• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Kelley resigns state post
 School pamphlet is good P/R...
 Interview with Maurice E. Holley,...
 New Possibilities of plastics
 Vizcaya - villa of the Veneto
 News and notes
 Avertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Editorial: Let's control our growth...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00025
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Kelley resigns state post
        Page 2
        Page 3
    School pamphlet is good P/R gesture
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Interview with Maurice E. Holley, AIA
        Page 7
    New Possibilities of plastics
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Vizcaya - villa of the Veneto
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    News and notes
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Avertisers' index
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Editorial: Let's control our growth before it can control us
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.





































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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch . North
John Stetson . . South
William B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
Daytona Beach William R. Gomon
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Florida North . Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
Fla. No. Central Albert P. Woodard
Florida South Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland
Jacksonville . George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
Mid-Florida Francis H. Emerson
Palm Beach Frederick W. Kessler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421


l74




Florida Architect


VOLUME 6


JULY, 1956


NUMBER 7


CONTENTS


Kelley Resigns State Post ...--- ------..........- ------- 2

School Pamphlet is Good P/R Gesture-------- 4

Interview with Maurice E. Holley, AIA ---- --- 7
The Architect's Place in Public Service


New Possibilities of Plastics _---
By Robert Fitch Smith, AIA


----_ 8


Vizcaya Villa of the Veneto _- ----------12
By Robert Tyler Davis

News and Notes __-------------------- 16

Advertisers' Index --------------------- 23

Producers' Council Program _-----_--------24


Editorial ---------------------


-._3---- rd Cover


THE COVER

As one of "the last creations in an archeological style" Vizcaya,
once the great house on the estate of James Deering, is unique
throughout the South. As a monument to an era it is now quite
properly a showplace of Miami and fully merits designation as one
of Florida's most noteworthy historic buildings. For a story on Viz-
caya, turn to page 12. The cover photo is by Rudi Rada.




PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. . Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, f either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


JULY, 1956







Kelley Resigns State Post


to Join Dade School Board


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Effective July 1 two major changes
will take place in the staffs of two
of Florida's important school-plan-
ning bodies. FORREST M. KELLEY,
JR., AIA, resigns as State School
Architect to take over the duties of
architect for the Dade County Board
of Public Instruction, a position held
for the past seven years by JAMES
E. GARLAND, AIA. Garland resigned
the post to become a principal in a
newly-formed firm of architects and
engineers.
Though not publically announced
until two weeks prior to the effective
date, the shift has been under con-
sideration for some months, accord-
ing to James E. Garland. Garland
will join MAURICE H. CONNELL, HAR-
VEY W. PIERCE and EDMUND FRIED-
MAN, Miami engineers, to form the
new firm of CONNELL, PIERCE, GAR-
LAND AND FRIEDMAN with offices at
315 N.W. 27th Avenue, the present
headquarters of the engineering firm
of Maurice H. Connell and Associ-
ates. Pierce, an officer of the present
Connell firm, will assume the role of
principal in the new organization.
The fourth member, Edmund Fried-


Forrest M. Kelley, Jr., for the past
five years State School Architect,
becomes architect for the Dade
County Board of Public Instruction
in Miami, effective as of July first.


man, a civil engineer, was formerly
city manager of Coral Gables.
During his service as Dade County
school architect, Garland has been
instrumental in developing technical
improvements in public school design
and equipment and has taken a firm
stand with board members in favor
of retaining architects in private prac-
tice for the major portion of the
Board's architectural requirements.
Prior to his Dade County assignment
Garland served as State School Archi-
tect in Tallahassee.
In obtaining Kelley to succeed him,
the Dade County School Board chn
look forward to a continuation of the
same general policies that character-
ized Garland's administration. As
State School Architect during the last
five years, Kelley has shown himself
in complete sympathy with these pol-
icies and has done an outstanding
job of cajoling other county school
boards to adopt a broader and more
constructive attitude toward archi-
tectural service as the means for
obtaining better school planning and
construction.
(Continued on Page 4)


James E. Garland resigned as Dade
County's school architect to enter
private professional practice as
principal of a new architectural
and engineering firm in Miami.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




































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JULY, 1956 3




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Kelley Resigns State Post
(Continued from Page 2)

Kelley has headed the State School
Architect's office since 1951. Prior
to that time he served as an associate
professor of architecture at the U/M
College of Architecture and Allied
Arts. He was registered to practice
in Florida in 1939 and was formerly
a partner of SANFORD W. GOIN, FAIA,
in Gainesville. Kelley's AIA member-
ship dates from 1947; and he is cur-
rently a member of the Florida North
Central Chapter.
Up to the press deadline for this
issue, no announcement had been
made by the State Department of
Education as to an appointment to
fill the vacancy occasioned by Kelley's
resignation. Superintendent THOMAS
BAILEY was out of town and could
not be reached for comment. Thus
the question as to whether this im-


portant post will be filled by an
appointment from the State School
Architect's present staff or from the
office of some practicing architect is
open to speculation.
Currently the Tallahassee office is
staffed by three young men acting
in various capacities as assistants to
the State School Architect. Of these,
two are not registered in Florida,
though both attended the State Board
examination sessions held in Jackson-
ville in mid-June.
The other, GEORGE M. MEGGINSON,
holds a Florida registration (certifi-
cate No. 2127) and is also registered
as a practicing architect in Illinois,
where he was graduated from the
University of Illinois in 1951. He has
served almost two years as Kelley's
assistant and came to Florida some
two and one-half years ago from his
native state where he had been an
administrative assistant on the staff
of the Illinois State Architect's office.


Gainesville High School Booklet

is Good Public Relations Gesture


a T..e,, a. U.,, h. s". fW.h kw in .M a1te 1w
l:j mr^ a^ aoro uIn adlnvlor a





d..um p
I o 7uou~d umml i nd I-% cmccufuadd







714 bin-,8 1 av .plur. a d l.

