• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 The profession and the press
 Operation record-breaker
 Pre-Columbian sculpture & New AIA...
 "Stars shine on Carolina!"
 Interama
 News and notes
 Field day for golfers
 Producers' council
 State board exams to start june...
 Advertisers' index
 Some educators need some educa...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00022
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: April 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    The profession and the press
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Operation record-breaker
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Pre-Columbian sculpture & New AIA hurricane hazards committee
        Page 8
        Page 9
    "Stars shine on Carolina!"
        Page 10
    Interama
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    News and notes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Field day for golfers
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Producers' council
        Page 20
        Page 21
    State board exams to start june 11
        Page 22
    Advertisers' index
        Page 23
    Some educators need some educating!
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.









Ii I

Floid Achtr


April- 1956








Record . .
In Jacksonville, the St.
Vincent's Hospital Al
Nurses' Home became
the highest slab-lifted,',,
building and opened
the eyes of its architect,
engineer and builder to
possibilities for more_-
economy, greater' speed
in construction . S.
an construction .





i:

1.


:-
E:

.., c.

!,


.MIAMI
PHONE 89-6631
S5220 Biscayne Boulevard
FT. LAUDERDALE SOUTH DADE
PHONE LOgan 4.1211 PHONEls Hoemes d 1432, 1459
1335 Northeast 26th Street South Allapattah Road & Moody Drive


the stamp


A





OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Edgar S. Wortman
1122 Norit Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 Las
OIN Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Frakli S. Bunch North
John Stetson ; . South
Wlliam B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS
reward County William F. Bigo6ey, Jr.
paytona Beah .. William R. Gomon
ord Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Florida North . Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
Fla. No. Central Albert P. Woodard
Florids South . Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Honey
James E, Garland
acksonville . George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
idFlorida . Francis H. Emenson
Palm Beach . Frederick W. Kenler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421

PRIL, 1956
*fe .A' ^^^,"' .-.'.*. ; ',*.=.


Fo rida Architectp

VOLUME 6 APRIL, 196: NUMBER 4



CONTENTS

The Profession and The Press _____ 2
Operation Record-Breaker -
Pre-Clunibiai Sculpture ,8
New AIA Hurricane.RHzards committedd --------. 8:
"Stars Shine on Carolina!" --- ----10
Progress Report Interama_ .-l :1 .
News and Notes -.__.__-____"14
Field Day for Golfers __ ___ -_18
'.Crusade for Fieedom" _19 .
Producer's Council. Program .---- .20
State Board. Exams to Start June 11 2-- _22
Advertisers' Index ___. 2__. _._ -.-2. ,'
Some Educators Need Some Educating! -__-- 4 :



THE COVER
This pogrnus pheotoraph of iba St. Vincent's Hospital Nu ans' H :., '
now buinu built in Jacksonvile shows the second of seven 270 reinforced concrete sabs being lifted into place a part of a con-
structioi operatioaq is new and still news in Florida.
More pictures appear on p 6 and 7; ;*

-----------


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor--Roger W. Sherman.
"The FLORIDA ARCIwTECT is the. Official. Joural. f, the FlI Association of
Arhitects of the American Instite of Archlects:" It-l 1oJM by the
Florida Association of Architlrd inc. a Florida Coo e nd is.
Published monthly. undr the athory and dir nation
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. I jWk7-0421 .
Correspodenc and editorial contributions are d enoel d b
be guarantee d all copy is subject to approval-' the Plc uatlon -4.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those o fon
Committee or the Florica Association of Architects. Editorial cotents m ay 'ly
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications provided credit is accord" The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the .Adrtiem of products, ials
Sand services" adaptable for u in Florida are welcoaned; but mention of n or
illustrations of such materials and. produ ts,..in either editorial or ead"rt lng
columns does not constitute endorsement By tie Publication Committee 'r The
SFlorida Association of Architects . Address all- communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W.. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.












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Published in the Blueprint, the
AIA bulletin of the Westchester, N.
Y., Chapter, are two letters which
have a direct bearing on P/R activ-
ities of architects in Florida quite
as much as those in New York. One,
addressed to a representative of a
New York State chain of newspapers,
was written by GERSON T. HIRSCH,
president of the Westchester Chapter.
It set forth the fact that architects'
work has been published without
credit to the architects involved. And
it tactfully suggested that due credit
be accorded in future publication.
The editor's answer to that letter
contains the' real meat of the ex-
,change of correspondence. Jtst as
tactfully the editor, OXIE REICHLER,
of the Yonkers Herald-Statesman, sug-
gested the advisability of group ad-
vertising within the code of AIA
ethics. But his.comments.on the strict
rews approach are- something every
' architect and AIA Chapter admin-
istration could well take to heart.
"Instead of looking at published
stories and eating your hearts out
because your side of the story wasn't
told, it should be your duty to put
the story in the hands of the reporter
or editor BEFORE publication.
"It should be clear that we can't
print something we don't know about.
It should also be clear that the best
story of a building's design should
come from the architect and not from
the usual news sources of the news-
paper.
"Therefore I can't impress on you
too strongly the idea that to get your
story before the public, You must
tell it. Why don't you arrange to
prepare actual press releases describ-
ing architects' contributions to the
construction of ,specific buildings?
Even a short description of -the build-
ing, together with the architect's
name would be of value to both you
and us, provided it contained ma-
terials of general reader interest.
"In any event, you might become
a friendly news source. A dependable
news source is one of 'a reporter's
most *cherished hossessionsl A scrap


The Profession and The Press

A New York editor discusses what makes architectural news--and
suggests a good idea that's equally as practical for. use in Florida.


of' paper with a few notes from ,
reliable source can replace hours o
'digging' for elusive facts.
"There, I think, is where your pub
lie relations can do the most good
As you say in your letter, you're no
interested in the'recognition and pub
licity for the individual architect a
such, but a more appreciative treat
ment of the. architects as a group.
"So what does it profit you merl,
to have us mention the name of ai
architect in the caption of a picture
if we don't have something from v y
to describe what the architect cori
tributed" .
Editor Reichler's letter (printei
only in part here) confirms the often
repeated statement of P/R peopi
that papers are not natural. antag
onistic to the architectural profession
Editors and reporters are always ayii
for news. At the same time, thi
shy away from what'appears to .1
"free advertising"' in the form .e
publicity blurbs. Their jobs mal
them right from both viewpoints.
But there's a way of meeting theB
on common ground. That is to follow
the suggestions contained in 1N
Reichler's letter.

