By now, the series of guest speakers
had begun to arrive. Through the
arrangements of SANFORD W. COIN,
FAIA, and CLINTON GAMBLE, AIA,
we were able to welcome a number
of prominent FAA members who
presented a vast amount of informa-
tion on widely diversified subjects
about which they were highly in-
formed through long experience.
Among them were: EDWIN T. REED-
ER, CLINTON GAMBLE, RUSSELL T.
PANCOAST, FORREST M. KELLY, JR.,
JOHN STETSON, WILLIAM D. KEMP


and ARCHIE G. PARISH. The series
lasted well into the spring.
Most functions of the second se-
mester centered around preparing for
the Home Show and its related events.
By the time President Reitz arrived
Friday morning, the 27th of April, to
cut the opening board, the show was
ready for the crowd of people that
went through it in the next three days.
The center of interest was, of course,
the House, built and furnished com-
plete with patio landscaping and a
1956 model automobile in the car-
port from the plans of the winning
design by Miss ELLEN POFFENBARGER.
The concourse of the stadium con-
taining the House was filled with
work of students from all parts of
the college, professional displays and
manufacturers' exhibits arranged in
booths. Many of these booths were
designed by students under contract
to the commercial exhibitors. In-
cluded for the first time was a booth
showing the work of the members
of the Florida North Chapter, FAA,
(Continued on Page 43)


ing Department has adopted the
Southern Standard Code with the
revisions that were worked out for
the City of Miami. This area has been
the most active in trying to establish
a uniform code for the South area of
the State.
Florida Central Chapter: Mr. Rob-
ert Levison reports that the area as
a whole has more or less adopted the
Southern Standard Code with revis-
ions as worked out for each area.
Mid-Florida Chapter: The South-
crn Standard Code has been adopted
for Orlando and Winter Park, but
with numerous revisions. The County
Zoning law has gone into effect and
their Building Department has
adopted the same code. The County
Building Inspector has rendered very
good service in insisting on the strict
adherence to the code.
Broward County Chapter: No re-
port.
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Chairman






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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Committee Reports


Student Chapter . .
(Continued from Page 41)
a trend which we would very much
like to broaden this coming year to
include as many of the other FAA
Chapters as possible.
Much of the material, furniture,
accessories and fixtures for the House
were donated or loaned by various
local businesses for which they re-
ceived due credit and appreciation.
The Student Exhibits were judged
by a panel consisting of HARWELL H.
HARRIS, SANFORD WV. GOING, ARTHUR
L. CAMPBELL, DAVE E. REAVES and
a recent alumnus BOB HALL. From
them came many compliments on
the range and quality of the student
work.
Held during the same week and
in conjunction with the Home Show
were several other events. A Coffee
Hour to honor exhibitors and guests
was held Friday; the Annual College
Awards Luncheon was held on Satur-
day; a Fashion Show was presented
by the Department of Costume De-
sign with the Home Show House as


a background later Saturday afternoon
and all relaxed to the festivities of the
Annual Beaux Arts Ball that night to
the theme of "Re-incarnation."
Of special interest was the Awards
Luncheon with guest speaker HAR-
WELL HAMILTON HARRIS AIA. Many
awards such as the G. E. Kitchen
Competition, Southern Brick and Tile
Competition, the FAA Scholarship
Award, The Alpha Gamma Rho
Medal and the Home Show House
Competition as well as the Student
Exhibits Award and other commenda-
tions were given following the lunch-
eon. The Home Show week-end came
to an end with the dismantling of
the house and the cleaning up of the
stadium Monday.
The Student Contractors and
Builders Association and the Student
Chapter AIA became better ac-
quainted in the spring through the
medium of a "beer-ball game." Fun
for all, including the winning of the
game by the Architectural team of
Faculty and Students highlighted this
event.


The final meeting of the semester
was concerned with final reports of
the Home Show and the election of
officers. The reports showed us break-
ing even financially and the elections
resulted in: President, RANDY WED-
DING; Vice-President, ALAN GREEN;
Secretary, RoY HENDERSON; Treas-
urer, CARROLL PEACOCK, and Co-ordi-
nator, BOB DENYSE. Plans were im-
mediately presented for a bigger and
better Home Show with new accents
and ideas. Already we are starting
publicity by showing movies of last
year's show and the design compe-
tition has been planned with a pro-
gram written.
The Student Chapter is co-ordi-
nating activity with the new admin-
istration of the College in the plan-
ning and carrying out of functions
common to both. With the future
ahead, we see our AIA Student Chap-
ter growing and developing with the
College as it becomes a leader in the
architectural education of the country.
ALAN GREEN, Vice-President
Roy HENDERSON, Secretary


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NOVEMBER, 1956


I ff I N C 0 R P 0 R A T E DI





Committee Reports


Board of

Trustees

FAA Loan Fund

By JOHN L. R. GRAND

In discharge of our duty as Trustees
of the Florida Association of Archi-
tects Loan Fund at the University
of Florida we submit this our annual
report of activities and status of the
Fund.
Attached is a detailed account of
the status of the Fund. These detailed
figures must be studied in their tabu-
lar form to be understood and no
attempt will be made to read them
to the Convention. We invite all
interested members to consult copies
which have been made available to
the Officers and Members of the
Board
As was noted last year, the book
value of the fund now stands at


just over a thousand dollars which
is twice the original sum deposited
by the Association 30 years ago.
Interest accretions arc now somewhat
reduced as a result of the policy of
allocating 10% of interest collections
to the Loan Collection Fund. A
recommendation has been made that
the announcement of the FAA Loan
Fund in the University catalog be
changed to show a value of $1,000.00.
The FAA Loan Fund has not been
as active recently as might be desired.
This, we believe, can be traced in
part to new opportunities made avail--
able in the form of scholarship grants
by this Association and other friends
of the College, and to the fact that
the fund is somewhat less attractive
due to higher interest rate than some
other funds available at the Univer-
sity.
Your Board recommends that the
interest rate be lowered from 5%
to 4% and that the interest be
changed from the date of the note
for long term loans extending beyond
graduation, and that short term loans


be made from the fund in accordance
with regular University policy.
The Committee regrets to report
that for the first time in 3U years
a beneficiary of the fund and an
alumnus of the University, JOSEPH C.
BORIS, has refused to pay his loan;
and the University, upon the recom-
mendation of the Board of Trustees,
has instituted suit against him. Over
a period of two years your Board had
made every effort to persuade Mr.
Boris to repay his debt before making
this recommendation.
JOHN L. R. GRAND, Chairman


