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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 AGC state convention stresses co-operation...
 It reached a new high in quali...
 No. One Miami
 Guide-posts to the future
 Contrast in the Caribbean
 FAA board of directors hold meeting...
 Arnett resigns post as dean
 Florida newspapers sweep AIA...
 News and notes
 Prestressed concrete institute...
 Advertisers' index
 AGC convention stresses cooperation...
 Editorial: The challenge of progress...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00023
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: May 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00023
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    AGC state convention stresses co-operation and AIA reports on state procedures
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    It reached a new high in quality
        Page 5
    No. One Miami
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Guide-posts to the future
        Page 9
    Contrast in the Caribbean
        Page 10
        Page 11
    FAA board of directors hold meeting at St. Petersburg
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Arnett resigns post as dean
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Florida newspapers sweep AIA competition
        Page 23
    News and notes
        Page 24
    Prestressed concrete institute meeting
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertisers' index
        Page 31
    AGC convention stresses cooperation (continued from page 2)
        Page 32
    Editorial: The challenge of progress is change
        Page 33
    Back Cover
        Page 34
Full Text







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CalFMauO
FOR

LMiLM


INDUSTRIES C.


FORT LAUDERDALE
PHONE: LOgan 4-1211
1335 Northeast 26th Street
SOUTH DADE
PHONE: Homestead 1432 1459
South Allapattah Road & Moody Drive





OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA












F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch . North
John Stetson . . South
William B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS


Broward County .
Daytona Beach .
Florida, Central
Florida North

Fla. No. Central
Florida South


William F. Bigoney, Jr.
. William R. Gomon
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
S. Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
. Albert P. Woodard
. Edward G. -Grafton
Irving E. Honey
James E. Garland


Jacksonville .. George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
Mid-Florida .Francis H. Emerson
Palm Beach .Frederick W. Kessler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421

MAY, 1956


ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS










Florida Architect


-- VOLUME 6


MAY, 1956


NUMBER 5


CONTENTS
AGC State Convention Stresses Cooperation -- 2-
AIA Reports on State Procedures ---- ---- 2
It Reached a Nelw High in Quality ----- .--- 5 "
Report of the AIAA Regional- Conference
No. One Miami _---------- -- ------------:--------- 6
Guide-posts to The Future --__- --- ----------9 '-'
Keynote speech by Alono J. Harriman
Contrast in The Caribbean-- ----------
FAA Directors Meet at St. Petersburg ------
Arnett Resigns Post as Dean __- --------_21
The Profession and The Press ----- ---23
Florida Newspapers Sweep ALA Competition
James, E. Greene Wins G.E. Competition ..--...24
News and Notes _.----------------- ------ -- ----24
Dues are Due.! ..._... .....--.................... ------.. ......25
Prestressed Concrete Institute Meeting .. ........-25 .
Advertisers' Index -- __ ------- --------- ------8
Editorial .-.- -- -- ----- -- --3rd Cover
The Challenge of Progress is Change .

THE COVER
This bird's-eye rendering by John E. Petersen, of the Miami firm of
Petersen and Shuflin, shows the DuPont Plazi Center, No. One Miail
from the south. The 14-story exhibit-hotel-and-office building will : -
front some 625 feet on Biscayne B ay and is scheduled for completion .,
by January of next year. Story starts on Page 6.


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, gor B. Pqeyitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of,
Archfitcts of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation n6t for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F,A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or ,
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of -ArChitects . .*Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W, 82nd Court; Miami 43, Flprida, .
' ^' -'*- 1 " . "


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AGC State Convention


Stresses Co-operation


Through the convention of the
Florida State Council. ACC, held
in Palm Beach. April q-7. ran the
thread of the general contractors'
close association \with architects. The
eight-chapter con-ention's opening
session featured an address b\ CLIN-
roN G.MBLE. President of the F.AA:
and delegates %ere welcomed d bh an-
other architect. newl-electcd Nla\or
of \\est Palm Beach. MAURICEr E.
HOLLEY, \\ ho. \ith C.LA'DC A. REESE.
la\or of Palm Beach. \\as introduced
by the ACC Council's president I
IIILBERT S.\PP.
The FAA president outlined the
'\ork of the FAA-AGC.-FES- Joint
Cooperative Committee a detailed
report of which h \as later prsLscntcd
b\ the ACC Co-chairmian \\. H. AR-
NOLD-and commented particularly
on the proposal of National ACC


President FR\NK J ROONEY that Flor-
ida develop a State-" ide planning pro-
gram (see F/., March, 19561.
lhis idea," said Gamble, "is a
constructive one i which should be de-
veloped into a practical reahtv with-
out delav. It has the hearty endorse-
ment of the F..A: and it is on hope.
that some definite plan of action to
bring a program of coordinated plan-
ning to Florida can be 1i worked out in
our joint cooperative committeee'
The speaker cited present zoning
practices in Bro\\ard Count\ as one
c\ample of s\hat he called "an ob-
lious need for coordination toward
which both architects and contrac-
tors should urge Iunediate action."
"'\ hat county zoning boards are
noiw doing." he added, "is actually
nothing but spot-:oning. And that's
(Colt;iiamrd on Puge .12)


AIA Reports on State Procedures


Architects doing, or hoping to do.
State work \ill find a recentl.-issued
document of the .IA of particular-
though pos0h1l\ academic interest.
It is a report on "State Construction
Procedures" and essentially\ is a tab-
ulation of a questionnaire sent to all
4S states rclatlc to methods em-
plo.ed in the design and construc-
tion of State work.
Answers received from -t2 states in-
dicate that in 26. all architectural
ser ices are furnished b\ private archi-
tects-the situation in Florida -
"\\ith few exceptions." Eighteen of
the States use a standard state form of
contract; and 19 use AI.\ forms, either
of the standard thpe or modified to
meet individual conditions.
As to fees. 15 use schedules recom-
mended b\ local A[,\ groups. 12 use
"standard state fee schedules" some
of which, however. ha\e been de'el-
oped through cooperation \\th local
AIA organizations. Eight of the
states reporting use a flat fee based
on percentage of cost; and only t\wo
of them negotiate fees with architects.
The report contains a nuniber of
fee schedules in force by some states.


Florida's is not included, for fees
\ar\ since schedules recommended
b% local AIA chapters are used. Of
the schedules published, the south-
ern states of Alabama and North Car-
olina show \lde differences. Ala-
bama's rates start at 6 percent for
construction costs under $B0,000.
range down to 3.7 percent for a cost
of $3 million. North Carolina's
schedule is based on three classifica-
tions of buildings. For costs of
$50.000 or less fees are 6!' and 6
percent for caning classifications.
They range to 5, 4l:, and -i percent
for costs between $1 and $2 million.
Highest schedule published "as
that of Montana with a ".5 percent
fee for costs less than $50.000. rang-
ing to 5 percent for costs between
one and two millions and 1.5 percent
for costs o\tr $4 million. laryland's
schedule took account of higher costs
of "highly specialized and compli-
cated work. including difficult altera-
tions: also cery small jobs, or jobs in
remote locations." Jobs costing
$25.000 or under carried a 10 percent
fee: those costing from $2 million to
$- million listed at 7 to 61' percent.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


_ _

















































Engineers and Architects: Greeley & Hansen, Chicago.


The Cosme Water Plant near Oldsmar, Florida,

illustrates a pleasing and practical use of concrete in
modern design. Built for the City of St. Petersburg for the

softening and purification of its water supply, the
buildings are of architectural concrete. Roof and floor

slabs are Flexicore precast concrete. Exterior walls are
finished with White Portland Cement paint.


Here again-through concrete-strength, fire safety,

storm safety, termite safety, low maintenance cost, and
an extra safeguard for sanitation, are built right into
the structures.


GENER PORTLAND CEMENT CO I
GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANiY


FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA. SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
MAY, 1956 3


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This 4-foot, 15-riser stair, precast for a South Florida apartment building, is one of several standard types made
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That means economy also with Hollostone. We precast many
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4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

/ u3 .( .v.







7ItReached a ew eaigh in e--





It Reached a New High in Quality


Theme of the 1956 REGIONAL CON-
FERENCE OF THE SOUTH ATLANTIC.
DISTRICT, AIA, held at Durham,
N.C., April 12, 13 and 14, was "New
Materials and Construction in Archi-
tecture." It was admirably carried
out with an. excellent program of ad-
dresses and one of the most extensive
exhibits of building products ever as-
sembled at an AIA gathering.
But the speech-packed, three-city
program- attended by over 400, of
which some 175 were architects aVd
architectural students did more
than merely carry through a confer-
ence theme. It offered worthwhile
sight-seeing in the budding beauty of
a North Carolina spring.. It involved
a constant warmth of good fellow-
ship. And it offered a wide variety
of inspiration to all who opened their
minds to receive it.
And most did. The overwhelming
consensus of opinion was favorable -
even relative to the sometimes in-
volved discussion of design philosophy
that marked the panel discussion at
N. C. State College's Pullen Hall at
Chapel Hill on Friday afternoon. Re-
gional business was held to a mini-
mum. Committee meetings on the
afternoon of the opening day and a
brief session on the closing day dis-
posed of it. The rest of the confer-
ence sessions were devoted to devel-
oping, through a series of remarkably
well-prepared and presented addresses,
the importance of the Conference
theme.
The Conference was appropriately
opened by WALTER A. TAYLOR, Di-
rector, Department of Education and
Research of the Institute, who out-
lined what the AIA had been doing
in these two fields. In doing so he
emphasized the growing need for con-
struction industry research for "the
conversion of our industry into a
20th-century industry in which re-
search- is not a fortuitous adjunct, di-
version or happenstance, but a basic
MAY, 1956


tool and a top priority investment."
He indicated that the AIA Commit-
tee of Research, WALTER CAMPBELL,
chairman, would shortly issue, for
general membership distribution, a
statement on architectural research as
Special Report No. 4.
He pointed to the great 'amount of
work now being done in the general
field of architectural education, in-
cluding the Architect In-Training Pro-
gram. Some of his comments were
frankly critical of our present system
of architectural education. Educators
in our professional schools, he de-
clared, are in "an occupational rut,
so far as considering needed changes
in the organization, curricula and
courses in the schools of architecture."
"We used to have the long-haired
esthetes who didn't want architec-
ture sullied by such profane things
as engineering," the AIA spokesman
said. "It seems now we have the
crewcut long-hairs retreating into
their plastic space frames to avoid
getting too much involved with the
rest of the building industry."