Gathering for Greeley
MELLEN CLARK GREELEY, F.A.I:
will be chief guest of honor aj
dinner to be given at the Roos'
Hotel, Jacksonville, at 8:00 .
Saturday, May 5. Actually. Mr. G
ey is the chief reason for the g
ing, for his colleagues in the Jacks
ville Chapter have planned it
Testimonial Dinner a tang~
recognition of his high stature iri
architectural profession and a tri
to his long and completely dev
service to the best interests of
profession.
The Jacksonville Chapter is teis
ing an open invitation to archi.
from all sections of the State to;.,
its membership in thus honoring!
Greeley. Reservations for the ,'$
monial Dinner should be addi
to: ROBERT E. BOARDMNAN, AIA-1
Arcadia Place, Jacksonville 7; Flo
THE FLORIDA ARCHII










































Ribbed panels of precast concrete, prefinished in natural color and measuring 4 by 20 feet, form the walls
of the new Miami Springs Recreation Center, for which Steward and Skinner were architects. Jorgensen & Schref-
ler and Maurice H. Connell & Associates, Inc., were the engineers. General contractor was Bradford Builders, Inc.






^^W(^Cc---




Good as it is for the solid bones of a building, Hollostone is

just as suitable for wall construction. Precast panels are of

special advantage in industrial and commercial work ... For

data on types, sizes, finishes and range of use, call us ...







APRIL, 1956 3
r-


:r
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in Twelve-foot Panels...


The one thing that has limited the versatility of
plywood as a progressively vital element of architec-
tural design has been the restrictions of panel sizes.
Panels higher than eight feet have been available only
on special, time-consuming orders, often at prohibitive
prices.
Now- for Florida designers- that limitation no
longer need exist.
Panels up to twelve feet in height in a variety of
fine hardwoods can now be specified without the


It's Full Height
"WESTAG"
and Beautiful!


price penalties and production delays formerly associ
ated with such requirements. This is possible now
because we have been appointed as distributors in
Florida for Westag, internationally known European
producers of fine plywoods.
Westag Plywood Panels will be available in both
interior and exterior grades and in all usually available
thicknesses. Stocks are now in transit and will be avail-
able for immediate delivery in the near future.
Shortly also we will be able to supply architects
with complete descriptive and specification material.
In the meantime we welcome, and will be glad tc
service, any inquiries.


A. H. RAMSEY AND SONS, INC
71 N. W. 11th TERRACE, MIAMI--- FRanklin 3-081l

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT































It set a new record for slab-lifting-School of Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital, now under construc-
tion at Jacksonville. Reynolds, Smith and Hills were the architects and engineers, with Walter B.
Schultz and William D. Cromartie of that firm acting respectively as designing architect and engineer.




Operation Record-Breaker...


Florida's first building
to employ the lift-slab
technique of construc-
tion with unqualified
success is also the high-
est structure yet built
with this comparatively
new, but amazingly effi-
cient, method of basic
framing ...
APRIL, 1956


The building pictured above car-
ries the distinction of two modest
records. It is the highest building yet
constructed with the lift-slab method
of framing. And, though it is not the
first in Florida to employ the lift-slab
technique, it is the first to use that
technique with complete success.
The first of these two records is
more nominal than significant. Over-
all height of the St. Vincent's Nurses'
Home is 67-feet, 4-inches, thus top-
ping the former record-holder -the
62-foot-tall Litchfield County Hos-
' pital in Winsted, Connecticut, on
which lifting operations are now being
completed.
But much more than nominal sig-
nificance rides with the second record.
The early decision to use the com-
paratively new slab-lifting method for
framing started a kind of chain-re-
action in both design and construc-
tion procedures that has resulted in
notable advantages throughout the


building project. And, as an example
of what such a basic decision can
produce in the way of construction
economies including a substantial
saving in building time--this new
Jacksonville project is worth a long
second look by architects, engineers
and contractors alike.
But the decision in favor of slab-
lifting vs. more conventional methods
of construction was not made hastily.
The St. Vincent's Hospital School of
Nursing consists of a six-story build-
ing, 44 by 164 feet, that includes
five dormitory floors above a first floor
administration area, a two-story teach-
ing wing, 42 by 112 feet, and a one-
story lounge and auditorium. The
owner had planned for its completion
by September, 1956, the beginning
of the nursing school's term. Time
was scarce; and everything that could
be done to expedite every phase of
the project was promptly adopted.
(Continued on Page 6)
5


t






Record Breaker


Because the owner had already se-
lected the GEORGE D. AUCHTER COM-
PANY to construct the new project,
considerable time was saved. As soon
as piling plans and structural steel
columns were designed, the general
contractor could order the steel, on
which delivery periods were critical,
and begin the foundation work. Work
on drawings and specifications were
coordinated with a progress schedule
of construction. Thus, reinforcing
drawings were ready to permit the
contractor to begin pouring concrete
floor slabs immediately after columns
had been erected.
This close cooperation between
contractor and architect proved an
advantage to all concerned, partic-
ularly during the very early stages of
the project design. To quote from
WALTER B. SHULTZ, architect in
charge of the project:
"We wanted to be sure we were
on the right track. We prepared three
partial framing plans for the build-
ing: One of conventional column,
beam and slab construction; one using
a two-column system with a flat plate
poured in place; and the third de-
signed on the lift-slab method.
"Preliminary prices were obtained
from the contractor for each of the
designs. The" lift-slab design proved
to be the most economical of the


three, with the poured-in-place flat
plate the most expensive.
"Not unlike ourselves, the contrac-
tor at this p'int was not overly opti-
mistic about the claims made-for the
method and the possible savings-
which we believe only became really
apparent after the project was well
along. These savings apply not only
to the general contractor, but tomany
of his sub-contractors as well, espe-
cially in trades such as electrical,
plumbing, heating and air condition-
ing."
Both the six-story dormitory and
administration unit (which has been
designed for a future seventh floor)
and the two-story school wing (also
designed for an additional future
floor) were laid out with 26-foot
square bays. The architectural design
employed flat plates for the structural
floor systems, cantilevered on each
long side of both six and two-story
units about nine feet beyond the
column lines. This regular pattern of
bays, the use of flat plate floors
coupled with the tight, design and .
construction schedule led to the idea-
of using the slab-lifting methods for
erecting the building. Results of the
preliminary comparative cost esti-
mates clinched the decision.
Once under way, construction
methods used for this project fol-


