• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Keep cement blocks dry to prevent...
 Manatee county plans
 Craft arts in design - Interview...
 New tamped concrete footing is...
 News and notes
 Ladies AIA auxiliary maps expansion...
 Progress report, 1956 conventi...
 Advertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Editorial: Poor service is poor...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00027
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Keep cement blocks dry to prevent wall cracks
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Manatee county plans
        Page 7
    Craft arts in design - Interview with Edwin T. Reeder, AIA
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 12b
        Page 12c
        Page 12d
    New tamped concrete footing is substitute for piling
        Page 13
    News and notes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Ladies AIA auxiliary maps expansion plans
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Progress report, 1956 convention
        Page 22
    Advertisers' index
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Editorial: Poor service is poor public relations
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.








I I I
5c1[1 k

flaqa rctr


September
1956




.,.C.

Craft Arts...
What is their place in archi-
tectural design in Florida?
In another F/A Interview,
Edwin T. Reeder, AIA, dis-
cusses the question and
outlines a pertinent and
provocative approach to a
contemporary and eco-
nomic answer . .











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IAN U LE


71






OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
~-"l 1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch .. North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
William B. Harvard Central Florida

DIRECTORS
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
Daytona Beach .William R. Gomon
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Florida North . Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
Fla. No. Central Albert P. Woodard
Florida South Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland
Jacksonville . .George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
Mid-Florida .. Francis H. Emerson
Northwest Florida William S. Morrison
Palm Beach rederick W. Kessler
George J. Votaw

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421
SEPTEMBER, 1956-- -


Florida Architect


VOLUME 6


SEPTEMBER, 1956


NUMBER


CONTENTS

Keep Cement Blocks Dry to
Prevent Wall Cracks .-----..--..___-------:------__

Manatee County Plans .----- ----------- 7

Craft Arts in Design ----..----... ---------------- 8
Interview with Edwin T. Reeder, AIA

New Tamped Concrete Footing is
Substitute for Piling 1--- ---------------1

News and Notes -----


Ladies AIA Auxiliary
Maps Expansion Plans ---

Progress Report, 1956 Convention


-- ---20

22


Advertisers' Index


Producers' Council Program


Editorial -----
Poor Service Is Poor Public Relations'


-------24


3rd Cover


THE COVER
Decorative sculpture like this which adorns the Time and Life Building
in New York's Rockefeller Plaza is "usually not practical to consider,"
says Edwin T. Reeder, AIA, in an F/A Interview beginning on page 8.
It stands eleven and one-half feet high and was carved from laminated
pine. The sculptor was Carl Milles. Photograph is from a book on
American decorative art by E. Bitterman, courtesy of the Reinhold
Corporation.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor -Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
S. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.







iU Keep Cement Blocks Dry



STo Prevent Wall Cr

'W. :$'O
al '
A- J'ili~i.


" l Due partly to its inherent stability
and partly to its ready availability
compared to other structural mate-
rials, concrete has found an almost
automatic acceptance for almost every
S type of building in Florida. But in
spite of the fact that it has been used
in one form or another for well over
2000 years, modern evidence is con-
S tinually cropping up to prove that
architects, engineers and builders
alike still have much to learn about


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BELMAR DRAPES replace
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For example, take the question of
cracks that so often have appeared in
cement and concrete block walls. For
years they have plagued every one
concerned. The architect has blamed
the mason; the mason the block
manufacturer. And the block manu-
facturer has come back at the archi-
tect to cite poor job supervision as
the chief reason for wall cracking.
Actually, say modern concrete re-
search authorities, all are partially to
blame. And the solution to this
heretofore vexing structural problem
lies in a common understanding of
what causes the cracks-and in con-
tinuing collaborative effort to elim-
inate the cause.
Briefly, the chief cause of cracking
in concrete block walls is moisture,
according to the most recent deter-
minations of the concrete technicians.
If blocks contain much over 30 per
cent relative humidity, they say,
shrinkage after the wall is finished
may be sufficient to cause cracks.
The higher the moisture content of
the block, the greater the possibility
of cracks eventually showing up in
the finished wall.
Some old-timers may find this
somewhat confusing. For many years
it was commonly believed that wet-
ting block before laying increased the
bond of the mortar with the block.
And masons universally recognized
the fact that laying was quicker,
with mortar flowing more smooth-
ly, if block were dampened. So, the
present recommendations are an


almost complete reversal of past
practices.
Thus, some about-face on the
part of designer, builder and sup-
plier is needed to finally cure a con-
dition that none of them like to
think about. Here are the steps
needed to assure the elimination of
cracks in cement or concrete block
walls. Recently reported was an ex-
perience by Reynolds Smith and
Hills, Jacksonville architects and en-
gineers, which proved the worth of
these precautionary steps in the con-
struction of crackless walls after other
efforts to produce them had been
tried with common failures.
1. . The architect must specify
the type of block to be used and its
maximum allowable moisture con-
tent. It is no longer good enough
to specify merely "concrete block."
There are too many available kinds,
with varying mix-formulas, varying
weights, varying strengths, varying
methods of manufacture. Light
weight blocks are more subject to
shrinkage than heavy-aggregate blocks.
But an important qualification to this
statement is the proportion of cement
contained in the mix and the meth-
ods used for curing and storing.
2.. Dry job-storage must be re-
quired. This is a dual responsibility
of builder and job superintendent or
field supervisor. Once adequately
dry, a concrete block will not quickly
change moisture content unless
directly exposed to wetness. Thus,
protecting materials at the job is an
important and constant necessity.
3. . Test-check the moisture-con-
tent of blocks furnished to the job.
This can now be done by any com-
petent local testing laboratory accord-
ing to a new quick method developed
by the Portland Cement Association.
It would not only constitute a speci-
fication check relative to performance
by the supplier, but would also indi-
cate whether blocks were sufficiently
dry to be used in walls.
(Continued on Page 4)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


icks




































- .. .


Store and apartment building, for which Henry E. Brown, Jr., was the architect, utilizes Hollostone pre-
cast stairs and Hollostone Twin T units, the latter forming a 9-foot cantilever balcony and roof overhang.


The increasing use of Hollostone in commercial and residential
design is evidence of that. As with industrial construction,
these versatile pre-cast units can bring good looks and overall
economy to almost any type of home-or-business building . .


SEPTEMBER, 1956 3












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Cement Blocks ...
(Continued from Page 2)
Until the importance of such qual-
ity factors is generally understood by
both suppliers and builders, the re-
sponsibility for assuring adherence to
them rest chiefly on the architect's
shoulders. The answer, of course,
starts with the specification and ends
with the assumption of a more care-
ful and specific supervision-if not
superintendence-of the vital steps of
job progress.
As to the specification factor, sup-
pliers of concrete units are currently
the best source of information needed.
It is reported that at least one trade
association-Florida Concrete Prod-
ucts Association-is now compiling
a manual of technical information
relative to block types, characteristics,
formulation, etc. With most of the
suppliers now members of this or-
ganization, it should soon be possible
for an architect to write a definite
specification easily and with confi-
dence that it can be as easily met by
suppliers.