ALONZO J. HARRIMAN, architect of
Auburn, Maine, followed Taylor as
the keynote speaker. His speech is
reported in detail elsewhere in this
issue. Following him, was an address
by ALBERT G. H. DEITZ, Professor of
Building Engineering and Construc-
tion, M.I.T., on plastics, the first of
three information-packed talks on
modern building materials.
"Plastics," said Professor Deitz,
"have finally grown up to the build-
ing industry. Their diverse character-
istics and extremely wide and con-
stantly increasing range of use al-
ready complicate our. architectural
lives. And we cannot help but give
plastics serious consideration for many
varied applications in almost any type
of building."
He outlined briefly the various
types of plastics, illustrating descrip-
tions with samples, and sketched a
number of future applications to
which qualities of plastics might prove
adaptable.
"Though these synthetics are al-
(Continued on Page 26)


Prrt of the group which made the Conference a success were, 1 to r., Walter A.
Taylor, of the AIA's staff. Prof. Albert C. H. Deltz, MIT, Alonzo J. Harriitan,
Conference keynote speaker, Archie R. Davis, Durham, in charge of Conference
arrangements, Wm. Henley Deitrich, Raleigh, general chairman of the Con-
ference, and F. Carter Williams, of Raleigh, president of the N. C.-Chapter.
5


i





























The street facade of No. One Miami, from a rendering by John E. Petersen.
The three-in-one structure occupies a site that was once an Indian trading post,


No. One




miami











After three years of
planning, Florida will
finally have a head-
quarters home for her
huge and still growing
construction industry
in a 14-story, $10,000,-
000 structure that's
really three buildings
under one roof ...


Miami's famed oceanfront skyline
will shortly undergo a significant al-
teration. Scheduled for virtual com-
pletion and partial occupancy by Jan-
uary 1, 1957, is a new building that
will rise fourteen stories from its Du-
Pont Plaza waterfront site on land
which originally contained an Indian
trading post and later became part
of the lushly landscaped setting for
HENRY M. FLAGLER'S fabulous Royal
Palms Hotel.
The building itself will be as
unique as the history of its location.
Actually it could be called three build-
ings in one--a 301-room bay-front
hotel, an eight-story office building
and a huge, three-level exhibit area.
Postmen will know the structure as
the DUPONT PLAZA CENTER, No. 1
MIrAI, which will .include the Du-
Pont Tarleton Hotel and the Archi-
tects' Bureau of Building Products.
But when present plans for its full
development are completed, No. 1
Miami will undoubtedly be regarded
by building professionals throughout
the State as regional headquarters for
the architectural profession and the
varied interests of the entire construc-
tion industry.
When that comes about, it will
culminate over three years of careful
planning by a group of dedicated


building professionals including CUw-
TON T. WETZEL -who will operate
the project as executive vice-president
of its management group EDWIN
T. REEDER, AIA, and JoHN E. PETER-
SEN, AIA, and FRANK H. SHuFLni,
AIA, who, as Petersen and Shuflin,
were architects for the building and
who also will serve on its manage-
ment committee. This planning was
based on the fact that architects --
and indeed every element of the con-
struction industry -required more
than they had been getting to meet
their expanding need for technical
information and specification services
in the selection of building mate-
rials, products and specialized equip-
ment.
The full-fledged scheme for No. 1
Miaii grew out of an initial decision
to bridge this professional gap. Origi-
nally it was to be done by providing
an enlarged exhibit area for expand-
ing the scope of the present Archi-
tects' Samples Bureau. But because
such expansion would inevitably ald
tract out-of-town architects and eng.
neers, the idea grew to include hoted
facilities for them in conjunction.
with the exhibit they would journey
to see. A logical extension of tl
contemplated service was an offi
(Continued on Page 8)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

































Mezzanine Floor Plan


F I


Main 12nd) Floor Plan


i-Ramp up to Main Floor 17-Cold Storage Area 25-A.C. Equip. Room --
2-Ramp down from Main Floor 18--Office 2E-Bo.ler Room
3-Driveway 19-Lockers area 27-Transformer Room .- '
4-Parking 20-Trunk Room 2S-Eleclric Room ..
5-Enlrance to Architects' Bureau 21-Laundry .
6-Recei..ng Rm Bureau 22-Repair Shop .--
7-Elesalor 23-Pool Bottom .-
S-Shop 24-Storage
9-Bar
10-Package Store -
I I-Eleoator Lobby
I -Arcade
13-Coffee Shoppe
14-Kitchen -
15-Employees Cafeteria
16-Baker, _____ __



.. __ __.

*II 7..







Ground Floor Plan




MAY, 1956 7

-i







No. One Miami
(Conti ,tld f'romi Pnge C)
building to house all elements of con-
struction, notably representatives of
building products manufacturers. ho,
\ith a constant suppl\ of technical
facts on tap. could provide answers
to design and specification questions
and thus sa\c architects and engi-
neers time, effort, money\ and tem-
per. Overall. a good idea.
But working it out called for much
thinking and contingent discussion
by man\ cool heads-and some hot
ones-around manv a conference
table. \\etzel had proof that a larger
products exhibit was needed here.
For proof that it would work, he
pointed to the operation of Holland's
Boucentrum. in Rotterdam, to the
operation of the exhibit in New
York's 101 Park Avenue building, to
his own bursting-at-the-seams Bureau
on Miami's Bisca\ne Boule\ard. Fi-
nallv he \\as solid\ able Yo allocate
100,000 square feet of floor space-
more than 22 times the present hi-
ami Bureau-to accommodate local.
national and international exhibits
that will e\cntuall\ number more
than 1,000.
Once the spade work began to
outline a practical form, final ar-


rangements fell into line with what
seemed like a rush. ALBERT and
\\A.LIER J.COBs. successful operator-s
ot the Tarleton hotel chain, tied into
\\etzel's dream. Financing \\as made
njallablc. "ith the first Si-million of
the $10-million center supplied b\
the Massachusetts Life Insyrince
Company -the largest loan of this
t\pe made in the south b\ this old-
line institution.
Ground-breaking was scheduled
for earl\ in MNa\. opening of the three-
floor Architects' Bureau of Building
Products b\ the end of this \ear. com-
pletion of the entire project in earls
19q". At that time Florida will con-
tain the first multi-purpose building
of its kind. .nd Florida architects
will ha\e easy access to the largest
permanent exhibit of building prod-
ucts in the country.
The\ \ill Ihae more than that.
On the mezzanine floor, adjacent to
both exhibit areas and hotel facilities
\\ill be an "'.AI Lounge" a 2.100
square foot space overlooking Bis-
ca ne Bay and the king-sized hotel
swimming pool. This is being made
available to the Florida South Chap-
ter as a permanent headquarters.
Plans now being workedd out contem-
plate that it sill also serve the Flor-
ida Association of Architects as an


orfce for the Executise Secretan and
The Florida Architect.
.s t tis now dcieloping. No. 1
Nliami \ill undoubtedly become a
special sort of show place possibly
e'en a toriust attraction in which
all construction industry\ members
can take pride. The architect. Bu-
reau will be constantly\ open to the
public as sell as building profession-
a.i and ill include, among other
no-e! exhibit ideas, T\' studios to
broadcast product demonstrations
and special cents inxol\ing regional
architectural actl\itie_ and interests.
The Architcts' Bureau %ill be ad-
ministered b\ CLINION T. \\ErZEL
as its president. But its policy and
operation \ill be conducted \\ith the
help of a technical and ad\isor\ com-
mittee % hih ill be charged particu-
larlv \ ith the supervision and control
of product exhibits. This Design
Control Board is chairmanncd b\
EDor N T. REEDER. AIA. and includes
architects RussELL T. PANcoASt,
r.AI.: IOR B. POLEvIlzKv. FAIA;
ROBERI FITCII SMIliH, .AIA, and
RoRERf L\.. \\EED. AI.. The engi-
neer member will be IMEYER
DEUTsCHIMAN. FES. working g ith
these men \ill be .two interior de-
signers. JA.MES MIERRICK SIll H. AID,
and GEORGE F.ARK S. AID.


