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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 1956 regional conference
 Sound precedent for policy and...
 Interview with Frank J. Rooney
 Constitution and by-laws
 Florida architects win three P/A...
 News and notes
 U of F short building course for...
 Small house competition
 State board registrations
 Precedent for policy (continued...
 Producers' council program and...
 Editorial: Publicity vs. better...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00021
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: March 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00021
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    1956 regional conference
        Page 3
    Sound precedent for policy and PR ads win freedoms award
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Interview with Frank J. Rooney
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Constitution and by-laws
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Florida architects win three P/A design awards
        Page 18
        Page 19
    News and notes
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    U of F short building course for building officials
        Page 23
    Small house competition
        Page 24
    State board registrations
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Precedent for policy (continued from page 4)
        Page 27
    Producers' council program and advertisers' index
        Page 28
    Editorial: Publicity vs. better public relations
        Page 29
    Back Cover
        Page 30
Full Text



cSM^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^k^^^^^^^^



FlriaArhir


March -195,

1ft






Interview ..
Frank J. Rooney, newly
installed president of the
National AGC, talks
about Florida's growth
and the need for better,
has resulted from it . .






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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch North
John Stetson . . South
William B. Harvard Central


Florida
Florida
Florida


DIRECTORS


Broward County
Daytona Beach .
Florida Central
Florida North

Fla. No. Central
Florida South


William F. Bigoney, Jr.
SWilliam R. Gomon
Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
S Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
. Albert P. Woodard
SEdward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland


Jacksonville George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
Mid-Florida Francis H. Emerson
Palm Beach Frederick W. Kessler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 6


MARCH, 1956


NUMBER 3


CONTENTS


1956 Regional Conference -------- 3

Sound Precedent for Policy ----- 4

PR Ads Win Freedoms Award ----- 4

Interview with Frank J. Rooney ----- 6
Florida Needs A Plan
FAA Constitution and By-Laws -----13

Florida Architects Win Three P/A Design Awards 18

News and Notes--------------- 20

U of F Short Course for Building Officials -- 23

Small House Competition___. ----- 24

State Board Registrations ------ 25

Producers' Council Program -------28

Advertisers' Index_ ______ -------28



THE COVER
As a builder, Frank J. Rooney, National AGC President, has an
understanding of the need for clear, well-developed plans. And as a
citizen of our fast-growing State who has had a considerable hand
in its development, he has taken a definite stand as advocating a
long-range planning program for Florida as a region, as well as a
group of communities. His comments are reported in the Interview
which starts on page 6.





PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


MARCH, 1956





































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2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










1956 Regional Conference



Place: Durham, No. Carolina

Time: April 12th, 13th, and 14th

Theme: New Materials and Construction


The Fifth Annual Regional Confer-
ence of the South Atlantic District,
AIA, will be held in Durham, North
Carolina, April 12, 13 and 14. Plans
for it are now virtually complete; and
the tentative schedule of the three-
day Conference, just released, prom-
ises a series of meetings and discus-
sions that should provide attendants
with a continuously high level of
worthwhile interest.
Theme for the Conference is "New
Materials and Construction in Archi-
tecture." Elaborate arrangements have
been made to carry it through all
Conference sessions and to dramatize
it to Conference visitors. Not the
least of these are two exhibits one
of manufactured products which the
Conference committee hopes will oc-
cupy 100 booths and will afford op-
portunity to study new materials and
construction techniques at first hand.
The other exhibit is an architect-
ural one comprising the South At-
lantic Region's Honor Awards Pro-
gram for 1956. Eligibility to exhibit
has been confined to the fourteen
AIA Chapters comprising the region;
and buildings shown must have been
completed since January, 1951.
Both exhibits will open at 9 AM
of the first Conference day, April 12.
Building products will be shown in
both the Washington Duke Hotel,
which has been designated as Confer-
ence headquarters, and in the Armory
building close by. The architectural
exhibit will be shown at the hotel.
Conference plans indicate that act-
ivities will be constant, varied and
provocative from many angles. Un-
like past Regional meetings and most
AIA conclaves, this Conference will
be held in three cities, rather than
one. Headquarters will be Durham;
and the Conference's opening day
there will be marked by a morning
MARCH, 1956


meeting featuring addresses by ALON-
zo HARRIMAN and PROFESSOR ALLEN
DEITZ. Chapter meetings, committee
conferences and a meeting of the
Regional Executive Council will fol-
low luncheon. And, at an evening din-
ner meeting, Conference visitors will
hear addresses by North Carolina's
Governor LUTHER H. HODGES and
AIA President GEORGE BAIN CUM-
MINGS.
Friday morning, at Durham, the fea-
tured speaker will be R. T. A. JOHN-
SON, Chief, Division of Physics and
Engineering, Forest Products Labor-
atory of Madison, Wisconsin. The
Conference will then move via busses
to Raleigh to attend a luncheon meet-
ing at the N. C. State College Union.
This will be followed by a panel dis-
cussion scheduled as part of the Fes-
tival of Design.
A similar program has been planned
for Saturday, with the opening session
at Durham including addresses by
PAUL WEIDLINGER, MARIO SALVA-
DORI and ALONZO HARRIMAN. Con-
ferees will ride busses again, this time
to Chapel Hill and a luncheon meet-
ing at Caroline Inn, University of