P.Olsqnl ll ndq,. Ml ihm

il Ihl~n..70. &. .kud


The architectural firm of GOIN AND
MOORE of Gainesville has performed
a welcome service for its community
through issuance of a student's pam-
phlet describing the new Gainesville
High School for which the firm
served as architects. Inscribed on the
cover, "To the Student Body of the
Gainesville High School from the
Architects," the pamphlet contains
Architects," the pamphlet contains


eight pages and measures 6 by 9V4
inches.
Inside, it pictures the expansion of
Sthe school, tells the student about
,. "finding your way around" by means
of a semi-rendered plot plan and
legend and gets across the student's
stake in the educational plant through
a1 page of "statistics" that dramatize
(Continued on Page 20)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















































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Double Tee concrete roof slabs are being placed on 25' concrete
beams-both are prestressed units.
Concrete block walls and concrete floor slabs make the ware-
house a 100% concrete structure.
Economy in material, speed of erection, and freedom of design
are attracting more and more progressive architects to prestressed
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JULY, 1956 5








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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INTERVIEW:


The


Architect's


Place in


Public



Service


Q-Mayor Holley, how do you feel in general about
architects' participation in community affairs?
A-I feel the architect has a definite place in public
service, especially in community affairs, since he is a
planner to begin with.
Q-Do you mean he has the innate ability to plan
programs for the public as well as builders?
A-Generally speaking, yes. I think an architect is
in a better position to do that sort of planning than
the average layman. For example, real estate brokers
are often found on membership rosters of public bodies
such as the Planning Board, the Zoning Board of
Appeals and the City Commission. They and other
types of business men who serve on these boards do
so because they believe it's their public duty. But I
think the architect is basically better equipped for the
kind of thinking these Boards require than the average
laymen who make up the membership. Therefore I
feel he definitely has a place in many kinds of public
office. He certainly has a place in community affairs.
Q-Do you think that holds true even in the execu-
tive divisions of public service?
A-Yes. I think the average architect has got to be
a business man to be successful. Of course, that calls
for executive ability; and architects with executive
ability generally do very well in that sort of thing.
Q-Would you say, then, that the architectural pro-
fession should be represented on the governing body
of any community?
A-I certainly would. But of course the architects
themselves, individually and as a group, must be civic
minded first. Our group is a good example of what I
mean. Some five or six years ago the Palm Beach
Chapter started a movement to place members in the
JULY, 1956


public spot light so they and the Chapter itself would
have a definite place in civic affairs.
Q-Was that start made in any particular phase of
community affairs?
A-Well, planning and zoning activities are logical
starts for any architect interested in public service for
his community. The starting point is considered as
appointment on one of the planning boards or the
park and recreation board. Or even on one of the
citizen's boards that are often formed to study dif-
ferent civic problems.
Appointment to one of these boards gives the indi-
vidual an opportunity to express his ideas in public.
It gives him an opportunity to see how civic affairs
are handled. It offers a chance to participate in civic
programs that he might never have had otherwise. And
of course, membership on one board often leads to
an appointment on the next one.
Q-To get started in the field of public service, an
architect should first get himself appointed to a board?
A-Well, he should be recommended for the ap-
pointment by his local architectural group. That, of
course, puts the initiative up to the AIA chapters.
Each chapter should attempt to place its members in
civic positions on any city commission or board that
has an opening for an architectural type of person.
And each chapter should definitely encourage its mem-
bership to take on sucD'.responsibilities.
Q-Do you think entlgh of that sort of thing is
being done by AIA chapters throughout the State?
A-I can't speak for the other Chapters, but five
members of the Palm Bhch Chapter are on public
(Continued on Page 20)


rm.w.with MAURICE E. HOLLEY, AIA

As the Mayor of West Palm
Beach and at the same time
a civic-minded practicing
architect, few men in Flor-
ida are better qualified to
comment on the subject of 7
this interview. A native of
the city he now heads as
r Chief Executive, Maurice E.
Holley has been equally
active in both civic and
professional affairs. He has
served the Palm Beach
Chapter, AIA, as treasurer
and president and the FAA
as vice-president and direc-
tor. He served on the West
Palm Beach Planning Board
for five years, was elected to
the City Commission in
1955, was named Mayor
this year. Gordon Potter
,







Possibilities


for




Plastics



By ROBERT FITCH SMITH, AIA


Houses, small shelter units-in
this field designers will encoun-
ter one of their greatest chal-
lenges in the use of plastics to
develop a controlled environ-
ment styled and scaled to family
use. Here is one suggestion for
what may well be an immediate
future a domed dwelling,
lightweight, colorful, translu-
cent, with both living quarters
and landscaped "outdoors" en-
closed in a pre-fabricated,
weather and storm-proof plastic
shell.


Robert Fitch Smith, AIA, of
Miami, has done much basic
design development with plas-
tics. This story, reflecting his
evaluation of this new material,
was presented as an address
given June 13, before the Soci-
ety of Plastics Industry at a
meeting in New York City.
8


As we think, so we build. When
our needs call for new materials, these
new materials with their new possi-
bilities create new forms. When we
took our first airplane ride, little did
we realize that a new world of build-
ing was opening to us because of the
use of new, lighter, structural ele-
ments. Combined in our thinking
today is the light new structure of the
airplane and now the atom and other
new sources of power, ready to serve
man in this new building era.
For this world of today, architects
have dreamed of a new, light, color-
ful, durable, strong building material
which can be the new clothing of
new spaces for living activities. I be-
lieve they will find this new material
in the field of plastics.
Several years ago I designed a little
house at Deerfield Beach that em-
bodied the experimental use of trans-
lucent plastic sheets. During the time
this translucent house has been
occupied, it has proved successful.
Although of conventional design, it
has several exterior walls of trans-
lucent light yellow reinforced plastic
panels of one-eighth inch thickness
that glow with brightness, even on
dark days. There are no dark corners
in this house; and at night when
garden lights are turned on, the murals
created on these walls by foliage is
a complete new departure in building
design.
Since this little house was built, we
have witnessed many new and powr-
fully progressive steps. We are living'
in an age of the transition from earthy
building materials to this new inspir-
ing material of great and untold possi- 1
abilities.