8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


- "t.;L--~tA.~.--- .5 ~tY~W"Lkfl~ ~







Guide-posts to The Future


ALONZO J. HARRIMAN, AIA, of Auburn, Maine, as the
keynote speaker of the AIA Regional Conference, noted the
development of technological progress in terms of the past and
discussed current trends that are shaping our architectural destiny


A broad look at the history of
architecture indicates that all past
buildings are a direct expression of
the materials and labor available at
the time. They are more an expres-
sion of this than the design-ability
of the people who built them.
The P.ramids surely express mass
labor and native stont. A gothic
building surl\ indicates the pres-
ence of a native stone and deout
labor; and I think as we analyze all
periods of architecture in a broad
\\a\ and not in detail, \\ will see
that this is true. Leser House is defi-
nitely an expression of the industrial
know-how of the \ear of 19S50 with
labor at a premium.
Let us focus on the past century
from IS51 to 1950 hat \\as the
palette that architects had to work
Sixth? B\ this I mean what \\ere the
materials and \hat was the labor
condition?
TWhat I thought wouldd be one of
the best sources .ias to look in archi-
tctural magazines for the prior cen-
tur. The .Arnrican Arclitect and
Building News of June q. I SS0, the
earliest architectural magazine I could
find. had the following ads- globe
cntilatc'r.s; stable fixtures: hiho-htpe
printing, metallic shingles: an ad
warning the people not to infringe
on a patented sl\light: sheet iron,
black and galvanized. pressed brick
and terra cotta: strange enough min-
eral wool for insulating against heat.
cold and sound.
These earl\ ads also included llT.
LaUrencc Scientific School and Har-
\ard. Latr issues had ads for Co-
lumbia and S.racuse. Quite a few\
books were also advertised.
B\ IiO1) Architectural Rccord had
5-4 pages devoted to advertising. boil-
ers, water filters, hardware, contrac-
tors. cement, pipe covering, cut stone.
cast decoration, artists' supplies. dlec-
tric and gas fixtures. engineers, en-
MAY, 1956


gines, fire places of pressed brick, fire-
proohing, furnaces and elevators.
The architecture on the various
pages definitely expressed the mate-
rals in the ads. To my mind it is a
question of \sho came first the
architect or the manufacturer. But
one thing is certain, from an overall
design point of vien the\ are iden-
tical.
.s of todav. Architectural Record
has approximately( 250-odd pages of
ad\crtising-- and surely\ the build-
ings of todas express these advertised
materials. But this is not the %whole
story. \\e ha\e S\eet's Catalogs in
addition to these ads. which are in 10
volumes as of today w ith each \olume
nearly\ as big as W\ebster's Dictionary.
I do not remember when Sweet's Cat-
alog started, but I do remember the
carl\ olunles of the 20's-not as
big as one volume of toda\'s catalog.
This. in itself, is proof that we are
merely the coordinator of manufac-
tured items-that the old idea of
bringing the logs onto the site, saw-
ing them into boards and working
them into finished doors and sash is
far, far behind us.
Now as to foresight. se hear a lot
about the word automation. \\hat is
it and how will it effect architecture?
One of thc best articles on auto-
mation was ssritten by JAmrE BRIGHT
for the Harvard Business Rcview on
August, M195. "How to Eialuate Au-
tonmation." He contends it is not a
resolution as some people would con-
tend, but really is an improvement in
mcchanization: and that there are fews
areas of full automatic production -
the oil industry being a good exam-
ple of automation.
Product designs are still developed
b\ formula, hand books and slide
rules-except in the case of air
frames digital computers are used to
determine mathematical limits. How-
e\er. he does not den\ that a steady


grow\ th and man\ applications of con-
trols to reach new and advance levels
of mechanization are in process. But
advantages arising out of this are not
necessarily all labor saving. There is
generally a saving in material through
the reduction of scrap: also. a reduc-
tion of inventory due to the speed of
the process: and a refinement in the.
product design and an improvement
in the quality.
\hat effect can this ha'e on our
profession? From our look at,.the
past, one can be certain that we are
going to have more and more manu-
factured units to coordinate into our
buildings. These will be more intri-
cate as indicated by the past trend.
Nou. \what form \ill these factor\
units take?
It is hard to predict what will be
the ultimate. Economics dictates this
trend, therefore, it ,ill be followeed.
But there arc man\ obstacles in the
path. Labor has definite ideas, some
of which are venr obstructne. This
being so, the future architecture ma\
be developed in some other country
where labor is less testricti\e and
where automation can run rampant.
\\e should not forget that we are de-
'eloping a certain amount of site
mechanization with tilt-up slabs, lift
slabs and the like. These will be im-
proxed and new ideas added-but
along with the idea of cost-sa ings.
\\e ha\e seen a gradual decrease
in the amount of the building design
bh architects and an increase in what
we call. for \\ant of a better name.
the engineering trades. In 1920 the
heating, plumbing and electric swork
of a building was 10 to 20 percent
of the whole. Today the heating.
plumbing. electric, air-conditioning
and acoustics of the average building
amount to from 20 to 40 percent.
It is definite that this trend will
continue. The tail of engineering
(Contliuacd on Page 30)











CONTRAST IN THE CARIBBEAN





I p .,,Things are humming in the West Indies. These
paradoxical islands, so easily reached from our own.
State, are full of interest to architects. In the British
possessions, in Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico and the
Dominican Republic, that interest is a business one
for a growing roster of Florida's designers. But aside
from that, there's a wealth of violent history written
in mellowed ruins. And in direct contrast there's the.,
evidence of boot-strap progress in the gleaming new
structures that seem to be springing up near every
Caribbean bay.
Here, for example,. is a glimpse of what's happen-
ing in Cuidad Trujillo, capital of the Dominican.
Republic, and site of that country's "Fair for Peace
and Brotherhood of the Free World." The old city,
once a walled citadel of colonial Spain, sleeps on.
But outside it is bustling activity, as evident as a
neon sign and as up-to-date as the ambitions of its
promoters can make it.


History is the heritage of the old city. To
the walled citadel Spain brought culture and
religion as well as rule. Above is Columbus
Square on which fronts the oldest cathedral
of the western hemisphere--anta Maria la
Menor. Below, the ruins of El Alcasar, once
the home of Don Diego Columbus, brother
of the Navigator.













































The World's Fair was opened late in 1955, will continue
throughout this year. To the city's tourist facilities it
added two new modern hotels, complete with swimming
pools, polo fields and golf courses. It has also boosted the
country's prestige, bolstered her economy, and suggested
how progress can improve the natives' island life. With an
authentic international flavor, the Fair is already rated as
a successful venture.










Most of the Fair buildings are to
remain as permanent head-
quarters for various Government
and trade offices. Above, the
building for the Secretaries of
State, Interior and Communica-
tions. At the right is the per-
manent Exposition Hall, pho-
tographed from the Fair's cen-
tral plaza which features a huge
fountain of light and wpter as
well as these typically symbolic
world's fair embellishments.


MAY, 1956







FAA Board of Directors Hold | 1 T

Meeting at St. Petersburg U U I


The second quarterly meeting of
the F.\.A Board of Directors con-
\cned at 12:15 for a luncheon and
all-afternoon business session at tihe
Tides Hotel Beach Club. Redington
Beach. St. Petersburg. on Saturda\.
April 21. 1956. The sixteen people
present included all six F.AA officers.
seen of the Chapter F.AA directors.
one alternate director, a visitor from
the Florida Central Chapter and the
Executive Secretar. of the F.\A.
First order of business was consid-
eiation and final approval of minutes
of the Directors' meeting held Janu-
ar\ 21 at the Roose\elt Hotel in
lackson\ille. Just prior to the meet-
ing. a lun of three, appointed b\
President CLINTON C.AMBLE and in.
cluding FRANKLIN S. BUCIIn JOHN
STETSON and JAMES E. GARLAND. had
S selected winners of the FAA Scholar-
ship Competition from submissions
b\ -4th-Near architectural students at
LI F. From drawings presented b\
THONl.S L.RRICK, the jurn selected
those of JOSEPH BLAIS. of Da\tona
Beach. for the scholarship award. with
the scheme of ELLEN HOFFENBE.RGER.
New York, being accorded a special
commendation. The subject \as "A
Building for Architects": and the win-
ner of the competition \ill recc\ e a
5290 scholarship from the F.A.
President Gamble announced that
JA~NES K. POwNA.LL, Ft. Lauderdale.
had been named chairman of the
Legislative Committee in place of
FRANKLIN S. BiUNCH, \\ho had been
named tentatively \ at the Jacksonsille
meeting, but later indicated his in-
ability to accept appointment. The
F.A president pointed out that com-
mittee personnel had not \ct been
named b\ all chairmen. And he com-
nmented on the desirability. w\here\er
Chapter organization made this pos-
ible, of selecting comnittecs on the
verticalal scheme proposed b\ the
Chapter Affairs Committee.
\\ILLI\ aN B. H RV\.RD ga\e the
Board a brief but inclusive, report
of Regional Conference actiit ies.
His favorable comments became the
basis for discussion of plans nom de-
S slopingg for the F.A 42nd Annual
Convention. These "ere reported b\
ED\WARD C. GRAFTON; and the con-