Public Relations

By FRED. W. KESSLER

The Committee is obtaining for
the Legal Aid Committee the names
of Senators and Representatives and
their districts in the state of Florida.
This list is, however, rather obsolete
for November publication, due to
(Continued on Page 46)


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Committee Reports


Public Relations
(Continued from Page 44)
the fact that there will be an elec-
tion in November and many on this
list may no longer be holding office.
The committee has made prelim-
inary negotiations with the Palm
Beach County school authorities to
have copies of the Teacher's Man-
ual "At Home with Architecture", in-
cluded in the school curriculum. This
manual is designed for use in schools
to familiarize students and school
authorities with the work and value
of Architects and Architecture. It is
hoped that this program will be
made state wide. This literature is
furnished, free of cost, from the
Octagon.
FREDERICK WV. KESSLER, Chairman
HERBERT R. SAVAGE
ROBERT B. MURPHY
ELLIOTT B. HADLEY
F. TREADWAY EDSON
RoY M. POOLEY, JR.
JOSEPH A. WILKES
WILLIAM P. GREENING


From --

The Executive Secretary's Desk


The first ten months of the FAA's
currently organized operation have
shown undeniable progress toward
what the Board of Directors and the
Executive Secretary both recognized
as desirable when the office was es-
tablished at the Board's January,
1956, meeting. It has necessarily
been an introductory year. The office
is new. The FAA's program is ex-
panding as Chapter memberships in-
crease and as professional problems
become more numerous and complex.
But, in spite of limited means,
physical facilities and personnel, con-
crete results have been achieved
which indicate a near-future situation
that every FAA member can con-
template with satisfaction. Office
activities have been conducted chief-
ly along two general lines of planned
effort. One has been concerned with
the growing need for improving over-


all relationships-public, professional
and inter-industry. The other involves
the publishing enterprise represented
by The Florida Architect.
As to the first, a chief effort has
been to widen representative FAA
contacts both within and without the
general field of Florida construction
activity. We have strengthened our
association with such groups as the
general contractors, the engineers,
several of the various trade associa-
tions. We have brought our activ-
ities and interests to the attention of
various civic groups, to newspapers,
to legislators and to the significant
segments of administrative groups at
both county and state levels.
Among the FAA member-chapters,
as wide and constant a contact as pos-
sible has been maintained throughout
the State. This especially, has been
(Continued on Page 47)


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





valuable; for by such means has de-
veloped clarification of many matters
and situations which have important
bearing on service requirements,
scope of function, operating proced-
ures and working facilities of the Ex-
ecutive Secretary's office.
Relative to The Florida Architect,
a detailed interim report of its opera-
tion and current status has been given
the Board of Directors through the
Publication Committee. In general
the magazine is filling a need for a
professional publication with state-
wide distribution that has, apparently,
long been evident to readers and ad-
vertisers alike. Acceptance of pub-
lishing policies by both has been suf-
ficient to permit a slow, but appar-
ently sound, growth during the year.
However, the publication's full po-
tential value has by no means vet
been realized. It can, and will, be of
increasingly valuable service to Flor-
ida's architectural profession as more
members take advantage of its edi-
torial columns to contribute material
on all phases of professional or tech-
nical activity. Thus its value as a
medium for the advertising of mate-
rials, products and services which are
specifiable by architects will increase
accordingly. Plans are now being
made to stimulate progress along both
editorial and advertising fronts. It is
therefore safe to predict a continued
progress for The Florida Architect -
provided, of course, that support of
the publication remains at least as
strong as in the immediate past.
During the past year opportunity
has been afforded to check with Ex-
ecutive Secretary offices of other
State architectural organizations. Pro-
fessional problems in Florida are sur-
prisingly similar in character to those
in other states. But elsewhere operat-
ing budgets and office staffs arc both
up to five times that of the FAA,
though in some instances the respon-
sibilities of the offices are substanti-
ally less.
So, in the near future probably
before this same time next year -
the office of the Executive Secretary
and the FAA Board of Directors will
need to find solutions to several prob-
lems that will shortly become of press-
ing practical importance. These will
concern the policies, scope and eco-
nomics of this office's operation.
ROGER NV. SHERMAN
NOVEMBER, 1956


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News & Notes


Florida Central
The Ft. Harrison Hotel at Clear-
water was the site of the third quart-
erly meeting attended by a record per-
centage of the Central Chapter's
membership. More than 80 were reg-
istered for dinner; and most had at-
tended the cocktail party, business
meeting and seminar discussion of
soils and foundation problems which
preceded dinner. Affirmative action
was recorded on these matters:
1. Action to incorporate the Chap-
ter will proceed as soon as possible.
2. Dues may be raised $2.00 per
year to provide more working cap-
ital for the Chapter. Also approved
in principle was a proposal to assess
members $10 for a public relations
fund for next year's Centennial Ob-
servance program. After due notice
the Chapter will vote on these pro-
posals at its next meeting.
3. Meeting dates will be changed
to fall on the 2nd Saturday of Feb-
ruary, April, June and December,
with the annual meeting in October.