Our buildings today are spotted
with items of plastic. And these are
increasing daily, but still only as sub-
stitutions and not yet as the whole
integrated plastic building. We are
well aware of the time element in
the history of the development of
other materials -such as glass -as
a quality building material. We are
seeing the revolution today in the use
of aluminum in buildings, which was
only recently recognized as an excel-
lent building material. We have seen
the agony and the pain that the de-
velopers of plywood have gone through
in establishing their very useful panels
in buildings.
In our enthusiasm as architects,
chemists, engineers, and builders for
the use of plastics, we visualize it
everywhere it can be properly used;
and we realize that a new building
type is being developed rapidly. Our
enthusiasm leads us to try all con-
ceivable forms and uses-many good,
many experimental, and many in need
of much, much more development.
We are today seeing the develop-
ment of the module unit consisting
of a complete room with beds, dress-
ing tables, bureaus, drawer sections
and closets--all built as one unit
with floor and roof, ready to hitch
or attach to other units in any desired
finish. It is a complete part of a
house. If you want three bedrooms,
buy three units- all to be hitched
to the bath and kitchen core units,
with heating and air conditioning. The
bathrooms and kitchens are equipped
completely- unbreakable, sanitary
and colorful.
Structural skin walls which are pos-
sible with plastics only, contain the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



















The shape of things to come? It is not too fantastic, according to
those working with plastics, to look forward to whole cities thriving
under completely controlled conditions made possible by huge
transparent domes of protective plastic. Material characteristics for
such a condition are already here. Only structural and mechanical
problems remain to be solved.


structural bones, the skin, the utilities
and the ducts. This new structural
skin has great possibilities as part of
a building, interlocking as it can with
floors and roof. Sometimes translucent,
and of any desired color, it permits
of accurate and easy assembly and
erection.
Consider the many alternate sys-
tems of construction, of roofs at the
site, of new shapes-arched or, curved,
spiraled, or sloping-molded to suit
its function. Consider new units such
as floors 4-inches thick in 12-foot
spans-load-bearing, ready for carpet-
ing or vinyl covering--or core type
floors consisting of structural cells.
The trend of all of this will be toward
relieving our buildings of heavy foun-
dations and underpinning in the cre-
ation of a new building type. Could
this be the beginning of an earth-
quake-proof type of suspended or mo-
bile unit?
Houses must be personalized.
Therefore 'in our basic development
work it is far easier to develop plastics
for industrial and commercial uses
than for residential. Housing involves
styling and color-a controlled envir-
onment scaled to family use.
Our development of small shelter
units has not progressed too far at
present. This is a fertile field and
one not dependent upon research in
the future. Small shelter units are
needed, and within the right cost
bracket-properly designed-should
be good business.
Who will do the building? We have
seen how quickly our boating friends
have elected to use fiberglass for boats;
and I have found that builders wish
to do the same with their buildings.
Their subcontract work with this new


JULY, 1956


material will be much simpler than
present methods. The builder must
however, add a new department to his
organization: A plastic department
headed by a well-trained man-not
a highly skilled scientist, but a plastics
building technician.
We should be training such people
now-the type of person the builders
need. What a great field this man
has in building-and in economics,
to create more uses for his structures
which are more movable, more flex-
ible, more adaptable to a great many
needs. The school shortage-where
five rooms exist today, ten can be
available tomorrow. Again for fac-
tories, and government buildings-
especially for armed forces or for for-
eign uses, where shipment by air is
vital.
Designers have always tried to fol-
low nature's forms. Architects have
found it difficult because of materials
and construction methods, so we have


made use of rectangles, squares, and
conventional patterns. Today with the
use of this new modern plastic ma-
terial the architect's dreams can come
true.
For example, let us design a house
with the plan shaped to the activities
of the occupants and related to the
lot without dependence on conven-
tional patterns. A new free form is
born-with no waste covers, enclosed
in a new, beautiful, translucent, color-
ful clothing. The roof design will
follow the shape of the plan with
its new shape in plastic. The roof
may be rounded, spiralled, a bonnet
-or may take many other adaptable
plastic shapes.
So a new world opens-not only
to the architect, to the builder, but
to the entire plastic industry. This
world takes on new building forms-
fantastic, colorful, clean, bright, com-
fortable, healthful, livable!
(Continued on Page 10)


Rapid developments in the plastic field hlve created a whole new
set of structural characteristics for application to a whole new
range of design problems. In the near future architects will no
longer be bound to the straight line convention. New forms-
domed, spiralled, suspended, cantilevered, e n, perhaps, floating-
will result from full utilization of characteristics to achieve most
economical design. In this field progress is unlimited.


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(Continued from Page 9)
Architects have at their disposal
as never before, the means of applying
the building to its use. Let us con-
sider a theatre. Essential in the design
of a theatre are the sight lines, the
sound waves, the lighting. The archi-
tect can now project all of these
properly, and then shape his building
exactly to conform. He need no longer
try to fit them into a rectangle, or
a square as before. Or shall we design
an open-air bandstand where the struc-
ture will conform to garden surround-
ings? Here the problem of protection
from rain and sun, sound and sight
lines again may dictate the shape of
a bonnet.
Let us consider, too, a skyscraper
which becomes lighter by the use of
plastics in combination with metal and
may be translucent in design quality.
Our churches can be formed in new
and happier shapes. Visualize the new
and fantastic shapes that clubs and
restaurants will assume in clothing
which suits them better than rec-
tangles and squares. Our airports will
look more like places where airplanes
belong in their transparent plastic
quality. Shelters for recreational areas,
arenas, shopping centers can become
transparent covers for protection from
the elements-and the garden mall
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The architect deals with the whole
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buildings. We see the city as a living
thing-not a blighted, worn out skel-
eton where life has faded. The new
city is to be a perfect place to live
and work. The plastic industry's ma-
terial and research have brought the
means for-doing this job. The new
city of light and color will live within
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a hemisphere of controlled environ-
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Paul Chalfin, at 88, honored by
both architects and decorators for
his design skill in creating a mas-
terpiece of archeological style.


The bay facade of Vizcaya offers
proof that the great 72-room
mansion still has today the illu-
sion of Mediterranean Europe
more than any other of the
"princely" houses.


VIZCAYA





Miami's great villa of the Veneto, built

forty years ago, is now a shrine for art

and a source of new honor for its designer





By ROBERT TYLER DAVIS
Director, Dade County Museum of Art







In the last decades of the 19th
century and the first two of our own
century America produced a group
of men who had not only fabulous
wealth, but the taste for a lavish
way of living. Their incomes were
princely; and since America had pro-
duced no architecture for princely
living, they and their architects turned
to the great European traditions for
precedents. From the 1870's on Amer-
ican architects were called upon to
produce a series of replicas and vari--
ations on the themes of French,
Italian and, finally, Elizabethan and
Georgian mansions. As time went on
the great houses came closer and
closer to their European proto-types,
losing much of their exuberance as
they became more "correct."
One of the last of the great cre-
ations in an archeological style was
VIzCAYA, built and furnished, 1914-
1916, in the style of a great villa
] of the Veneto, its gardens brought to
0 completion around 1923. The owner
for whom it was built was JAMES
DEERING, a founder and officer of
the International Harvester Co., who
died in 1925. He was a contemporary
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT



