One possible answer to this tech-
nical problem of wall-cracking is now
being researched by a number of
progressive concrete block manufac-
turers in Florida. It involves an im-
proved process of curing the blocks
through the use of high-pressure
steam. This is called "autoclaving";
and the net result is generally to pro-
duce a denser, more stable block, less
subject to swelling or shrinkage.
Though not yet adopted by any
Florida block manufacturing, auto-
claving is not precisely new as a
means for overcoming some of the
construction ills that have been laid
at the doorstep of cement and con-
crete block. Interest in the process
by block suppliers in ever section of
the State is reported high-with at
least one mid-state plant actively
experimenting with a pilot operation.
Autoclaving is a process by which
green blocks are taken from the form-
ing machine and subjected to treat-
ment by steam at high temperatures
and high pressures. Blocks are passed
through a huge tube-akin to a kiln
for the firing of ceramic tile-in
which they are cured, ready for use
in construction, in about teel'e
hours. During this time steam pres-
su:rts are gr.adulalh built tup to soMe


150 lbs. per square inch. The result
is a chemical development in the
block that shows marked improve-
ment in characteristics of those under-
going the autoclave treatment com-
pared with those processed under
currently usual caring methods.
For example, compressive strength
is increased some 20 to 25 per cent.
Density is also increased-hence less
susceptibility to moisture absorption
-and shrinkage is cut approximately
in half. Also, the steam treatment
seems to stimulate chemical action of
the cement so that mix proportions
can be adjusted to a lower cement
content while still maintaining high
strength and density factors.
With color admixes now an ac-
cepted and growing trend in block-
making, the autoclave curing process
promises to make color-surfaced
block vastly more practical and per-
manent in effect than formerly.
Colors appear to be sealed into the
pores of the block; an extremely
small amount of color is required in
the mix, since the autoclaving pro-
cess appears to heighten color. Units
made with ordinary dark gray cement
have appeared nearly white after
autoclaving. And tests on colored
units have shown a marked lack of
effloresence. However, specifications
on color must be carefully handled,
since some colors will bleach out dur-
ing autoclaving.
It is too early to state definitely
whether this new concrete block pro-
cessing will produce any cost econ-
omy to match improvement in over-
all quality of concrete units. At
present costs for autoclaved units
have been slightly higher than others,
though comfortably offset by the im-
proved values such units can bring
to construction. Estimates of costs
for Florida indicate that the auto-
claving process will add approximate-
ly one-third of a cent to the manu-
facturing cost of a block. But sup-
pliers who are studying the method
for near-future installation in several
sections of the State apparently feel
that this higher processing cost will
ultimately be wiped out by the long-
run savings possible in both materials
and curing time. It has been esti-
mated that the added cost of auto-
claving will be offset by the cost of
cement saved in the block mix well
.within the period of the equipiiint
amortization.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























Sin a modern

college dormitory


THE modern trend in the use of LEAP prestessed concrete
double tees is perfectly exemplified in this new dor-
mitory for women at Florida Southern College,
Lakeland, Fla . Architect was C. Dale Dykema
of Redington Beach, St. Petersburg, and the
contractor was J. W. Ross of Miami

WRITE THE FRANCHISED YARD NEAREST YOU FOR NEW
LEAP CATALOG WITH TABLE OF LOADINGS AND COMPLETE
DETAILS:
Capitol Concrete Co., Jacksonville, Florida . Permacrete, Inc., Day-
tona Beach, Fla. . Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Lakeland, Fla ....
Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc., Pensacola, Fla .... Stress-
crete, Inc., Leesburg, Fla .... West Coast Shell Corp., Sarasota,
Fla. . R. H. Wright & Son, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.


*T.M. Reg.US Pat Off
timir4ete AA
Lakeland, Florida A
5


SEPTEMBER, 1956







'Twelve-foot Plywood---That's


what


we've been


needing!"


Full Height
"WESTAG"
Beautiful!


. 1n 'fl4 1VA


Versatility of Westag Plywood is suggested in this conference room in Black Limba.

Many imaginative designers have felt the need for full-
height panels devoid of premium prices and uncertain
deliveries .. .Now that need can be promptly filled.
Our growing stock of Westag Plywood in full, 12-foot
heights offers a variety of beautifully figured, fine
hardwood panels in both exterior and interior grades
and all usually specified thicknesses.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC.
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI---FRanklin 3-0811
Service to Florida's west coast is from our warehouse at Palmetto . Call Palmetto 2-1011
~


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


just






PSblre Relatloa in Patlcee---


Manatee County Plans


A new Planning and Zoning Commission is bringing order and control to
unincorporated areas, with Bradenton, the county seat, now well on the
march toward civic redevelopment -- and the sparkplug is an architect!


Scarcely more than a year ago, Man-
atee County, on the rapidly-growing
west coast of the State, was author-
ized by the 1955 Legislature to create
a much-needed Planning and Zoning
Commission. Today the County has
an inclusive zoning ordinance; areas
outside the nine incorporated com-
munities of the area are being rapidly
brought under its provisions; and Sec-
tion 20 of the ordinance starts with
this paragraph:
"All drawings and specifications for
any commercial buildings or places of
public assembly costing $10,000 or
more, shall bear the signature and seal
of an Architect or Engineer registered
in the State of Florida, and the name
of the owner or his agent, together
with a certification signed and sealed
by the, Architect or Engineer."
In addition, the city fathers of Bra-
denton, seat and chief community of
Manatee County, apparently im-
pressed with both the need and jus-
tification for better overall planning,
have authorized a comprehensive sur-
vey of the city's traffic and expansion
problems and a sweeping redevelop-
ment study of its entire waterfront
and civic areas. Public opinion, first
almost bitterly antagonistic to any at-
tempts toward planning and zoning,
now seems to be solidly behind such
plans. It appears probable that in
the near future, Bradenton, and most
other Manatee County incorporated
communities, will look with favor on
the adoption, as community ordi-
nances, of the county's provision rela-
tive to architectural and engineering
service as quoted in italics above.
Much of the credit for these ac-
complishments must be given to the
three young men who represent the
architectural profession in Manatee
County and who have worked unceas-
ingly in the interests of the people
with whom they live. They are SID-
SEPTEMBER, 1956


NEY R. WILKINSON, LEONARD GRIF-
FIN, and EDWARD D. WYKE, JR. A
fourth, RICHARD H. SLATER, recently
moved to Bradenton and is now work-
ing with them.
Sparkplug of the group is Wilkin-
son who moved to Bradenton from
Gainesville in July, 1953, to start his
own professional practice. Before a
year had passed he was up to his spare
time in community affairs and last
June was appointed to serve on the
newly created Manatee County Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission. Early
this year he was elected its Chairman.
His first job as a commissioner was
the drafting of a new zoning ordi-
nance. By November that had been
completed and Manatee County had
its first zoning and sub-division regu-
lations and a comprehensive plan was
underway for a large county area just
west of Bradenton.
But it wasn't easy! At a meeting
to discuss the first draft of the ordi-
nance the commissioners were con-


fronted with a delegation bearing a
petition in definite opposition to any
zoning attempt for their area. This is
the way Wilkinson handled that
problem:
"At the heat of the discussion, I
proposed to meet these people at a
conference called by them in their
own area-the purpose being to ex-
plain what zoning was, how it would
affect them and what our plans were.
The proposal was accepted; and at a
four-hour meeting the following week
a group of 200 finally voted unani-
mously to reverse their petition and
accept zoning in their area.
"This meeting proved a great deal
to everyone concerned. To property
owners it showed that zoning was
both necessary and de.srable' as an
overall protective measure. To us it
emphasized the fact that when peo-
ple know the facts, when they are
met on their own ground and when
they realize clearly what a measure
(Continued on Page 24)


YOUNG MAN IN A HURRY!
A resident of Florida since he was three
months old, Sidney R. Wilkinson, AIA,
coupled his life-long love of architecture
with a compelling urge to get things
done. Graduated in architecture from the
U/F in 1951, he worked with Goin and
Moore in Gainesville until registered in
1953, then moved to Bradenton to open
his own office. In a year he was First
V-P of the JayCees, a member of the
Contractors' Examining Board, director of
the Bradenton Boys Club, a member of
the Civitan Club and president of a 200-
member Sunday School Class. He is now
chairman of the Manatee County Plan-
ning and Zoning Commission. Married,
he presently has "three and one-half"
children.