Passed also were a number of
minor proposals requiring by-law
changes, all designed to provide
greater flexibility in Chapter opera-
tion toward the end of stimulating
interest and action in Chapter pro-
grams and affairs. Most of these
recommendations had already been
considered by the membership in a
questionnaire developed by Vice-
President A. WYNN HOWELL and
THOMAS V. TALLEY, to which a
whopping 74 percent response was
recorded.
Indicating the Chapter's present
vitality was the statement by Presi-
dent ROLAND W. SELLEW that pres-
ent membership had climbed back to
the volume enjoyed just prior to form-
ation of the Mid-Florida Chapter. At
that time it was 108; and transfers to
Mid-Florida accounted for a 29-mem-
ber loss. Twenty members have been
added since then; and with those ad-
mitted at this meeting the roster
stands at 107.
The Chapter voted to send re-
prints of the school maintenance data


published in the current ATA Bul-
letin to all school officials in the
Chapter's territory. It also instructed
its Convention delegates to propose
that all FAA Chapters be charged
with developing resolutions neces-
sitating Convention action four
months prior to the FAA annual
meeting date. These resolution pro-
posals would be published in The
Florida Architect to permit the en-
tire FAA membership to consider
them at Chapter meetings and decide
on firm action at the subsequent Con-
vention.
Relative to this proposal, it was
pointed out that such a procedure
would avoid perfunctory passage of
any Convention resolution without
sufficient consideration and discus-
sion of its merits or disadvantages.
Also, it would permit each AIA Chap-
ter to register its position on each
resolution question and would thus
make Convention action more truly
representative of state-wide opinion.
Balloting for next year's officers
(Continued on Page 50)


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 48)


Frank J. Rooney, National President
of the AGC, was the principle speak-
er at the October 9 meeting of the
Florida South Chapter in Miami.


resulted in the return of ROLAND W.
SELLER, A. WYNN HOWELL and
JACK MCCANDLESS as president, vice-
president and treasurer, respectively.
SIDNEY R. WILKINSON was elected
secretary, the post held last year by
JOHN M. CROWELL. MARK G. HAMP-
TON was voted a Chapter director.


Target Date October, 1957


Headquarters for t h e
South Florida Chapter,
AIA, and office of the
FAA Executive Secretary
and The Florida Architect
will be in the Du Pont
Plaza Building, now
under construction in Mi-
ami. The unique building
is also to include a 300-
room hotel, a 14-story
office building and the
largest exhibit of quality
building products in the
country. The Architectur-
al Products Bureau will
be housed in a 3-story,
100,000 sq.-ft. wing
over a sheltered parking
area. Now scheduled for
completion by October,
next year, the huge ex- r .
hibit will be in charge
of Clinton T. Wetzel,
far right. Examining the building model
and next to him is Frank J. Shuflin,
AIA, who, with John E. Petersen, AIA,
designed the three-purpose structure.
With them are two of the building's own-
ers, Perrine Palmer, former mayor of
Miami, left, and Al Jacobs, for many


B -
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The two FAA directors elected were
ROBERT H. LEVISON and ERNEST T.
H. BOWEN, II.
Applications for one transfer mem-
bership, three corporate, one associ-
ate and seven junior associates were
approved. After dinner, President
Sellew directed comments to all mem-
bers accepted during the past year in
a brief ceremony of welcome.
"I firmly believe," he said, "that
no single practitioner can be entire-
ly successful in lifting his own indi-
vidual prestige unless he does so with
at least one eye on the good of the
profession as a whole. A group such
as ours can be more effective in
bringing about public acceptance and
appreciation of those who are worthy
of it than can any member by him-
self.
"Your achieved status of member-
ship, received during the past year,
indicates that you subscribe to this
thinking. Speaking in the name of
the AIA, at national, state and chap-
ter levels, it is my privilege to wel-
come you among us. I trust you will
contribute of your time, through the
association, to the overall good of the
profession, remembering that one re-
ceives in proportion as he gives."


years an active developer of South Flor-
ida enterprises. The building fronts
1,000 feet on the Miami River and is
placed on the plot to permit construction
of additional office space as may be
required in the future.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 50)
Florida South
Active support of all Florida AGC
Chapters for the construction of a
new building for the U/F College of
Architecture and Allied Arts was
pledged by AGC National President
FRANK J. ROONEY in a talk at the
Florida South Chapter's dinner meet-
ing October 9. Rooncy said that the
construction industry's greatest need
was trained personnel. He was em-
phatic in his endorsement of the
building program proposed for
Gainesville and said the FAA could
count on the "full and complete co-
operation" of Florida contractors in
efforts to obtain appropriation of suf-
ficient funds from the next Legis-
lature to start the first unit.
The Chapter heard about the home
rule plan from Miami's former
mayor, JOHN B. ORR and subsequent-
ly adopted a resolution endorsing the
home rule program for Dade County.
Members also voted a $100 contribu-
tion to the California Council of
Architects to aid their legal efforts to
break a bureaucratic design monopoly
as reported in last month's Florida
Architect, page 15.
Mid-Florida Elects
At a dinner meeting at the San
Juan Hotel, Orlando, on October 18,
the Mid-Florida Chapter held its an-
nual election of officers. Chosen
were these architects who will take
over duties of their new offices Jan-
uary 1, 1967: JOSEPH M. SHIFALO,
president; JAMES E. WVINDIIAM, III,
vice-president; ROBERT B. MuRPHY,
secretary; and JOHN T. HART, treas-
urer. Two FAA directors were also
chosen-thus indicating that the cor-
porate membership now numbers at
least 20, in accordance with the FAA
Constitution and By-Laws. They are:
JOHN T. WATSON, and JOHN W.
BURTON.
2nd Auxiliary Formed
Wives of Mid-Florida Chapter
architects recently decided that if
formal organization was good for their
husbands it would be good for them.
Result was formation of the Mid-
Florida Chapter Ladies Auxiliary with
a membership of 28 and classifica-
tions of members corresponding to
those of the AIA Chapter. A consti-
tution and by-laws is now being stud-
(Continued on Page 52)
NOVEMBER, 1956