From the air the whole bold breadth and sweep of Chalfin's princely cre-
ation is evident. Every bit of land on which the house and most of the
gardens were developed and filled; and the house is screened by a dense
but artfully landscaped hammock on the land side. Below is a view of the
courtyard fountain, one of the many decorative details that fill the house.


of that generation of Americans who
loved Europe, who lived and traveled
there extensively, and did so much
to educate Americans to the values
of European living the generation
of HENRY JAMES, of EDITH WHARTON
and of MRS. JACK GARDNER.
While most of the great houses
built in European styles are now defi-
nitely "dated", looking far more like
adaptations of the 80's and 90's and
early 1900's, Vizcaya more than any
other has today the illusion of Medi-
terranean Europe. One can trace the
Italian origin of many of its features;
but in detail it is certainly not a copy
of any one villa or group of villas.
Yet in the warmth and boldness of
its conception, the skillful adaptation
to its sub-tropical site and the per-
fection of its scale, Vizcaya remains
an utterly convincing evocation of the
Mediterranean spirit.
Even to a fairly casual visitor it is
clear that the entire scheme; the mag-
nificent villa sitting -at the water's
edge facing a harbor protected by its
celebrated stone barge; the superbly
conceived formal gardens with clip-
ped parterres, fountains and statues;
JULY, 1956


as well as the spacious approach from
the city streets and the beguiling
farm buildings, were all controlled by
the taste, the knowledge and the
imagination of one man. Many able
designers and craftsmen obviously
contributed to the planning and ex-
ecution of such a grand scheme, but
the man who is chiefly responsible is
PAUL CHALFIN.
It was Mr. Chalfin who, on a trip
to Europe, first heard from Mr. Deer-
ing his plan to build a handsome win-
ter residence on Biscayne Bay between
Miami and Coconut Grove and per-
suaded him to build in a Mediter-
ranean style. Mr. F. BURRALL HOFF-
MAN was later associated in the build-
ing of the house, though Mr. Chalfin
went on to design the interiors and
the gardens.
Mr. Deering gave that unstinting
support and complete confidence of
the princely patron without which no
such work of art such a Vizcaya could
be produced. He and his luxurious
and fastidious style of living passed
from the scene in the mid-20's. In
later years the house was occupied
(Continued on Page 15)






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14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






VIZCAYA--

Villa of the Veneto
(Continued from Page 18)
sporadically by the nieces and neph-
ews who inherited it from their bach-
elor uncle. It was opened to the
public briefly in the mid-30's, and
finally in 1952 was made available,
with all its splendor of furnishings, to
Dade County and opened as a public
museum.
Though it has gone through all
these transformations, the essential
integrity of Vizcaya as a work of art
is still there. The elegance, the dis-
tinction and the charm of Vizcaya
are built in to its very conception.
From the beginning Mr. Chalfin con-
ceived it as a great establishment built
by a family of wealth in the 16th cen-
tury-a fictional family who had kept
their wealth through three centuries
and continued to add to and modify
their favorite country villa in the
styles of three succeeding centuries.
The mixture of styles either in archi-
ture or in decoration is never arbitrary,
but always appears as something or-
ganic and natural.
Each step in the design was taken
with a full understanding of the his-
toric reasons for its formulation. Be-
fore Mr. Chalfin was either architect,
decorator or landscape designer, he
was a staff member of the Museum
of Fine Arts in Boston and a lecturer
on history and art. In Vizcaya he
shows himself not only a designer of
brilliant invention, but a philosopher
for whom architecture and works of
art are, above all, an expression of
how people thought and felt.
So complete was Mr. Chalfin's Rudi Rada
penetration into the Mediterranean
mind, it is as if a man of the Renais-
sance had been reborn to recreate for
this remote Florida climate and site
a beautifully adjusted scheme of Paul
buildings and garden, skillfully adapt- Vize
ed to an exotic spot, but employing and
the full vigor and joy of the Renais- adal
sance vocabulary. For Vizcaya in no fro
tific
detail seems to be created from the Bot
outside, following the photograph or at
the measured drawing, but always Mia
from the inside out with the freedom Pres
of the true creative artist. It is a hon
measure of Mr. Chalfin's stature as ary
a person that he was able to infuse Jam
those who were associated with him chain
in the building of Vizcaya with the Jun4
same freedom and understanding.
JULY, 1956


The Patio of Vizeaya. If ever a building captured
the illusion of princely elegance, it is "this stately
house which breathes the spirit of the Renaissance".


I Chalfin, guiding spirit of both the conception and execution of
:aya, and the individual designer of that now-famous villa's gardens
interiors, has, after forty years, achieved the recognition that his
ptive and interpretative genius warrants. One evidence of it came
n the Florida South Chapter, AIA, which presented to him a Cer-
ate of Award and Honorary Membership in the Chapter itself.
h award and membership certificates were presented to Mr. Chalfin
his New Jersey home May 30, 1956, by A. J. Simberg, AIA, of
mi, representing the Chapter as chairman of its Committee on
ervation of Historic Buildings . t: Additional recognition and
or came from the American Institute 4 Decorators through Honor-
Membership presented to Robert Tyler Davis for Mr. Chalfin by
es Merrick Smith, AID director, and president of its South Florida
pter, at a buffet held in the patio of Vizcaya the evening of
e 9, 1956.






News & Notes-


Florida South
A near-record attendance 'of 95
marked the June meeting of the
Florida South Chapter held at Har-
vey's restaurant Tuesday evening, June
12. On the agenda was an informal
report of those attending the AIA
Convention in Los Angeles; and the
speaker of the evening was DR. JAY
F. W. PEARSON, president of the
University of Miami.
Informality was definitely the order
of the evening. ROBERT ABELE intro-
duced an impressive list of guests,
including ROGER G. WEEKS, secretary
of the newly-formed Northwest Chap-
ter, AIA, at Pensacola. Reading of
the minutes was dispensed with on
the supposition that secretary IRVIN
S. KORACH had done a proper job.
ROBERT M. LITTLE introduced Dr.
Pearson whose announced subject was
"A future school of architecture at
the University of Miami."
Dr. Pearson's talk was less definitive
on that subject than many of his
listeners may have hoped. In general


Dr. J. F. W. Pearson, President of
the University of Miami, looks for-
ward to a future College of Archi-
tecture for the U/M and called on
Miami architects to help make that
dream come true.