lowed the same general pattern em-
ployed in other slab-lifted buildings.
After columns were erected, the seven,
9-inch-thick slabs for the main build-,
ing and the three slabs for the school
wing were poured, one on top of
one another. Side forms of plywood
were built the full height of the
stacked slabs; and as each slab was
finished, it was given two coats of
bond breaker at the rate of one gallon
per 100 square feet of slab surface.
Slab depressions for tile and ter-
razzo were filled before the next slab
was poured; and the necessary pipe
sleeves, conduits and chase openings
were placed and formed integrally.
with reinforcing of each slab. For .each
slab, shear heads were threaded over
the columns; and these were welded
to the columns after slabs had been
lifted to their permanent level.
Fabrication of the ten slabs was
completed within 30 days -a speed
made possible by a schedule that
called for pouring slabs alternately
on both the six and the two-story
building. While one section was be-'-,
ing poured, reinforcing, sleeves, con-
duit, etc., were being placed in the-,
other area.
Lightweight structural concrete was -
used in all the slabs. WILLIAM D.
CROMARTIE, designing engineer who 1
worked closely with the architect


-All sabs were poured on the ground
and the first one lifted was 14 days old.


Slabs for roof and three upper floors
were lifted first in temporary positions.


. .................









from the very inception of this project
describes it this way:
"Use of this type of concrete'min-
imizes the dead load which lightens
the slab design itself and lightens
the load which is placed on the jacks
in the lifting operation. The concrete
we specified was made from ex-
panded shale aggregate and having a
minimum strength at 28 days of
3,000 psi. This concrete does not
normally employ any sand, but rather
consists of aggregate itself in two
sizes -inch to %-inch and %-
inch to dust and weighs approxi-
mately two-thirds of regular stone
concrete."
Actual lifting of the slabs was
started February 9 and was com-
pleted in four weeks with an ad-
ditional week required to finish the
welding operations. A total of ten
slabs were lifted; and three wLe
lifted twice, since they were tempo-
rarily stacked above the fourth floor
until the columns were spliced.
Before lifting operations began, the
40-foot steel H-columns were braced
both ways at the top. Not until the
four lower floors had been lifted to
permanent positions (the first floor
is raised three feet from the ground
to provide crawl space for utility serv-
'icing under it) were the columns ex-
(Continued on Page A2)


Each floor of the administration
and dormitory unit, shown above,
contains over 7,000 square feet of
area. Each of the 9-inch, light-
weight concrete slabs weighs about
270 tous and was lifted at an
approximate rate of five feet per
houi by a series of jacks placed
at the top of columns. Lifting rods
from the jacks were connected to
east steel shear heads built into the
slab at each column so that the
columns act as vertical tracks up
which the slabs can slide. The jacks
lift three inches at a time and
their operation is controlled by the
"console" shown at the right. The
-lifting engineer can operate each
jack independently, thus can keep
the moving slab approximately level
at all times to prevent undue deflec-
tion at any column point. When a
slab has reached its proper position,
shear plates are welded to each col-
umn and cooled for at least 30
minutes before lifting load is re-
leased and lifting rods disconnected.


All slabs were lifted and permanently
anchored in place within five weeks.







Pre-Columbian Sculpture -- Totem or Statue


A carved owl totem, dis-
covered at his real estate
development near Deland
by Mr. Victor Roepke of
Eustis late in June 1955,
is now on display in the
Florida State Museum at
Gainesville. Both archaeo-
logically and architectur-
ally it is unique in Indian
art of the southeastern
United States. It is digni-
fied, formal and in repose.
It has more of the char-
acter of 18th and 19th
century American primi-
tive carving or of Archaic
Greek art than anything
pre-Columbian that I have
ever seen.
The sculpture is a form-
alized, conventionalized, ,
immense (six foot) owl
that represents a develop-
ment of an art form that
must have taken genera- Photo
tions of study and work. The owl is
represented as a dignified and calm
spirit not a vengeful, horrible crea-
ture which was eager for blood and
sacrifice. All other pre-Columbian


by Sadi Koruturk


art which I have seen is obscene and
awful. Its art forms were meant to
terrify.
Technically the owl reminds me
more of a statue of the wooden In-


dians which used to stand in front of
our cigar stores, or a figure head on a
clipper ship. It has some of the spirit
of an early Pharaoh whose authority
was all-prevailing, and of course not
benign but just and consistent from
his own point of view.
To have so changed the character
of an owl, which normally even now
to us strikes a haunting fear by the
sound of his hoot, into a calm spirit
shows a change of the ideal of that
spirit.
There is both carving and groov-
ing on this statue (for it is much
more of a statue by every definition
than a totem). The horns, upper
head, eyes and beak are carved. The
legs, tail, and five toes (a real owl
only has four) are carved in full re-
lief. The feathers are represented by
conventionalized grooves. All is so
carefully and well done as to repre-
sent first class workmanship. This
sta&t is, in the opinion of this archi-
tectural critic, (for I am not an art
critic by trade) an important one
beyond its intrinsic interest, and I
would urge all visitors to Gainesville
to see it.
-EDWARD M. FEARNEY, A.I.A.


AIA Hurricane Hazards Committee


. As Chairman for the recently-
formed AIA Committee on Hurri-
cane Hazards, FAA President CuLN-
TON GAMBLE has been invited to ad-
dress the AIA Convention to be held
in Los Angeles, California, May 15
to 18. He will speak as a member
of the Tuesday Convention Seminar
and will present the program of his
Committee.
This program was the subject of a
conference held in New York Feb-
ruary 15 by the FAA President, AIA
Executive Director EDMUND R.
PuRvEs and the staff of the AIA's
Department of Education and Re-
search, headed by WALTER A. TAY-
LOR. At that time the broad scope
of the general subject was discussed
Sand possibilities outlined for organiz-
ing Committee action along the most
Practical lines of research and tech-
nical development.