census of Directors' opinions x-
pressed without formal Board action
- as that the pattern of high tech-
nical %alue developed at the Durham
conference should guide future con-
vention committees (of the F.A. In
effect. this \\as a forceful suggestions
to hold organizational business ses-
sions to an absolute minimum and to
expand the cultural. informational
and inspirational aspects.
Grafton had no specific convention
program to offer for the Board's ap-
proval. But he indicated this wouldd
be presented at the Board's Jul. meet-
ing. He reported that sale of exhibit
booths had been excellent.
Announcement \'as made that the
next Conference of the South Atlan-
tic Region -ould take place in At-
lanta. on April 4. 5 and 6, 15-. At
that time nomination uill be made
for a new regional director to suc-
ceed HERBERT C. NIlLLKEE whose
term ill then expire. President Gam-
ble said he would appoint a nominaL
ing committee to receive recommen-
dations from Florida AI. Chapters
to\\ard the end of naming a candi-
date from Florida for regional con-
sideration.
The F.A\ President also announced
that all formalities required for char-
tering the proposed Pensacola Chap-
ter had been cleared. and that Char-
ter action would d presumably' be taken
b\ the Institute Board at its Nla\
1 th meeting.
He also indicated that the Insti-
tute would probably\ fro\ n on an\
ne\\ charter application in Florida.
Current Institute police he said. is
to encourage organization of local
chapter branches, rather than form-i-
ton of nei\ chapter entities through
a split-up of present charter person-
nel and operating areas.
The Board seleeteid Prcsidc.nt Gam-
ble as th. FAA's State C)rganization
delegate to the Los Ang.les Con\ien-
tion. And it instructed him, as a
delegate, to urge that Florida he ac-
corded the status of an AIA region.
There w\as general and emphatic ap-
pro\al of this suggestion the full
effect of which wouldd be to make the
F.\A into a regional organization \\ith
(Coitilerdil on Paye 21)


ONE




MOMENT




PLEASE


BEFORE you examine
Italian Ceramic Tile
ialongside!I . just a
explanation.


the JO-
catalog
word of


Since this catalog was printed;,
some wonderful additions have'
been made to the line. There's
more to it than what we show!
We have also completed negoti.
nations with the master-of-them-'
all, the original JO GRESITE of.
Milan, Italy. We are now the;
EXCLUSIVE U. S. importers of
these brilliant tiles, made with
pride, skill and craftsmanship of
Old World artisans.

* IMPORTANT
To facilitate your orders, a
fabulous stock of JO Italian
Ceramic Tiles is ready and on-
hand in Miami. .4 complete
sample chart of 111 actual tiles
on-hand will be sent you upon
request.
f e solicit your inquiry.


J IT A h I AN
CERAMICSI
DISTRIBUTOR
Ralph Torres, Jr.
241 Pan American Bank Building
Miami 32, Florida
Phone 9-1663
NOTE: Excellent opp:,rlniry for experienced
:'ale'nman ell kncvn in archite-tural
and rile circles throughout Florida.
THE FLORIDA ARCHi.TECT
a..


-......~ ..&jtA~t~. '2-. -






1||| JM o
CERAMIC
TILE































^t--B.|--







ow -the Jewel of Tile
Glistening in sunlight or scintillating softly indoors,JO Italian
Ceramic Tile complement contemporary buildings and enhance
older remodelled structures. Outdoor and interior uses for the
diminutive yet elegant 3/" glazed squares are limitless. There
is no climate too hot, cold or changeable for JO. Colors of the
weatherfastJO Tile-and combinations of colors-are myriad.
Ceramics, one of the most permanent substances in existence. Many
objects made 6,000 years ago are still in excellent condition today.


colors cover pnolo: replace ana
floor-ORO I. Wall-ORO 10. Bar
-ORO 10 a4Lplain white mixed.















CERAMIC

STILE


A Palatial Product at a Practi


Ice


A fresh and beautiful product, the tiny hard glazed
ceramics are manufactured according to an Italian for-
mula of mixed clays, flint and feld-spar. Esteemed on the
Continent for their highly individual handcraft effects
as much as for their weather imperturbability and color
permanence, the Italian Ceramic Tile has been time-
and climate-proved in installations from the North Sea
to the torrid Mediterranean. Now these gemlike little
beauties are being produced in quantity and are avail-
able for economical use in and on American buildings
through JO Italian Ceramic Tile Corporation's United
States Representative.


Conventional mosaics, because of the difficulties and
time involved in cutting and setting stone aid glass
fragments, have been regarded as embellishment for
palaces and temples, outmoded by current construction
need for speedy application techniques. JO Italian
Ceramics are low-priced-not only in initial cost but
also in installation. Suitable for regular mortar bed or
adhesive setting methods, factory-assembled JO Tile
are in line with the building industry's demand for
materials that save man hours on the job. The /4" tile
actually go up faster and easier than conventional,
larger wall tile.


The new Hotel Seville in Miami Beach
employs JO ceramic tiles on the entire
facade, lobby and bathrooms.


This striking interior of the Maule
Building in Miami has walls of JO
ceramic tiles.


Commercial store use of tiles is indi-
cated by this interior of a-ashion shop.






















The production line facilities of this modern plant
w industrious Puerto Rico, have been turned
over to the production of JO Italian
Ceramic Tile, to meet orders and to
facilitate shipments to the United States.


Miniature Scale Adaptable. Because of their non-imposing
proportions, gracious %" JO Tile can be used to
blanket an object or area of any size or shape-from a
fireplace to a whole room or complete building exterior.
This monolithic quality, combined with JO's inherent
individuality, easy installation over various board and'
masonry materials, and minor maintenance required,
suit the small-scale ceramics to such different deco-
rative and practical uses as walls and wainscoting in
school and hospital corridors, restaurants, apartment
and hotel bathrooms; as counters and facing on display
cases, store fronts; as cladding for washroom partitions


and prefabricated curtain wall panels, as well as sundry
other commercial and institutional applications. The
new brilliantly toned tile also adds graciousness to a
home, wherever used: kitchen, entrance hall, living
room, powder room or patio.
More Coverage per Sheet. Each single 12" x 12" sheet con-
tains 225 of the tiny 5/32"-thick tiles, covering an area
3 times that of a standard "king size" 6" x 9" tile and
eight times as large as one regular 4/4" tile unit.
The setter is concerned with only 4 casual seams
per square foot.of JO Tile instead of the 24 precise
joints required by nine 4V4" tile.


I~


A majestic example of the use of JO The versatility of these magnificent
ceramic tiles on curved walls, tiles is indicated in this "all tile"
mural wall.

























Installing JO Ceramic Glazed Tile: thoroughly soaked (about 3 seconds) to insure the
bonding of ceramic tile to the setting bed. The tilesetter
(For materials and base surfaces involved, refer to places the bottom half of the 12" x 12' sheet in position
Specifications, page 6.) on surface to be tiled and spreads the remaining half on
Before each 12" x 12" sheet of tile is applied, it the adjacent area (Photo 1 above). Using a wet sponge
is folded in two and immersed in clean water until to keep the sheet pliable, he lays the 12" x 12" unit


tightly against the neighboring ones(Photo 2)a nd aligns
it so the vertical joints are plumb and horizontal joints
are level (Photo 3). After each 15 to 20 sq. ft. of tile has
been set, the paper facing is removed while still wet.
If the paper has dried, it is rewetted with a brush for
easy removal. (Photo 4). The tilesetter then presses the


sheets of tile into the setting bed with a steel trowel
(Photo 5).
After the tile has set for 20 to 30 minutes, it is beat
into the setting bed by placing wood block flat over
the tile surface and tapping the block with a hammer
(Photo 6).


Standard mounting width...each joint is built to its
entire depth. Hairline joints between abutting sheets
of tile correspond in width to the factory-set hairline
spacing around each individual JO Tile, creating an
overall monolithic effect. All cut tiles are to be rubbed
smooth and even. Joints are saturated with water and


then grouted with a prepared waterproofed grout or
waterproofed Portland cement, colored or noncolored
as chosen by the Architect. The grout mixed to
a creamy consistency, is sponged thoroughly into
the joints so that each hairline seam is filled to
its entire depth.


9- If -I


JO ceramics also furnished
in above size.


Alignment Automatic. JO Tile presents no seam alignment problem. Sheets
of prespaced tile fit next to one another effortlessly. No measuring or
string-spacing is necessary, either for vertical or horizontal joints, and
any slight irregularity is in perfect keeping with the handcrafted colora-
tion and handset look of the overall tile surface.

Gorgeous Galaxy of Gemlike Colors. At present, 80 standard tones (see full size
chart p 7) are being produced at the Puerto Rican plant in smooth gloss,
smooth matte, and pebbly surfaces in colors ranging from subtle mono-
chromes and gold-stroked solids to bold duotones. Several of the deep
colors resemble semi-precious stones.


Mosaics by the Square Foot. Factory assembled in sheets 12"x 12"with
peel-off paper facing for fast application, JO Italian Ceramic Tile have
been applied to everything from the table and counter tops to marquees,
lobby walls, swimming pools and entire building facades.

Architectural Harmony. JO Tile, applied in subtle solid tones or controlled
mosaic schemes specified by the designer, can bring'new tactility and
a welcome infusion of warmth to severe surfaces of modern structures.
The- adaptable surfacing of small ceramic squares prearranged on a
flexible sheet conforms just as easily to the contours of a column, a
vaulted ceiling, or an arch.


IUV
~io


__










General Conditions: The Tile Contractor shall consult the gen-
eral conditions governing the general contract, which are
hereby made part of this specification, for instructions pertain-
ing to this work. The A. I.A. general conditions and any supple-
mentary general conditions, together with the current edition
of The Tile Handbook and Thin Setting BedMethodsandMaterials,
complementary to the Tile Handbook, K-400, compiled by Don
Graf, published by and available through Tile Council of
America, 10 East 40th Street, New York, N. Y., are hereby
made a part of the specification insofar as the provisions apply
to this project.
The installer is not to be responsible for (...any construc-
tion to receive the setting beds... removal of existing surfaces
...accessories as described...etc.) unless otherwise specified.