S









INTER I

VIEW

with EDWIN T. REEDER, AIA





CRAFT ARTS IN DESIGN





0 -In his keynote speech at the
AIA Convention in Los Angeles,
Dean John E. Burchard deplored the
lack of decorative craft work on con-
: temporary buildings. Do you agree
with his comments relative to archi-
tectural design in Florida?
A -As I see it, our work in Flor-
ida is not suffering from any lack of
decorative crafts work. However, from
Dean Burchard's point of view--
or what I think is his point of view -
work of the decorative crafts is assum-
ing a considerably different character
than that of which he spoke. Illus-
ij itrative of that is the use of the ma-
chine to produce the decorative work.
The individual who manipulates the
;I machine to produce this work is what
we used to think of as an individual
craft artist.
Q --Do you mean that fabricating
organizations are replacing the indi-
vidual craftsmen? That decorative
metalwork, for example, is now being
x T produced by factory methods instead
of being hammered out by hand at a
forge?
A That's correct. And it's a re-
sult of our present economics. Though
buildings and building budgets keep
getting bigger, we don't have as much
to spend proportionally on decorative
work as architects did formerly.
Q-Do you think this economic sit-
uation is ruling out individual crafts-
Prodded by economic necessity and nurtured by new men in relation to architectural
machine processes, the decorative arts are achieving design?
new forms-as suggested by these free-form neon A-No, not as such. But the
lights in a Milan, Italy restaurant. Photo is from
Paul Damaz' book, courtesy of Reinhold Corp. craftsman has assumed a different po-



8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





























sition in relation to the design. He
has become an individual who helps Rudi Rada
originally to create a motif. But that
motif will be translated in its final
form and material by use of a machine
which makes possible its repetition in
different scale and different materials
for a variety of applications in a
building.
Q--Iow would that work relative
to a sculptor, for example?
A Well, one of our buildings was
designed to make use of a sculptural
screen on the exterior to produce a
pattern of solids and voids. We work-
ed out* six motifs which were to be
repeated in different combinations
over the building. The sculptor mod-
eled them and made the original
molds which were then used to pro-
duce the required number of cast
stone units. There was sufficient va-
riety in the motif created by the
sculptor to produce a ripple of light
and shade and give us the effect we
wanted.
But the type of work that Lee Law-
rie did with Bertram Goodhue on the
Nebraska State Capitol is rarely possi-
ble today. A monumental effect
through use of multiple pieces of
sculpture -or even a single monu-
mental piece- is usually not practi-
cal to consider.
Q Is the trend of architectural Ezra Stoller
design tending to eliminate the type
of architectural sculpture Lee Lawrie
did?
A-No, not at all. I don't think
(Continued on Page 11)


Wall grouping in the new Maule building, Miami,
made with standard, machine-produced units which
are manufactured and sold by the company.


The decorative screen of this South Florida house by"
Edwin T. Reeder is composed entirely of standard
shapes of burned clay tile imported from Panama and
made by native craftsmen. Here one basic form is
used repetitively with telling effect.


SEPTEMBER, 1956 9










What does



SERVICE


1%^t ..



TO YOU?

At the very least it should mean
good workmanship good mate-
rials properly installed. That's min-
imum. And you have the right
to expect it from any electrical
contractor worthy of the name.
But with Satchwell, Service means
something more.
It means the diversified technical
knowledge needed to complete any
job given us from repairing a
lamp (our smallest) to the layout
and installation of the complex
electrical services and controls for
a huge paper mill. This, a recent
job, was one of our largest, with
the electrical work alone running
over $1,500,000.
Then there's experience. Our com-
pany has been in business continu-
Sously for 39 years-since 1917.
Our technical staff represents an
aggregate of more than 100 years
in their special fields of electrical
work. We know what quality is,
how to get it, how to build it into
all our jobs.
There's good organization, too.
That means team work, coordina-
tion between staff and field men,
keeping pace with schedules -
and keeping job performance high
and job costs low at the same
time.
That's what Service means to
Satchwell. It can mean the same
for you if you'll let us figure your
next job.



SATCHWELL
o ELECTRIC

CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY, INC.
2922 Old St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville
P. O. Box 5777 Phones FL9-1643-4-5


Sculpture Costs...


Charts permit computation of approximate
fees for sculptors and costs of stone carving
and bronze casting. They were developed by o'
averaging figures from sculptors, foundries og' 0
and carvers, based an examples illus- ._
treated. Prices may vary, however,
with individual sculptors. Use of
charts is mainly to provide a c .
general guide to sculp- o -
ture costs for budget
purposes.


0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1;
HEIGHTS OF FIG URES IN FEE




I.
SQUARE FOOT V1 __
AREAS

-^Bg




0 10 20 SO 40 50 60 70 80 9
Estimated prices for reliefs vary according to projections
of reliefs. For example, 2-inch projection in limestone
would cost $70 per sq. ft. A limestone relief up to
4-inches projection would cost $95 per sq. ft . .
Bronze casting reliefs up to 2-inch projection would
cost $60 per sq. ft. Up to 4-inch projection bronze
casting reliefs would cost $84 per sq. ft . These
costs do not include sculptors' fees nor costs of pedes-
tals, foundations and setting.


SIMPLE RELIEF


STONE BRONZE
FIGURE


COMPLEX


4' ,


-t 4!


1L--zLLAtI I I g*_oo
O 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 11 13 14 15 16
HEIGHTS OF FIGURES IN FEST
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


l19,000
,o000
17, 000


14,ooo
13,000


10. oo


9,000
8.000


6,ooo

5.ooo


-LL~ iii
lii


4,ooo
I. ooo


I I I


S. -1-


-
/V
I//

/
i/ i







Craft Arts . .
(Continued from Page 9)
the trend of design is limiting the
use of sculpture. The job budget
limits it. It's an economic question.
Q-Would that hold true relative
to work of other craft artists-as the
iron worker, wood carver, tile crafts-
man, muralist?
A-I think that, in effect, they have
assumed the same aspect as the sculp-
tor. For instance, Lee Lawrie took
an area, a design unt, and designed
multiple panels to fit that unit. Today
we take a design unit and try to de-
sign one panel to fit multiple uses.
It's slightly in the reverse. We are
necessarily confronted with a machine
operation; and we recognize that fact
and design for it.
The machine operation may actu-
ally give a more complete finish than
an individual workman could produce.
But we don't eliminate the craftsman
from the design. We can't eliminate
him, because, after all, he's the one
who has to operate the machine.
Q-Then the real function of the
craft artist today is to utilize new
production techniques to solve prob-
lems of design- including the eco-
nomic problem?
A- Yes. Our use of mosaics can
illustrate that point. Heretofore, mo-
saics were made by first designing the
mural, then cutting each little piece
of material--stone, glass, or what-
ever-to fit the design of the mural.
Today we make the mural fit tesserae
of standard sizes. Using these, the
craftsman designs his work to fit
the size of the unit he's going to do,
thereby speeding up his work. Be-
cause the machine has made stand-
ardized tesserae available, the mosaic-
mural craftsman can increase his pro-
duction. The same thing applies in
iron work and stone work. We use
the artist, but we use him to what we
think is better advantage--by utiliz-
ing the production possibilities of the
machine in conjunction with him.
Q-Then you evidently disagree
with those who say that the quality
of craft work is not what it was?
A- I violently disagree with that
viewpoint. I feel that today we have
just as fine craftsmanship as we have
ever had-at least in the particular
phase of it we are discussing. I can
see a great many faults to be found
(Continued on Page 12)
SEPTEMBER, 1956


'p


Decorative grilles on the
facade of Miami's Industrial
National Bank, by'Edwin T.
Reeder Associates, will be
of gold-anodized aluminum.
Machine-fabricated from an
original design, they offer
another example of how a
single motif can be adapted
to a multiplicity of panels.