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 51)
ied; but meetings are now being held
on a schedule of six per year, with
membership dues of $3.00 already in
effect.
No definite policies nor long-range
program have yet been established,
but the group's general purpose is to
foster cooperation among members
and to aid as may be practical the
organizational activities of the Mid-
Florida Chapter. Officers are: Mrs.
RORERT B. MURPHY, president; Mrs.
JAMES M. SHIFALO, vice-president;
Mrs. F. EARL DELOE, secretary; and
Mrs. HILL STIGGINS, treasurer.
The new Mid-Florida group is the
second AIA Chapter Auxiliary to be
formed in Florida. The first, affiliated
with the Florida Central Chapter, is
now in its second year of successful
operation and on October 13 held
election of officers for the coming
year. These include: Mrs. ELLIOTT
B. HADLEY, president; Mrs. ARCHIE
G. PARISH, vice-president; Mrs. DoN-
ALD JACK WEST, secretary; and Mrs.
ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II, treasurer.
The Central Chapter Auxiliary is
now considering a program of varied
activities for next year. At their elec-
tion meeting held at Clearwater
coincident with the AIA meeting -
ROLAND W. SELLEW presented the
27 members attending with a num-
ber of suggestions along these lines.
Work with local hospitals and public
school groups was one; a lecture series
before local women's clubs was an-
other. The Central Chapter president
invited the ladies to attend Chapter
business sessions.

mTalbot F. Hamlin, FAIAm
1889- 1956
The art of architecture has lost a
staunch and vocal champion, the his-
tory of that art an erudite and un-
derstanding recorder. And in the
death of TALBOT FAULKNER HAMLIN,
FAIA, at New Bern, North Carolina,
on Sunday, October 7, architects who
respected the worth of scholarship
and knew the perfectionist who
masked knowledge with a shy quiet-
ness and dry humor have lost a friend.
He died from a heart attack which
came suddenly as he and Mrs. Ham-
lin were sailing to Miami from a sum-
mer spent at Cape Cod, on their
floating home, the Aquarelle III. He
(Continued on Page 54)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Peter L. Hawes, 4th-year architectur-
al student at the U/F, was awarded
the scholarship bestowed annually by
the Florida North Chapter at the
Chapter meeting held October 18.
He is a member of the Student Chap-
ter, AIA, and vice-president of Gar-
goyle, honorary architectural society,
and embarked on a career in archi-
tecture after 10 years service in the
Army Air Force. He is married and
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ployed in the office of Goin and
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


News & Notes_
(Continued from Page 52)
had reached his 67th birthday June
16, 1956.
Educated at Amherst College and
Columbia University Architectural
School, Talbot Hamlin was active in
architectural practice until 1934 when
he joined the architectural faculty of
Columbia, where, since 1947 he held
the rank of full professor. Early in
his career he discovered an absorbing
interest in architectural history and
a gift for writing about it. The result
was a whole series of articles and
books, culminating in his biography
of BENJAMIN HENRY LATROBE, pub-
lished last year and this year the
winner of the coveted Pulitzer prize.
Talbot Hamlin retired from the
Columbia teaching staff two years ago
and had picked Miami as his home
locality, the South Florida Chapter
as his Florida professional affiliation.
The association promised much for
all architects in Florida, for retire-
ment could not stop the scholarly
habits of a lifetime, nor the natural
bent of this gentle, but persistent
man to search for truth and to clarify
deviations from it as he found them.
That search and the wisdom which
evaluated its results will be missed.







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3590 N. W. 52nd Street, Miami Phone: NE 4-1749


NOVEMBER, 1956 55












2nd Annual Roll-Call ---1955-1956



Listed here are the firms which have helped this Official Journal of the FAA

grow in breadth of service during the past year. Through their advertisements

they seek opportunity to work with building designers toward the development
of better buildings, a sound industry and a stable prosperous future.


ARTEX ENGINEERING COMPANY
Summerville, So. Carolina
Panel Walls
Agency-Tom Daisley
Columbia, So. Carolina
ALUMINUM INSULATING CO., INC.
5706 W. Flagler Street, Miami
Distributor Alumiseal reflective and
vapor barrier materials.
ARMOR-FLEX PRODUCTS
2111 So. Andrews Ave., Ft. Lauderdale
Factory distributor "Hermosa" Tile,
Bennett-Ireland, Inc., "Spun-Lite"
Fiberglass and "Miracle" Adhesive.
BRUCE EQUIPMENT COMPANY
24 N. W. 36th St., Miami
Electronic Sound Systems
BLUMCRAFT OF PITTSBURG
460 Melwood St., Pittsburg, Pa.
Aluminum Railings
BURNUP & SIMS, INC.
505 Park Street, W. Palm Beach
Distributors of Pumice Aggregate.
Suppliers of building materials for
construction.
CEMENT ENAMEL OF THE
CARIBBEAN, INC.
254 Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables
Wall surfacing
COOL ROOF OF AMERICA, INC.
101 Andalusia Avenue, Coral Gables
Plasticized cement-base roof coating
DIXIE STYLE
4800 N. W. 37th Ave., Miami
Contract furnishings and interiors.
Agency-Bishopric Green and Fielden,
Inc., 3361 S. W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 11th Street, Hialeah
Slumped brick, decorative masonry
materials
DWYER PRODUCTS CORPORATION
Michigan City, Indiana
Dwyer Cabinet Kitchens
Agency-Knowlton-Washburn Co.
123 No. Sangamon St., Chicago, Ill.
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING CO.
OF FLORIDA
2433 Central Ave., St. Petersburg
Electric heating systems
EXECUTONE DISTRIBUTORS
404 Eunice Street, Tampa
224 Alcazar Ave., Coral Gables
2070 Liberty St., Jacksonville
220 No. Orlando St., Winter Park