Overall work of the Committee on
Hurricane Hazards will be to "explore
broadly the functions and services
which architects canr best perform, in
terms of precautionary planning and
design, and relief activities, to pre-
vent or ameliorate the hazards of
natural forces of unusual magnitude."
Initially, the group will be concerned
with hazards of wind and water which
are characteristic of such storms of
hurricane velocity as lashed the At-
lantic seaboard last year. Expecta-
tion is that duties of the new Com-
mittee will later be expanded to in-
clude protection against effects of
tornadoes and seismic disturbances.
Work of the Committee falls
naturally into two parts. One is
the compilation of technical informa-
tion on all types of protection against
hurricane damage-and its distribu-
tion to architects and engineers. In-


cluded in this phase of the Commit-
tee's work would be efforts toward
improving local building codes to:
facilitate better design against hurri-
can forces of both wind and water.
In this phase of its work, the Com-
mittee would act in the nature of an;
information clearing house.
That first phase is regarded as thej
long-term objective of the Commit-I
tee. Phase Two contemplates preparat-
tion of material for wide distribution.
to the general public. This would
deal with overall advance precaution=
and with local "do-it-yourself" meth
ods that have proved practical to
protect life and property against dam~.
aging storm effects.
It was pointed out that the sco
of this program covers an extre
wide area of technical subject mat
in which research and testing 6
ganizations, building material a
product manufacturers, several
of Government agencies-even o
(Continued on Page S2)
THE FLORIDA ARCHIT
............


- -- -- -- ---- -- -- ------------------


~:, .~~;,............ ............3"`


'~" "


j


















































This architect wisely includes a compact circulating warm air heater that gives

permanent protection against cold snaps. It tucks away anywhere, in floor,wall,

closet or fireplace and floods the house with cozy warmth. Yet this new flame-

type furnace costs less than a built in oven or barbecue pit. Modem Florida

homes are livable every day in the year with circulating warm air heating!
A


NPRIL, 1956


F .LO.RI HOME HEATING INSTITUTET
INCORPORATED
326 S. E. First Street Miami


"1





















9 *
'.'




"" "" .... : "- "2 "-":' :' ;. 'tY t-^^ -w"y r I" r



"Stars Shine on Carolina!"


Better not miss the Regional Conference at Durham! The Speakers'
roster reads like a Who's Who of good design, progressive thought.


Plans are now complete for the
unique, three-city Regional Confer-
ence of the AIA South Atlantic Re-
gion and promise a program full of
information and inspiration to all
who can attend. Three full-day ses-
sions-April 12, 13 and 14-have
been scheduled to coincide with a
"Festival of Design" at North Caro-.
lina State College. Theme for the
Conference itself is "New Materials
and Construction in Architecture"
-and between the design festival and
the conference program visitors will
be privileged to hear speakers whose
names have become synonymous with
progressive thinking and outstanding
accomplishment.
In addition to honor guests, in-
Seluding the mayors of Durham, Ra-
leigh and Chapel Hill, AIA top brass
- will be on hand, including President
GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS and Re-
-gional Director HERBERT C. MILL-
KEY. Participating personalities in-
clude: JOSE Luis SERT, Dean of
Graduate. School of Design, Harvard
University; GEORGE BOAS, Chairman
of Department of Philosophy, The
SJohns Hopkins University; PAUL
WEIDLINGER, Consulting Engineer.
and faculty member, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology; GARRETT
ECKBO, Professor of Landscape Ar-
chitecture, University of Southern
California; JoHN EKIN DINWIDDIE,
Dean and Professor of Architectural
Design, Tulane University.
Included also in the Conference
programs will be: ALBERT G. H.
DEITZ, Professor of Building Engi-
neering and Construction, Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology; R. T.
A. JOHNSON, Chief of Division of
Physics and Engineering, U. S. For-
est Products Laboratory, Madison,
Wisconsin; PIER LUIGI NERvI, famed
structural engineer from Rome, Italy
-and his translator, MARIO SALVA-
DORI, Professor of Civil Engineering,
Columbia UJniversity.
Architects who will participate in-
clude'CHARLES M. GOODMAN, Wash-
ington, D. C., ALONZO HARRIMAN,
Auburn, Maine, and WALTER A. TAY-


LOR, Department of Education and
Research, The Octagon, Washington.
The architectural press will be repre-
sented by FRANK G. LOPEZ, Senior
Editor, Architectural Record. CLIF-
TON BECKWITH, attorney, poet, ex-
ecutive and lecturer, will present the
summary address at the Honor
Awards Banquet on the closing eve-
ning of the Conference.
As if the opportunity to mingle
with and listen to such an array of
talent were not enough, Conferenice
Chairman WILLIAM HENLEY DEI-
TRICK and his various committees
have arranged a program that offers..
individual pleasure as well as intel-
lectual profit. Each afternoon of'the
Conference offers a cocktail party. A
tour of Duke University and the in-
comparable Duke gardens is schbed-
uled for Thursday. afternoon, the'
opening day. A tour of Raleigh is'
slated for Friday afternoon; and Sat-.
urday afternoon has been left open
for a tour of Chapel Hill and inspec-
tion of student and alumni work
marking the 10th Anniversary of the'
Department of City and Regional
Planning of. te University of Northi
Carolina.
Friday night has been set aside for.'
informal fun at a barbecue supper-
followed by square dancing; and,
dancing though of the ballroom
variety will follow the Honor:
Awards Banquet Saturday night.
Ladies are cordially invited to at--
tend all events on the program. But
a series of special events has been.
arranged for in place of regularly
scheduled meetings for those whoa
wish a choice. .4
The registration fee of $5.00 in-:
eludes admission to all Conference
sessions and permits purchase of ticked
ets to all special events. It also in-
cludes transportation by bus for tri
to Raleigh and Chapel Hill. Luno
eon and dinner tickets must .
bought at time of registration.
Room reservations should be se_'
as soon, as possible to WM. E. STUB'
JR., Manager, Washington-Duke

tel, Durham, North Carolina.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITEI
.. .. . .' ,- ,'-














































INTERAMA

Design study of the huge Interama project continues
at the preliminary sketch level, pending completion of
financing and development of any actual construction
drawings. These two most recent sketches dramatize what
many may not wholly realize--the tremendously broad
scope of this Inter-American Center and the tremendous
opportunity for diverse architectural accomplishment that
it represents.
In the air-view above, HUGH FERRISS, a Board of Design
consultant, has visualized the overall complex of buildings
that will surround the Interama "core"- a comparatively
small portion of the planned development adjacent to
the Theme Center, a study of which, by TRIPP RUSSELL,
is shown at the right. Other buildings, though subject to
approval by the Design Board, will be built and owned
by private organizations: Literally hundreds of American
industrial and commercial groups have signified their firm
interest in the Interama project; and five Latin-American
nations have stated intentions for building programs that
will adequately represent their varied interests.
APRIL, 1956


The drawing above, by Hugh Feria is a
visualization of how Interama may one da'
appear as viewed from a low-flying airphi.e
looking southeast. Many basic p
problems have been virtually solved. Study
is now being concentrated on "core build-
ings" like the Theme Center--a two-level
viewing court surrounding a rising stage.











