Ezra Stoller


Smaller scale and protected
character of interiors widens
the range of use of decora-
tive craft work, makes eco-
nomically feasible use of
one-of-a-kind designs like
the bar-front tile strip and
the woven-wood cabinet
doors of the back bar.


Colorful glass tile has been used in decorative panels
on this Beverly Hills, Cal., house. Photo from a book
by E. Bitterman, courtesy of Reinhold Corp.







Craft Arts ...
(Continued on Page 11)
with the trades and their craftsman-
ship. And some branches of craft
art have almost died out. Wood
carvers, for example, are so scarce to-
day that we hesitate to use carving in
conjunction with woodwork. So we
bend other craft work to serve the
decorative purpose and try to stretch
the individual's talent over a wider
field than heretofore. That is possible
because of the machine advantage
and chemical advancements.
SQ-By that do you mean the plas-
tics field?
A- Yes plastics and paints and
adhesives. For instance, putting a
glass mosaic on a wooden rood screen
was practically impossible twenty years
ago. But it's no problem today. You
simply stick the glass on the wood
with one of the marvelous new ad-
hcsives.
Q--You seemed to imply before
that one of the architect's problems
was to utilize more widely the craft
skills that were still available? Is that
correct?


A--Well, that's almost correct.
There is a certain lack of craft skill.
We recognize that fact and design
for it. The practical lack of certain
talents has resulted in the use and
combinations of varied materials to
produce the decorative effects sought.
Q-Then your fundamental de-
sign thinking relative to the use of
the decorative crafts is necessarily lim-
ited by the availability of talent?
A-Yes, that's right. Here's an
example of that. In a number of
instances we have used wall paper in
place of other mural decoration. It
has served the purpose admirably, for
today's wall papers are designed large-
ly by distinguished artists who pro-
duce very handsome pieces of work in
a wide variety of character and color
combinations. That's another instance
of the craft designer utilizing the pro-
duction possibilities of the machine
to make results of his work applicable
to a vastly greater field of use.
As a matter of cold fact, there are
few artists today who work to produce
individual creations that are one-of-a-
kind things and never duplicated.
Economic limitations of major build-
ings are such that we rarely have the


privilege of working with them. Actu-
ally, I think, most artists are success-
fully working with manufacturers.
They have combined their craft talents
with the manufacturer's knowledge of
materials and have utilized his me-
chanical facilities to produce a tremen-
dous variety of beautifully designed
products. That's the over-powering
effect of the machine on our daily
life.
Q--Even though the decorative
concept and execution may be differ-
ent now from what it was, is there
still wide opportunity for employment
of craft talents in architectural design
in Florida?
A I believe so, within the eco-
nomic and technical limitations I've
touched on. It's my opinion that all
over the country today there's more
and more recognition of ,the fact that
a building doesn't accomplish every-
thing by being strictly utilitarian. It
must be beautiful, too, must give its
owner that swelling-of-the-chest pride
which you can't get from just a big
blob of concrete.
Of course, our decorative concept is
changing, too. Today we're confronted
with a vast new pallette of material-
(Continued on Page 20)


A4 &aierw to eat, 6Ceot, VCaof and V/ewtmn


That's ALUMISEAL the
special alloy aluminum sheet
(not foil) that reflects up to 97
per cent of radiant heat. The
ALUMISEAL system of con-
struction saves both space and
dollars, is proven and permanent
-and can hold inside temper-
atures down to minus 1250 F
ALUMISEAL can provide
the solution to many types of
low-temperature insulation prob-
lems. When you have one call
us for specification facts, en-
gineering details and installation
supervision.

Produce box, 40 x105 x 22 feet, is one
of nine rooms included in the 1,300,-
000 cu. ft. of refrigerated area of the
new Food Fair Warehouse at Miami.
Leslie B. Taylor was the engineer.

ALUMINUM INSULATING CO., Inc.
5706 W. Flagler St., Miami, Florida


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Trade Mark Reg. U.S. Pat. Office

ALUMISEAL
U.S. Patents Applied For




13c
Mr



Siramrsk ica1M
.. d made by CERAMICA JO0 MILANO r 8. M



the new

glazed ceramic

mosaic tile
for interior and exterior
decorative effects








Me l











Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach, designed by Morris Lapidus
Facade Covered with Ceramic Mosaic Tiles
Craze-proof Fade-proof Shock-proof
Frost-proof Non-absorbent
Over 150 Colors to Choose From

In Florida
Preciv.-;rely with
INTERSTATE MARBLE & TILE CO.
4000 North Miami Avenue Miami 37, Florida
Actual ize tiles PLaza 8-2571








A VERSATILE DECORATIVE MATERIAL
THAT OFFERS COMPLETE FREEDOM OF DESIGN
The wide color selection and subtle variations in surface
texture of Ceramica Venezia P. B. M. Glazed Ceramic
Mosaic Tile provide a distinctive, non-mechanical effect,
whether used in solid colors, in random-color patterns, or
in free shapes. This distinctive effect is due to the fact that
the tiles are hand colored and textured, so that no two
tiles are likely to be exactly the same.

Pictured below and on the cover ore a few typical instal.
lations.


Reception Hall The intermixing of colors on
the wall of this reception hall provides on inter-
esting effect. The free shape in the floor tile
adds a bright note that harmonizes with the
modern treatment
Hospital Entrance Blended tones and ab-
stract mural designs, together with the random
color floor, reveal the complete flexibility of
the tile in achieving distinctive decorative
effects in this view of a hospital entrance.
Supermarket The abstract mural of Ceramica
Venezia P. B. M. Glazed Ceramic Tile, set in a
frame pff brick, strikes a harmonious note for
this modern supermarket structure.

f '7a .aaii


Where
Ceromico Venezoi P 8 M.
Glazed Ceramnc Tile
Con Be Used
General facade 'o.rk
and ceramic murals or
hotels hospitals
other institutions
public buildings
Store fronts Swimming poo.s
Bolhroom & Corridor
walls dadoes
Table tops floors'


Hotel (front cover) Two vertical towers of
tile starting with a random mixture of dark tur-
queise and softly blending into a pale blue ac-
cent the luxurious front of the new Eden Roc
Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla., shown in full color on
the cover.


EXCLUSIVE
FLORIDA DISTRIBUTOR:


'A double glaze is applied Io ivle
Specifically ordered for floor use
in quantities of 200 square feet and
over at no extra charge




INTERSTATE MARBLE & TILE C
4000 North Miami Avenue Miami 37, Florida
PLaza 8-2571




the new glazed ceramic mosaic tile


Ceramica Venezia P. B. M. is a glazed ceramic tile made by
skilled Italian artisans in Milan. It is produced by a special
manufacturing process which develops a biscuit, glaze, and
texture of superior quality. The tile is guaranteed to be
craze-proof and highly resistant to fading.
Made in a wide variety of colors and textures, this versatile
decorative tile permits complete freedom of design for both
exterior and interior applications. Consultation and plan-
ning service is available in the creation of distinctive decora-
tive designs and murals.
An outstanding feature of the tile is the fact that it provides
the same or more glazed area on a /8" body than is found
on the ordinary %" body. This is especially advantageous in
facade applications, where weight is an important factor.
Because of the enduring nature of the material, Ceramica
Venezia P. B. M. Glazed Tile is one of the most economical
surfaces to apply. In cost it is well below the range of marble
and comparable exterior surface materials.

complete freedom of design Over 150 colors permit
full flexibility in the creation of any desired color scheme.
Random color mixtures in any desired blend can also be
supplied to order, mounted on approximately one square
foot paper sheets.
Insignias and trade marks, as well as abstract designs, can
be made on order in a geometric construction or hand painted.
Quotations on special designs will be made upon submission
of the design.

