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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Public relations in practice
 The 88th annual AIA convention
 Salute to a Christian gentlema...
 Prescription for chapter ailme...
 Honor awards show
 FAIA-for service to the institute...
 Notes on an airline schedule
 Mid-Florida -- The AIA's 122nd...
 News and notes
 FAA Scholarship competition...
 Advertisers' index
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00024
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: June 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00024
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Public relations in practice
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The 88th annual AIA convention
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Salute to a Christian gentleman
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Prescription for chapter ailments
        Page 13
    Honor awards show
        Page 14
        Page 15
    FAIA-for service to the institute and state groups urge closer AIA ties
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 18
        Page 16c
        Page 16d
        Page 16e
        Page 16f
    Notes on an airline schedule
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Mid-Florida -- The AIA's 122nd chapter
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
    FAA Scholarship competition winner
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Advertisers' index
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Producers' council program
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text









111q A-


June -1956 0









88th AIA
Convention... '
At Los Angeles, these
men steered the AIA
through one of the busi-
est National Conventions
ever recorded as a pre-
lude to planning for the
bright and equally busy
year they see ahead. ...











I I l I


I I


I I


Thanks to South Florida's
creative leaders our homes and
communities are among the most
modern and interesting in the Nation.
Over the years our architects'
original and imaginative application
of even the most basic materials
has given us a style of
architecture that is functional,
enduring and beautiful.
Today, with the constant
development of new building
materials by Maule, the
opportunity for new and original
effects is almost unlimited.
You'll see many of these new
materials at work in our new
office building at 5220 Biscayne
Boulevard. You'll see the many
ways exposed masonry can be
used... building blocks for both
facing and interior walls ...
pre-cast walls for exteriors...
and many other applications of
both new and traditional materials.
We believe you'll gain timely and
valuable information in this
"show case" building of ours.
So come on out and see us. We'll
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many applications.


Tree Parking in our private lot.


",. ..


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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
S Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS


Franklin S. Bunch North
John Stetson . . South
William B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
Daytona Beach William R. Gomon
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II


Florida North .


Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick


Fla. No. Central Albert P. Woodard


Florida South


Jacksonville


Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland
George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz


Mid-Florida Francis H. Emerson
Palm Beach .. Frederick W. Kessler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421


l74




Florida Architect


VOLUME 6


JUNE, 1956


NUMBER 6


CONTENTS


Public Relations In Practice


------ 2


88th AIA Convention Report ----- 6

Salute to A Christian Gentleman ---- -- 8

Prescription for Chapter Ailments ---------13

AIA to Study Package Deals _-- ----13

Honor Awards Show _____ ------14

FAIA For Service to The Institute ---16


State Groups Urge Closer AIA Ties .

"Notes on an Airline Schedule ... "


Mid-Florida the AIA's 122nd Chapter

News and Notes ------

FAA Scholarship Competition Winner


------16

------17


---- 21


"Interpertation of Specerfications" --------22

Advertisers' Index _____ --------------- 26

Producers Council Program _.---_---------- --------- 28

THE COVER
A rare picture of the AIA's top brass-the men who are guiding
the destinies of a professional organization in which more than
11,000 architects can claim membership. Photographed at the
opening business session at Los Angeles they are, left to right:
Edward L. Wilson, re-elected as secretary; retiring president George
Bain Cummings; the newly-elected president and former treasurer,
Leon Chatelain, Jr.; and AIA Executive Director Edmund R. Purves.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
S. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


JUNE, 1956


---19









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Throughout the State evidence is
piling up to prove that Florida archi-
tects understand both the value and
the methods of public relations. And
recent developments by groups in
the North, Central and South Flor-
ida Chapters offer good illustrations
of the effective use of various meth-
ods to gain the values sought in
common by every member of the
profession.

Luncheons for Legislators
In Miami, an experiment in per-
sonal contact has now grown into a
custom that could well be adopted by
every architectural group in the State.
Some time ago individual architects
made a point of getting to know
their local legislators. Discussions
between them- usually over a leis-
urely luncheon-served to inform the
legislators about the aims of archi-
tects on one hand; and on the other
clarified the stand of an office-holder
relative to these aims.
The idea worked out well. But a
couple of years ago individual archi-
tects clubbed together, talked to
legislators in groups. Now the idea
has grown to embrace the South
Florida Chapter. And contact with
legislators-or prospective ones-has
become a regular and important part
of Chapter activity.
It's particularly important just
prior to an election or the start of a
legislative session. Here's how it
works:
Prior to an election, the Chapter
arranges a luncheon, invites its mem-
bers. Invited too are candidates for
office. After a good meal candidates
are given a chance to state their views
on affairs, their stand of matters of
issue. Their architect-hosts fire ques-
tions at them, test their attitudes,
often explain the importance at-
tached by the construction industry
to some proposal or position. On the
basis of this group-interview result the
Chapter selects the candidate it will
support.
Much the same sort of thing goes
on prior to a legislative session. But


at this time the legislator is
on the stand of architects, the
for supporting one measure,
ing another.


briefed
reasons
oppos-


The idea has caught on and in
time may well expand to include
engineers' and contractors' groups in
the area. It's welcomed by legislators
as a sincere attempt to develop a
mutual understanding and a clarifi-
cation of issues. And, if carried
through by architectural and con-
struction groups throughout the
State, it could be developed as a
potent political force for good at all
legislative levels.

Community Development
in St. Petersburg
Architects in Pinellas County be-
long to the Florida Central Chapter,
AIA. But the area of that Chapter
is large; the Chapter holds formal
meetings only four times a year, finds
it difficult to carry on Chapter proj-
ects that will prove equally effective
in all localities within its jurisdiction-
al area. Thus, St. Petersburg archi-
tects have been in the habit of hold-
ing weekly luncheon meetings, part-
ly to maintain contact with each
other, partly to focus their profession-
al attention on local matters that
need improvement.
Last fall this group decided to take
a more active part in community
affairs than formerly. They or-
ganized themselves as the St. Peters-
burg Society of Architects, AIA, ap-
pointed officers and a few committee
heads and drew up a program of
objectives for the year ahead. On
this basis they preceded to make
themselves heard in St. Petersburg
affairs as a voice of the profession and
a factor of leadership in community
development. Among items on their
planned program were these:
1. . A Metropolitan Planning
Association for Greater St. Peters-
burg. With cooperation of the St.
Petersburg Times and the Commu-
nity Planning Department of the
U/F, a regional planning study for
(Continued on Page 4)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Public Relations in Practice

How some Chapters of the FAA are going about
the job of "doing good and getting credit for it"




































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JUNTE 1956


I1:













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-:
^




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.-'



-'-

.-**





:.4






Public Relations in Practice
(Contianed from Page)
Pinellas County was initiated. Public
meetings on the, idea were held at
which both architects and civic lead-
ers explained the program. The
study is now under way. When fin-
ished it will provide the reason for
other public meetings and will also
provide the basis for cooperative ac-
tion by St. Petersburg and Pinellas
County toward the end of putting
the plan into operation. The Times
will give the plan full publicity and
has offered to publish the planning
studies in a booklet for public dis-
tribution.
2. . Urban Design and Housing.
This involves several related projects.
One is the development of St. Peters-
burg's waterfront. Working with the
Planning Department and the Hotel-
men's Association, architects have de-
veloped an overall scheme for city-
owned waterfront property. It is
primarily a waterfront recreational -
project, involving site planning, traf-
fic allocation and suggestions for
buildings needed to provide complete
facilities.
Another similar project is now un-
derway looking to. the development
of Mullet Key into an 800-acre Com-
munity Recreational Park. Work is
being done with the Pinellas County
Commission, since the land is county-
owned.
A third part of this project con-
cerns Urban Renewal a matter
of more importance to many Florida
cities than is generally realized.
Studies are now being programmed
with the City Planning Department
which will eventually lead to recom-
mendations for a sweeping program_
of area re-development that may in-
volve slum-clearance operations and
the construction of new housing.
Housing for the aged has already
been an additional concern of the St.
Petersburg Society of Architects. Re-
cently a round-table discussion of the
subject was held, sponsored jointly
by, he architects and a local news-
paper. It resulted in a well-docu-
mented article in the Times as part of
the growing file of data on this glifi-
cult subject which may serve as the
basis for future project development.
3. . A Service Program for com-
munity use. The Society has formed