it was a plea to the architectural pro-
fession to "exert every effort to avoid
loss of beauty as we go forward in
our civic development"; and it was
also a direct call to architects for help
in maintaining the high standards of
quality in both plant and program


that is the basis for the "bright out-
look" which Dr. Pearson holds for the
University's future.
"From its very inception," said the
U/M president, "this rapidly chang-
ing institution has owed much to
architects. Much of what the Uni-
versity is now has been due to their
skill and talent and foresight. And
we will be placing even more import-
tance on such qualities in the future "
"Our plans for that future are
broad," the speaker continued. "But
they must necessarily be kept flexible.
Unfortunately, they are influenced
largely by the finances available to
us. The University once had a school
of architecture. It now offers a course
in architectural engineering. But that
is not enough. And we are planning
on the ultimate development of a
full-fledged College of Architecture
that will not only attract students
of our own country but will also
become a focal point for the tech-
nical training of talented youth of
Latin American nations."
Dr. Pearson set no timetable for
fruition of such plans. But he did
sketch the type of development he
had in mind.
"We are planning on the highest


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level of quality," he declared. "The
U/M College of Architecture must
and will be a leader, equipped with
the finest plant obtainable and staffed
with the ablest minds and experience
that rich opportunity and adequate
financial security can attract."
He gave his audience a hint that
such plans might be more definite
and farther along than could pres-
ently be announced when he called
for specific help in bringing them
into being. He asked that South Flor-
ida architects "help re-establish" the
former department of architecture and
suggested that their "particular talents
and experience" could well be utilized
.as the nucleus of a professional teach-
ing staff.
EDWIN T. REEDER, SAM KRUSE and
Chapter president TRIP RUSSELL all
offered commentaries on the Los An-
geles Convention. Russell's was par-
ticularly noteworthy.
"Los Angeles," he said, "is a living
example of what Miami may become if
we do not solve some of our planning
problems before it is too late. In
spite of the natural advantages of
the site, the city has become so fan-
tastically miserable that people have
moved out of it and live by pre-
ference on the edge of the desert.
"The freeways, developed at enor-
mous expense for the purpose of per-
mitting traffic to reach downtown
areas, seem to be shunned by the
city's inhabitants. They're mostly
used by professional drivers and un-
inhibited speed maniacs. I was taken
on a sightseeing ride on them. We
went along at 90 miles per hour anid
I didn't see a thing!"
Florida Northwest
The 10th of Florida's AIA chapters
was granted a charter at the June
meting of the AIA Board. Officers
elected at its organization meeting
were: HUGH J. LEITCH, president;
ANKER F. HANSEN, vice-president;
ROGER G. WEEKS, secretary; JAMES
H. LOOK, treasurer. Elected as Chapter
directors were: SAMUEL M. MAR-
SHALL, FRANK J. SINDELAR and THOM-
AS H. DANIELS.

Purely Personal
The Miami firm of COUGHLIN AND
DEUTSCH, architects, has been dis-
solved by mutual consent of the part-
ners. EDWARD J. COUGHLIN will con-
tinue architectural practice under his
(Continued on Page 18)
JULY, 1956


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)
own name at 3030 Coral Way, Coral
Gables. WILLIAM L. DEUTSCH has
joined the land development firm of
Layne, Inc., with offices in the Ains-
ley Building, Miami.

After a seven-year's partnership as-
sociation, FRANK H. SHUFLIN and
JOHN E. PETERSEN, of Miami, have
come to a mutual decision to conduct
independent offices. Shuflin will con-
tinue at the former firm's headquar-
ters, while Petersen will establish a
new office at the same address, 20
S. E. 3rd Avenue. Both men will con-
tinue their association as PETERSEN
AND SHUFLIN on a number of un-
finished projects, including the Du-
Pont Plaza Construction Industry
Center.

MORTON T. IRONMONGER, Secre-
tary of the State .Board of Architec-
ture, FAA Treasurer and President
of the Broward County Chapter and
Mrs. Ironmonger will visit middle
Europe for a six-weeks travel-holiday.
Plans call for them to start July 12th
and return early in September.


ROBERT LAW WEED, senior partner
of the Miami firm of Weed, Russell,
Johnson and Associates, recently re-
turned from an extended tour of
South American cities as the archi-
tect-member of a Greater Miami
Trade Commission team.

Broward County Chapter
A healthy majority of the Broward
County Chapter absorbed food for
thought as well as the body on the
occasion of the Chapter's meeting on
Friday, June 8. The entire member-
ship had been invited as guests of
the Amor-Flex Company to an "in-
formational luncheon" held in the
Company's warehouse at Ft. Lauder-
dale.
With Amor-Flex president DON
FREEMAN acting as cordial host and
toastmaster, each guest registered for
a chance at after-luncheon prizes.
After a huge buffet luncheon the
meeting was turned over to Chapter
president MORTON T. IRONMONGER.
That gentleman turned it immedi-
ately back to his host after Chapter
members unanimously agreed that of-
ficial business could be dispensed with
for that particular meeting.


LARRY NATALINE, co-hosting for
Amor-Flex, spoke briefly for his com-
pany and the building products it
distributes and manufactures. He in-
troduced ROBERT SWETT, sales man-
ager of the Spun-Lite Corporation,
of Miami, who gave a brief, but in-
formation-packed outline of the char-
acteristics, manufacture and widely
varied uses of this reinforced plastic
sheet material.
Nataline then introduced WALTER
MICHALSKI, executive vice-president
of Tile Distributors, Inc., of St. Peters-
burg, who showed an unusually well-
produced sound-movie on the manu-
facture and use of Hermosa tile.

P/R Pamphlet Completed
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(for a No. 10 business envelope).
"Presenting Your Architect" is a
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GEORGE J. HAAS, AIA, prominent
in Miami architectural and Producers'
Council activities, died recently at the
age of 66. Originally from Detroit,
Mr. Haas practiced architecture there
for 25 years, coming to Florida in
1944 to form the GEORGE J. HAAS
COMPANY, distributor of building
products. He was one of the founders
of the national Producers' Council
and helped form the Miami Chapter.
In addition to being a member of
the Florida South Chapter, AIA, Mr.
Haas was a life-long Kiwanian, having
been one of the 24 charter members
of the service club that has now over
200,000 members. He was also a 32nd
degree Mason.


the answers to many questions relative
to architectural practice and thus is
designed to pave the way for a
smoother, more intelligent architect-
client relationship.
Information regarding availability
of copies for individual use should be
addressed to H. Samuel Kruse, AIA,
Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami.