enduring beauty Results of exhaustive "torture tests"
performed by an authoritative testing and research laboratory
offer ample assurance of durability well beyond accepted mini-
mum requirements. The tests covered the following:
Resistance to Crazing. The presence of zirconium in the clay
body and a special manufacturing process permit an absolute
guarantee against crazing.
Resistance to Fading. The under-glaze colors baked into the tiles
insure stable color tones through years of service, both on
exterior and interior applications. A 300 hour weatherama
tegt proved negative.
Resistance to Freezing, Thawing and Absorption. 25-cycle laboratory
tests proved its unqualified resistance to freezing and thawing.
Additionally, acutal experience has shown superior resistance
to frost action under adverse conditions in such cities as
Montreal, Toronto, Stockholm, Copenhagen, in Switzerland
and in the United States... as well as providing ample evi-
dence of the non-absorbent character of the tile.
Resistance to Thermal Shock. High-temperature firing minimizes
internal stress and assures durable service under normal abuse.

flexibility of use The tile is equally suited to exterior
and interior use. Striking decorative effects can be achieved
on walls, dadoes, or floors.
Exteriors. Some outstanding installations include the facing
of the new town hall in Copenhagen and complete facades of
modern buildings in European, Canadian, and American
cities. One of the distinct advantages of the tile in exteriors
is its lighter body weight with the same or more glaze area
than ordinary tiles. This lighter body affords a substantial
reduction in the weight factor.




I o sample kit
A practical sample kit containing ac-
A' a tual tiles of most styles is available
Without cost to architects and builders.
Please write on letterhead for kit.


Interiors. Entrance halls, corridors, and bathrooms are practical
areas where the full color range of the tile can be drawn from
to achieve distinctive beauty. Most modern European ocean
liners have corridors and bathrooms as well as swimming
pools of this tile. Tables and table tops have been made of
the tile for distinctive decorative effects.
Floor Tile. The wide selection of finishes and availability of
special glaze permit interesting and practical floor installa-
tions. A selection of mottled styles are especially recom-
mended. Gold and silver-treated tiles, however, are not suited
for this service.
On orders specifying use for floors, a double glaze is provided
to insure maximum durability. Minimum orders for floor tile
with special glaze are 200 square feet.


shapes and sizes The standard size is %" x %", but all
color combinations are also available in 11/" x %" (at 10%
extra charge) and 11z" x 1%" (at 331/3% extra). All sizes
are mounted on approximately 12" x 12" paper sheets. A full
selection of caps, coves, and corners are available.


A B C D E

A. Bullnose
B. Double Bullnose
C. Cap
D. Cove


F


*G H


E. Out-Corner Cap
F. In-Corner Base
G. In-Corner Cap
H. Out-Corner Base


application methods The tile is mounted on approxi-
mately one foot paper sheets for easy application. It can be
set in cement or secured with suitable adhesives.
Conventional installation in a cement backing follows the
same procedure used for standard tiles.
When required, however, the tile can be applied to any dry
and true backing such as wood, masonite, cement plaster,
plaster, or gypsum board with miracle adhesives. Installa-
tions on dry wall construction in bathrooms, and on table
tops and bar backings have proved highly satisfactory. De-
tailed application instruction sheets are included with each
shipment of tiles.


maintenance A heavy rain is ample for cleaning most
exterior walls. Most styles of the tile can also be cleaned with
any ordinary cleanser, with or without abrasives. Styles
with gold or silver surfacing, however, should be washed with
mild soap and water only. Because 24 Kt. gold is used, these
colors have too low a melting point to be applied under the
glaze.


delivery About 50 styles are stocked in New York for
immediate delivery. Other styles are available within ap-
proximately 4 weeks from order. The sample kit, available
upon request, indicates those styles carried in stock.


design and planning service A special design and
consultation service is available to assist in planning distinc-
tive mosaic designs. This service includes the design and
execution of mural decorations as well as the design, execution
and setting of ceramic murals in large size panels. The murals
in free-form designs can be delivered painted on raw bisque
and fired at a net cost of $6 to $10 per foot.









































1.: l c2 1.







r- .- 11-. .,. +4
.I -11- MA
.*.. .

, ~..










li5 i
I~~
0* 0:







0O ** 0O :. **0

r~~ ~ ~~ I. Tk~~bI~I
.,j-






New Tamped Concrete Footing

Used As Substitute for Piling


A new footing design has been
developed by JOHN GRAVELEY, Jack-
sonville architect, for use particu-
larly in place of piling in wet, sandy,
or otherwise unstable soil conditions.
First used as the foundation system
for a small two-story office building
three years ago, the new type footings
are now being employed for the foun-
dation of a large church school struc-
ture and show a saving of 75 per
cent over use of conventional piling.
Essentially the footings are con-
crete, compacted within a metal form.
The form is a medium-heavy sheet-
steel cylinder, about four feet in
height and two feet in diameter at
the top, flaring to a three and one-
half foot diameter at the bottom.
Forms are placed in holes, leveled
and the holes back-filled around
them. If a high water table is en-
countered, well points are used to
keep the holes relatively dry until the
concrete is poured. After the cylin-
ders are filled with concrete, a six-


inch wooden pad is placed on top
and the mix compacted by three
blows from a 450-pound concrete
hammer dropped in a sheet-metal
guide.
The first blow compacts the mix
about six inches, the second about
two inches. After these two blows
the concrete is firm enough to reg-
ister only about one-half inch addi-
tional settlement on the third im-
pact. Forms are then filled to the
proper level.
Thus far, Gravcley has not used
any reinforcing steel at all in these
footings. Structural design of the
buildings involved calls for use of the
footings on 10-foot centers as bear-
ings for foundation beams; and the
architect feels that in such cases re-
inforcing is unnecessary. He says,
however, if the footings were to sup-
port columns, he would specify re-
inforcing and in the case of corner
piers would also design the footings
with dowels so framing members


could be tied integrally with them.
No special formulation of con-
crete is specified. That used on the
building now under construction in
Jacksonville is a 2500 psi mix with as
low as possible water-cement ratio.
Graveley says that concrete for foot-
ings containing reinforcing should be
a 3000 psi mix.
Actually this new-type footing is a
combination of a miniature caisson
and a spread footing. The real trick
of making this design the stable and
cost-saving one it has proved to be is
the use of hammer-blows to ram the
mix firmly into the forms. E. C.
KENYON, the contractor who is
working with Graveley on the new
church school building, has estimated
that use of the new footing design
will save the owner about 75 per
cent of the cost of a more conven-
tional foundation method. *
Size and design of the footings
were calculated by their designer
through application of a standard
piling formula. Two sizes are being
used in the present job, the smaller
being four feet deep by eighteen
inches at the top, flaring to two and
one-half feet at the bottom.


Specify Perlite because it'


S...


S1 ... Lightweight- Perlite aggregate is 1/10 the weight
' of sand, can save up to 30% deadload in structures.
2 2... Firesafe Perlite concrete won't crack or disinte-
grate when properly designed and placed, gives equal
protection with less material.
I' 3 ... Insulating -Each tiny Perlite cell fights passage of
heat, provides structural insulation to lower the costs
Sand capacities of air conditioning.
Your guide to
lightweight ... Acoustically correct Perlite Coralux acousti-
aggregate is -
this certificate cal plaster is an efficient sound-deadner that meets all
that guarantees
performance. Federal specifications.

SC I Our new plant is now in the process of development.
MEMER 9 When completed in the near future, it will triple our
CP.I present production of Perlite Lightweight Aggregate.
PRODUCER GUARANTEES THIS
SPERLITE PERLITE, INCORPORATED
MAN~fUFACTURED IN CONFORMANCE TO
ASTM C35-54T Phone TU 8-8791 for facts
:f.,. W. Tf2sto..2... PLANT: 285 W. NINTH STREET, HIALEAH, FLA.