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In every w
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12 .THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







































ast experience with Miami Windows... estab-
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quality of their hardware... these elements often
ad the men responsible for selecting and speci-
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wning Windows. That's why their presence
roughout the nearly 650 rooms of "The Golden
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ough the Gold Coast, is excellent evidence of
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y the continued performance of the windows
a building, you will, logically, think first of
iami Windows. Whether the problem is a
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r a sprawling giant like The Golden Gate,
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d . with the surf on one side, and docks on
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now that the genuine economy of quality con-
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PRIL, 1956 13










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News & Notes


Jacksonville Chapter
What ROY M. POOLEY, P/R Com-
mittee Chairman, has labeled as "a
trial balloon" has all the earmarks of
an excellent idea for other Chapter
committee chairmen. It's a P/R
Newsletter a one-page mimeo-
graphed bulletin that contains a
round-up of Chapter activities, notes
on personalities involved, brief re-
ports of suggestions from members
on possible future projects, comments.
on current events of special, interest
to Chapter members.
Culled from No. 1, Vol. 1, for
example, it: a) a request for partici-
pation in a building publication's
editorial content; b) a comment on
the March editorial in The Florida
Architect: ci notes on buildings of
Chapter members appearing in both
local and national publications; and.
d a suggestion that a Draftsmen's
Club be formed in lacksonville.
The Jackson ille firm of REYNOLDS.
SMITH and HILLS, Architects and
Engineers, has been chosen as one
of eight professional planning groups
from various sections of the country
to advise on the development of a
National Cultural Center in Wash-
ington, D.C. A 21-man Federal Com-
mission, authorized by Congress last
year, has been charged with estab-
lishing the National Cultural Center
to fill a major gap in the Capitol's
present facilities.
The Jacksonville firm will be asso-


ciated with such architectural and
engineering firms as PEREIRA and
LUCKMAN, project coordinators for
the Commission's planning board;
FAULKNER, KINGSBURY & STENHOUSE,
Washington; GIFFELS & -VALLET,
INC., L. ROSSETTI, ASSOCIATED,
Detroit; HOLABIRD & ROOT & BURGEE,
Chicago; MACKIE & KAMRATH, Hous-
ton; SHEPLEY, BULLFINCH, RICHARD-
SON & ABBOTT, Boston, and STANFORD
RESEARCH INSTITUTE, Washington.

Mid-Florida Chapter
Honored guests at March 9 lunch-
eon meeting, held in the Langford
Hotel at Winter Park were RIcHAbi
C. NEUTRA, his son DION NEUTRAL,
Nlayor RAYMOND C. GREENE of %'in-
ter Park. \\'ILLIAN AXERMAN, pres-
ident of the Orlando Chamber of
Commerce. and Cot. HuBERT Mc-
CORD, US Corps of Engineers (re-
tired i. The meeting was directed by
Chapter President F. EARL DELOE,i
who introduced Mr. Neutra, en route
to his home in California from a trip
to Spain, as the speaker.
NMr. Neutra's talk covered a broad:
range of professional interest, sparked:
immediately by his comment on th4
importance of the architect to t".
development of an\ country and.
his illustrations of the point by como
parative reference to such countrieS
as Spain, Portugal, India, Venezuelaj,
Puerto Rico and Cuba. He had higti
praise for the quality of contempt.
-i


The Mid-Florida Chapter entertains distinguished guests. Chapter Pres-
ident F. Earl DeLoe, left, was presiding host at a luncheon meeting at
which Richard C. Neutra, center, wis the speaker. With them were Col.
Hubert McCord and Mayor Raymonw C. Greene of Winter Park, right.
t THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





rar\ building design in the United
States. But he \\a. sharply\ critical of
current cit\ planning techniques.. Not-
ing that M.\uRicr Rori\ \L had re-
ccentlh becn conmnis,_ioned to de'elo'p
a complete. long range plan for
\\inter Park. Mr. Neutra said he
knew of "'no other %ia\ to perpetu-
ate the'bcaut\ of a cit\ other than
to adopt a master plan and stick
to it."
The speaker aimed some of bis
remarks directly\ at roung architects..
ind in so doing \oiced an oier-all
criticism of architectural education.
Mr. Neutra said that Succe-.ful pro-
fessional practice today\ requires an
architect to become "' student of
humanism" \\ho must become lei. a
critic of the \\ork of other and mure
of a participant in trul\ creatoic acti-
it\ -particularli in our system of
professional education.
Graduates from architectural
schools. the speaker maintained, are
not now heing equipped to put Irto
practice ideas and philosophies that
should ha\e bcen offered them at
school. Lecture courses h\ practicing
architects could at best provide onl!


a partial answer to a gr..m ing problem
of professional education, MIr. Neutra
thought. He advocated a complete
re-caluation no:f c.\.r ph.ae of archi-
tectural education if the future sound
progress of the architectural profession
is to be assured.
In answer to the question. "Hoi
can the architect improie hiis status
as a proritelinal man'" MIr. Neutr
oi(ced the opinion that the arclhi-
tectural profusion Uould eicntuall'
hate to relinquish a measure of its
indi\idualit\. He urged that archi.
tects %ork more closely( tozethcr as
a proTfs~ional team in both e\ ri-
da\ practice and on specific projects.
And he stressed the point that pro-
fessional progress dcnanid, "e\.iu-i
tionists. rather than .lties"
date for presentation of the Mid.
Florida Chapter's Charter b\ AIA
Regional Director HERBERI C. NIILL-
KIE has been set for Satuida\. April
.S. As no\% planned, the ceremony\
\\ill take place at a dinner meeting.
which h Chapter officers hope \ill be
attended b\ as man\ members of
Florida's other eight Chapters as can
attend Rescrnations in advance of the


date \%ill be neessarv and should be
obtained from IoSrPI-I E. SHFlrlO.
Secretary. Postal Building. Winter
Park.

Florida South Chapter
The regular monthly\ meeting on
March 1I th drew a customarily high
percentage of members to Coral
Cables' Pinc Tree Inn for cocktails.
dirnncr and an addre._ on Miami's
traffic problems b\ Cit\ Engineer
ARTHUR D\RLo\\. Before Mr. Dar-
lo\'s talk. hith \as illustrated ith
a series of traffic flo\ i harts. Chapter
President FRIPP RUSSELL introduced
tio of the evening's honor guests-
Miami Cit\ Manager GCNERIL E. A.
E\.NS and TA.LBo A. HAMLIN. F.A.
I.A.. dean of America's architectural
historians \ hoe comprehensive stud\
on the \\ork of Hcnr\ Latrobe "as
rtcentl\ published. Mr. Hamrlin. no\\
all but retired from his connection
lith the College of Architecture of
Columbia L'niversit., has transferred
his .IA membership to tie Florida
South Chapter and plans to make Iis
permanent residcnce in Miami.
(Co,it;i,,c!d i.,, Piy. 16)


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and economical.