a modest speakers' bureau; and archi-
tects have already appeared as speak-
ers for sen ice club meetings and local
business groups. And the Society's
president, HOWARD F. ALLENDER, is
now serving as a member of the St.
Petersburg Planning Department.'
it -is too early to assay the full
potential of this ambitious program.
But so far a number of definite and
worthwhile results have shown them-
selves. First, architects in St. Peters-
burg are speaking virtually as one
voice-and they are thus rapidly gain-
ing respectful attention in all quar-
ters. Second, they are initiating civic
improvements on a service not a
self-seeking basis; and they are
thus taking a position of prime lead-
ership in" matters of community de-
velopment. Third, what architects
are doing in St. Petersburg is con-
stantly making news. The result is
the best possible type of publicity
architects can get. And finally, such
collaborative efforts are proving to St.
Petersburg architects that cooperation
provides a strength formerly lacking,
a realization of public relations values
not attainable before all this began.
Florida North Project
Praised by Institute
Florida AIA Imembers can pride
themselves that the Florida North
Chapter has been singled out for
special commendation by the In
stitute's Chapter Affairs Committee.
The occasion was announcement
of a series of lectures for prospective
homeowners, sponsored by the Flor-
ida North Chapter. The series, con-
ducted by the General Extension
Division of Florida in cooperation
with the College of Architecture and
Allied Arts, features lectures by AIA
and UF faculty members on such
subjects as home financing, design,
materials, landscaping and building
processes. First lecture were given
April 26; and the full course, open
to the public for a $1 registration
fee, was to continue through May 31.
In naming the lecture program the
Chapter Affairs Committee's "Docu-
ment of the Month," Beryl Price
the Committee's chairman, said
"This -project is the finest kind of
public relations work in which our
Institute Chapters can participate."
He especially commended the Florid
North Chapter for its part in "thf
excellent 'educational activity."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




































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JUNE, 1956 5


UA~ymU1


~;2~2~~







REPORT





The 88th Annual



AIA Convention


Monday, May 14-It was quite hot
in Los Angeles. But the papers car-
ried this notice "No smog today.
Morning burning permitted."
It was a quiet day, mostly devoted
to registration for early-comers, with
all-day tours to Santa Barbara and
Pasadena for those lucky enough not
to miss the busses. In the evening
the Producers' Council-which had
put on a record-breaking 81-product
exhibit-were hosts to the architects
at a traditional entertainment, just
prior to the opening of their exhibit.
The Council did themselves and the
architects proud; and a story about
their own particular convention is
carried elsewhere in this issue.
Tuesday, May 15-Still no smog in
Los Angeles, but plenty of heat. The
88th Annual Convention of the AIA
officially opened at 9:30 before a
packed audience in the Biltmore
Theater. The usual amenities of an
opening session were gracefully ob-
served-invocation, a welcome by Di-
rector DoNAI.D BEACH KIRBY, the
acceptance by President GEORGE BAIN
CUMMINGS. Then the welcoming
talks by Los Angeles Mayor NORRIS
POULSON and PAUI. R. HUNTER, presi-
dent of the host Chapter of Southern
California.
The keynote address of the Con-
vention was ably given by JOHN ELY
BURCHARD, Dean, School of Humani-
ties and Social Studies, MIT. To
some it may have seemed long and
somewhat sonorous; but to the major-
ity it apparently left the impression of
having been the finest keynote ad-
dress in many a long year.
Burchard addressed his attention,
of course, to the Convention's theme
Architecture for the Good Life. What
he voiced was largely an essay of


definition-definition of what con-
stitutes the good life and the archi-
tecture that helps to make it good.
The essay followed a sound, work-
manlike outline (Burchard was
trained as an engineer and once
taught structural engineering at
MIT) rounded out with intellectual
passages that were sometimes frankly
envious of the glories of ancient
Greece-"those times when the conm-
mon purpose was reasonably clear"-
and at others almost as frankly dis-
paraging of our current architectural
achievements-with which "we dissi-
pate the opportunity in good average
work on matters of good average im-
portance. The mountain peaks are
not there."
"The good life," said Dean Bur-
chard, "is not a matter of good gim-
micks or of physical ease. It is a
matter of things that uplift the spirit.
High averages will not define it. The
Arch of Etoile and the tree-lined
streets that come to it and depart are
more important to the good life of
the poorest Parisian than a tenth of
one percent improvement in his sub-
standard dwelling.
"I meant this rejection of the high
average to apply to all elements of
the good life-to the poetic life, to
the political life, to the visual life, to
the spiritual life. It is a life that
occasionally, though not too often,
must reach to ecstasy. Not too often,
because ecstasy cannot be prolonged,
as readers of Dante's Paradiso can dis-
cover.
"Architecture, then, is obviously
more than a building. It must be
more than a high average of con-
venience and amenity in the provision
of places to sleep, eat and work. It
must contain something that lifts up


the spirit when it is beheld or ex-
perienced- something, indeed, that
lifts up many spirits. It must not be
too personal; or must, if personal, be
open to a multiplicity of uplifting
interpretations."
In developing a fuller definition of
architecture for the good life "the
mountain peak on the plateau of a
high-average existence" Burchard
scored reluctance of client and archi-
tect alike to adopt "the brilliant en-
gineering schemes suggested by the
works of Freyssinet or Maillart or
Nervi or even' our own Buckminster
Fuller" and the too general exclusion
of texture and painting and sculpture
from our buildings. Such things, the
speaker declared, are ordinarily re-
garded as "too expensive" a dim
viewpoint in face of the fact that we
are the richest nation in the world.
"It may well be," said the speaker
firmly, "that a Nervi system is better
economics in Italy than it is in Amer-
ica. But to apply economic deter-
minism to art is the last refuge of
the anesthetic mind."
But not all of his utterances were
quite so devastating. He saw at least
a glimmer of hope for America's
architectural future, if not for her
somewhat confused present.
"In the last analysis," declared the
Convention's keynoter, "if one were
required to name the nation in which
the highest average of architecture
was now being maintained he must,
and without chauvinism, name our
own land.
"In this country architecture, so far
as what architects do, has finally come
of age. We have a past of which we
need not be ashamed and a future
which we need not fear. And this has
come about despite our Puritanical
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














It was a four-day whirl of speeches, seminars and sightseeing against

a background of fabulous freeways and Southern Cal hospitality that

ranged from cocktail buffets to a gala Hollywood premiere . .


rejection of the opulent, the colorful,
even the elegant, despite our native,
tendency toward the disorder of the
newspaper litter and momentarily si-
lenced horns of New York and the
ubiquitous used-car dump.
"On all this we can look with some
pride. But also humbly, for we have
not reached the stars.
"I cannot believe that in the long
run the wealthiest nation in the
world, and in some ways the most
daring, will not cease to be timid and
tepid in its acceptance of its total
esthetic opportunity anid responsi-
bility. It is not impossible that we
may achieve in America a sort of
Periclean age in architecture. Ameri-
can architecture is now mature; it
needs only to become great."
Dean Burchard's address was the
first of many others throughout the
four active days of the Convention.
At luncheon, Tuesday, an increasing
roster of delegates (the final count


was close to 500) heard GEORGE
BAIN CUMMINGS, who had sometime
before announced that he was not a
candidate for re-election as AIA presi-
dent, report on the state of the AIA.
lHe touched on the past year's prog-
ress of the Institute-its growth in
membership and income, the worth
of the regional judiciary procedure in-
itiated last fall, the encouraging start
of the Student Forum and the work
now being done by many Institute
departments to activate recommenda-
tions of the Survey Commission's re-
port of 1954. But mostly it was a
farewell "thank-you" to the Institute
"team" of which the speaker had
been a member for many years.
In the afternoon the Host Chapter
had arranged a Downtown Tour of
Los Angeles-one of a seemingly in-
numerable series of such tours and
sightseeing programs. But at almost
the same time were scheduled a Semi-
nar on "Architecture for Safety"-in


which CLINTON GAMBLE, as chair-
man of the AIA Committee on Hur-
ricane Resistance took a leading part
-and three separate Round Table
Discussions on Preservation of His-
toric Buildings, School Building
Trends and Office Practice. Manly
Convention participants including
both guests and delegates were in-
terested in everything! The generally
reported result was "frustration." At
most of the meetings attendance was
disappointingly meagre.
The traditional President's Recep-
tion was held on the poolside terraces
and gardens of the huge Ambassador
Hotel. Afterward, what seemed like
the whole Convention packed the
Moulin Rouge a theatre-restaurant
modestly billed as "Showplace of the
World" to dine and dance and
watch a stage show that reminded
more than one spectator of the
Chauve Souris.
(Continued on Page 23)