Scope Of Tilework: Furnish all labor, materials, any and all items
of service, facilities, transportation, and construction plant
required for the properly completed installation ofJO ceramic
wall tile, in strict accordance with drawings and/or specifica-
tions and/or schedule. Tile is to be installed to the heights
detailed on the drawings and/or as specified, under the direc-
tion of the Architect.

Materials: All JO glazed ceramic wall tiles shall be as manufac-
tured byJO Italian Ceramic Corp.,,U. S. Representative: Ralph
Torres, Jr., 241 Pan American Bank Building, Miami 32,
Florida) as per approved samples on file, or equal only as
approved by the Architect. All tile shall be delivered to the
job in unopened containers.
All JO glazed ceramic wall tile with trim pieces shall be
dust pressed, mixed clays, flints and feldspars, white body,
machine made with backs grooved. Face colors shall be fast
and non fading. Tiles shall be thoroughly and evenly matured,
free from defects which might affect serviceability, and shall
have a finish surface that is impervious to water. Tiles shall be
of colors, combinations of colors, and patterns selected by the
Architect. All JO glazed ceramic wall tiles for exterior and/or
interior, vertical and/or horizontal surfaces (except floors
other than in bathrooms) shall be weatherproof, temperature
proof, acid resistant, of selected colors, smooth and/or rough
textured, square edges, size V4" x /4" x 5/32", mounted on
12"x 12" papered sheets with unfilled, hairline joints.


Inspection: The Architect is to be afforded all reasonable facil-
ities and assistance for site inspection of materials and work-
manship. The Tile Contractor shall have someone in authority
approve job conditions. Containers in which tiles and other
materials are packed shall be kept dry until tiles and other
materials are removed and checked; and precautions shall be
taken to see that the tiles are not stained before they are soaked
or set in place.

Base Surfaces: JO glazed ceramic wall tiles may be applied to
the following base surfaces: gypsum lath or wallboard, un-
painted or painted gypsum plaster skim coat, gypsum plaster
brown coat, plaster, exterior type plywood, hardboard, cement
asbestos board, fiberboard, masonry with portland cement
mortar joints, portland cement plaster or concrete, metal, glass,
marble, terrazzo, steel, cork, flush boarding, slate, Keene's
cement, magnesite, and oil glazed tile. Precautions shall be
taken to prime and prepare base surfaces in strict accordance
with the aforesaid Tile Handbook and complementary K-400.
Furthermore, the problem should be discussed with the Tile
Contractor and manufacturer of setting bed material being
considered.

Setting: All materials and workmanship shall be in strict accord-
ance with the current edition of the aforesaid Tile Handbook
using conventional mortar installation; or, JO glazed ceramic
wall tiles may be applied with any of the following thin-type
setting beds: 1/32" to Vs" organic adhesive, 1/32" to /8" in-
organic bonding coat, or Vs" to 3/16" portland cement mortar
setting bed as described in Thin Setting Bed Methods and Mate-
rials, complementary to the Tile Handbook K-400. For freezing
conditions, setting bed should be not less than /4". (For in-
stallation specifications, see p. 4.)

Cleaning and Protection: As soon as setting bed and grout harden,
JO glazed ceramic wall tile surfaces shall be washed clean of
all grout with clean water and protected with a suitable cover-
ing of paper, before other trades shall have access to the area.
Note: Any non-acid cleaner may be used on JO glazed ceramic
wall tile, except on the D-Oro tile series, which should be
washed only with water and mild soap and should not be
cleaned with scouring powders containing abrasives.


SPECIAL SHAPES FOR TRIMMINGS
T-2 T-6
DOUBLE BULLNOSE
S BULLNOSE CAP





BULLNOSE BULLNOSE T-5
BASE




T-7
T-8B DOUBLE T-3
EXTERIOR INTERIOR BASE T-4 INTERIOR
CORNER BASE EXTERIOR CORNER CORNER BASE
Trim size corresponds to 3/4-inch tile 1-5-6 supplied by lineal foot with
peel-off paper facing.


"Oppus piccoli"a distin
tern, furnished in soliL
multicolor, which has c
great stir through Eu
Usedinfloors and walls
standard trimmers.




COMPLETE RANGE OF COLOR AND TEXTURE


0 10










U0


-t


A-I


CA-7


RD.R


FCO10 A-5



CA-5 FA-7


CA-6 FA-5

o, Qt t, 5n IU

FC 9 FC3



FA 8 CA 9


NOMENCLATURE 0 Oro A= Series "A" B= Series "B" C = Series "C" CA= Caribe FA = Fantasy "A" FB = Fantasy "B" FC= Fantasy "C"

Symphony in Polychrome. As pigmentation varies slightly in JO
Ceramics from tile to tile, an architect or designer who orders
one stock color can expect a distinct and inherently beautiful
pattern to appear throughout the surfacing when it is applied.
On the following page are selected samples of exotic Italian tiles.


FA-9



CA-3


CA-4


D-t


m0mmm


a~a~b~,








HAWAII 7


HAWAII 9 SIENNA 9





CAIRO 5 CAPRI 2





CUBA 3 CARIBE 2
CUBA 3 CARIBE 2


'SIENNA 1


toior riA i use in iuxunruu
rpAiApntal tiv;nu rnnm


SIVIGLIA 4 SIVIGLIA 1 HAWAII 6
These selected examples of exotic Ital-
ian tiles are also available from JO
Italian Ceramic Corporation.


'" IC""M"
of r.., irnl


MR. RALPH TORRES
JO Italian Ceramic Corp.
United States Representative


For a highly individual effect on a particular installa-
tion, the designer may prefer to specify two or more
standard colors in proportioned or random mixtures.
There is a nominal charge for factory-grouping the
standard tile on percentage-wise basis.

To the Designer, Decorator, and Architect, JO Italian
Ceramic Tile signifies a sumptuous medium for self
expression. It also pleases the most fastidious client's
taste for subtle, brilliant visual effects, and satisfies the
most practical-minded building owner in its longevity
and negligible maintenance.

We have endeavored to convey in this catalogue the
typical information requested by architects in the
numerous inquiries received.

Keep Posted for Additional Releases


JO Italian Ceramic Corporation

U.S. Representative: Mr. Ralph Torres, Jr., 241 Pan American Bank Building, Miami 32, Florida


-~

ni~L* ~._






FAA Board of Directors
(Continued from Page 12)
direct representation on the Institute
Board, instead of a state association
of chapters with only an oblique
contact with regional affairs.
Announcement of Dean WILLIAM
T. ARNETT'S resignation from his
U/F administrative post signaled a
prolonged discussion of the situation
now current in the College of Archi-
tecture and Allied Arts. Net result
of this discussion was the Board's
decision to authorize SANFORD W.
GoIN, FAIA, chairman of the FAA
Committee on Education and Regis-
tration, to meet with U/F President
WAYNE REITZ and Vice-President H.
W. CHANDLER, as representing the
Board's policy. This policy involved
a firm conviction that the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts should
be continued at the University sub-


stantially in its present form of ad-
ministrative organization. At the
same time the Board expressed its
desire to be of any practical assist-
ance to U/F administrators.
Discussion also developed on the
question of continuing the FAA
Group Insurance program now vested
in the Inter-Ocean Insurance Com-
pany. Decision was to continue the
program for the time being.
Directors and alternates present in-
cluded: WILLIAM R. GOMON, Day-
tona Beach; SANFORD W. GOING,
FAIA, and THOMAS LARRICK, Flor-
ida North; EDWARD G. GRAFTON
and JAMES E. GARLAND, Florida
South; WALTER B. SCHULTZ, Jack-
sonville; and FREDERICK W. KESSLER
and GEORGE J. VOTAW, Palm Beach.
ANTHONY L. PULLARA attended as a
non-voting representative from the
Florida Central Chapter.


Arnett Resigns Post as Dean


WILLIAM T. ARNETT, for the past
ten years Dean of the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts of the
University of Florida, has resigned
that position. As of July 1st he will
resume his former position as full
professor of architecture.
His action was ratified by the Uni-
versity Board of Control at its April
meeting in Fort Lauderdale. The
Board named H. W. CHANDLER, the
University's Vice-President in charge
of Academic Affairs as acting dean
until a suitable replacement for Dean
Amett can be found. In announcing
the change in the administrative posi-
tion DR. J. WAYNE REITZ, U. F. pres-
ident, characterized Dean Amett as
"one of the finest men on the staff
of the University, an excellent teacher
and a splendid citizen."
Dean Arnett has been a member
of the University's Planning and Pol-
icies Committee and Campus Devel-
opment Committee; and has also
served as chairman of the Graduate'
Faculty on Community Planning. He
was one of the very first graduates of
the University's former School of
Design, holds a master's degree in'
architecture and was named Dean
when the School's status was changed
to that of College.
The shift in administrative person-
nel will have no immediate effect on
the present staff of the College, ac-
cording to both Dean Arnett and
MAY, 1956


JOHN L. R. GRAND, head of the De-
partment of Architecture at the Col-
lege. Commenting Jon the move,
Dean Arnett said he felt that no staff
member should serve more than ten
years in a top administrative position
and expressed the hope that his suc-
cessor, when finally selected, would
find it possible to solve some of the
pressing problems with which the
College has been struggling for some
years past.
One of these is the extremely low
salary scale for the College's teaching
staff. This has not only made it diffi-
cult to attract able and experienced
instructors, but has resulted in .such
a high rate of personnel turn-over as
to present the College administration
with an almost constant crisis. This
staff situation has been the more
critical in view of the growth in Col-
lege enrollment which last year made
the College the second largest of its
kind in the country.
The other major problem is the
serious lack of housing adequate for
College activities. Last year's drive
for the first unit of the College's
overall building program failed to ob-
tain the necessary appropriation from
the Legislature. However, it did fo-
cus attention on the pressing need
for such buildings; and it is hoped
that the next Legislature will be able
to authorize the $1,500,000 appropri-
atioh that will be sought.