Sll lllllllEPTEMBER, 195611111
SEPTEMBER, 1956 IS


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 11111111111111111111Illlllllllllllllltll






News & Notes


Florida Central
As chairman of this group's Chap-
ter Affairs Committee, JACK Mc-
CANDLESS, St. Petersburg, has made a
proposal to all Chapter members that
is unquestionably of more than local
interest. It concerns the overall im-
provement of Chapter meetings and
suggests "more discussion of basic
professional subjects" as the basis for
Chapter meeting programs which
would give "a real opportunity for
the profession to serve the public."
His proposal was contained in a
letter to all Florida Central mem-
bers. The major portion of it fol-
lows:
"There are many matters which
seem to cry out for concerted action
in the public interest. A few of these
are listed at random below; many
more will no doubt occur to you.
"l...We are all aware that the
strength of concrete depends to a
large extent on the water-cement
ratio. Too much concrete is being


poured at what might be called 100
per cent slump. If the concrete ar-
rives at the job in any other than an
absolutely liquid condition, more wa-
ter is likely to be added from the
tank on the truck before discharge.
"2...Really effective curing of con-
crete is almost unknown. The same
applies to the curing pf stucco and
terrazzo. As we all know, the Amer-
ican Concrete Institute recommends
that concrete be cured for at least 7
days, being kept wet preferably by
continuous spraying or ponded water.
Contrast this with the typical casual
covering with sand, perhaps wet down
once, or the large amount of con-
crete which receives no curing what-
ever.
"The situation as regards stucco is
even worse. Men who have appar-
ently worked all their lives in these
trades seem to be entirely unaware
that the continuous presence of water
is required in order for the cement
in these products to do its best job.
It is doubtful that there is a single


stucco job, at least in Pinellas Coun-
ty, which has been applied and cured
to the minimum, recommendations
of the Portland Cpnent Association.
"3...More and more good paint
materials are coming into use which
are required to be applied as received
in the can without thinning. Notice
to this effect is printed on the label
and also in many cases embossed on
top of the can. The manufacturers
do their part, often stating that the
material will be wasted unless used
according to direction. However,
many painters accomplish about a 10
per cent dilution, which they do not
even count, by using thinner to clean
out cans as they pour into the actual
paint bucket. Then, if the material
has any real or imagined stiffness in
application, it is further thinned.
The result is that the finished job
has very little relation to what the
manufacturer built into the product.
"4...No one small item seems to be
more appreciated by the public than
(Continued on Page 17)


MODERN HOME OWNERS WANT i X

MODERN ELECTRIC WATER HEATERS i













are easy to install. . need no flues or vents ........ can be tucked away
tVOg/ Oanywhere. Important, too .. electric water heaters are safe, clean,
4 -- 1 fast and economical. For added sales appeal-be sure it's electric.



FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY



4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































Build Type I Buildings at Moderate Cost

with Precast Concrete Structural Units

Substantial reduction in construction costs of Type I buildings can
be'nade by using a combination of concrete tilt-up walls and pre-
cast concrete structural members.
This fact was demonstrated in a 65 x 120 ft. two-story office
building erected for the Mutual Credit Bureau of Los Angeles.
Four types of precast concrete units were used: (1) two-story-
high interior columns, (2) girders to carry second floor and roof
joists, (3) floor and roof joists, (4) exterior wall panels.
The total erection time for the precast units was only seven
working days. The precast walls first were tilted into position and
braced. Next the precast interior columns were set up and the
girders hoisted into position. Then the precast concrete joists for
the second floor and roof were placed. Finally, concrete for the
second floor and roof was cast on metal forms.
Structures designed to utilize precast concrete units can be
built fast and at moderate cost. Like all concrete structures they
offer low maintenance cost, long life and low-annual-cost service.
In addition, they can be designed for great resistance to such
destructive forces as storms, quakes, decay, fire and blast.
For additional information write today for illustrated literature.
It is free but distributed only in the United States and Canada.


PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION.
227 North Main Street, Orlando, Florida
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of portland cement and
concrete through scientific research and engineering field work
SEPTEMBER, 1956


Large photo, completed building. Above Placing a roof
girder. Belows Placing a precast floor joist. Alec Arany,
engineers John K. Minasian, consulting structural engineer;
J. A. McNeil Company, Inc., contractor, all of Los Angeles.




















I


505 PARK STREET
WEST PALM BEACH
FLORIDA


all
Iurnup &
Dims*


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


T G% .&,S HAD A WORD FOR IT






The domes of the St. Sophia Mosque in Constantinople,
the Pantheon of Rome and many other magnificent
structures of the past are eloquent examples of the
durability of PUMICE Concrete. Built more than 2,000
years ago, they are still in perfect condition. ThePUM-
ICE aggregate fines combining with the free lime in
concrete contribute to the pozzolanic qualities. PUM-
ICE lightweight concrete continues to gain strength
indefinitely. PUMICE concrete has a range in strength
of 300 p.s.i. to 3,000 p.s.i. and a range in 28 day air
dry weights of 55 to 110 lbs. per cubic foot.
THE ONLY SUPERIOR LIGHTWEIGHT AGGRE-
GATE ECONOMICALLY AVAILABLE IN FLOR-
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FLORDA."
Pumice aggregate is stockpiled for IMMEDIATE DE-
LIVERY and is distributed by BURNUP & SIMS,
INC., in Florida and all Southeastern United States.




ff


~
~--
~I






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 14)
the silent mercury switch. The cost
of a mercury switch is measured in
pennies. They have been tested
through millions of cycles of use
without deterioration. Yet, because
of what appears to be a prejudice on
the part of many electrical contract-
ors, they are very difficult to get on
a job. If silent switches are insisted
upon, there is a tendency to substi-
tute -so-called 'silent' mechanical
switches which are far inferior to the
genuine article.
"Many more items could be listed,
but the above will illustrate the point.
It seems that we as Architects owe it
to the public to take immediate and
continuing action to correct such ap-
parent deficiencies. The program
might be set up as follows:
"1...Determine and agree upon
proper procedures in these questioned
areas. Research papers might be pre-
pared by members and presented for
discussion at future meetings.
"2...Let us take the time on jobs
which come under our control to see
that such matters are corrected. If
every Architect universally would in-


sist on proper concrete curing, for
instance, contractors, sub-contractors
and material men would be bound to
get the idea in time.
"3...\Ve might develop an educa-
tional program, bringing in contract-
ors, sub-contractors, mechanics and
material men and explaining what we
are trying to do-always with the
public interest uppermost in mind."

Florida South
Experimentation, they say, is the
mark of an inquiring mind. If that's
true, the meeting of August 14th
marked the collective mind of the
Florida South membership as having
a lively interest in sports as well as
architecture. For the program com-
mittee had tried an experiment a
talk by GENE ELLENSON, University
of Miami line coach on the subject
of "How To Build a Football Team."
By and large, the experiment was
a huge success. The speaker was in-
troduced by MORRIS MCLEMORE, 200-
pound-plus former footballer, ex-ar-
tillery Captain and sports editor of
the Miami Daily News, who himself
is just as comfortable in an after-din-


ner speaking spot as he is before a
typewriter on which he can size up
the season's chances of a ball club as
suavely as he can excoriate fight man-
agers for a mis-match or a poor con-
test. Ellenson rocked his audience.
lie had the belly laughs started dur-
ing his opening remarks; and they
continued throughout his speech -
not all of which was delivered for
verbatim reproduction in the public
prints!
But to most of his audience he
made a point clear. A winning foot-
ball team like a building is an
end-result. The coach is a designer,
too. He works with materials, too.
And though this material is not the
same as that which architects specify,
there is just as much sweat and tears
- and sometimes much more blood
- in building a successful team as
there is in the architect's work of de-
signing a successful building. Ellen-
son handled his assignment well; and
most of his audience enjoyed listen-
ing to him. But President TRIP
RUSSELL reported a comment which
proves that every architectural audi-
ence is merely a collection of individ-
(Continued on Page 19)