FARREY'S WHOLESALE HARDWARE
CO. INC.
7225 N. W. Seventh Avenue, Miami
Doors, fixtures and locks.
FLORIDA FOUNDRY & PATTERN
WORKS
3737 N. W. 43rd Street, Miami
Ornamental castings
FLORIDA GENERAL SUPPLY CORP.
1310 Flamingo Way, Hialeah
Air Conditioning
FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
INC.
1827 S. W. 8th Street, Miami
Oil and gas heating
Agency-Bevis Associates, Adver-
tising, Ingraham Building, Miami
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
DIVISION
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa
Manufacturers of cement
Agency-R. E. McCarthy & Assoc.,
Inc.
206 So. Franklin Street, Tampa
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Miami, Florida
Electric Utility
Agency-Grant Advertising, Inc.
201 S. W. 13th Street, Miami
FLORIDA STEEL PRODUCTS, INC.
215 South Rome Ave., Tampa
Reinforcing steel and accessories
Steel and aluminum windows
GATE CITY SASH & DOOR COMPANY
15 S. W. Third Avenue
Ft. Louderdale, Florida
Jalousies and awning windows
Agency-J. Walter Thompson Co.,
430 Lexington Ave., New York City
GLASS DOORS, INC.
2477 West 4th Ave., Hialeah
Lumidor aluminum sliding doors
GRANCO STEEL PRODUCTS CO.
2651 Euston Rd., Winter Park
Steel building products
Agency-Gardner Adv. Co.,
915 Olive St.-St. Louis, Mo.
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
"B" & "G' Aluminum awning windows
THE HAYWARD EQUIPMENT
CORPORATION
718 Broadway, Daytona Beach
Heating and cooling equipment
HOLLOSTONE COMPANY OF MIAMI
480 Ali Baba Avenue, Opa Locka
Precast concrete products


HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS
Winter Park
Concrete products
Agency David H. Obermeyer
620 W. Robinson Ave., Orlando
INSUL-MASTIC OF MIAMI, INC.
275 S. W. 6th Street, Miami
Corrosion proofing
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc.
503 Ainsley Bldg., Miami
INTER-STATE MARBLE & TILE CO.
4000 No. Miami Avenue, Miami
Marble and ceramic tile
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc.
503 Ainsley Bldg., Miami
JACKSONVILLE METAL & PLASTIC CO.
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville
Architectural signs of aluminum
and plastic
JO ITALIAN CERAMIC CORP.
241 Pan American Bank Bldg., Miami
Ceramic tile
Agency-Bishopric, Green and,
Fielden, Inc.
3361 S. W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
LEAP CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland, Florida
Prestressed concrete units
Agency-Sanborn Adv. Agency
P. 0. Box 949, Lakeland
LUDMAN CORPORATION
No. Miami
Agency-Biscayne Advertising
2138 Biscayne Bldg., Miami
MAGIC CITY SHADE & DRAPERY
CORP.
297 N. E. 67th St., Miami
Custom bamboo and wood draw drap.
series, fabrics for architectural use.
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC.
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Concrete and building products
Agency-Robert & Clarke & Asso. Inc.
4017 San Amora, Coral Gables
MIAMI WINDOW CORPORATION
5200 N. W. 37th Avenue, Miami
Aluminum awning windows
Agency-The Rolfe Asso. Inc.
Langford Bldg., Miami
MIRACLE ADHESIVE SALES CO.
City Center Bldg., Lake Worth
Miracle Adhesives
MILLER ELECTRIC CO. OF FLORIDA
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville
Electrical contractors


56 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








MOORE PIPE & SPRINKLER CO.
P. 0. Box 4248, Jacksonville
Automatic sprinkler systems
PALMER ELECTRIC COMPANY
Box 7636, Orlando
Electrical contractors
PERLITE INCORPORATED
285 West 9th St., Hialeah
Lightweight aggregate
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
227 No. Main St., Orlando
Portland cement
Agency-Roche, Williams & Cleary
Inc., 135 So. LaSalle Street, Chicago
PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP.
Berkeley, California
Lighting fixtures
Agency-John O'Rourke Advertising
Flood Bldg., San Francisco, Calif.
A. H. RAMSEY & SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th Terrace, Miami
Architectural woodwork and supplies
SATCHWELL ELECTRIC CONSTRUC-
TION CO.. INC.
2922 Old St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
Electrical contractors
SISTRUNK, INCORPORATED
400 N. W. 71st Street, Miami
West Indies Shutters
SOUTHERN VENETIAN BLIND
COMPANY
1727 N. W. 28th Street, Miami
Architectural shutters & drapes __
Agency-Hoite Agey Advertising
First Nat'l Bnk. Bldg., Miami
TILE DISTRIBUTORS INC.
130 19th Street South
St. Petersburg, Florida
Hermosa Tile
TROPIX-WEVE PRODUCTS
350 N. W. 52nd Street, Miami
Woven wood doors
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th Street, New York City
Interior and exterior plywood,
related products
Acency-Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc.
247 Park Avenue, New York City
UNIT STRUCTURES, INC.
Peshtigo, Wisconsin
Glued laminated timbers
Agency-R. C. Breth, Inc.
Green Bay, Wisconsin
UNIVERSAL-RUNDLE CORPORATION
Morehouse Supply Co.-Miami, dists.
Bathroom fixtures
Agency-Geyer Advertising, Inc.
3rd Nat'l Bank Bldg., Dayton, Ohio
VULKAN, INCORPORATED
75 West 21st St., Hialeah
Structural steel units
VUN-RUSS COMPANY, INC.
1009 E. 16th St., Hialeah
Aluminum windows
Agency-Robert Hurwitz
2788 S. W. 32nd Ave., Miami
F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS COMPANY,
INC.
1690 Boulevard, N. E. Atlanta, Ga.
Masonry building materials, roofing,
tile, aluminum windows, roof decks




NOVEMBER, 1956


6at Architects






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Service architects demand they want to know about
it. And the best place to tell them is in THEIR VERY
OWN MAGAZINE . .