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New Florida Registrations
Thirty-one licenses to practice arch-
itecture have been issued since Jan-
uary 14, 1956, according to the office
of the Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture. Of these, 21 were issued to
out-of-state architects. Distribution of
these were: New York, 5; Georgia, 4;
Illinois, 3; California, 2; Tennessee,
2; and one each from Ohio, Mary-
land, North Carolina, Wisconsin and
Texas.
Newly-registered Florida residents
were:
Ft. Lauderdale
Max L. Worthley
Ft. Myers
Raymond H. Strowd
Miami Beach
Howard L. Dutkin
Palm Beach
Otto R. Eggers
Robert W. Wening, Jr.
Pensacola
Ula L. Manning
Samuel M. Marshall
Sanford
John A. Burton, IV
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H. Leslie Walker, Jr.
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George A. Tuttle, Jr.


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P. O. Box 5777 Phones FL9-1643-4-5


JULY, 1956


STANDARD JOISTS STRUCTURAL
LONG SPANS SUPERSPANS
SPECIAL TRUSSES


FLORIDA DIVISION VULKAN, INC











0






Precast &
Prestressed


*TM Reg. U.S. Pat. Ofc.
For complete details, write the Leap
franchised yard nearest you or direct
to Leap Concrete, P. 0. Box 1053,
Dept. G-1, Lakeland, Fla.
LEAP FRANCHISED YARDS
IN FLORIDA
CAPITOL CONCRETE COMPANY
124 Johnson Street
Jacksonville, Florida
HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS
Winter Park, Florida
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland, Florida
SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC.
Pensacola, Florida
STRESSCRETE, INC.
Leesburg, Florida
WEST COAST SHELL CORP.
Sarasota, Florida
R. H. WRIGHT & SON
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
PERMACRETE, INC.
Daytona Beach, Florida


Good P/R Gesture ...
(Continued from Page 4)
the building through an easily under-
stood series of facts and figures.
The last page is devoted to a group
of suggestions "How you can help"
-on ways of keeping the school and
grounds clean and avoiding actions
which make for high maintenance
costs. The front cover contains an
illustration of the tile mural at the
entrance. The back cover explains the
design as executed by ceramist KAY
PANCOAST.
The whole thing is well-written,
nicely, though inexpensively, done.
The architects' names don't appear
at all, except as part of the bronze
credit-placque reproduced on the
opening page. But as a follow-through
evidence of their interest in serving
their community, it is a practical ges-
ture of effective professional public
relations which might well be adopted
by other school-and-public-building
architects to the benefit of all con-
cerned.

INTERVIEW .. .
(Continued from Page 7)
boards and architects are very well
represented in our city government.
JEFFERSON POWELL, the Chapter
president, was appointed to a 16-
man citizen's board to study west-
ward expansion. FRED KESSLER be-
came a member of the Planning
Board when I resigned to take on
the job of city commissioner.
GEORGE VOTAW has been appointed
to the Zoning Board of Appeals.
RAY PLOCKELMAN spent many years
on the Parks and Recreation Board.
So I think that in this area, at least,
architects are particularly well-
equipped and are doing a fine job.
Q-What individual qualification
should an architect have as a basis
for a successful career in public
service?
A-He would first of all have to
have the desire to serve the public.
Any man has to be willing to give
of himself before he can do any
good for his community. You've got
to want to see your community
progress to such an extent that
you're willing to give your time and
effort without any thought of any
glory or remuneration.or anything
else. It's got to be purely a civic
(Continued on opposite page)


0 MEMBER









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Contracting . Fixtures . .
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PALMER ELECTRIC

COMPANY


316 W. Colonial
Phone 5-7551
ORLANDO


523 Park Ave., No.
Phone 5-4471
WINTER PARK


SERVING FLORIDA

ARCHITECTS & BUILDERS

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FLORIDA STEEL
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TAMPA 8-4824
ORLANDO 2-4539
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




(Continued from opposite page)
gesture, a real desire to better the
community by contributing what-
ever particular abilities and training
and thoughts he may have.
Q-Well, assuming this desire for
civic improvement, is it practical
for a professional man like an arch-
itect to maintain his own private
practice and still hold public office?
A-I think so. Most public offices
don't demand so much time that
a man can't continue architectural
practice. If he likes his work, which
most architects do, I'd certainly
recommend he keep on with it. It
will keep him in better contact with
people and I'd say would tend to
make him more efficient in his
public service job because of that.
I've found time to do both things
-though I don't have much time
for anything beside my practice and
my civic work.
Q-As the Mayor of West Palm
Beach, you hold a political office.
How did you get it?
A-Well, I was elected by the
city commissioners of which I was
a member. And I was elected to
the Board of Commissioners by the
public, just like any other office
holder. Before that I had served on
the Planning Board for about five
years. When a vacancy occurred on
the Board of Commissioners, I was
asked to run for the empty seat by
a group of prominent business men.
After a year's service there I was
elected Mayor by the city commis-
sion itself.
Q-That means, then, that you
have been in politics for six years?
A-Well, not quite. I don't con-
sider that planning and zoning
boards are political organizations.
Service on them comes through
appointment by the Board of Com-
missioners. Membership on boards
of this kind is selected by the Com-
missioners generally on the recom-
mendations of organizations-like
an AIA Chapter.
Q-But when you run for election
to the Board of Commissioners,
that's political?
A-That's certainly political. You
have to go out and campaign and
(Continued on Page 22)
JULY, 1956


TEXTURE

with

Woven

Wood


Combination of fine
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types of yarns produce
the appearance and
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that's unmatched any-
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range of texture and
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Wov(e Wood is virtu-
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MAGIC CITY SHADE & DRAPERY CORP.
297 N. E. 67th Street Miami, Florida



Inconspicuous ... until fire strikes!
The Moore Flush-Type Ceiling Sprinkler
provides inconspicuous fire protection 24
hours a day.
The time to plan for fire protection is
at the start. Wise planning in the archi-
tect's office can result in a system de-
signed for attractive modern interiors.
Call in the Moore Engineer let
him show you the advantages of
Moore Automatic Sprinklers.
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Company ACKSONVILLE












DISTRIBUTING COMPANY OF FLORIDA
2433 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, Florida
WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER.




IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIlHIIII IIIIIII lIIIIIIII II miiUHIIIIIII HI iIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIlIUIUIIIIIIIIll iIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIH ill II lllIHIIIIIIIIIIIMINIIIIIIIIIIII t

* BUILDERS' ROSTER ,
IIIII i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii l 1 IIIIIi i miIIIIIIIi i IIIIII IIII I llll tilllllll iii IIIIII 1ii IIIIIIIIi IIII IIII IIIiii l 1IIIIIIIIii llIII
Contracting firms listed below have either been recommended by practicing architects in their
locality or are trade association members of recognized standing. AGC-Associated General
Contractors; FAEC-Florida Association of Electrical Contractors; ACI-Amer. Concrete Institute;
NCMA-Natl. Concrete Masonry Assoc.; NRMCA-Natl. Ready-mixed Concrete Assoc.; FCPA-
Florida Concrete Products Assoc. C-Person to contact.


- CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL
Cleveland Construction Co., Inc.
Harborview Rd., Punta Gorda
Phone: NE 2-5911
C-Roy C. Young, Pres.-AGC

-- DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
Avant Construction Co., Inc.
360 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
Phone: NE 5-2409
C-John L. Avant, Pres.-AGC
Edward M. Fleming Construction
Co., Inc.
4121 N.W. 25th St., Miami 42
Phone: NE 5-0791
C-Ed. M. Fleming, Pres.-AGC
PAVING, GRADING
T. J. James Construction Co.
1700 N.W. 119th St., Miami
Phone: MU 8-8621
C-Randolph Young, Gen. Mgr.-AGC

- PALM BEACH COUNTY
GENERAL
Arnold Construction Co.
S'te 7, Murray Bid., Palm Beach
Phone: TE 2-4267
C-W. H. Arnold, Pres.-AGC
Paul & Son, Inc.
921 Ortega Rd., W. Palm Beach
Phone TE 2-3716
C-P. D. Crickenberger, Pres.--AGC


CONCRETE MASONRY
Shirley Brothers, Inc.
N. Canal Pt. Rd., Pahokee
Phone: Pahokee 7185
C-Claude L. Shirley, Pres.-AGC
AGC assoc. NRMCA; FCPA; NCMA
PLASTERING
J. A. Tompkins
1102 North A, Lake Worth
Phone: JU 2-6790
C-J. A. Tompkins, Owner-AGC
ELECTRICAL
Arrow Electric Company
501.Palm St., W. Palm Beach
Phone: TE 3-8424
C-V. L. Burkhardt, Prez.-AGC
Assoc.; FAEC
PINELLAS COUNTY
GENERAL
A. P. Hennessy & Sons, Inc.
2300 22d St. N., St. Petersburg
Phone: 7-0308
C-L. J. Hennessy, Pres.-AGC

VOLUSIA COUNTY
CONCRETE MASONRY
Quillian's Concrete
3rd St. F.E.C., Daytona Beach
Phone: CL 3-8113
C-Hugo Quillian, Partner--AGC
Assoc. NCMA; FSPA; NRMCA. ACI

- GEORGIA-Fulton County -
GENERAL
Beers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: AL 0555
C-E. M. Eastman, V.-Pres.-AGC


INTERVIEW ...
(Continued from Page 21)
beat the bushes just as if you were
running for the Presidency.
Q-Did you enjoy it? And how
about the dirty side of politics?
A-I enjoyed it very much. As to
the ins and out of politics, the only
way to keep a political race from
getting -dirty, is to keep it clean.
I'm not a politician. I don't want
to stay in office all my life. Public
service is a thankless job in many
ways. But it's a job that good men
must do. If you could interest the
good business men of any commun-
ity to give just two to four years
of their time toward civic develop-
ment, I believe we wouldn't have
the trouble we see now in local
civic politics.
Q-What especially could archi-
tects do along those lines?
A-Well, the contact with work-
ing men, the understanding of hu-
man nature that comes from super-
vising jobs, builds up an excellent
background for understanding pub-
lic life. Public service, and even
politics, is actually an experience in
handling human relations properly.
That's a fascinating avocation in
itself.
Another thing I've found neces-
sary-and a lot of fun besides.
That's public speaking. Before I
entered the commisisoner's race, I'd
never made a political speech in my
life. So I took some lessons in public
speaking. The ability to get up and
say what I want to with no fear is
one of the most valuable things I've
gotten from my public service.
Q-But how about the special
problems of civic office?
A-Any good architect's business
experience will give him enough
training there. There's no mystery
to civic operation-even the budget
meetings will quickly become clear
to anybody who's been used to
working with cost allocations and
estimating on building projects. It's
really just a matter of applying your
general experience and good com-
mon senses to the particular prob-
lems involved. Civic business is
actually much like the architectural
business. It's just bigger business-
that's all. Both the architect and
(Continued on opposite page)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


DRAFTSMAN

ENGINEERING DRAFTS-
MAN experienced in streets,
utilities, city planning. Per-
manent, civil service and
retirement. Send resume,
availability and salary re-
quirements to
CITY ENGINEER
West Palm Beach, Florida


SURVEYOR

SURVEY CHIEF experienc-
ed in all municipal Engin-
eering and right-of-way
problems. Florida registra-
tion required. Permanent.
Send resume, availability
and salary requirements to
CITY ENGINEER
West Palm Beach, Florida


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111





(Continued from opposite page)
the city official handle other
people's money to get the best
results from the expenditures. The
principle's the same.
Q-How can architects improve
their present contact with civic af-
fairs?
A-Chiefly by seeking to help
their community willingly and
graciously. Architects should belong
to some kind of civic club where
they get out and meet business
men. And they should learn how
to speak up on the civic subjects
that interest them. Then, when
they get appointed to a civic board
they should give all the time and
effort it takes to do a fine job.
The results of doing something con-
structive like this and having your
community appreciate what you're
trying to do is a tremendous per-
sonal satisfaction. So far as our
Palm Beach area goes, we've found
it's also making the community
itself more architect-conscious. So,
of course, whenever architects do
a good job in public service, it's
good public relations for the pro-
fession as well.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Armor-Flex Products, Inc. 24
Belmar Drapes . . 2
Brown & Grist . .. 10
Bruce Equipment Company 4
Builders' Roster . .. 22
Burnup & Sims, Inc. . 14
Cool Roof of Miami 16
Electrend Distributing Co. 21
Florida Portland Cement Co. 5
Florida Power & Light Co. 18
Florida Steel Products . .20
George C. Griffin .. .10
Hollostone of Miami . 3
Interstate
Marble & Tile Co. 17
Leap Concrete .... .20
Magic City Shade
& Drapery Corp. . 21
Maule ..... .2nd Cover
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler 21
Palmer Electric Company 20
Perlite, Inc . .. 11
Positions open . .22
Prescolite
Manufacturing Corp .24
A. H. Ramsey & Son, Inc.. 6
Satchwell Electric
Construction Co. . 19
Southern Venetian Blind Co. 2
Vulkan . . . 19
F. Graham Williams . 23