William Henry Dei-
trick, of Raleigh, N. C.,
General Chairman of
the 1956 Regional Con-
ference, discusses plans
with Regional Director
Herbert C. Millkey,
center, and Henry L.I
Kamphoefner, Dean,)
School of Design, North
Carolina State College. .


North Carolina, returning to Durham
in time for cocktails and the Con-
ference Banquet. This will be held
at the Washington Duke Hotel.
Honor Awards will be presented, and
the Conference will adjourn after
an address by CLIFTON BECKWITH.
Pleasure as well as profit has been
planned into the Conference pro-
gram. Opening day afternoon has been
set aside for a tour of Duke University.
A similar sightseeing trip around Ral-
eigh is scheduled for Friday after-
noon, and on Saturday, following the
luncheon meeting, conferees will en-
joy a tour of Chapel Hill. Fun and
frolic will be the order of Friday
evening's plans which include cock-
tails, a barbecue dinner and square
dancing at Durham.
Conference committeemen stress
the fact that wives are as welcome as
architects-and that a special program
has been planned for them also. Con-
ference Chairman WILLIAM HENLEY
DEITRICH says, "We hope the pro-
gram will appeal to you from every
starndpoint-educational, social and
entertainment." He urges immediate
action to assure reservations.
















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Sound Precedent for Policy

Plans represent service--not a commodity for sale


If, as someone once said, "eternal
vigilance is the price of freedom,"
each of Florida's practicing architects
can note with satisfaction the result
of the Jacksonville Chapter's recent
stand against the outright sale of
school plans and specifications to the
Duval County School Board.
The Board was presumably seeking
ways of reducing school building costs
when it queried Jacksonville architects
as to the "fee" involved should it
decide to "purchase all rights to the
original drawings and specifications
of schools previously drawn." The
Board's avowed intention was to "per-
mit the Board to duplicate that build-
ing as many times as they see fit,
without paying the architect any ad-
ditional fee."
The query was dated December 16,
and the Chapter acted fast. At a
December 27th meeting it approved
a recommendation of its School Build-
ing Committee that the Board be
informed by letter of the basic pro-
fessional policy regarding plans and


specifications as instruments of service
and the architect's sole property. And
it also approved a motion as Chapter
policy that "No architect shall furnish
architectural services for school build-
ings unless all rights to the original
drawings and specifications are re-
tained by the architect and unless the
architect is employed to furnish full
services, including the supervision of
construction."
For the helpful guidance of other
Chapters which may well have to face
up to the same sort of situation in
their localities, here is the major part
of the letter stating the Jacksonville
Chapter's position:
"The drawings and specifications
that an architect prepares are instru-
ments of his service and are not in
themselves a commodity which is for
sale.
"The drawings and specifications
represent the architect's design and
illustrate his knowledge, his talents
and his solution for a particular build-
(Continued on Page 27)


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Architects and engineers were two of various groups saluted for their
contributions to the American way of life in a series of public relations
advertisements developed last year by the Florida Power and Light Com-
pany. Appearing in a number of Florida newspapers, each ad had a total
possible readership of 550,000. The series earned for its sponsor the top
award of the Freedoms Foundation for the nation's best advetrising cam-
paign promoting the principles of American freedom. The Freedoms
Foundation at Valley Forge, Pa., was established seven years ago. Its coveted
awards are made by a 30-member jury selected for their attainments in
the arts, sciences and public life and service.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






















Education



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Occupying a 20 -acre site and with
83,924 square feet of floor space, the
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foresighted planning in concrete.
Built in three reinforced concrete bays
with connecting roofed-over corridors,
the design facilitates the movement of
pupils and shortens distances between
classrooms. The 46-foot bays have rigid
concrete frames with continuous concrete
slab roof deck, and projecting eaves to
modify the brilliance of Florida's sunshine
and to provide shelter during Florida's
air conditioning rains.
While the architect-engineers specified
equipment and materials that would min-
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concrete construction also rendered the
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Interview--with FRANK J. ROONEY-
NATIONAL PRESIDENT, A. G. C.