That's THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT the only mag-
azine of its kind in the State. It's the; Official Journal
of The Florida Association of Architects, representing
the ten Florida Chapters of the AIA. It's wholly owned
by the FAA, and goes monthly to every architect reg-
istered in Florida and also, by request, to registered
professional engineers.

It's edited solely for these men whose work controls
the spending in Florida's huge building business. They've
been called "the brains of building" for through draw-
ings and specifications they tell the great body of con-
struction what to use, and where, to develop the final
form of the building designs they constantly create . .

Architects themselves won't buy your products. But
their specifications control your sales. To help them
specify the product or service you offer, tell them about
it where they'll see it regularly HERE . .




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A New Approach ...
(Continued from Page 11)
the advantages of organized research
in all phases of the building process
must surely awake enthusiastic re-
sponse among all architects. In a
state such as Florida, in which the
construction of new buildings looms
so large in the total economy, the
design and implementation of such
a program must surely enlist the
whole-hearted participation of the
entire profession.
In moving to realize the archi-
tectural potentialities of the next
decade, it seems to this prospective
participant that Florida architects
enjoy not opportunity alone, but also
to an unusual degree the conditions
basic to its fulfillment. The economy
and population of the state are ex-
panding vigorously. The building in-
dustry is one of the most active in
the country. The profession is alert
and progressive. The University and
its administration display these same
qualities. Its School of Architecture
has built a firm reputation and is
fortunate in possessing a capable and
forward-looking faculty.
I am certain that each of its mem-
bers joins me in the sentiment that,
in inventorying our resources, in set-
ting our sights for the coming decade,
and in implementing whatever pro-
gram is selected, the counsel and
collaboration of the profession will
be sought and valued. WVith such a
spirit, I am confident that the years
ahead can be made to yield sound
and significant results for Florida
architecture and architectural educa-
tion.


Craft Opens Office
CHESTER LEE CRAFT, AIA, has
announced the opening of a new of-
fice for the general practice of archi-
tecture at 1427 Ponce de Leon Boule-
vard, Coral Gables, as of November
1st. The new office is the culmina-
tion of plans which have been de-
veloping since his resignation, the
first of this year, as the architect for
the Polk County Board of Public In-
struction, a position he had held
since 1952. Prior to that he had
served as Assistant State School Ar-
chitect and taught for two years in
the U/F College of Architecture. He
is a former secretary-treasurer of the
Florida Central Chapter.
NOVEMBER, 1956


Ornamental Castings of Quality




In Your 0
Files .

You can select
many standard
decorative
units from
our Catalog 52,
AIA File No.
15; or write us
for a new one.



Architectural use of fine metal castings is centuries
old but also modern as today! Our craftsmen work
in gray iron, bronze or aluminum. They will produce
special castings from your designs or you can
specify from a wide range of traditional patterns
in gray iron from stock.


FLORIDA FOUNDRY 3737 N. W. 43rd Street
Miami, Florida
- & PATTERN WORKS



Thin-set method is the jet-age


way of setting Ceramic Tile. It


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Visit our display
at the Convention
Product Exhibit.
Booth No. 73 . .


Florida Distributor:

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Lake Worth Phones: JU 2-6846, JU 2-6848


Inconspicuous ... until fire strikes!
The Moore Flush-Type Ceiling Sprinkler
provides inconspicuous fire protection 24
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1- The time to plan for fire protection is
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SCall in the Moore Engineer let
him show you the advantages of
Moore Automatic Sprinklers.

Moore Pipe & Sprinkler CompanyTAMPA MIAMIE






Florida


Northwest



Chapter


Launched





AIA Regional Director Herbert C.
Millkey makes it official as he pre-
sents the charter to Hugh J. Leitch,
president of the Florida Northwest
Chapter, Florida's tenth AIA member-


group and the third
chartered this year.


Florida Chapter


Last May, at its pre-convention
meeting in Los Angeles, the AIA
Board of Directors approved an appli-
cation for a new Florida chapter. It
was the tenth such group to be formed
in the State and the third AIA chapter
within the year to be formally wel-
comed to the AIA fold through pre-
sentation of a charter by a Regional
Director of the Institute.
For the Northwest Chapter, head-
quartered at Pensacola, this significant
event took place on the evening of
October 2, 1956. Place was the ban-
quet room of Martine's Restaurant,
Pensacola; and when President Leitch
called the meeting to order, a record
crowd had enjoyed cocktails and din-
ner as a preliminary to the charter-
presentation ceremonies. Civic inter-
ests were represented by Mayor C.
P. MASON of Pensacola and City Man-
ager OLIVER J. SEMMES, JR., who were
among the honored guests of the new
Chapter. Other guests included TILL-
MAN BURKS, secretary-manager of the
Pensacola Chapter of the Associated
General Contractors and HERBERT C.
MILLKEY AIA, of Atlanta, Regional
Director, who gave the principle ad-
dress of the evening and formally
presented the charter to HUGH J.
LEITCH who briefly acknowledged the
ceremony on behalf of his group.
Millkey noted that formation of


the new chapter was in line with the
planned expansion of Florida's AIA
organization which was set in motion
some three years ago as the result of
a study on re-districting made by an
FAA committee, headed by WILLIAM
T. ARNETT, of Gainesville.
"But this 10th Florida Chapter,"
said Millkey, "is also the result of the
great vitality of the building industry
in this State, the volume of which,
last year, was more than North Caro-


lina, South Carolina and Georgia.
"This vast amount of work creates
problems, within and without the pro-
fession, beyond the range of any indi-
vidual practitioner to solve. Hence
the importance of the Florida North-
west Chapter lies in the fact that it
provides an instrument of action for
attacking these problems.
"Of greater significance, it serves
as an official voice for the profession
in this area to which all citizens can