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SEPTEMBER, 1956 17










HIGHWAY BRIDGE in


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When completed, the Cortez bridge, near Sarasota, will be another strong
example of all-concrete construction. Prestressed-precast class "P" concrete
piling, 50' to 66' long, support the structure . Caps of class "A" concrete
are cast in place... The "D" type post-tension and pre-tension concrete girders
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Whether bridges or buildings, homes or highways, the modern trend is to
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FLORIDA DIVISION, TAMPA* SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
18 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes_-
(Continued from Page 17)
ualists. One member complained
that Ellenson's talk wasn't serious
enough!
It was a fun night that required
little formal action relative to busi-
ness matters. But as an experiment
in that type of Chapter meeting it
was generally rated as being success-
ful. The dinner meeting was at Chan
Lee's restaurant and was preceded by
the usual cocktail hour.
Florida Northwest
Since the formal approval of its
charter by the AIA Board of Direct-
ors at its meeting last June, the Chap-
ter has held two meetings. One was
an organizational gathering for the
purpose of selecting chapter officers
who were listed in the July issue of
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT. At the
other, the Chapter started off with
the right foot in holding a dinner
meeting at which those attending
heard a talk on public relations by
JUSTIN WEDDELL, formerly Public
Relations Director for the St. Regis
Paper Company and now head of his
own professional organization in Pen-
sacola.
Recently the Chapter has accom-
plished the next step in its program
by appointing Committees. Presi-
dent HUGH J. LEITCH has named the
following as members:
Membership: SAMNEL M. MAR-
SHALL, (ch.), JOHN BARADELL, JAMES
KENDRICK.
Chapter Affairs: ROGER G. WEEKS
(ch.), CLAY RIDGEWAY, R. DANIEL
HART.
Relations with Construction In-
dustry: FRANK J. SINDELAR (ch.),
HAMILTON AVERY, JAMES H. LOOK.
Public Relations: F. TREADWAY
EDSON (ch.), ANKER F. HANSEN, BAR-
NARD W. HARTMAN, JR.
Education and Research: R. DAN-
IEL HART (ch.), JAMES CROOK, F. R.
FRITZ.
Historic Buildings: CHANDLER
C. YONGE (ch.), ULA L. MANNING,
KARLVON STRASSER.
Program: ULA L. MANNING (ch.),
ELLIS BULLOCK, ANKER F. HANSEN.
Governmental Relations: WI.-
LIAM S. MORRISON (ch.), CARLTON
NOBLIN, DANIEL BRUNO.
The Florida Northwest Chapter
will be represented on the FAA Board
of Directors by WILLIAM S. MOR-
RISON.
SEPTEMBER, 1956


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Ladies AIA Auxiliary
Maps Expansion Plans
Less than a year and one-half ago
the first Auxiliary AIA Chapter was
formed at Lakeland. Charter mem-
bers were wives of members of the
Florida Central Chapter; and the
Lakeland meeting launched formally
a program of cooperative action on
the part of "architectural wives" that
has been spectacularly successful in
other states. Since that time the
group has adopted a constitution and
by-laws, has held a number of meet-
ings and is now well into its second
year as a going organization.
Officers originally chosen were re-
elected recently for second terms.
They are: MRS. A. WYNN HOWELL,
Lakeland, president; MRS. T. V. TAL-
LEY, Lakeland, vice-president; MRS.
A. G. PARISH, St. Petersburg, secre-
tary; and MRS. E. B. HADLEY, St. Pe-
tersburg, treasurer.
This pioneer women's group is the
nucleous of what can easily become a
state-wide AIA Auxiliary. Mrs. A.
Wynn Howell invites inquiries from
women of other chapter groups and
has offered full cooperation in help-
ing to develop the AIA Auxiliary pro-
gram on a state-wide basis. Her ad-
dress is: 2400 Circle Drive, Lakeland.
Purpose of the organization is "to
promote unification and advancement
of the profession, friendship and unity
within the group, and to stimulate
greater public interest in the work of
the architectural profession and its
capacity to be of service to the com-
munity." It has already shown its
value as an aid in arranging group
exhibitions and helping publicize local
chapter activities.



Craft Arts. ..
(Continued from Page 12)
and in addition with a growing num-
ber of new uses for old materials. We
particularly have a whole gamut of
exterior facing materials -aluminum,
bronze, stainless steel, porcelain, glass
and tile mosaic, plastic- all of which
we are trying to put together in inter-
esting ways that are compatible with
our structure and give an indication
of interior function.
These are often sufficiently deco-
rative in themselves. Some are adapt-
able as basic materials for the employ-
(Continued on facing page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






ment of craft artist's talents. Some-
times their use doesn't turn out quite
the way we thought it would from
the sample. Sometimes the result is
far better than we thought it would
be. But all these new materials are
elements of progress in both archi-
tectural and decorative design.
Q -In view of all this do you feel
that the old handicraft type of archi-
tectural embellishment will ever re-
turn?
A--No I do not. I do not think
we can afford it. But that is not to
say that opportunities for craft design-
ers to work collaboratively with archi-
tects is, or will be, any less. In my
opinion such opportunities are increas-
ing tremendously. In some instances
we depend entirely on the craft de-
signer to work out a design subject to
our criticism.
Q-Do you feel there exists any
tacR of craft talent nere any scarcity
of designers who can work well with
architects toward solving any type of
decorative problem in any type of
building?
A-We have not found that to be
so. So far we have found collabora-
tive technicians who have not only
been talented, but with whom it has
been enlightening to work. They have
been able to do what we had in mind
and do it in a very fine manner.
Q-Would you make greater use
of the associated arts were you not so
strictly limited by a building budget?
A- Well, I'm not sure there
would be much greater use. I think
our use of materials today rather de-
mands a restriction of richly orna-
mental surfaces. Our climate gives
an intense brilliance which tends to
accentuate shadows and colors. In
addition, we're competing today with
such things as illuminated signs and
various other distractions which didn't
exist before. As a result, a plain sur-
face becomes an exceedingly pleasing
thing.
Certain buildings in Europe are
simply covered with detail. But they
were built when there wasn't the vis-
ual competition we have now and
you find them in areas which are gen-
erally devoid of much that is orna-
mental or colorful so the buildings
themselves stand out. Our situation
is almost the reverse. So our use of
ornament has to be very judicious;
and any decorative treatment has to
be carefully placed to be effective.
SEPTEMBER, 1956


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* BUILDERS' ROSTER ..

Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in their
locality or are trade association members of recognized standing. AGC-Associated General
Contractors; FAEC-Florida Association of Electrical Contractors; ACI-Amer. Concrete Institute;
NCMA-Natl. Concrete Masonry Assoc.; NRMCA-Natl. Ready-mixed Concrete Assoc.; FCPA-
Florida Concrete Products Assoc. C-Person to contact.


- CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC

DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John L. Avant, Pres.-AGC
Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC

- PALM BEACH COUNTY
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC
Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W. Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.


CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501 Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Pres.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
--- PINELLAS COUNTY -
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC

VOLUSIA COUNTY
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C-Hugo Quillian, Partner-AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI

- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


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316 W. Colonial 523 Park Ave., No.
Phone 5-7551 Phone 5-4471
ORLANDO WINTER PARK'


Plenty of Fun
Is Being Planned
For 42nd Convention

Though plans for the coming 42nd
Annual FAA Convention to be
held November 8, 9 and 10 at the
Seville Hotel on Miami Beach- are
keyed to "Planning for the Automo-
bile" as a subject of vital importance
to every Florida architect, the lighter
side of Convention activities has by
no means been neglected. Each con-
vention day will be marked by a time
for fun and relaxation; and for those
who can stay through the full week-
end, there exists the beckoning pleas-
ures of nearby Cuba, or Nassau.
Convention activities start Thurs-
day morning, November 8. But
Thursday evening is slated as a care-
free fun night. Present plans call for
a cocktail meeting at 6:30, followed
by a buffet dinner and show. Fes-
tivities will start in the huge Seville
ballroom-which will be turned into
one of the largest exhibits of quality
building products of any architects'
convention-and then will move on

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






to the Seville poolside for buffet serv-
ice and a gala swim show by some of
the loveliest of South Florida's lassies.
The Annual FAA Convention Ban-
quet is scheduled for Friday night.
It will be preceded by a mammoth
cocktail party given by the Florida
South Chapter as convention hosts.
Highlight of the evening, which will
include presentation of awards and
prizes to exhibitor contest winners,
will be a performance by Dr. Henry
Gerald, one of the entertainment
world's foremost mystifiers. Dr. Ger-
ald is a mentalistt' of the Dunninger
ilk who spices his incredible feats of
mind-reading with a running fire of
laugh-provoking comment.
A progressive open-house is being
planned for Saturday evening. It will
include visits to homes of several
Host Chapter members-cocktails at
one, buffet dinner at another, dessert
and coffee at a third.
A special program is also being
planned for ladies of the Convention.
And for every visitor there will be
opportunity for swimming, golf, ten-
nis and fishing. The hardest job for
any visitor will be taking advantage
of every fun opportunity offered.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Aluminum Insulating Co., Inc. 12
Armor-Flex Products . 22
Belmar Drapes . . 2
Bruce Equipment Co. . 4
Builders' Roster . . 22
Burnup & Sims . 16
Cool Roof . . 17
Electrend Distributing Co. 20
Florida Foundry . .. 21
Florida
Portland Cement Division 18
Florida Power & Light Co. 14
Florida Steel Products . .24
Gate City
Sash & Door Co. . 4th Cover
George C. Griffin-
B & G Windows . . 19
Hollostone ... . 3
Interstate
Marble and Tile Co. Insert
Leap Concrete, Inc. . 5
Magic City
Shade and Drapery Co.. 21
Maule Industries . 2nd Cover
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Co. 20
Palmer Electric Co.. . 22
Perlite, Inc. . . . 13
Portland Cement Association 15
Prescolite . . .. 24
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc.. 6
Satchwell Electric Const. Co. 10
Vulkan, Inc. . . ... 20
F. Graham Williams Co. . 23

SEPTEMBER, 1956


F. GRAHAM
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


WILLIAMS, Chairman
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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Producers' Council Program


Marking its 35th anniversary, the
Producers' Council will hold its An-
nual Fall Meeting in Cleveland, Ohio,
on September 25 and 26, at the
Wade Park Manor Hotel. As now
planned the meeting will be attended
by several members of both the
Miami and Jacksonville Chapters.
Included in the intensive program
planned for the meeting is a series
of talks by industrial and business
leaders centered on "Forces and
Events Shaping the Industry." There
will be a conference for all presi-
dents who direct the Council's 38
chapters. Subjects of another con-
ference will be market research to ex-
plore ways of attaining more com-
plete and accurate construction sta-
tistics.
The policy of Council chapters cen-
ters primarily on informative coopera-
tion with other factors of the build-
ing industry. Last year more than
39,000 architect, engineer and con-
tractor guests were entertained at


local Chapter meetings. This repre-
sents about a 25 per cent increase
over previous years.
The Council was originally created
as a producers' committee of the
American Institute of Architects for
the purpose of improving the type of
product literature used by architects.
Since then the organization has grad-
ually widened its scope of interests
and activities to include the entire
building industry.
One of the most dramatic of its
nationally sponsored activities is the
CARAVAN, a traveling exhibit of new
and improved building products.
This will be the third successive
year in which this unique exhibit will
have visited the major marketing cen-
ters of the country. This year it is
being called the "Home Building
Caravan" and had its premier show-
ing in Washington, D. C., August 30.
It is slated to visit Miami Novem-
ber 20. The showing in Jackson-
ville has been set for November 29.


The fixtures illustrated above, and many others
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part of the unit... for STRENGTH, DURABILITY,
APPEARANCE. 1. No. 1015-6715 Recessed. 2. No. A-14
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Manatee County . .
(Continued from Page 7)
is and how it will affect their inter-
ests, the battle is more than half won.
"Since this first meeting many
others have been held with residents
of the various areas involved. These
gatherings have been the key to the
success gained in such a short time.
"Now public opinion is snowball-
ing. There are still large areas of the
county to be zoned. But now we are
constantly receiving requests to speed
up the program-and every call is
cordial and encouraging.'
Those paragraphs can only hint at
the tremendous amount of time and
effort which this program called for.
Wilkinson estimates that "practically
every member of the Commission
spent at least two nights a week of
extra time talking to people and lay-
ing ground work for the excellent re-
sults obtained." But one important
point to be made is that these results
were accomplished through patient
explanation and persuasive reasoning


rather than by political shenannaging
or legal bludgeoning.
Aside from the fact that Manatee
County now has the start of an or-
derly and constructive permanent
planning program, the Bradenton
architects' contact with it has been
valuable on several counts. First, it
has brought the name "architect" to
the interested attention of hundreds
of people who scarcely knew the
meaning of the word. It has linked
that word in the minds of community
leaders throughout the county with
the idea of constructive improvement
and civic service. It has placed the
architectural profession-through the
persons of Sidney Wilkinson and his
colleagues in its rightful position of
leadership in Manatee County com-
munity affairs.
And it constitutes yet another con-
clusive proof of the slightly garbled
old adage that you can catch more
cooperation, interest and understand-
ing with the honey of solid service
than you can with the vinegar of any
legal fiat.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Poor Service


Is Poor


Public Relations


In a mid-state community a school is now being built, the final
cost of which will make it one of the most expensive in Florida. Yet the
contract figure was low enough to warm the school board's collective
heart. It also warmed the heart of the contractor. He explained it to
an associate later.
"Our bid on that job was our cost," he said frankly. "But we'll make
one of the best profits ever from it. The architect issued those plans as
final. But they were so incomplete that the extras required to make the
building into an acceptable school will almost equal our base bid."
There's another building, an air-conditioned commercial structure
with a final cost considerably higher than it should be. Part of that
extra cost resulted because all the doors had to be remade as specials.
The architect had neglected to schedule them properly, didn't bother to
check them on delivery and only discovered the expensive error when the
air-conditioning people pointed out that the system was designed for
return circulation through door grilles.
In still another building the costs of prefabricated interior wooden
partitions went far above their original cost because the building was more
than five inches out of square and many of the partitions had to be
remade. The architect learned that fact only when all the basic structure
had been completed and the partitions were delivered to the job ready
for installation.
There is a multitude of morals in those three citations. Architects
as well as doctors and lawyers, are entitled to make mistakes-and no
great blame ever dogs the man who makes an honest error, honestly
admits it and seeks to make it right.
But in these three cases the difference is important. In the first, the
lack of documentary completeness verges on incompetency. The second
is an instance of inexcusable carelessness, to say the least. And the third
might easily be construed as a callous breach of professional integrity. Even
though the contractor's mistake threw the whole building out of square,
the architect's responsibility of supervision was to find the mistake and
have it remedied before it was too late.
Happily, such situations are rare in architectural practice. But when
they do happen, they ripple a wide sea of contact, often far beyond the
individual's circle. True, such situations often lessen the local reputation
of a man. But of much more importance, they also tend to lower the
community's faith in, respect for and acceptance of, architectural service
and the architectural profession in general.
The overall point is clear. Poor service is bad public relations, to say
the least. Anything less than full technical competency and complete
integrity is a drag on our profession. Any architect who accepts a lower
standard not only hurts himself. In the eyes of the public he is hurting
the architectural profession. For, to his working associates and to the
people of his own community that is exactly what he is.


..........





























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