AIA Treasurer Elected to Institute Presidency for Coming Year

Leon Chatelain, Jr., was born in Washington, D. C., March 8, 1902, and
graduated from George Washington University with a B. of Arch. degree.
Married, and the father of three children, he has practiced under his own
name since 1930, but recently formed the firm of Chatelain, Gauger and Nolan.
For many years he has been active in District of Columbia civic and business-
affairs, having served on D.C. Committees of Public Works, Urban Renewal,
Redevelopment and Historical Buildings. He is a past president of the Wash-
ington Board of Trade and the Building Congress and is a director of the Bank
of Commerce and the Jefferson Savings and Loan Association and a trustee
of the Equitable Life Insurance Company. . .His professional activities
include membership in the D.C. Board of Examiners and Registrars of Archi-
tects, treasurer of the NAAB Board and past service on many AIA committees
including Finance, Public Relations, Dues Structure, Errors and Omissions,
Insurance, New Headquarters Building and Centennial Observance. He is a
Trustee of the AIA Insurance Trust and the Pension Fund and has served as
4. National Treasurer since 1954. He became a corporate member of the Washing-
ton Metropolitan Chapter, AIA, in 1930 and is a past president of that
Chapter. His elevation to Institute Fellowship dates from 1953.


JUNE, 1956


M M_ =





a5ta&e eGa et Ijeo4E5 reaCetlCmwa


Jacksonville


Chapter


Pays Homage


to a Neighbor


and Good Friend


Mellen C. Greeley, FAIA, receives a certificate of
appreciation prepared by the Jacksonville Chapter as
Mrs. Greeley listens to Bishop Frank A. Juhan voice
the affection and congratulations of all present.


At a dinner held in the Roosevelt
Hotel, Jacksonville, May 5, some 125
people representing all phases of
Florida's construction industry met
to honor MELLEN C. GREELEY,
FAIA, for a lifetime of self-effacing
service. The gathering was held
under the auspices of the Jacksonville
Chapter. But the tribute paid to the
snowy-haired dean of Florida archi-
tects went far beyond the boundaries
of his professional affiliations.
Present to voice their appreciation
for his efforts on behalf of both the
church and the state were Bishop
FRANK A. JUHAN, of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida and GEORGE
SIMONS of the Jacksonville City Ad-
visory Planning Board, on which Mr.
Greeley served as secretary from 1929
to 1947. A friend of long standing,
Louis AICHEL, who heads a Jackson-
ville equipment supply firm, acted
as toastmaster. SANFORD W. GOIN,
FAIA, of Gainesville, spoke for the
architects.
Bishop Juhan read, and then pre-
sented to Mr. Greeley, a framed
certificate of appreciation signed and
sealed by Governor LEROY COLLINS,
AIA President GEORGE BAIN CUM-
MINGS, Jacksonville's Mayor HAYDON


BURNS and Bishop Juhan. Thus the
certificate represented a combined
testimonial from State, Church, Com-
munity and Profession, though it had
been prepared by members of the
Jacksonville Chapter.
In outlining, on behalf of the archi-
tectural profession, the many notable
phases of Mellen Greeley's life-long
service, Sanford Goin said ". . he is
many things to many people: Chris-
tian gentleman, public servant, good
citizen, good neighbor and friend.
But to the architects of Florida he
is even more. He is an institution."
Mr. Greeley opened his own office
in Jacksonville in 1909 after architec-
tural training in various offices fol-
lowing military service in the Span-
ish-American War. His practice was
interrupted by additional military
service in World War I as an officer
in the Quartermaster Corps. In 1923
he was named as secretary to the
Florida State Board of Architecture,
a position he held continuously until
last year. He was a charter member
and a president of the first AIA
Chapter in Florida; and was elevated
to AIA Fellowship in 1934.
Not realized by many architects is


the fact that in 1915 Mr. Greeley was
instrumental in securing passage of
the first Florida statute regulating the
practice of architecture and creating
the State Board of Architecture. His
efforts to strengthen the architec-
tural profession went far beyond the
boundaries of his State; One indica-
tion is his service as a member and
president of the National Council of
Architectural Registration Boards.
Others are his long-time connection
with the Hotel Commission, his serv-
ices on the Jacksonville City Park
Commission and the City Planning
Advisory Board.
Commenting on the influence Mr.
Greeley has had on maintaining the
high standards of professional prac-
tice, Goin said.
"As an officer of the State Board,
he consistently stood firm in the
position that the primary purpose of
any licensing board is the protection
of the public-and that the public
interest is a trust to be held inviol-
able.
"What Mel believed in he
preached; and what he preached, he
practiced. This man does more
honor to our profession than we will
ever be able to do to him."
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Prescription for Chapter Ailments

From the Chapter Affairs Session at Los Angeles came sug-
gestions for bolstering Chapter strength and local AIA prestige


Those attending the 88th AIA
Convention in Los Angeles for its
solid fare, found at least part of what
they sought at the Chapter Affairs
Committee conference Thursday. It
was an all-morning session, chair-
manned by BERYL PRICE who, as
partly Floridian, maintains an office
in Ft. Lauderdale. And when it broke
up, some four and one-half hours
after starting, participants had heard
suggestions enough to revitalize any
AIA Chapter which might have been
bogged down by the quagmire of
inaction or stagnated by boredom.
It was the 10th such meeting of
the Chapter Affairs Committee, ac-
cording to Price; and its attendance
by some 150 interested people gave
substance to Price's statement that in
the vitality of Chapter activities lies
the greatest potential for AIA ac-
complishment. The architectural pro-
fession is weakest at the Chapter
level, Price told his audience. Thus
the strengthening of Chapter activity
can become a vital factor in raising
the importance of the architect
throughout the area of his Chapter.


Subsequent discussion was centered
largely on how this could be accom-
plished. There was a great deal of
it, most directly pertinent to the
job of making Chapter work im-
portant- and interesting for all
members. Here are some points that
have direct bearing on Chapter affairs
in Florida:
First Pick a man to run local
Chapter affairs for his all-around
ability to plan things with imagina-
tion and to get things done-smoothly
and so everybody's happy to work
with him. He must be what Price
called "a rover," for many Chapter
activities with which he will be asso-
ciated touch on the work of other
committees as public relations,
education, schools, program, etc. As
such, he's a coordinator for many
Chapter programs.
Second Be certain every Chapter
meeting is both interesting and pro-
fessionally important. Price cited one
New York State Chapter which holds
only five meetings per year, with
every one a standout, as an example


Package Deals to be Subject for AIA Study


During the post Convention
"orientation meeting" of the newly-
elected AIA Board of Directors, held
May 18 in Los Angeles, President-
elect LEON CHATELAIN, JR., said that
activities of so-called "Package Deal-
ers" were on the increase. He stated
that the AIA Board had received
much comment relative to organiza-
tions offering a combined service of
design, engineering, financing and
construction. Some, he indicated
were directly inimical to the practice
of architecture as a profession; while
others were operating in a way that
might prove helpful to architects un-
der the proper type of collaborative
set-up.
Chatelain promised the appoint
ment of a committee to probe the
pros and cons of package operation
and present a series of recommenda-
JUNE, 1956


tions to guide architects in future
relations with them. Others present
at the meeting commented on the
importance of this study; and at
least one suggested that in some
adaptation of a "package-deal set-up"
might lie new opportunities for ar-
chitects' abilities and accomplish-
ments.
Pending completion of the AIA
study, however, the package idea is
being vigorously resisted in many
quarters. Latest states to announce
formal action against it are Arkansas
and Georgia. Both actions involve
the attempts by The Bank Building
and Equipment Corporation to prac-
tice architecture in these states. This
organization is reported to have an
architectural department of some 200
persons, headed by W. G. Noebel,
licensed as an architect in Arkansas.