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Florida Newspapers Sweep AIA Competition


Dramatic evidence of the good re-
lations that exist generally between
Florida's architectural profession and
the press is the fact that Florida edi-
tors won both newspaper awards in
the AIA's Third Annual Journalism
Competition.
JOHN SENNING, of the Miami Her-
ald, won the Class I award; DOUGLAs
DOUBLEDAY, of the St. Petersburg
Times, the Class 2 award. Each
award involves a prize of $250 to
winning authors and a certificate to


them and the newspapers they repre-
sent. Presentation of awards will be
made by. AIA Chapters in the home
cities of winning publications.
The jury included HENRY H. SAY-
LOR, FAIA, Editor of the AIA Jour-
nal;. AUSTIN W. MATHER, AIA Re-
gional Director for New England;
HAROLD R. SLEEPER, -FAIA, mem-
ber of the AIA P/R Committee;
VERNER W. CLAPP, Library of Con-
gress; and LOWELL MELLETT, news
writer.


Above, Douglas Doubleday of the.
St. Petersburg, Times, and, left, his
story that won a prize for the "best
feature story on an architectural
subject or personality in a news-
paper, newspaper supplement or
newspaper magazine." Doubleday
joined his paper in 1949. As real
estate editor he saw that "amenities
of good Florida design was good
economics for the community",
worked closely wih architects and
broadened his news coverage to in-
elude city planning as well as a~chi-
tectural design. Now a special'
writer, he did his prize-winning
story at the suggestion of Sandy
Stiles, Sunday magazine editor. He
has been a frequent guest and
speaker at local AIA chapter
meetings.


Above, the story by John Senning,
left, won an award for the "best
factual reporting on an architec-
tural subject or personality in the
news columns of a paper." The
author has been real estate editor
of the Miami Herald for the past


*two years and rapidly re-made the
section into -a national prize-win-
ner. His broad outlook and under-
standing of" the community-value
of good architecture has been help-
ful to both the architectural pro-
fession and his community.


23


'


MAY, 1956







News & Notes_


USE




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Institute Convention at
Los Angeles, May 15 to 18
With plans for the 88th Annual
AIA Convention now completed,
Florida architects should be reserv-
ing accommodations for the sessions
which run from May 15 to 18.
Themed as "Architecture for the
Good Life" the convention's program
will include three major seminars and
several round table discussions of
AIA committees. Subjects include
Hurricane Resistance, chairmanned
by CLINTON GAMBLE, house design
and collaborative design. School build-
ing trends, specifications, education
and office practice are other subjects.
Principal speaker will be CLARENCE
S. STEIN of New York, slated as re-
cipient of the Gold Medal. Other
speakers will be JOHN E. BURCHARD,
M.I.T., who will give the Conven-
tion's keynote address; JOHN HERMAN,
Housing and Home Finance Agency
administrator, and CARLOS CONTERAS,
Mexican architect and planner.


Convention headquarters are the
Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles. Reser-
vations must be made through the
office of Director of Convention Ac-'
tivities, 1735 New York Avenue, N.
W., Washington 6, D. C.

Last-Minute Reminder
The Testimonial Banquet for
MELLEN C. GREELEY, FAIA, to be
held at the Roosevelt Hotel, Jack-
sonville, at 8:00 P.M., Saturday, May
5, 1956, is more than a party for a
fine gentleman and architect by his
professional colleagues. It will be at-
tended by many of "Mel's" long-
time friends from the many activities
in which he has been active church
and community organizations.
You are especially invited and,
urged -to attend this tribute to a
man who has given much to archi-
tecture in almost 50 years of prac-
tice. Reservations-and better make
them quickly--should be sent to
ROBERT E. BOARDMAN; AIA, 2014
Arcadia Place, Jacksonville 7, Florida.


James E. Greene Wins G. E. Kitchen Competition


Here is the U/F archi-
tectural student's design
as published in The
Bride's Magazine. It
took first prize in a 4th-
year student'contest for
the most original design
for a kitchen suitable
for a Florida house
costing $14,000. Second
prize was taken by Jer-
ry D. Tillinger. Con-
stance Louise Capps was
awarded the third prize.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


....- -.







DUES ARE DUE!-
According to FAA Treas-
urer Morton T. Ironmonger,
that heading is almost a
masterpiece of understate-
ment! At the recent meet-
ing of the FAA Board of
Directors, he called atten-
tion to the fact that FAA
dues from several chapters
are already overdue.
Through this notice he
sends a special request to
every chapter member: If
YOUR dues aren't yet paid,
please get busy with that
checkbook right away!r
We know how it is. We're
all busy, too. But organi-
zations have budgets; and
to meet them they need
your cooperation on dues.
.So if you haven't, do it
now: Drop that dues check
into the mail tonight.


Concrete Institute To Hold
Second Annual Convention
At Hollywood Beach Hotel

The role- which prestressed con-
crete is playing in today's architec-
ture will be emphasized during the
second Prestressed Concrete Institute
convention in May.
The event will be held in the Hol-
lywood Beach Hotel at Hollywood,
Fla., for three days starting May 16.
It will be attended by approximately
600 architects, engineers and con-
crete technicians.
Of prime interest to architects at-
tending the sessions will be a discus-
sion on design, to be presided over
by W. B. DEAN, assistant Highway
Engineer for the State Road Depart-
ment of Florida.
Scheduled for 3:30 p.m., May 16,
the discussion will include the fol-
lowing panel members: CURZON DO-
BELL of the Preload Co.; R. M. Du-
sors, Freyssinet Co., both of New
York THOR GERMUNDSON, Portland
Cement Associatiori, Chicago, Ill.;
T. Y. LIN, University of California,


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MAY, 1956 25
-_4


and PAUL ZIA, University of Florida.-
The following day, convention
delegates will be taken to local pre-
stressed concrete yards in South Flor-
ida to observe the latest casting
techniques.
The final day of the convention
will be devoted to the reading of
technical papers by outstanding au-
thorities in the field of architecture,
engineering and construction. -
Featured in this phase of the pro-
gram will be Germundsson, Dobell,
Dean and Lin, in addition to C. E.
EKBERG, Lehigh University, Bethle-
.hem, Pa.; H. J. GODFREY of John A.
Roebling's Sens, Trenton, N. J, and
R. W. KLUGE, University of Florida.
The convention will be climaxed
by a banquet at 7:30 p.m., May 18,
in the Hollywood Beach Hotel. The
featured speaker will be WALTER L.
LOWRY, JR., Head of the Civil Engi-
neering Department of Clemson Col-
lege, Clemson, S. C.
GEORGE W. FORD, Fort Lauder-
dale, vice president of R.-H. Wright
and Son, is convention chairman
and president of the institute.


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Regional Convention
(Continued from Page 5)
ready being widely used in construc-
tion," the speaker observed, "the
real potentials of their efficient appli-
cation have hardly been explored.
What is needed now is collaborative
research on the part of both archi-
tects and manufacturers to make full
use of the special qualities of various
plastic types to solve problems of de-
sign and construction in more efficient
and more economical ways."
Professor Deitz also explained
briefly two M.I.T. research projects -
one the development of an all-plastic
house for industrial reproduction.-
The other concerned use of solar
energy as a source of heat for build-
ings.
"Solar heating methods," said the
speaker, "have now been researched
to the point of practical calculation.
Data is now available for the efficient
use of solar energy in any section of
the country.
"We have built solar heating units
that can utilize tip to 30 per cent of
available solar energy. We are' now
working on the problem of reducing
the cost of making such units. At'a'
cost of $2 per square foot a solar heat-
ing system for a house in Cambridge
(Massachusetts) would be competitive
with oil heating."
"It's possible," he added, "that use
of proper plastics can lead to the so-
lution of this cost problem."
Other provocative talks on build-
ing materials were given by R. T. A.
JOHNsON, of the U. S. Forest Prod-'
ucts Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin,
and PAUL WEIDLINGER, New York'
consulting engineer and M.I.T. fac-
ulty member. Mr. Johnson spoke on
"Laminated Wood Structures"-and
his talk, illustrated with examples of
Florida designs which have used lamn1
inated wood members, is slated for
publication in an early future issue
of The Florida Architect.
Paul Weidlinger's talk concerned
aluminum and its structural use in
building design. First he discussed
the various characteristics of the met-
al's alloys which provide a basis for
their use. He then pointed out how
these characteristics operate as limit-
ing factors or as factors that can
be adapted to achieve new structural
solutions and thus new design forms.
"Alloys, of aluminum," said the en-
gineer, "are now such as to let us