V"ito


THE*

MOER


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


APRIL. 1956 i





News & Notes -
(Continued from Page 15)


What


Makes


A Good


Job?




FIRST-
Good Design, Functional
Layout; with drawings
and specifications by
qualified Architects and
and Engineers.

SECOND -
Qualified and Experienced
General Contractors.

THIRD -
Qualified and Experienced
Sub-Contractors and
Specialists-like Miller
Electric Company who
have stood the acid-test
for over twenty-five years.


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During the business meeting, it
was announced that ROBERT LAW
WEED had resigned his post on
Miami's Building Board of Appeals.
IGOR B. POLEVITZKY was named to
succeed him.
JAMES E. GARLAND, staff architect
for the Dade County Board of Public
Instruction, reported on the results
of a recent committee meeting called
by a member of the Board to consider
the question of eliminating services
of architects in private practice in
favor of. expanding the Board's arch-
itectural office. Garland called the
question "a matter of recurring con-
cern to each newly-elected Board that
crops up regularly every four years"
and said that the committee, which
included an architect, an engineer and
a contractor, had, in his opinion.
demonstrated the impracticality of
the idea.
He cited the volume of school-
building construction slated for corn-


pletion in Dade County within the
next three or four years- $34,000,000
worth. He stated that in the conduct
of that building program some school
plans would be re-used on a "royalty
basis" of payment to the designing
architects. His comments occasioned
a sharp verbal exchange from listeners
when he said that "pressure of need
and volume of work" plus the desire
to avoid costly and time-consuming
"mistakes" had led to the Board's
decision on plan re-use.
Commenting on Garland's report,
Talbot Hamlin drew general applause
when he said "Re-use of plans can
come dangerously close to standardi-
zation. And standardization leads
to stagnation. This year's mistakes
may be next year's stroke of genius."
Miami City Engineer Darlow.
sketched a traffic problem in Miami
which, in varying degrees, is faced
now, or shortly will face, every grow-:
ing community in the State. He cited>.


? '





traffic counts 1,000,000 trips per
day by Dade County's 400,000 cars-
and outlined a comprehensive pro-
gram of street widening, traffic flow
reversals, one-way streets and speed-
way links to arterial highways that
was already underway.
"Cure of metropolitan traffic, ills,"
he said, "is a major planning problem
that cannot be attacked timidly. It
has been hindered by a lack of money,
for acquisition of rights of way is
tremendously expensive. So our plan-
ning must be long-range and im-
mediate improvements must make
use of every practical traffic control
measure at hand."
Darlow indicated- that re-zoning
certain areas for parking was now
being studied as well as regulations
prohibiting the flow of traffic into
certain centers of major congestion.
"Installation of extra traffic lights
is not a solution." the speaker added.
"Lights don't move traffic. They
hinder its flow -in some cases is
much as fifty per cent."
In commenting on the extremely
high cost of traffic improvements
within an established city like Miami,
Darlow stated flatly that results had
justified the costs.
"The worse the congestion," said
the engineer, "the higher will be the
overall cost of any solution to the
traffic problem. In spite of high costs,
however, land values have doubled on
every Miami street that has been im-
proved thus far."
Broward County Chapter
In common with a growing num-
ber of Florida AIA Chapters, mem-
bers attending the Broward County
Chapter's March luncheon meeting
voted that costs of meetings be pre-
paid and collected as part of each
member's dues. Adoption of this
plan by other Chapters has proved
it to be a practical stimulus of at-
tendance at meetings-and a pain-
less way of providing the Chapter
treasury with funds that can apply
to expenses incident to programs
planned in advance.
The Chapter also voted to assess
each member $5 to meet expenses
of its annual party-the date of which
has not yet been determined.
As at other Chapters, a communi-
cation from ROLAND V. SELLEW,
president of the Florida Central
(Continued on Page 18)
APRIL, 1956.


Architect, J. Brooks Haas, A.I.A., Jacksonville
Contractor, E. C. Kenyon, Jacksonville


A S/gn oi






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process. Surfaces are of translucent plastic, lighted
from behind by neon tubing. Letters are bolted to
the canopy facia formed of two 6-inch aluminum
channels that provide a raceway for necessary
wiring ... A wide choice of stock styles and sizes
of letters are available in cast aluminum or endur-
ing plexiglas--or signs of any size and style can
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-- --






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)
Chapter was read and carefully con-
sidered. This communication dealt
with the course of action upon which
,that Chapter is presently engaged.
The consensus of opinion among
Broward County members was that
this course of action reflected a com-
mendable approach to common pro-
fessional problems and was worthy of
their support. Consequently, it was
voted that $200 be appropriated from
the Broward County Chapter's treas-
ury and forwarded to the Florida
Central Chapter for use in further-
ing the program now under way.
This action on the part of Brow-
ard County membership is in line
with a resolution passed at the Day-
tona Beach convention to the effect
that the FAA "expresses its sympathy
with the action presently contem-
plated by the Florida Central Chap-
ter of the AIA arnd commends the
support of that Chapter and its prob-
lem to the AIA Chapters of the State
of Florida and to the members of the
FAA in their individual capacities."
Members voted to sponsor a Chap-
ter display in the Ft. Lauderdale
Home Show as in the past. And they
voted also to increase their Chapter
membership by admitting the fol-
lovinig as Associates: JOSEPH T.
ROMANO; PAUL M. BRADLEY, JR.;
ROBERT E. -HALL; CARL A. PETER-
SEN, JR.; PAUL E. KOSTKA; GEORGE.
R. CARNAHAN; KARL A. RANSCHERT;
and CHESTER W. TROWBRIDGE. As-
sociates advanced to Corporate status
were: VICTOR A. LARSON and JOHN
EVANS.