of success on this point. Chapter
programs are planned a year in ad-
vance. Each features a paper on some
research subject assigned months
ahead to a younger member, then
presented by him as a practical and
informative project. Entertainment
and good fellowship aren't lacking
at meetings. But the solid value of
the research programs are the core
of the Chapter's stability.
Third Stimulate cooperation be-
tween Chapter members and students.
In areas where students are within
Chapter areas this can be especially
active. Elsewhere, architects' active
help with the in-training program now
being sponsored by the AIA Edu-
cation Committee can bring equally
good results. Help on the Log-Book
program is one means--and if no
such program is now in effect, ini-
tiation of it can become a worthwhile
project.
In this connection, JAMES BERRY,
Rice Institute student and president
of the newly formed AIA Student
Forum, emphatically voiced the stu-
dents' desire and willingness to work
with Chapter members. He pleaded
for a closer-than-present tie between
students and in-training architects
with seasoned practitioners.
Fourth Conduct programs that
will link Chapter affairs with public
interests. The Dallas Chapter, for
example, holds an annual "Awards
Luncheon" to which dignitaries, news-
men, business leaders are invited as
well as those whose buildings are to
receive awards. In any Florida city
this could become a yearly affair of
note, an excellent medium for better-
ing professional relations and a stim-
ulus for upgrading architectural design
in a manner the public could under-
stand and enjoy.
Another similar activity in Dallas
is the raising of scholarship funds for
high school seniors through a yearly
dinner. This affair, customarily at-
tended by 400-500 representatives of
the city's building industry has proved
to be fun, newsworthy and a prac-
tical means for reaching the goal.






















Above, the St. Louis Munici-
pal Airport Terminal Build-
ing; one of the five First
Honor Awards, for which the
firm of Hellmuth, Yamasaki
and Lienweber, St. Louis and
Detroit, were the architects.



Below, another of the First One of several exhibits all worth while to those
Honor Awards went to the
house of Richard Hodgson, in who could find time and opportunity to see them.
New Canaan, Conn., for which
Philip C. Johnson, New York,
was the architect. It was the
only residence to win a top
award. Photo, Ezra Stoller.

Architects' work and the collabora-
tive efforts of fine arts were somewhat
buried under the Los Angeles Con-
vention's avalanche of tours, meet-
ings, seminars and round tables. But
a number of worth-while exhibits
were open to any who wished to
visit them. Included was the Na-
tional Honor Awards exhibit a
sampling of which is shown here -
a grouping of projects designed by
... newly elected Fellows of the AIA;
an exhibit of Finnish architecture
provided by the Smithsonian Institu-
tion; a showing of contemporary
church architecture; and an unusual-
ly fine exhibit of collateral arts, ar-
ranged under the joint auspices of
the Artists' Equity Association, the
Independent Artists of So. Cal. and
the So. Cal. Chapter, AIA.
All these exhibits offered inspira-
tion and pleasure. But not all of
them were easy to visit for busy con-
ventioneers. Thus the booklet "A
Guide to the Architecture of South-
. : ern California" which was handed
each Convention registrant was par-
ticularly welcome. It sketched Cali-
fornia's history, presented many cate-
gories of buildings and contained
also work of west-coast artists.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















The New York firm of Skid-
more, Owings and Merrill
was also given a First Honor
Award for the design of the
Fifth Avenue Branch, Manu-
facturer's Trust Co., New
York, right. Photo, Ezra
Sioller.









The Hilton Istanbul Hotel, in
Istanbul, Turkey, was one of
the 14 Award of Merit win-
ners. Owned by the Turkish
Republic Pension Fund, it
was designed by Skidmore,
Owings and Merrill, New
York, associated with Sedad
H. Eldem, Turkish architect.
Photo, Ezra Stoller.


JUNE, 1956
t;' -.


.* -






FAIA-for Service to The Institute

Marion 1. Manley, of Coconut Grove, is the third
woman ever to have been granted an AIA Fellowship
and the only Floridian to be so honored this year.


For conspicuous service to the In-
stitute Miss MARION I. MANLEY, of
Coconut Grove, was elevated to Fel-
lowship in the Institute at ceremonies
following the Annual Banquet of the
82nd AIA Convention in Los An-
geles, May 18. She was the only
architect from Florida so honored
this year.
Miss Manley is one of the real
"pioneer" architects of the State.
Born in Junction City, Kansas, and
educated at the University of Kan-
sas, University of Illinois-where
she received her architectural degree
in three years-M.I.T. and the Uni-
versity of Michigan, Miss Manley
started her Florida architectural ca-
reer in the office of the late WALTER
DE GARMO in August, 1917. She ob-
tained her registration certificate the
following spring and started her own


architectural practice shortly there-
after.
Her association with AIA dates
from 1926; and since that year she
has been one of Florida's most active
exponents of professional organiza-
tion. She has served on many com-
mittees of the South Florida Chap-
ter and the FAA and has represented
both at national conventions for
many years. Miss Manley was secre-
tary-treasurer of the South Florida
Chapter and its President for two
terms; and for two years served as
Vice-president of the FAA.
Always an advocate of organiza-
tional expansion, Miss Manley was
instrumental in helping form both
the Palm Beach and Broward Coun-
ty Chapters as outgrowths of the
Florida South Chapter. In 1941 and
1942 she headed the important By-


To Marion I. Manley, FAIA, honor
for professional progress.

Laws Committee of the FAA and
spear-headed the movement in Flor-.
ida for unification of State Societies
and Institute Chapters. This laid
the groundwork for the rapid growth
of the Institute nationally; and in
Florida it signalled the start of our.
present association of Chapters, the
FAA, as one of the strongest and
most important state organizations
in the country.


State Groups Urge Closer AIATies

Convention Round Table showed power of State Organizations
with the FAA almost ready to assume a new regional status.


In terms of its possible repercus-
sions on the future of professional
organization activity in Florida, the
Round Table on "The State Orga-
nization in the Institute," held
Wednesday afternoon, May 16, at
the Los Angeles Convention, could
well be called one of the most im-
portant of all Convention meetings.
Attendance was understandably small
-for even without the influence of
host-chapter tours, the subject is a
specialized one of interest to only a
minority of the AIA membership.
But what this meeting lacked in
numbers, it made up in constructive
discussion. Representatives of several
AIA state groups were present-Ohio,
Michigan, New Jersey, New York,
Texas, California-in addition to
representatives of the FAA which
included JOHN STETSON, Miss MARION
I. MANLEY, the FAA executive sec-


retary and CLINTON GAMBLE, FAA
president, who, with HENRY L.
WRIGHT, past. president of the Cali-
fornia Council of Architects, and
MATTHEW DEL GAUDIO, New York
regional director, constituted the dis-
cussion "panel" moderated by ED-
WARD L. WILSON, secretary of the
AIA and past president of the Texas
Society of Architects.
To the extent that this meeting
was more an airing of comparative
state organization experience than any
attempt to hammer out an AIA
policy relative to such organizations,
it achieved little that can be reported
as either definitive or conclusive. In-
deed, one of its chief values was from
a negative point of view.' State orga-
nization representatives outlined,
clearly and forcefully, both the func-
tions and operations of their groups-
and in' doing so posed the important


question of how the undoubted value*
of such organizations can be recog-.
'nized officially by the Institute-but
not woven into the current chapter-
region-headquarters pattern of AIA
operations.
Discussion brought out two facts
of particular significance to Florida
AIA membership. One touched the:
possibility that Florida might be ac-
corded regional AIA status in the
not-too-distant future. The point was
made clear that mere size is not a
criterion for regional recognition-
geography, activity volume, rate of
growth, organization initiative, eco-
nomic and political, as well as pro-
fessional,, problems are all factors.
And due' to the increasing pressure
of all such factors within her borders,
Florida is rapidly moving into a pro-.
fessional position where administra-
tive integration to provide a direct
and constantly constructive contact
with the Institute's headquarters pol-
icies and programs will be essential.
The other fact is that our pro-,
fessional organization in Florida -is.
even now such as to make a possible
(Continued on Page 17)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECTi
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State Groups
C''ol'i,,tid fromii Page 16)
transition to regional status both
natural and .is'i. Thei stup of the
F.- i, s chlscl parallel to that of
both Tlcx.a-which i a regio.n-andc
California. nhich is not. hbit operates
almost is if it ,cr,.. Organizations
in all three states arc based on anl
associtio n -f Cha:.tcr, but both
TeS i and C(liiforni hiae strng-thl-
-nled th!i C(haptcr tit. aind ha'.i
'. idcre ed their .,.._p- of .peratiion
bc\:ond tilhose c .rrent in the F.i .
But hnr-:. for professi ornal org.ni-
zatiou. progress in Florida are clerrk r
nuw than the\ e\cr ha~e been. And
-in the basis of facts gleaned at this
Round Table discussion, there is
cten reason to belhe\e that thel can
be formed into a pattern of great
strength, purpose and accomplish-
ment in the near future.