26


solve any structural problem compar-
ably with steel -and in relation to
long spans, much better than. with
steel.
"But to achieve proper use of the
material we must start from the be-
ginning. Steel can do some things
aluminum cannot do -and vice
versa. So it is not a case .of design-
ing a steel structure for fabrication in
aluminum. New thinking is needed;
and out of this will come new forms."
The speaker pointed out that alum-
inum cost was about six times that of
steel by weight, about twice by vol-
ume. But the cost trend is down; the
production trend, up. Steel produc-


Two outstanding personalities of
the Regional Conference were F.
Carter Williams, left, president of
the North Carolina Chapter, AIA,
and AIA National President George
Bain Cummings, FAIA. Mr. Wil-
liams was the genial master of cere- .
monies at dinner meetings held on:
both opening and closing evenings
of the Conference. President Cum-
mings spoke Thursday.

tion, for example, has' doubled in
recent years. But aluminum produc-
tion has increased six to seven times
in a comparable period.
"Tha designer's problem," Weid-
linger told 'his audience, "is to detail
structures that will solve the problem
of enclosing space with a quarter, a
fifth or even a sixth the weight of
steel to equalize the cost factor.
"The only practical way of doing
this is through full utilization of alum-
inum alloy characteristics and careful'
calculation of new structural forms
that will take advantage of each one."
FollowinglWeidlinger's talk on Sat-
urday* morning, HENRY L. WRIGHT,
F.A.Y.A., New York research con-
(Continued on following page)
T'HE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
-. s .- *.


V






V


^*'.


r.;- :6.1





sultant and former editor of Archi-
tectural Forum, spoke on "Environ-
ment and Comfort." Using air-con-
ditioning as a basic illustration,
Wright pointed out how various tech-
nical factors needed to condition
building interiors operate as signifi-
cant, and often controlling, influ-
ences of design. As other speakers
had done, he emphasized the increas-
ing need for research in building de-
sign and construction.
"Research on building materials
and various elements of equipment is
important," he said, "but of even
more importance is research on build-
ings themselves as a basis for learning
how best construction materials and
equipment can be combined and co-
ordinated in buildings designed for
various specific purposes."
To illustrate his point he cited
how analytical tests of a completed
school building, coupled with experi-
mental use of materials, had provided
i-a practical measure of the building's
performance. Tabulation of test re-
sults thus provided the architect with
a kind of performance scale which
Could be used to improve school
building design.
Friday morning,, most Conference
delegates journeyed to Raleigh to hear
PIER NERVI, famed Italian engineer,
discourse, through his interpreter,
MARIO SALVADORI, New York con-
sulting engineer and professor of civil
engineering at Columbia University,
Neivi's talk followed substantially the
lines of his article published in the
April, 1956, issue of Architectural
Record. In the afternoon, the two
speakers joined with JOSE LUIS SERT,
Dean of the Graduate School of De-
sign, Harvard University, and GAR-
RETT- ECKBO, professor of Landscape
Architecture, University of Southern
California, in a panel discussion.
Moderated by philosopher-author
GEORGE BOAs, of The John Hopkins
University, the discussion developed
into an exchange of intellectual ab-.
stractions that was politely absorbed
by a lecture hall packed with N. C.
State College students. DEAN HENRY
L. KAMPHOEFNER of the NCSC
School of Design introduced the mod-
erator and panel members to the prac-
ticing architects who attended the
meeting as Conference guests.
The business part of the Confer-
ence consisted largely in a series of
brief committee meetings, the ap-
(Continued on Page 28)
MAY, 1 956


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28


Regional Convention
.(Continued from Page 27
pointment of new committee mem-
bers by Regional Director HERBERT
C. MILLKEY and election of chapter
delegates to fill vacancies on the Reg-
ional Executive Board. Appointed as
members of the judiciary committee
were: ALBERT SIMONS, of Charleston,
S. C., for three years; J. WARREN
ARMISTEAD, JR., of Atlanta, for two
years; WALTER D. TOY, of Charlotte,
N. C., for one year; and THOMAS
LARRICK, of Gainesville, alternate.
At the Saturday morning business
session delegates elected five new
members to the executive committee:
JOHN STETSON, of Palm Beach; SAN-
FORD W. GOIN, F.A.I.A., of Gaines-
ville; Miss ELLAMAE LEAGUE of Ma-
con, Ga.; W. R. JAMES Of Winston-
Salem, N. C.; and H. N. FAIR Of Co-
lumbia, S. C.
The only resolution to be pro-
posed and acted upon by the Con-
ference was presented by F. CARTER
WILLIAMS, president of the North
Carolina Chapter. He noted that R.
T. A. JOHNSON, speaking on wood-
laminated .construction, had stated
that current .practice was to ship
southern pine to northern states for
processing into laminated members--
then ship the finished products back
for use in southern states' buildings.
Williams' resolution proposed that


the Regional Executive Board recom-
mend that a wood-laminating plant
be established in the south to utilize
native material, eliminate wasteful
time and effort in shipping and re-
duce costs. His resolution was unani-
mously approved.
Surrounding the Conference meet-
ing area in Durham's Armory, was an
extensive exhibit of architectural work
by AIA architects in the four-state
Conference area. Announcement of
awards were made by Miss LOUISE
HALL, Durham architect and chair-
man of the architectural exhibit com-
mittee, at the banquet which closed
the Conference Saturday evening.
Awards had been made by a jury com-
posed of JOHN EKIN DINWIDDIE, Dean
of the School of Architecture, Tulane
University, New Orleans; FRANK G.
LOPEZ, senior editor of Architectural
Record, and .CHARLES GOODMAN,
Washington, D. C., architect.
A special merit award went to A.
G. ODELL, JR., AND ASSOCIATES, Char-
lotte, N. C., for the Wilson Junior
High School building in Mecklenberg
County, N. C. JOHN FORTMAN, Of:
Atlanta, won two awards, one for
the residence of Samuel T, Lemer,
the other for his design of the build-
ing for the Fraternal Order of Ea-
gles. G. MILTON. SMALL and
GEORGE MATSUMOTO, Raleigh: archi-
tects, shared an award for their de-
(Continued on following page)


Miss Louise Hall of Duke University, Durham, N. C., with judges for the
Honor Awards program as they take a look at the Geodesic House which
was displayed in the lobby of Washington Duke hotel. Left to right, Dean
John Ekin Dinwiddie of the Tulane Universify School of Architecture,
New Orleans, Miss Hall, Frank G. Lopez, senior editor of Architectural
Record, and Charles M. Goodman, Washington architect.
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sign of the Gregory-Poole Equipment
Co.'s building in Raleigh. Of the
Florida designs submitted, that for
the Venice-Nokomis Presbyterian
Church building, for which VICTOR
A. LUNDY of Sarasota was architect,
was the only award winner. JOSEPH
N. BOAZ of Raleigh received a cita-
tion for his parking-lot office build-
ing in Oklahoma City.
GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS, F.A.I.A.,
Institute President, greeted Confer-
ence delegates and visitors in an ad-
dress following dinner on the opening
day of the Conference. His central
theme was the obligation to fellow
citizens and the community that is
both the heritage and the responsi-
bility of every practicing architect.
President Cummings called upon
architects not -only to recognize their
obligations, but to discharge them in
ways to reflect credit on themselves
and their profession. His message
was frankly an inspirational one and
presented in the same sincere min-
ner with which it was received.
"Socially responsible practice of
the profession," the AIA President
said, "must be 'of the spirit.' It de-
mands that the architect be a 'whole
man'- gentleman, scholar, citizen,
philosopher.
"Out of -his productive time and
income he should give a tithe to the
betterment of his community and the
society to which he owes his living
and his life. Nothing less than a life-
Stime dedication to the ideals of his
profession will suffice for his ultimate
satisfaction and happiness."

Florida's Delegation Small
Florida's attendance at the Dur-
ham Regional Conference was disap-
pointingly meager. Only five of the
state's nine AIA chapters were repre-
sented, three of them by only one
man each. Four were registered from
both Florida Central and Florida
North.
The FAA delegation included:
from Florida North, SANFORD W.
GOIN, FAIA, WILLIAM T. ARNETT,
JOHN L. R. GRAND and EDWARD M.
FEARNEY; from Florida Central, ER-
NEST T. H. BOWEN, II, WILLIAM B.
HARVARD, BLANCHAID E, JOLLY and
ROBERT L. ALLEN; from Jacksonville
Chapter, WILLIAM K. JACKSON; from
Broward County, FAA president
CLINTON GAMBLE; and from Florida
South, A. J. SIMBERG.
MAY, 1956