As members of the first roster elected by the Northwest group, the new
Chapter's officers have every right to look pleased. They are, from left:
James H. Look, treasurer, Samuel H. Marshall, director, Roger G. Weeks,
secretary, and Hugh J. Leitch, president. Anker F. Hansen is vice-president.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





come for counsel and information;
and through which you can provide
service to the city and county and
collaboration with the various facets
of the construction and design fields."
In commenting on the particular
need for directive as well as collabor-
ative effort in the building industry,
the speaker called on his audience to
shoulder the responsibility for such
effort. The architect's responsibility
is today greater than ever before, he
said, because of the great advances
in building technology and the fact
that architectural practice has kept
well abreast of such advances.
"I don't believe that the average
architect-and certainly not the pub-
lic-realizes just how far in the fore-
front we are in this respect," declared
Millkey. "The profusion of new con-
struction techniques and materials, our
new uses for old materials and their
effect on planning, economics, insur-
ance rates, mortgages, etc., make it
impossible for anyone but the archi-
tect to evaluate."
Millkey touched on the activities
of the "package dealer" which is now
a subject of study by an AIA com-
mittee, newly appointed in the early
part of this year. He characterized
such activities as not giving "value to
the owner for the building dollar;"
and observed that the "package
dealer" uses one type of construction
to solve all types of building problems,
however inefficient or wasteful might
be the result.
As one illustration of this point,
the speaker cited the case of a five-
story office building on a 40-foot lot.
Two and one-half feet, or five percent
of this width were exterior walls. But
the wall thicknesses could easily have
been reduced to a total of six inches,
thereby increasing the rentable area
four and one-half percent-or enough
to pay the interest on the mortgage.
The AIA official called for a
broader base of professional opera-
tion in line with the growth and
expanding economy and interests of
the country. And he particularly urged
upon members of the new Chapter
an active participation in community
activities and public life.
The Charter presentation arrange-
ments were made by ULA F. MAN-
NING as chairman of the Chapter's
Program Committee. Press coverage,
both before and after the affair-and
including this report-was handled by
F. TREADWAY EDSON.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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NOVEMBER, 1956







, BUILDERS' ROSTER..
1111I lll llIII llulI1111 1111 1111111111II111illllllllll11111111111 111iiu ll llIII lil1 111111111111111111111Illl lllllII11111111111111111111111111111111
Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in their
locality or are trade association members of recognized standing. AGC-Associated General
Contractors; FAEC-Florida Association of Electrical Contractors; ACt-Amer. Concrete Institute;
NCMA-Natl. Concrete Masonry Assoc.; NRMCA-Natl. Ready-mixed Concrete Assoc.; FCPA-
Florida Concrete Products Assoc. C-Person to contact.


- CHARLOTTE COUNTY -
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC

DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John L. Avant, Pres.-AGC

Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC

- DUVAL COUNTY-
INDUSTRIAL & HEAVY
Henry G. Dupree Co.
1125 Kings Ave., Jacksonville
Phone: FL 9-6622
C-Henry G. DuPree, Pres.-AGC

- PALM BEACH COUNTY -
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC


Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W. Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.
CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501 Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Pres.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
- PINELLAS COUNTY
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC
- VOLUSIA COUNTY
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C-Hugo Quillian, Partner-AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI
- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


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Contracting . Fixtures . .
Appliances . Heating
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PALMER ELECTRIC COMPANY


523 Park Ave., No.
Phone 5-4471
WINTER PARK


ADVERTISER'S INDEX


Artex Engineering Company
Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc..
Armor-Flex Products . .


Bruce Equipment Co.
Builders' Roster
Burnup & Sims

Cement Enamel of the
Caribbean, Inc.

Dunan Brick Yards


2
. 39
* 47


. . 4
. . 62
. . 58


3rd Cover


Electrend Distributing Co.
Executone Distributors . .

Farrey's Wholesale Hardware
Co., Inc . . ..
Florida Foundry & Pattern Wks.
Florida General Supply Corp. ..
Florida Home Heating Institute
Florida Portland Cement
Florida Power & Light Co..
Florida Steel Products Co.


52
. 54


. 63
59
10
8
20
48
47


Gate City Sash & Door Co. 4th Cover
G'ass Doors, Inc. .. 43
Granco Steel Products Co. . 18
George C. Griffin . . . 17

The Hayward Equipment Corp. 26
Hollostone of Miami . . 3

Interstate Marble & Tile Co . 1 1

Insul-Mastic of Miami, Inc . 45

Jo Ceramics . . . 6 and 7

Magic City Shade & Drapery Co. 16
Maule Industries . . 2nd Cover
Miracle Adhesives Sales Co. . 59
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Co. . 59
Morehouse Supply Company . 40

Palmer Electric Co. . ... 62
Perlite, Inc. . . . . 5
Portland Cement Assoc. . .. 49
Prescolite . .. . .. .. 63

A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. 50 and 51


Satchwell Electric Const. Co.
Sistrunk . .
Southern Venetian Blind Co.

Tropix-Weve Products

U. S. Playwood Corp.
Unit Structures . .

Vulkan, Inc. . .
Vun-Russ Company, Inc.
F. Graham Williams Co. Inc.