Wilson Re-Elected Secretary,,
New Directors Chosen
\\hen LFON CH IuTELN. r, neIl\
elected AIA president, assumes his
man\-sided organization duties, he
\will ha\c the benefit of a seasoned
man as one of his ke\ officers. This
\will be EDWARD L. \\ILSON. Ft
\\orth, Texas. who was re-elected as
Secretary of the AIA. \\ilson has
been active in AI. affairs for man\
\ears, having been president of both
the Ft. \Worth Chapter and the Texas
Society' of Architects, an AIA reg-
ional director and member of several
important Institute committees. Ra.v-
MOND S. KAsrENDILEC. Car\. Indiana.
was chosen as treasurer, the post
\which the new AIA president has
held since 1954.
JOHN NOBLE RICHARDS. Toledo,
Ohio, % as elected as first \ice-presi-
dent, PHILIP \\II. Jr., of Chicago.
a; second \lce-president.
New regional directors elected to
the AIA Board for .1 three \ear term
were: JOHN I\I ES PRITCHARD. Tu-
nica. Miss., Gulf States Region; DON-
AL.D STEWART. Portland. Oregon.
Northwest Region. J. Roi CARROLL.
Jr.. Philadelphia, Middle Atlantic
Region, and BERGMAN S. LETZLER.
Louis\ille, Kv.. Create Lakes Region.
Letzler succeeds the new AIA treas-
urer. Ra\mond S. Kastendieck. who
has been director of this region for
the past three sears.
JUNE, 1956


"Notes on the back of an airline schedule concerning St.
Petersburg, hair tonic, goodby now and other problems"

SThis account of the Uinivsrsits it Florida' .Annual Busminc Contercrnce
hicld in St Pet'lrsbur. durmn .Aprrl. n'as written bv Roger Allen. architect
rt Graud Rapidc, Alich.. and one of the Contcrence speatkcr It appeared in
his regular column. pubhilld tri ruicklv in the Grand RapEid Pro; I


SRecentl I
madL d a fast t\\o-
dai' s sit to St.
w MW Pctersbure at the
S request of the
Sex tension dl\l-
%. ic n of the' Iiii-
sersity of Florida
and it is a good
thing I did. as
inians %ss the
fun I had do\\n there, a stone's
throw% from a lnmel Gulf of Mlexico
beach.

If I hadn't gone. I wouldn't have
heard John Al. Fox describe a new
hair tome. "This tonic won't grow
any hair." admitted Air. Fox. "but
it shrinks your head so that 'what
hair you have fits."

Subsequently Mlr. Fox, president
of a frozen orange concentrate com-
pans-Bing Crosb.. a stockholder.
used to plug the product on a disc
jockey program-told me privately
about still another hair tonic. This
is a lo\\ calorie tonic for people
\\hose heads are fat enough already.

On a Super-Constellation it is only
five hours from Chicago to St. Peters-
burg and I spent some of this time
nmeditatin2 on whi airline hostesses
always' sav "Coodb\ now," to alight-
ing passengers. \ 'hy always goodbyey
nown'" ~'lhy not "Goodby some other
time" or "Hasta la vista" or "Over
the river, bud" or "Farewiell. mir
lovelvc" So when I got off, the host-
ess said goodbye y now" to ever) bod)
until I came along. Slhe said "Good-
by. sir." to me. the beautitul but
double-crossing thing.

The night I arrjied Frank Pace.
former secretary of the arm\. former
budget director and currently execu-
tise \ice president of General Dyna-
mics corporation, made a fascinating
speech on the peaceful uses of atomic


po\ser. He should know\ a division
of his company\ built the Nautilus.
the first atomic-pow\ered submarine.
and while the Nautilus of course is
hardly for peacetime use. wht the\
learned in building it is being ap-
plied now to power installations in
man\ parts of the country.

College professors are getting
younger. smarter and more tun. rt you
ask me. The faculty members of the
University of Florida. including mernm-
bcrs of the staff ot the extension di.
vision and the business administration
department, put on this conference
on "planning Florida's Growlth" with
verve, efficiency and good humor.
Somebodv'd better start planning
Florida's growth or the nevt thing
vou know the buildings iill/ be '
projecting out into the Gulf of
M exico on one side and the Atlantic
ocean on the other, to a considerable
distance.

Twso old friends and fellow archi-
tects. Sanford Coin of Gamess ile .
and Roger Sherman of Miami, took ,
me o\:er to Tampa or rather to Ybor .
City. a Spanish section, to dinner.
On the \way oter we passed through
a district so tough that Mr. Coin -
assured me I could "get mi hair cut'
n ith a busted beer bottle," in his
picturesque phrase. I decided my
hair \as all right the way it was.
The dinner was well worth the trip .
Spanish bean soup, pompano Papil-
lote, a green salad and Cuban bread.
Yum.

I stayed in a truly advanced motel
so gadgeted up that the manager
spent five minutes telling mie wlat
all the various switches operated, how
one end wall slid out of sight to open
the whole room into the patio, and
so on.
A *? *


Goodbv now.


, o ,


Roger Allen.



17







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Mid-Florida-The AlA's 122nd Chapter


As the FAA's ninth chap-
ter, Mid-Florida was offic-
ially launched in Orlando
on April 28th.


It's little wonder that the five
gentlemen in the picture at the right
seem- pleased. They are the elected
officers of the 37 charter members
of 'the Mid-Florida Chapter, AIA-
the Institute's 122nd local unit and
Florida's ninth. And the particular
occasion for their pleased expressions
was the official Charter-presentation
meeting of the Mid-Florida Chapter,
held in Orlando's San Juan Hotel
on Saturday evening, April 28.
It had been announced as an in-
formal gathering- though Chapter
members could easily be spotted
through the crowd of some 125 by
their white dinner jackets. But in-
formal or not, the official recognition
of the newly organized professional
group signalled the start of what every
well-wisher-and that means every
AIA member in the State--hopes
will be a vigorous program. for pro-
fessional advancement.
Certainly the dinner meeting,
which opened with cocktails at 6:30,
indicated a: good beginning for that
program. Several representatives of
other Chapters were present, as were


officials of local AGC and FES orga-
nizations. Mayor RAYMOND C.
GREENE of Winter Park and CLINTON
GAMBLE, FAA president, were seated
as honor guests at. the head table.
Toastmaster of the affair was F. E. L.
WHITESAL, president of Winter
Park's' Chamber of Commerce; and
CLAUDE EDWARDS, Orlando City
Commissioner, was on hand to offer
official greetings'.
Brief, but to the point, greetings
were also proffered by the FAA Pres-
ident and Mayor Greene'- who par-
ticularly welcomed formation of the


Chapter and expressed the hope .that
its membership would play an in-
creasingly important part in develop-
ment of Winter Park.
Mid-Florida's Charter was. pre-
sented to President F. EARL DELOE
by HERBERT C. MILLKEY, AIA Reg-
ional Director, who also made' the
principal speech of the evening. He
sketched the amazingly rapid, but
sound, growth of Florida that had
made formation of the new Chapter
possible and practical. But he warned
his listeners that volume of activi'
(Continued on Page NSO) -


V.I.P/s at Mid-Florida's Meeting


H. Samuel Kruse, past-president, Mrs. F. Earl DeLoe and President
Florida South, with Richard Boone DeLoe beam greetings "from their
Rogers, president of the State place of honor at the charter-
Board of Architecture. presentation table. ,
JUNE, 1956


Clinton Gamble, FAA president,,
and Winter Park's Mayor. RayZ-'
mond C. Greene found a common
interest in regional planning, .
"p


These are the men chosen to steer the Mid-Florida Chapter through its
first year of progress: Robert B. Murphy, vice-president; Hill Stiggins,
treasurer; F. Earl DeLoe, president; Joseph Shifalo, secretary; James
E. Windham, III, director. The two other directors are L. Alex Hatton
and Ralph P. Lovelock. Francis Emerson represents the Chapter on the
FAA Board, with George H. Spohn as alternate.