JULY, 1956


F. GRAHAM
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


WILLIAMS, Chairman
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


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Represented in Florida by
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Telephone No. 83-6554


ATLANTA

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Attendance at the coming FAA
Convention at Miami Beach this fall
will be swelled by most of the Stu-
dent Chapter, AIA, at the University
of Florida if plans now being dis-
cussed by the Miami Producers'
Council Chapter fully materialize. It
has been proposed that the Council
sponsor transportation of the students
from Gainesville to Miami Beach-
and, of course, their return after Con-
vention hand-clapping has stopped.
The idea has been enthusiastically
received by Council members and
steps are now being taken to assure
bus travel for some 45 students, and
their professors.
By the time that the trip will be
made, however, the Miami Chapter
will be well into another year's activ-
ity under a new administration. The
June 26th meeting was slated for the
election of officers, with a planning
session for the new staff taking place
early in July. But our press schedule
prevented reporting of the election in
this issue. That report, plus an out-
line of next year's program will appear
in the August issue. Barring a radical
change in the Chapter's past policy,
the program of "informational meet-
ings" at which Council members act
as hosts to architects will be con-
tinued.
That program involved a traditional
"table-top" exhibit in May. Some 155
architects were invited guests of the
entire Miami Chapter at a cocktail
party and dinner on Tuesday eve-


'~-~ ~ ~. .kx,&>&~ ~' ;xz::~r~s~.


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too, employ "DieLux"* diecastings as an integral
part of the unit...for STRENGTH, DURABILITY,
APPEARANCE. 1. No. 1015-6715 Recessed. 2. No. A-14
Swivel Unit. 3. No. 8585 Hospital Light. No. WB-25
Wall Unit. Write for your free copies of current
PRESCOLITE literature.
*Prescolite'strade name for precision diecast products.

PRESCOLITE MANUFACTURING CORP
Berkeley, California Neshaminy, Pennsylvania


Notes to Spec Writers ...

Two items of practical interest
have recently claimed attention. One
is the new and admirably prepared
catalog on steel bar-joists and related
specialties issued by the Vulkan Flor-
ida Division of Hialeah. In it is a
wealth of information of both design
and specification character includ-
ing many details, technical design
notes, spacing data and safe load
tables for various clear spans and a
variety of joist sizes.
The other is a glare-control product


developed, and now being manufac-
tured, by the Amor-Flex Company
of Ft. Lauderdale. It's made up of
a series of reinforced plastic strips,
hung vertically from an overhead track
and linked at the edges with plastic
rings. The plastic, which can be had
in a wide variety of colors with or
without integrally-fused patterns, is
translucent to let light in, but keep
glare out. When not in use, the
strips stack in an accordion fold
against the jamb of an opening.
Operation is similar to that of a well-
designed traverse drapery.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111


ning, May 22nd, at Miami Springs
Villas. After an excellent meal, Chap-
ter president Gosper Sistrunk intro-
duced the 26 member-firm represen-
tatives who were in charge of as
many capsule exhibits-as large as
could be held on a table-top.
The table-top exhibit idea has been
adopted as one of the best ways to
permit the more than 50 Chapter
members who wish to participate
to show the latest development in
their respective fields. And it has
proved a source of interest to archi-
tects as an opportunity to view
samples too large for office showing
and also to obtain specific informa-
tion about them without interference
of office pressure.
Earlier in the same month a Coun-
cil member staged an independent
party of his own at the Coral Gables
Country Club. The firm was Farrey's
Wholesale Hardware; and the prod-
uct about which the show revolved
was Modernfold doors, for which the
firm is a distributor. Francis Farrey
and Harold Doehler ran the. show
like experts a fast moving, fact-
packed demonstration complete with
excellent staging and plenty of eye-
filling glamour. It followed a cocktail
party and dinner for a throng of
nearly 200, most of whom had the
welcome opportunity of meeting some
of the Modernfold top brass who had
accepted Farrey's invitation to visit
Miami and help make the party a
success.










Let's Control Our Growth



Before It Can Control Us


It is not impossible that this State of ours is at one of the most critical
crossroads of its existence. Here are some of the signs.
1-Communities from Key West to Pensacola are growing like beans in
a summer rain. Yet with precious few exceptions, nothing is being done to
direct that growth, to channel progress into pleasure, to save the trees from
an onward march of asphalt.
2-Construction activity is at an all-time peak. But buildings are going up
to create more congestion in cities which have no zoning regulations adequate
to prevent it and which do not have utility systems sufficient for even current
needs, let alone expansion.
3-Permanent population is soaring. We set our caps for more tourists,
cajol industries to settle here. Yet so far have paid little more than lip
service to such problems as transportation, traffic and service facilities which
are the direct results of our successful promotion.
In short, we are just growing, willy-nilly. Other areas than ours, other cities,
other states have done the same- and have finally discovered that uncon-
trolled, uncharted expansion has a cancer at its core. The disease is showing
up in choked highways, in city slums, in vast stretches of blighted neighbor-
hoods, both urban and suburban. It has become a disease of national scope
and so vital a concern that curative measures like Urban Renewal and Rede-
velopment are being pushed with all the vigor of an aroused public.
It can happen to Florida. Indeed, it will happen to Florida unless those
who love the State as a place to live and work act quickly and decisively to
prevent it.
We still have a chance to do so. We still have the opportunity, in most
cases, to avoid the cause to set up conditions for good health instead of
prescribing measures to cure the disease.
That is a big job. But it can be done if citizens of this State have the
will, self-discipline and good-humored patience to do it. It needs the leadership
of the State Government. It requires far-sighted initiative from county and city
officials in every section of the State. It involves the understanding cooperation
of civic groups and private citizens. And it will take much research and thought-
ful planning.
That's where architects come in. Individually and collectively they can
furnish the brainpower and technical experience that's necessary to point the
road to steady, healthy progress throughout the entire State.


*> "














































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The Seville Hotel, Miami Beach, is headquarters for the 1956 FAA Convention


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