The 42nd FAA Convention Commit-
tee is anxious that the architectural
exhibit at the Seville Hotel next No-
vember be "the most complete show-
ing .ever assembled." Plans are being
.perfected to save architects the
trouble and cost of packing exhibits-
at the Committee's. expense. Full
details can be had from Leonard H.
Glasser, Architectural Exhibit Chair-
man, Suite 301, 530 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach. 81


Field Day for Golfers
The Golf Tournament and Dinner
in Atlanta for which the F. Graham
Williams Company are hosts, started
as a gesture of good will for a few
local architects. Since then it has
grown to almost an institution.
This year the 33rd Annual Event





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Producers' Council Program


Fr6m EMMETT H. JONES, Secre-
tary of the. Jacksonville Chapter of
the Producers' Council, comes word
that the three-company, informational
meeting held in the Roosevelt Hotel,
March 16, was a complete success
from everyone's point of view. Of the
135 men present, 68 architects and
draftsmen and some 30 engineers were
the guests of the remaining number of
Producers Council members. That
picture above proves it!
Chapter President GEORGE COYLE
emceed the affair, which started off
with cocktails and wound up with a
panel show staged by representatives
of three manufacturers American,
Standard, Sanymetal and the J. A.
Zurn Company. CARL E. STONE dem-
onstrated for American-Standard. DAN
G. HANN, Cleveland sales manager,
held the stage for the Sanymetal Prod-


ucts Company. The story of J. Ar
Zurn products was told by RAY A
LITKENHAUS, of Edwin T. Davis 8
Associates.
In Miami, the next Informationa
meeting will .present products of twh
instead of three companies as
Jacksonville. ALLEN KERN, chairman
of the Miami Chapter Program Corn
mittee, has announced that the Mo
saic Tile Company- of which he -i
a Miami representative -and th
Crane Company will team up to pr
vide what his announcement ch
acterizes as "an evening of good f
lowship and education."
The meeting is traditionally
to architects and designing engine
and will be held as in the past,
the Coral Gables Country Club..
is March 27 and the evening's
gram includes cocktails at 6:30,


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of The American Institute of Architects to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
pubic welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession -fn the'
State, and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITE
'.- ,-.


TAMPA 8-4824 \Y
ORLANDO 2-4539 V
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662






Hurricane Committee
(Coutittl'd .'roil PagEt s)

.\IA Committees. including those on
Human Safech. Hospitals. School
Buildings. etc.--\ill concei\abl\ be
inmoled. .n important part of the
Committee's job will be to effect the
nccessarv coordination betvccn all
such information sources.
\\ork of this Committee can there-
fore become significant on a national
basis. It is of particular interest to
architecch and engineers of Florida on
t\o counts. First. they are probably
more experienced than any othcr pro-



CHIEF DRAFTSMAN
A position as chief draftsman
which can lead directly to active
participation and a possible future
partnership is open in a well-estab-
lished Miami office. Applicant
must have a sufficient educational
and experience background to take
full charge of a medium-sized
drafting room. His work will also
call for some ability at design and
a sound knowledge of specification
writing and job supervision.
Registration in Florida is desir-
able; but non-registered applicants
will be considered if they plan on
registration in the near future.
Starting salary will be subject to
progressive increases on the basis
of interest and performance.
This permanent position will es-
tablish the successful applicant as a
key man in an office now doing a
substantial volume of commercial
and institutional work, schools and
fine residences. To apply, send a
resume with a recent snapshot to
The Editor, 7225 S.W. 82nd Court,
Miami 43. Information will be
treated confidentially and turned
over to the architect for action.


fessional group in current techniques
of protection against hurricane dam-
age. Second. the proposal that such
a Hurricane Hazards )tud\ be made
was first suggested by Clinton Cam-
ble in a speech opening the F,.A
Convention at Daytona Beach last
fall.
That suggestion was immediately
taken uider advisement by AIA Presi-
dent CEORCE B.\N CULMININCS and
the AIA Board of Directors. The
present Hurricane Hazards Committee
is the outgrow th of their considera-
tion. The program which the Com-
mittee is charged with dteeloping
points to the nation-wide importance
of the diversified job which members
have set themselves to accomplish.

APRIL, 1956


Ia



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By the Company We Keep...


The Peninular Life Insurance
Building, Jackson\dlle Kemp
Bunch & Jackson, architects.


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Security
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2i19 Pearl Sr
JACKSONV ILLE
Milky Way Building
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NEW MYRNA BEACH ...
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TALLAHASSEE
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State Board Exams
To Start June 11

Dates fo:r JunioIr examinations (.if
those appl\ng to the State Board
of Architecture for Florida registra-
tion ha\e been set for June 11 to 1-4.
inclusive. The Board has announced
that the exam, 'Mill be ti\en 'imul-
tancouslh at the Rooscielt Hotel.
jackson\illk and the .\cazar. Hotel.
Miami. .\ll papers will be grad.d
at the B.,ard', office. 12(.1 E. Las
()la Bouleard. Ft. Lauderdale.
Increaw-.d \o:luime of applications
led to the B,:oard' decision to hold
examinations in t\\o locations last
January. Indications are that appli-
cations for the June cxamin.ltionis \ ill
total close to l I.;.
Regulations of the Board require
that applications for Junior ex.minna-
tions be filed \%ith the Board at lea;t
;1 da\s prior to exam dates. Thus.
ni'ne received later than N i\ 11
'would be eligible for processing this
\car. The Board \ill meet MalI 10.
11 and 12 to qualif\ applications for
the June exams.
RICHARD BOONE ROGERS. ne\
President of the Board since lanu-
ar\. lq6 i called attention to an im-
portant change in the Board's regula-
tions. This \ear. those taking Junior
examinations \sill be required to pass
at least fouLr of the written n tests to
bc eligible to re-take those not passed
in six months. Otlier se the\ rust
.ait a year before re-examination.
Reason for the ne\\ ruling is that
correspondence and record-keeping in-
cident to re-examinations has saddled
the Board's clerical staff \ith a tre-
mendous burden of routine work. It
is hoped this %ill be considerable"
lessened b\ a reduction in the nunm-
ber of candidates for successive re-
examination. The Board also hopes
the ne\w ruling %will ha\e a tendency.
to cut down the current volumee of
poorl -prepared applicants.