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News & No
(Continued from. Page "19)
is not always a measure of sound ac
complishment; and he called on each
new Chapter member to accept th(
responsibility for professional leader
ship and community progress thai
such membership in the AIA implied
"Responsibility is the symbol o;
leadership," the regional director de
dared. "As construction industry
leaders, you have the responsibility,
of recognizing civic obligations an(
the need for using your talents toward(
improvement of your community
Much civic growth is without a def
mite sense of direction. You can givi
that needed orientation and in so
doing can provide not only a helpful
public service, but also overcome thi
public's lack of understanding of wha
architects do."

Pullara Appointed -Memberof
National Research Committe<
ANTHONY L. PULLARA, partner ii
the Tampa firm of Pullara, Bowei
and Watson, has been named a mem
ber of a committee of the Buildinj
Research Advisory Board, Division o
Engineering and Industrial Researcl


As last year, the feature of the annual Stum' Home Show, held in
Gainesville in April, was a modelhome desi~d, built and furnished by
U/F students. This year's house was designed by 4th year architectural
student Ellen Poffenbarger as a one-bedroom home for a retired couple
which would be suitable also for a family by addition of two more
bedrooms. The house contains 1200 square feet of floor space grouped
around a screened patio and garden to take full advantage of a Florida
setting. Living, dining and kitchen areas are contained in a unit sep-
arate from sleeping quarters. Construction employs the post-and-beamnk
system. The house was erected in just four days by the Student Con-
tractors' and Builders': Association. The entire show, which included an
exhibit of manufactured .products, was planned and run by the Student
Chapter, AIA, of the U/F.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT,


.N


for the National Academy of Sciences,
National Research Council. The com-
mittee will study the cracking of con-
crete face brick to determine data
needed to establish- manufacturing
and installation standards for concrete
masonry units.
This is one of several studies being
conducted at the request of the FHA,
Reports of the studies provide the
FHA with technical information
needed as a basis for revising its min-
imum property requirements.*

Florida Group Totaled 20
Seven of Florida's nine AIA Chap-
ters were represented by.those attend-
ing the Los Angeles Convention. Big-
gest delegation was from Florida
South and. included: Miss MARION
I. MANLEY, T. TRIP RUSSELL, ROB-
ERT M. LITTLE, H. SAMUEL KRuse,
EDwIN T. REEDER, A. J. SIMBERG
and NOMAN M. GILLER. Others at-,
tending were: from Palm Beach
Chapter, JOHN STETSON, MAURICE E.
HOLLEY, KENNETH JACOBSON and
EDMOND A. PACHNER; from Florida
Central, ANTHONY L. PULLARA and .
(Continued on Page 22)





Winner--FAA Scholarship Comietition


This is the winning design, by
JOSEPH BLAIS, Daytona Beach, in the
first FAA Scholarship Competition,
open to 4th year students of the
College of Architecture and Allied
Arts of the U/F. The .problem, "A
Building for Architects" specified a
50 by 150-foot interior lot and listed
a number of mandatory requirements


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JUNE, 1956 "


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Solution called -for the type of pre-
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FAA jury FRANKLIN S. BUNCH,
JAMES E. GARLAND and JOHN STET-
soN picked these as the best.


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News & Notes_


Precast &
Prestressed


..TM Reg. US Pat Ofc.
For complete details, write the Leap
franchised yard nearest you or direct
to Leap Concrete, P. O. Box 1561,
Dept. F-1, Lakeland, Florida.
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WEST COAST SHELL CORP.
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R. H. WRIGHT & SON
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(Conltined fropm Page 20)
\\'ILLI.rM B. HARV'ARD: from Florida
North. \\ILLIsM T. ARNETT and
IOHN L. R. GRAND: from Da tona
Beach Chapter, FRANCIS S. \\ALTON
and HARRY MN. GRIrrIN; from Jack-
s'mn\lle, ROBERT BRO\A.\RD.
CLINION GAMBLE. FAA president.
represented both the Bros\ard County
Chapter and the State organization.
ROccR \1. SHERMAN also attended
as Executi\t Secretar\ of the FAA
and as a representative of The Florida
Architect.

Last Year's Good Advice
Is Better Than Ever Today!
Last year (on page 1l of the Julh.
19;. issue) we said "Guard That
Portrait!"
\\e noted some of the difficulties
\\e believed would d be encountered as
a result of the 1955 Con\ention's ac-
tion permitting use of architects' por-
traits in advertising. And we advised
FAA membership to be %ern \ary in
allowing use of their pictures in ad-
\ertising layouts--pending the issu-
ance of a policy guide by the AIA
Committee on Public Relations.
That ad% ice has since proved sound.
No such policy guide has e\er been
issued. And the SSth Convention at


Los Angeles \oted to rescind the mea-
sure approved last year. Thus archi-
tects' portraits may not now be ethi-
call used in advertisements except
in such instances %where limited use
has been specifically% approved by AIA
licadquartc rs.
B\ and large, it is probably a wise
decision. Promotors ha\e the uni-
\ersal reputation of taking the mile
if gi\en the inch: and the ne\w ruling
will probably\ tend to sa\e a great deal
of individual and professional embar-
rassment. In the case of the com-
pletely sound institutional campaign,
AIA approval \%ill undoubtedly be
forthcoming where and when it may
be needed.
So let's repeat the admonition.
Guard that portrait more zealously
now than e\er!



Don't Forget Those Dues!

Did you heed last month's call for
dues from F.\. Treasurer Morlon T.
Irominonger.' Belier check your check-
book again! If the stub for "AIA
dues" isn't there-please get busy.
Vrite one uou. And drop the check
in the mail Ioday.


"Interpertation of Specerfication"
(At the testimonial party tor Mel Greclev. toastmaster Lou Aichel
regaled his audience nithi a little gem on specifications which he swore
was real and had come to his attention through figuring a job. Here it
is just as it was read and, according to him, just as it was written!)
The Plans and specerfications are to be taken tergether. Anything shown
on the plans and not mentioned in the specerfications and not shown on
the plans is to be considered as both shown and specified, and anything
wanted by the arketekt or any of his friends or by anybody else, (except the
contrakter) shall be considered as shown, specerfied, implied and required,
and shall be pervided by the contrackter without no expense to nobody but
hisself.
If the work has been done without no expense to the contrackter, the
work shall be taken down and done over again and again until the expense
is satisfactory to the arcketekt.
Anything that is right on the plans is to be considered right. Anything
that is wrong shall be discovered by the contrackter and shall be made right
without a-telling the architect or indercating it on the bills.
Anything that is forgotten or left out of the plans or the spercerfications
but which is necessary for the convenyance of the owner shall be pervided
without extry cost to nobody but the contrackter. The arckitekt reserves the
right to change his mind about what is best.
Any evidence of satisfaction on the part of the contrakter shall be con-
sidered as just cause for withholding final payment.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Convention Report ...
(Cilr'ti rd I'fear, P(1g( 71
\\ednesda,. lak 16--Still no
smog in Los Angeles But the tern-
peiature had .limbecd enough to makl
front-pag. headlinec.
To 1 isubtintil nmbinhl f Ch.ip.
ter pr%.id&nt1 jnJ Chaptcr affairs
tnilmittce clhirmenii. the da', opened
n\ith a C'hlpter Affairs Breakfast at
-".It Tlhr ilrrt'ng. moderated I\
BrrL PRIcc. chairman of the .\AA.'
Chapter .ffairl Cominitte. lastcd
till after 11. its ,-ibstjnce is reported
cls'.-uhier in this j'.ue
B\ the timr-. tliho-- attending v.-rc
free, the Con\cntion's second busi-
nei ssi-ion hAd tnded but during
it delcj tic lhcard a dc-taild present.
tatlin of Uirban Rcd i l'.ipmint b\
IUSTIN I-IERM N. reiegnanl administra-
toi of the Housing and liomen Finance
.\genc\. Thlt a!so hard the Coin en-
tion 'ote to rescind li st \ear's ime.aure
permitting use ':f architects" portraits
in advertising. Nov,. sIuch portrait ma;
not be ethical\ ucsd "c.cept under
exceptio:in (I (ircutlstni-i(c'" and then
on1\ \ith specific approval from .\AI
hcadqu.rtcrs.
During the ,i\jrds luncheon there
were m1or0e pcechesj as the Fine Arts
NMedal \\. printed to, Mliss N
I IiiDREii NEIERE. the Craft'smanship
NMdal to I IARRy BER Ioil. and the Ed-
tard C. Kemper A\.lard to THEODORE
IR\INC COE. llit \'ii. not there to
recci;e it due to a lait-minutte illn.s
in hi's fanil\ A blug list of lihnoi
ja\rd' for archite.ture ra', rc;:d and
the a%%ards bestotued to .irchitects in-
'olihd: and eight honor3r\ mnember-
'hips and fello, ships \\ter prt-
scnted to deser\ Iin friends of tlh ,irch-
itectural profession.
.\fternjrds. Co.in\ention atindaiits
took thcir choice of four host-chapter
tours that \ied for interest with a
seminar on A.chitecture for Enjov-
ment and thce iound talbles on The
State ()rgani:ation of the Insttute
More full\ reported elsewhere in this
issue I. Architectural Spec fticatiozns
and Th/ic Educatutiwr Coniiniitt't' Pro-
grarn. Frustrations o(f onscienltioLis
Con\entioncers 'clled up again. \\ ilh
the host chapter tours nuaLnmg a sub-
stantial \in o\er ni.iM nation offerings.
Reports of poor ittendanic ere (om-
mon at all dicilision groups.
But attend.inc at the Prcminire
Night--a Graumnar's Chinese The-
(Cootiivacld oj Pago 24)
JUNE 1956