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Guide-posts to the Future
(Continued from Page 9)
trades may soon be wagging the archi-
tectural dog. What these trades will
be is anybody's guess. But we can
definitely see Mechanism creeping
into everything. Automobiles with
push-button windows and push-but-:
ton drives, automatic daylight control
for buildings, such as is being installed
in the new Science Building in Wash-
ington, are obvious examples.
If we do these things in automo-
biles-which are practically throw-
away items--and special buildings,
why will they not become things re-
quired for the ordinary run for build-
ings? Time was when very few homes
had bathrooms. Will not individual
rooms in future buildings have sepa-
rate, fully automatic, controls for light,
and heat and ventilation and cooling
to maintain a constant environment
- probably from its own nuclear
power plant?
It seems that in the engineering
side of architecture, we will have the
greatest growth. It is with this in
Mind, therefore,, that we should be
educating our younger architects.
Maybe in the future individual archi-
tects will not exist, but will operate
as a group or an architectural clinic.
According to current statistics the
trend is definitely towards larger and
more complete architectural offices.
This is not just a trend in architects'
offices, but is a trend in every form
of business in this country. So the
future architect who is to manage this
group should be educated with some
knowledge of all technical fields so
he can intelligently coordinate them.
Just a word on pre-fabrication. I
think we should make a real study of
pre-fabrication and its effect on our
profession and not run and hide
and get annoyed the minute the word
is mentioned. When we buy a heat-
ing boiler, for instance, it is pre-fabri-
cated; when we buy an air-conditionu
ing unit it is pre-fabricated. Why
should we get annoyed the minute
somebody puts plywood and two-by-
fours together and calls it pre-fabri-
cation?
It is very definite from trends al-
ready pointed out that we are going
to have pre-fabrication, that the manl
ufacturer is seeking all the time for
new fields to use his equipment to
(Continued on following page)r
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






reduce labor, improve the product
and make a profit. \\ith or without
automation in some fields the manu-
facturer can fabricate cheaper thin
\Ie can site-fabricate. He "\ill get defi-
nitel\ more and more into building
construction. But it is up to us to
point the \wa\ and create the demand
and to control the market in the
building field.
The English have gone far in de-
signing buildings, the parts of \which
can be factor fabricated. The Mmn-
istry of Education. the architect and
the manufacturer all collaborate on
the design. \e should do something
along the same line in this country.
Otherwise it ma\ be too late.
I cannot state too strongly my
thoughts as to the Octagon having a
Department of Standards and Re-
search. I think this department should
issue certificates of approval similar
to those of the Undereriters Labora-
tory and Good Housekeeping maga-
zine. This in itself should help de-
fra\ some expense of the department:
and if assistance can be had from
foundations. I think this should be
done. If not, it should he financed
by its members. But of one thing I
am certain: it must be establislied
before it i_ too late. Research and
more research is what architects need
-also know ledge to keep abreast of
research and to use intelligent ma-
terials that %\ill be developed from it.



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Florida Power & Light Co. 22
Florida Steel Products, Inc. 28
George C. Griffin .. . 29
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Interstate Marble & Tile Co. 27
Jo Ceramics . 12 thru 20
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MAY, 1956


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MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pies.


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JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H. BARRON, JR Secy-Treas.
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32


AGC Convention Stresses Cooperation
(C,,,itnrdl I'f st, Pig< .2)


putting the cart before the hlorse.
Planning should precede rfmins,. not
the other una\ round." -
In a rcpcort to dekdgate about con-
struction acti\ tics of the Li. S. C'.rp
of Engineer.s C:o.. E. E.. KIRKPtRICK
conmmeinted (n the need for "-reater
precision" in building and "rccolu-
tionar\" methods of construct t.i'.'. Hle
cited as one example, the need for
improved methods rf p.s\ing :ir-base
strips to produce "a super-smrooth-
ness, uith the maximum allow able
de\iatirn from 4- t.o I:-inch in a
11ill-foot run."
Col. Kirkpatrick expressed hope
that the Stat-'s flood control program
should soon get under s\\a in earnest.
.nd commented on the \ital need for
cons.riMin n~attr for both industrAil
and population ui-e.
Presented to delegates as "a labor
statesman." CEORGR L NMITCHELI
riprescntati\e of the carpeleters' un-
ion. undersrcored a point important to_
all present in commenting on the
need for better safety. practices in con-
struc tion.
"Florida's sjafet record." the labor
leader said. "is among the verv uorst
in tire counrtr. The satet'\ program
/iere I5 almost no program t all IN lai-
be the unh l n' to _et orne is through
Iciselation."
Bid-shoppinm was the subject of
another discussion durmin Fridas's
.ifternooun session. It \nas mentioned
in a report on sub.-cH.ntractor relations
b\ S. C. LEIFFRT and alo in \\ .H.
.rnold's report on Joint Coopcra.ti
Committee activities. Coni nsus of
opinion was that "Bid-shoppmin is an
industry problem that must be
sol\ed." But no definite conclusiOns
to\\ard tins end w\erc adopted b% tihe
conv mention.
Pointed out during discussion was
the substance of Senate Bill (LI. S.I
16-44 which b\ requiring submission
of all sub-contractors' names on all
Federal projects. would force elimi-
nation of bid-shopping b\ g emrn-
inent control.
"Covernment control is certainly
not the answer we want." the commit-
tee chairman stated cmphaticall).
"But ie'll/ be forced into it it weI
cannot sohei the problem by our-
selhes "
He indicated that progress \\as al-
read\ being made in jac\ksonmlle.


Here contractors are making a sus-
tained effort to accede to architects
derm.ndsl that all sb-co:ntrictors be
named within 2 hourI s A-fttr a gen-
eral contract a.ird Ihas been made.
In Palm Beach architects are asking
that general contractors name selected
sub-contractors prior to contra t
awards. Cooperating contractors are
hoping that in time such n',\- experi-
mental practices mnal eventually clim-
nate bid-shopping in this area.
Saturday morning's sesico-n u is
marked b\ election of officers and
addresses h\ FR NK J. ROONFN. Na-
tional \GC President. and \\irri\ .
F DUNN. manaCer of \GC's Labor
Relations Department. Elected as
neS officers sere: \\. \\. ARNOLD.
Ft. Pierce. President. and \. R. COR-
II.Mi. \\\st Palm Beath. Treasurer.
The Crouncil \I:ted mea'urcs to
strengthen the .GC: State organiza-
tion. to expand its ati\ities and to
alhii\e a crlos.r integration between
its member chapters. To put the
program into operation delegates
elected \\'ILLI.\ P BoOr,, JR.. as
the Council's Executi e Secretar\.
Bobb. for the past seen \ears secre-
tar\-manager of the .AC's Florida
East Coast Chapter. u th headquar-
ters in Palm B1. eh. \\II lhandli the
new assignment in addition to hus
present duties.
In his address to convention dele-
gates. Frank 1. Roone\ re-temphasized
tihe importance of the Joint Coupera-
tive Committees nou, operating skith
architects and engineers. He ca\e
high praise to achieem ents of Flor-
ida joint committees, p.rticularh that
in Palm Beach lhiech he said had es-
tablished a pattern for successful
operation throughout the country .
Roomn\ also d\elt pointedly on
the need for better and more nclus-
i\e training for \on: people in the
construction field. He pin-pointcd
the lack of training facilities at the
Linisersits of Florida and indicated
he would advocate strong support of
Florida's ACC organizations for an\
efforts toward construction of ade-
auate training facilities. I hus he
aligned the .CGC with architects \\ho
are pl.aning to rene\\, at the next
legislative ssiosun, their attempts to
obtain funds for constructing a ne\\
building for the Li.,F College of
architecturee and Allied Arts.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















76e



(^uLCvt,


^e'a


9'ZCU



94


e'a#9 e


History, the experts say, has a way of- repeating itself. And right now
the architectural profession is getting a fresh taste of that truth.
Architects are being told they must change their ways. Some fifteen
years ago, when Unification was a burning professional issue, they were
hearing the same thing. The hue and cry which raged across the country in
the wake of the Chicago World's Fair at the turn of the century made
raucous, and sometimes bitter, music on the same single string. And for-
mation of the AIA some hundred years ago is evidence that even then
professional life had become generally so coated with complacency as to
obscure the fire and urge for progress that is its virile and necessary core.
The changes advocated gradually came into being. And it is surely safe
to say that no architect practicing today would want it any different. But
now architects are under bombardment from admonitions of those who see
a new kind of handwriting on the wall and are becoming increasingly vocal
about it.
"We face," they say, "a whole new world with new technology. In it is
atomic power, solar and nuclear energy, automation, industrial pre-fabrica-
tion beyond our past imaginings. Completely new materials are being
developed. New types of complex equipment are being perfected constantly.
"All these things," they cry out, "are the tools of our new designs. We
must know them, use. them, coordinate them. And we must do so with
sureness, with skill, with imagination. Only by doing this can we justify
our existence as professional men and maintain our traditional position of
leadership in construction.
"The future is now!" they warn. "It is later than we think! We must
change now before it is too late!"
Well .. Of course, they're right. That is, they're right about most of
it. But like many prophets, they sometimes get a little shrill around the
edges.
It is most certainly true that our world is on the threshold of some of
the most profound technological developments that have ever been dreamed.
And it is just as certainly true that architects, of all people, will be directly
concerned and basically affected by the materials and products and methods
that will shortly grow out of these developments.
To that extent architects must grow too. They must raise the sights of
their own techniques. They must (to use a nasty, but expressive word!)
streamline professional procedures to travel in company with those who are
constantly stepping up the speed of technological evolution. And they must
certainly keep abreast of every new idea that offers any promise of providing
them with a better means for designing better buildings the real core of
their professional existence.
If this constitutes "change," why then, of course, architects must accept
it. But it seems to us that this is better named a challenge. Architects have
been doing all these things since a society coined their name and designated
their function. The challenge to our profession is no different than that
which our expanding technology is throwing down to the whole world.
One of our country's great manufacturing companies has a word for it.
They call it "Progress." And the architectural profession might do.worse
than adopt for its own that company's terse but vital slogan ". Progress
Is Our Most Important Product."


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