\ork of the Board has also been
Sgrcatl\ increased by the number of
: legal cases that hase come before il
since reSisiun of the Florida Statutes
in '15; gave the Board authority tb
Prosecute \iolators of the State Regis'
tratiOn Law. Currcntl, at least eight
cases that in\ol\e legal action are nos\
pending before the Board. A nuri
ber more are now in the preliminary
stage of Investigation.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ri


.1
. ... -





-(Crtii cdl fi',-r, Page 5)
tended to the full height by 26-foot
additions.
On the o crall engineering design
of the main building Cromartie has
this to say:
". building of this height having
tinned floors does not have sufficient
rigidity transversely to have each
transverse bent of sufficient strength
to withstand wind forces perpendi-
cular to the long dimension of the
building. \e decided to let each
floor act af a large diaphragm IMing
on itF side and spanning from end
to end of the building.
"'At each end of the building we
built two vertical steel trusses which
are cantile ered from the foundation.
One of the cords of thee trusses is.
it each case, one of the basic build-
ing columns. The other cord is inset
into the outside edge of the slab. The
stair towers at each end of the build-
ing and the leh'ator shaft about
mnidi.wa of the long dimension will
assist in taking the wind which is
perpendicular to the short dirnen-
ion."




ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Belmar Shades . 18
Bruce Equipment Compan 24
Decor Shutters . 18
Dixie St le 2
Dunan Br.ck Yards 3rd CcAer
Electrend Distributing Co. 22
Florida Home Heating
Institute . 9
FI,:rida Power & Light Co. 15
Florida Steel Products, Inc 20
George C Grifin . . 10
Hollostone Co. of Miami . 3
Holloway Concrete Products 19
Inrer5tate Marble & Tile Co. 21
Jacksonville Metal
& Plastics Co ... 17
Leap Concrete . . 14
Maule . 2nd Cover
Miami Window .12 and 13
Miller Electric Co. of Florida 16
Palmer Electric Co. . 20
A. H. Ramsey & Sons, Inc. :4
Satchwell Electric
Construction Co . 22
Southern Venetian Blind Co. 18
F. Graham Williams Co. Inc 23


APRIL, 1956


F. GRAHAM
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice Pres.


WILLIAMS, Chairman
JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice Pres.


ESTABLISHED 1910

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INCORPORATED


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discuss it with

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SOUnD


Our Counth School Boards are presumably charged \\ith the job of
pro hiding proper educational facilities for the children of our State. But
evidence is constantly\ cropping up to support the contention that some
School Boards themselves need to-be educated along certain lines quite
as much as the moppets whose ultimate interests the\ are supposed to
be ser\ ing.
That evidence looks like this: One Board seriously considers the use
of "stock" plans. Another starts investigating the idea of developing its
(-own designing office to eliminate "the high cost" of architectural se\ ices.
A third insists on doing its own supervision, to "sa\e money. And still
another attempts. \ia a service contract, to force architects to pay for
"mistakes"-- without first giving them the means or authority\ of pre-
\enting them.
What part of such actions stems from a real desire to sa\e taxpayers
dollars and what part comes from politicking can't be measured. Nor
does it really matter. What does matter is that such actions indicate that
school boards which contemplate them are not aware of the facts of
their own responsible life. The\ are substituting economic emotionalism
forbudgetary reason, loose, rule-of-thumb thinking for sound, progressive
anial\sis.
Much of this emotional brain-storming is directed at money spent
for architectural service. School board efforts to reduce architects' fees is
one of the economy proposals which DOUic.4S HASKELL. writing in the
March issue of the Forum. says "lose more at the bung than they save at
the spigot." His article should be a must reading for every school board
member in Florida. Show this, for example, to \our school board clients:
".-\rchitects' fee . have been the target of excited citizens' meetings
weak in arithmetic. Figure this: Occupancy costs a scant 15'; of the
annual school budget: and half of occupancy is operation and mainten-
ance. leaving S, for construction.
"Consequently. if you cut the architect's fee from. say. 6"'C to 5c.,
you have achieved a net annual having of just 0.O(S1.. or S'/10.00)0. in the
education of your children. Ts that worth a battle?
"Now turn it around. For the architect himself this means a 17',
reduction in his gross. which makes all the difference between being able
to pav his men for a first-rate job. and being unable to pay and still make
a living. Mloreoier. the community's 0..0S'-, saving is not to be confused
with just another saving on materials. A cut in planning means a cut in
those CONIROLS which balance and rule all arrangements and result in
schools whose efficiency will be only 66(-, o er a period of 50 years-and
whose pleasantness wiill be 66c. below :ero!
"For school economy, architects' fees should be raised, not lowered as
they achieve it."
This is the kind of informational spotlight that should be turned full
on man\ of our Counts Boards of Public Instruction. It might serve to
highlight the fact that architects' fees are not the economic drain which.
man\ school boards seem to think-and that their reduction may actually
result in unpardonably high costs measured in terms of future educational
values. Too many fine schools have been designed, at fair fees, for too
mrany progressive communities for anyone to say it can't be done here.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Some Educators


Need Some Educating!


*7










.3 A


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RAINBOW RANGE . TAN RANGE. RED RANGE. . PINK RANGE

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Sta ^tC, W sold in Florida by:


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company
Fort Myers Ready-Mix Concrete, Inc ...-
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Baird Hardware Company----...-------
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company
Florida Georgia Brick & Tile Company
Sirunk Lumber Yard ...-- -- -.. .- -- ------ .


Avon Park, Fla.
S Bartow, Fla
Fort Myers, Fla.
SFrostproof, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla.
Hoines City, Fla..
Jacksonville, Fla.
- Key West, Fla,


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company... Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company . Marathon, Fla
Gandy Block & Supply Company Melbourne, Fla
C. J. Jones lumber Company .. Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company. Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company .-..-.. Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply ..----- Tallahassee, Fla.
Burnup & Sims, Inc. -. -. West Palm Beach, Fla.


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, PHONE TU 7-1525, MIAMI, FLORIDA
INCORPORATED


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THE ENGINEER has made it possible for the architect to
limit his attention to the individual, isolated building.
The sheer scale of the engineer's operations, his immense
capacity for good or bad, forces the architect out of his ivory
tower . .The engineer must be watched, in other words,
not because he is dumb, but because he is too smart; not
because he is dishonest, but because his honesty is as accur-
ate as an IBM computer. He threatens us all with disaster.
. tt would be arrogant nonsense to claim that the architect
should police these colleagues of his. Only the American
people can, in the last analysis, tell the engineer what to
do with his bulldozers, dishwashers and space frames. But
the architect does occupy a peculiarly strategic position in
society. He, if anyone, can balance trees against asphalt,
historic value against expediency, human well-being against
efficiency. He can show the American people how our splen-
did technology can be used to build homes and cities worthy
of our country. And he can help the engineer to channelize
his energies in the right direction, converting his technical
units of measurement in the broader scale of great
architecture.
-JAMES MARSTON FITCH
From "The Engineer" in the March
1956 issue of Architectural Forum


I




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