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Convention Report...
('onti tir d f( ,,, Page' 23)
at.r part\ with all the trinmming--
packed the house. The Host Chap-
ter's CH\ RLFS LuCkt.AN., U ith a stage
presence and sual it\ equal to an\
loll\ i\ ud star. introduced .\AR LINK-
LErIER-%-ho then introduced AL-
FRED HITCHCOCK, DORIS D.\v and
JIMMNl STEw\ART. director and stars
of "'The Mlan \\lo Kn-ew Too
Much." the thriller-diller excuse for
the premiere. To man. Convention.
cers particularly to th.ir charmed
anid charming i\\\es-it w\as the
highlight of the four-da\ conclae.
Thursday. lMal 1"- The temper-
ature \\ent hog-\\ild, climbed to 99
and broke a long-standing Los An-
geles record. But still no smog to
speak of.
The morning \was the laziest of
the Con\ention thus far. filled b\
the third business session that finished
up approval of the pre-prinkd Board's
report. disposed of a fe\\ innocuous
resolutions and permitted JOHN R.
FUC %RD. FAIA,. to tell about the Inter-
national Congress on Housing and
To\n Planning. No official luncheon


meeting has been slated: and Con-
%entioncers paired off. formed groups
or attended one of the man\ "re-
union" meetings of colleges and fra-
tcrnities.
But the afternoon ran almost true
to the form of preceding ones Four
of th. popular and almost ubiquitous
ho.t-chapter tIuirs started promptly\ at
2 1 -though at ".00 an elaborate
si.mlinar on "Thec .\rclhtects' Big New'
Challenge -Better design for a Ail-
lion New1 Homes Each Yearc" \\as
scheduled t, start. It started on time:
and though of aborbing interest to
those in\olI.d in the hulme-dl sign
field. it folioh\ed closcl\ the pattern
established b\ a round-table iointl\
sponsored h\ the .A.\. N.\IIB and
House and Homne magazine as re-
ported in the Nla. I'Q%. issue of that
publication.
T'he evening sas the occasion of
the Annual Dinner, marked b\ the
solemn and somewhat tedious cere-
monies b\ shich ";5 A1., members
\\ere elevated to Fellowship in the
Institute among them. and the only
one from Florida. being Miss MIARION
I. Nl.NLEY. The Dinner meeting sas
marked also b\ presentation, to CLAR-


ENCE S. STEIN. F.IA. New York, of
the Gold Medal for his accomplish-
ments in the fields of architecture.
and community and city planning.
Mr. Stein's response to the pre-
sentation was a gentle, somewhat
\wistful. speech which attempted to
provide a prescription for the good
life through the medium of archi-
tec(' concern \with community plan-
ning. He brnadl\ sketched the evil
drawbacks of our present towns and
cities. Then, in equally as broad
strokes, outlined his ad'ocacyV of new
communities bais-d on the "green-
belt" principles first demonstrated b\
his deselopnient of Radburn. N.J.
"In the contemporary citr." said
the Cold lMedal recipient. "the green
openness ii l go far beyond the built-
in parks. flowing through and con-
necting the super-blocks. Not only
will every building cpen on views of
tine old trees or distant hills. but
broad green belts itill be close by for
agriculture or forests, for great sports
tield- or hiking, boating, fishing,
swimming, skating or just for soli-
tude in the peaceful vallecs or the
wilds."
(Coitiined on facig page)


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THE
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4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


m





Mr. Stien saw such cities as pos-
sible for any part of the United
States and visioned them as ulti-
mately replacing "our mad metro-
politan monstrosities" of the present
And he called on the architectural
profession to accept the difficult chal-
lenge of bringing them into being.
"Such communities cannot be se-
cured by the ordinary piece-meal
process of city planning," he declared.
"A beautiful and livable urban en-
vironment cannot be boxed into
cubbyholes bounded by fixed and
dominating streets and lot lines. It
must be created as an entity, embrac-
ing the site, the mass of buildings
and their relation to each other and
to the natural setting- in short, to
all visual surroundings.
"What we need is an architectural
attack on problems much more com-
prehensive than the individual build-
ing. The architect must deal with
the whole environment in which his
building is an essential, harmonious
part- and without which the archi-
tect's work is impotent. The com-
munity may merely be a small group
of interdependent structures. It may
be most likely will be a neigh-
borhood, an urban district, a whole
town or city, or even a region."
Friday, May 18 -The heat-wave
broke. But with the coolness came
the smog at last the same eye-
watering, nose-tickling stuff as re-
ported.
This was what one Conventioneer
called "stragglers' day." Only a com-
paratively faithful few attended the
final business session called for 9:00
to consider new business (conspicu-
ous by absence), to hear a speech by
an architectural student, another by
CARLOS CONTRERAS, Mexican city
planner, and to hear retiring President
GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS introduce
the new slate of officers and directors.
In the afternoon the newly-con-
stituted Board met with President-
elect LEON CHATELAIN, JR., presid-
ing at what was billed as an "orien-
tation meeting." Attending were
Institute staff members, several na-
tional committee chairmen, Chapter
presidents and a number of delegate
observers. But beyond a few explana-
tory remarks by newly-elected officers,
EDMUND R. PURVES, the Institute's
executive director,, and some of his
staff, little resulted beyond a pleasant
opportunity to meet and see the
(Continued on Page 26)
JUNE, 1956


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OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall
be to unite the architectural profession within the State of
Florida to promote and forward the objectives of the The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects; to stimulate and encourage continual
improvement within the profession, to cooperate with the other
professions to promote and participate in the matter of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural
profession in the State, and to promote educational and public
relations programs for the advancement of the profession.





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26


Convention Report
(Continued from Page 25)
people who make AIA wheels go
round.
Officially, the 88th Annual AIA
Convention was over. But to those
delegates who were objects of the
host chapter's further hospitality, the
evening was to be another Los An-
geles highlight. Homes of host chap-
ter members had been thrown open
for good food and drink and fellow-
ship relaxation in domestic sur-
roundings as only California's archi-
tects can offer it. Many a convention
delegate from 2,000 and 3,000 miles
distant would return home with the
impression of a wonderful country-
smog or no peopled by architects
who were uniformly successful, in-
variably charming and the gracious
donors of hospitality without an equal.
But those host chapter tours! They
were still going on Saturday, when
the Biltmore lobbies and public rooms
looked like ghost towns! Most of the
Octagon staff had gone, too; and the
last we saw of any of them was Miss
PIGNONE, checking into the Pan
American terminal bound for Hono-
lulu and a well-deserved holiday.



ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Armor-Flex Products . 28
Belmar Shades . . 26
Bruce Equipment Company 20
Cool Roof of Miami . 18
Decor Shades . . 26
Dunan Brick Yards 3rd Cover
Dwyer Products Corp. . 5
Electrend Distributing Co. 25
Florida Home
Heating Institute 9 thru 12
Florida Power & Light Co. 24
Florida Steel Products Co. 28
George C. Griffin Company 4
Hollostone of Miami . 3
Holloway Concrete Products 23
Interstate
Marble & Tile Co. .Insert
Leap Concrete .. . 22
Magic City Shade
& Drapery Corp.. . 2
Maule . .. 2nd Cover
Miami Window . 4th Cover
Palmer Electric Co. . 27
A. H. Ramsey & Son, Inc. 21
Satchwell Electric Co. .25
Southern Venetian Blind Co.. 26
Unit Structures . 18
F. Graham Williams 27


lz cu~sitetqz


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in Woven Wood
Belmar Drapes lend themselves to
the finishing touch of any interior
design. Lighting glamour at your
command with practical,-inex-
pensive woven basswood drapes.
BELMAR DRAPES replace
Venetian Blinds as well as
cloth draperies.


Constructed of %" seasoned bass-
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edges and are available in rich
natural or modern decorator colors
for all window sizes.
WRITE FOR DEALER NEAREST YOU

SOUTHERN
VENETIAN BLIND CO.
1727 N.W. 28th STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





New Committee to
Study P/R Program
Some drastic revisions in the over-
all public relations program of the
AIA ma\ be in the making, judging
from recent actions of the AIA Board.
At this %ear's Board meeting in
Washington, D. C., it was decided to
retain the firm of KEICHUIM, INC.. as
the Institute's P/R counsel "for the
remainder of this \ear." But a move
to boost the firm's payment from
$72.000 to $95,000 \\as defeated.
Also, a NMemo issued from the
Octagon this spring contained this
item: "Although the Board believes
much good inorf has been done by
the committee on public relations and
that the work by public relations
counsel has been effective in stimu-
lating members of the profession to
greater activity and appreciation of
public relations, it realize a need for
reappraisal at this tmne of the ma-
chinery and methods of operating
the program." For this reason a spe-
cial liaison committee was appointed
to make a separate studs of the pub-
lic relations problems and. w ith the
full P 'R committee, make a full re-
port at the Board's fall meeting.


4


It assures you and your
client of high performance
and fair dealing in every
phase of electrical work . .
Contracting ... Fixtures...
Appliances . Heating
. Air Conditioning.


PALMER ELECTRIC

COMPANY


316 W. Colonial
Phone 5-7551
ORLANDO


523 Park Ave., No.
Phone 5-4471
WINTER PARK


F. GRAHAM
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


WILLIAMS, Chairman
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED

"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


ELGIN 1084 A Lt
LONG DISTANCE 470 G.





FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
ALBERENE STONE
SERPENTINE STONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING


1 1 A 1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD
L.





PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"
STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE
ALUMINUM WINDOWS
ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA
BUCHINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS

ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


A
r4


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. 83-6554


JUNE, 1956


A"E'J AITrl A







DISTICTIVE Produc' e Conc il Prog ra


VERSATILE
ENDURING
"Immediate
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Exclusive Distributors-
Dade, Broward, Monroe Counties


America's most versatile
translucent Fiberglas Paneling
made in
continu-
ous rolls 7



ARMOR-FLEX PRODUCTS
WHOLESALE FACTORY DISTRIBUTORS
Phone JA 2-3204
2111 S. Andrews Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
1111111 11111 111IIllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH llIIIIIIlllII II


SERVING FLORIDA

ARCHITECTS & BUILDERS
REINFORCING STEEL
BAR JOISTS
STEEL SASH
ALUMINUM SASH
JALOUSIES
STEEL DOORS & FRAMES
MISC. IRON AND
ALUMINUM
ORNAMENTAL IRON
STEEL ROOF DECK
STEELTEX
HIGHWAY PRODUCTS
COMPLETE ENGINEER-
ING SERVICE
MODERN FABRICATING
FACILITIES


From the 81-booth Producers'
council l display of building products
Shat was an important highlight," of
the 88th Annual AIA Convention at
Los Angeles, eight were picked by ar.-
3-man jury for citations.: Those re-i
ceiving commendation "for outstand-'
ing attractiveness" were: National
Concrete Masonry As s o c i a t i o.n;
Youngstown Kitchen Division, Am-
erican-Standard; Arcadia Metal Pro-
ducts; and Styln 'Corporation. The
Stylon booth was the collaborative
work of architect ALFRED B. PARKER
and designer CARMEN GRAHAM, both
of Miami.
Cited "for effective display, of
their products" were: Corning Glass
Works; Minneapolis-Honeywell Reg-
ulator Company; Gladding, McBean
& Company; and the Armstrong Cork
Company. The jury which selected
these eight booths as worthy of spe-
cial comment included architects
MAURICE E. HOLLEY, Palm Beach;
GRAHAM LATTA, Southern Calif.
Chapter, and WVAYNE S. HERTZKA,
Northern Calif. Chapter.
Top honors for excellence in build-
ing product literature and space ad-
vertising went to five more Produc-
:ers' Council firms at the May 14th "
after-luncheon awards session of the
Council's Convention. Those .receiv-
ing certificates of exceptional merit
were: Acoustical Materials Associa-
tion and American Brass Company


William Gillette, Producers' Coun-
cil national President, listens to
Charles Luckman, of Pereira &
Luckman, architects, address mem-
'bers at the Awards Luncheon.

(Class I, technical information rela-
tive to a type of product); Armstrong
Cork Co. (Class II, technical infor-
mation relative to a single manufac-
turer's products); Aluminum Com-
pany of America (Class III, promo-
tional literaturee; and Knoll Asso-
ciates (Class IV, space advertising).
Also honored at the Council's
luncheon meeting were three men se-
lected for their encouragement od
Modular Measure. Presentation of
awards. from the American Standards
Association was made to LEONAR -G.
HAEGER, Levitt & Sons; FRED .
HAssERMAN, the E. F. Hauserman
Co.; and H.- B. ZACKRISON, U.S.A.
Corps of Engineers..


Florida furnished the only model exhibited at the joint AlA-Producers' *
Council conclave. Here Clinton Gamble, FAA president, and T. Tripp
Russell, president of the Florida South Chapter, ALA, explain features of .
the Construction Industries Center, scheduled for year-end completion.
in Miami's DuPont Plaza, to Earl T. Heitschmidt, FAIA, Los Angeles.

THE FLORIDA- A-RCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


TAMPA 8-4824 V
ORLANDO 2-4539
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662


H IIIIIIIIllulllll llIIIIIIllulllllIIIIIII










l,] -A


BRICK


SSpecialists In

DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS

FOR WALLS, WALKS AND FLOORS

MATERIALS OF CLAY, SHALE

CONCRETE AND NATURAL STONE





Manufact urers Of




(A Concrete ProductIl.

In The Following Color Ranges

OYSTER WHITE . CHARCOAL . CHALK WHITE

RAINBOW RANGE . .TAN RANGE . RED RANGE . PINK RANGE

GRAY RANGE . TAUPE RANGE .. GREEN RANGE
ST.M. REG.


S ata d VT4&6 sold in Florida by:
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Avon Park, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Barlow, Fla
Fort Myers Ready-Mix Concrele, Inc.. Forr Myers, Fla
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Frostproof,. Flo
Baird Hardware Company . ...... Gainesville, Fla
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Haines City, Fla
Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company Jacksonville, Fla.
Strunk Lumber Yard ... Key West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company .... Marathon, Fla.
Gandy Block & Supply Company..... Melbourne, Fla.
C. J. Jones Lumber Company ..Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company .. ....Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply. . Tallahassee, Fla
Burnup & Sims, Inc .... .. . ..West Palm Beach, Fla


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, PHONE TU 7-1525, MIAMI, FLORIDA
INCORPORATED







































e .site the day you s

,4AlJlI WIsDO A
& .&Qs. s1,S tA


ove


ecify!


THE FIRST /'
ALL-ALUMIN UM
+ AWNING
_ .m i wOni 2 wRP iAfloRi
Miami Winjipw Corporation 5200 N.W.87th Avenue *Miami, Florida-


More than a

MIAMI WLM


And th