52
. 47
2

. 55

. 53
. 46

. 54
42
61


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


316 W. Colonial
Phone 5-7551
ORLANDO


I








Producers' Council Program


The Miami Chapter will be much
more directly involved with the
FAA's 42nd Annual Convention than
many FAA members might be expect-
ed to realize. President NICHOLAS
NORDONE has announced that the
Chapter has underwritten the cost of
bus transportation from Gainesville to
Miami for the entire Student Chap-
ter Associates of the AIA at the U/F
College of Architecture and Allied
Arts. The trip to and from Conven-
tion headquarters at the Seville HIo-
tel, Miami Beach, will be available
also to those college instructors and
professors whose schedules will per-
mit them to make the trip.
Details of the arrangement are be-
ing coordinated by MYRL HANES,
AIA, member of the Florida North
Central Chapter in Gainesville, and
President Nordone in Miami.
In addition, of course, a good num-
ber of Producers' Council firms are
represented in the Exhibit of Build-
ing Products at the Convention. It
is hoped that each exhibit of a mem-
ber firm or its Florida representative
will indicate Producers' Council mem-
bership through display of the or-
ganization's characteristic symbol.
Since this symbol was adopted many
years ago, it has come to signify
"quality" in building products of al-
most every type as the AIA seal has
been established as the mark of tech-
nical competence and professional in-
tegrity.
The evening of October 23 was
slated for the Miami Chapter's sec-
ond informal meeting of the 1956-57
season. Place was the Coral Gables
Country Club; and the Otis Elevator
Company was the sponsoring organ-


Future on Wheels
(Continued from Page 16)
both size and character of parking
facilities. Such regulations can obvi-
ously influence the character of a
building-can affect the percentage
of its land-coverage and the extent to
which it may include parking areas
within the structural envelope.
All such factors are subiect to a
thousand variations according to the
force of local community conditions,
NOVEMBER, 1956


ization. The meeting was chair-
manned by President Nordone who
turned it over to T. U. BERMINGHAM
of the Otis company. Bermingham
spoke briefly about the influence of
modern vertical transportation on
multi-story building design; and then
showed two full-color slide films with
a coordinated sound track which ex-
plained operation of the relatively
new Otis "Autotronic" elevator and
discussed the advantages of "operator-
less" elevator control in terms of
building operation economics.
Reminder . .
The Caravan of Home Building
Products, the Producers' Council na-
tionally-sponsored travelling exhibit,
is due for an all-day showing at Mi-
ami's Bayfront Auditorium on No-
vember 20. All architects, home
builders and contractors are invited
to view it. At Jacksonville the Car-
avan showing will be at the Roosevelt
Hotel on November 29.
Idea for Meeting . .
A number of Florida AIA archi-
tects have privately suggested that the
two Florida Chapters of the Produc-
ers' Council take a cue from their
national organization and work out
meeting schedules so that both can
join in a big annual "convention"
meeting timed in conjunction with
the Annual FAA Convention. The
idea is too good to keep under wraps.
Admittedly it would take some read-
justment of yearly plans on the part
of both Miami and Jacksonville Chap-
ters. But it might serve to strength-
en contacts between producers and
specifiers of quality products, thus
over-shadow possible disadvantages.


probable future developments and the
overall economics of a building pro-
ject. But this central fact should be
clearly understood and faced by archi-
tects: Traffic-now and more in the
future-is an inevitable part of any
urban pattern. It cannot be elimi-
nated; it should not be ignored. And,
in the hands of those architects who
will work with their local traffic
experts lies one additional hope of
controlling, if not completely solving,
the problem which it represents.


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in conference...







Prologue


to Progress



By T. TRIP RUSSELL


On the eve of the 1956 Convention of the Florida
Association of Architects, many of us who have been
a long time in Florida will recall another such con-
vention, an eon or more ago, of which this is an
anniversary.
The Convention ended in a banquet in the gar-
den of a hotel in Palm Beach. The air bore a hint
of the chill of early winter. The moon was full, or
nearly so, and rode high over a calm sea. Architects
and their wives talked gaily of the good year that had
passed and their plans for the year to come.
The Convention had been a lively one. For the
first time the voice of the younger architects had
carried weight; and the newly elected young officers
were filled with plans for broadening the scope of our
professional organization and bringing to it a new
spirit of fellowship. True, there was uneasiness in
the air. The madness that had broken out in Europe
filled us with dismay. But, somehow, on that lovely
December night Europe seemed far away.
Tired from the gaiety of the night before and the
long drive home, most of us slept late the next morn-
ing. From the clear beauty of the night before, the
weather had changed to threatening storm. Half
somnolently we made our morning coffee and
skimmed the Sunday paper. Someone idly turned on
the radio. The voice of the announcer trembled
slightly, but the words were clear enough. Thus in
a few moments on December 7, 1941, the world in
which we lived and hoped and planned only a few
hours before, lay shattered at our feet.
I do not know if there was a Convention four


years later in 1945, as architects, released from the
unwelcome tasks in which they had been engaged,
returned to take up again the work for which they
had been trained and which they dearly loved. The
soiled ribbons on their battle jackets bore little stars
with strange names Salerno, the Ardennes, the
China Sea. Feet that were at home on the streets of
London, Recife, Melbourne, found the pavements of
Miami strange. Miami had not changed, but the
architects would never again be quite the same.
Eleven years have now passed since that time -
years of almost unbroken progress in our profession.
The architects' position in the community has stead-
ily increased in importance. The public is more and
more conscious of the things the architect can offer
for civic betterment. We are ourselves touched with
a deeper awareness of our duty to the community.
There have been setbacks, isolated islands, that have
rebuffed our efforts but the surge has been for-
ward. The public image of the architect in an ivory
tower is gradually being replaced by the image of
the architect as the planner of the future.
It is certain that much must still be done. But
we must not let the magnitude of the objective blind
us to the fact that in fifteen years we have come a
long way. In that, I think, we may be allowed a
moment of quiet pride. God grant that the future
holds for us no such ordeal as the one on the thresh-
old of which we stood fifteen years ago. But come
what may, we have at least learned that our profes-
sion has given us a training and a skill to place at
the service of our country in peace or war that
will earn us a place among its most honored citizens.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























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