For Long-range


progress ---


FLORIDA NEEDS A PLAN


Q-Mr. Rooney, your long-time background as one of
Miami's successful builders qualifies you to comment on
the immediate future of the construction industry in our
State. What do you see ahead for it?
A-The construction industry's future is bright, with-
out any question. Florida has become the fastest-growing
State in the Union, however you want to measure it. I
believe firmly that architectural and construction activities
are certainly going to continue to expand. Overall volume
is pretty big right now; but the amount of construction
that's now being discussed is certainly greater than we ever
thought would be possible. Millions and millions of dol-
lars worth of new construction is being contemplated right
now. With the growth of the area the present rate of
building should certainly continue -possibly even rise.
Nothing that I can see in the future looks anything but
rosy.
Q-Are you speaking about any particular area of
Florida, or about the State as a whole?
A-I think the whole State is progressing-developing
and expanding in many ways. Of course, some areas are
going along faster than others. Miami, or rather the whole
Dade County area, is one example. The southern west
coast section around Sarasota and Tampa Bay is another.
But my statement applied generally to Florida as a whole.
If you travel all over the State as I have, you'll find a
great deal of construction in every part of it.
Q-What about the character of development? Will
growth of construction activities be centered largely in
the large cities, or do you see a very substantial community
growth along the routes of the new highways?
A-Probably all growth activity will springboard from
the cities and then spread out into rural areas. How-
ever wherever you find a new highway going through a
particular area, you'll find a natural build-up of activity
in that area. For example, the new bob-tail turnpike is
now coming down to Miami from Fort Pierce. I look
for the entire Ft. Pierce, Stuart area to build up because
of the easier accessibility to Palm Beach, Miami and the
other communities down the lower east coast.
Q-That suggests the question of zoning. Do you
think that intense construction activity, particularly in
development of congested cities such as Miami and Jack-
sonville, can continue without some revisions to present
zoning regulations?
A-Well, in all fast-growing areas we're going to have


to face the same situation that exists in the Miami area
right now. The zoning and planning that's been done in
the past has never kept pace with the city's actual growth.
As a city grows, it naturally changes. Demand for business
and industrial areas increases. Business has got to come
in--so the residential areas move out.
Of course, that situation creates a lot of pressure on
any zoning scheme. There's a great need now in every
section of the State, for a lot of re-zoning and long-range
planning. And a lot of thinking and work is being done
along these lines. The need for it is particularly great
in Miami-and I think Miami's probably doing as much
thinking about it, perhaps more, than most other areas
in Florida.
What all cities and even smaller communities in Florida
really need is some practical long-range planning. It's
certainly been shown that just spot-zoning won't work.
Spot-zoning has actually been one of our ills here in
Florida. I think that most Florida communities now
recognize that fact and are now thinking in terms of
long-range planning to replace temporary zoning measures.
What we really need is an over-all plan. We've got
to come to the point of laying the whole thing out
and quit trying to solve our problems by just spot-zoning
this or that.
Q-That's a far-seeing outlook and an encouraging
statement. But do you know whether any branch of the
State Government has been charged with solving the
overall planning problem for the State?
A-I know there's work being done on it. I don't
know what progress is being made.
Q-Would you advocate that such a planning job
be undertaken?
A-Indeed yes. I think we're going to need overall
planning-not only for all communities, but for the State
as a whole.
Q-Has any definite program been suggested to Gover-
nor Collins along these lines?
A-Not that I know of. I think Govenor Collins is
well aware of the problem and would enthusiastically back
any program that would give promise of solving it. We
can look for all sorts of cooperation from him. I think
his effort to bring industry into the State is an indication
of his progressive thinking. I'm sure he must realize that
to bring industry in here, we will have to plan and zone
so we can assure its accommodation and take care of its


6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT















Spot-zoning can't control our rapid growth. We need some


coordinated planning---for communities and the State as a whole.


expansion needs when it's ready to come in.
Q-To put this long-range planning idea into operation,
would you advocate that an official program be started
for Florida-to coordinate planning programs for com-
munities with long-range plans for State-wide transporta-
tion improvements?
A-Well, I think Governments are apt to be over-run
with committees and commissions! However, I do think
there's a definite and pressing need for some general,
over-all planning-county-wide and State-wide. Right now
each little sub-division and each little community has its
own zoning and its own planning. I think all these should
be coordinated so we can finally arrive at a practical,
overall planning and zoning program.
Q-As you know, that was the objective of the New
York Regional Planning Association, undertaken several
years ago. Would you suggest any existing department
or commission of the State as qualified to take on that
job for Florida? Would either the State Road Depart-
ment or the Industrial Commission qualify?
A-Well, the Industrial Commission might help. And
the State Road Department could be of service in its
own field. But I'm sure it's going to take better-qualified
specialists to do the job. These would logically come
from the architectural and engineering professions. I


"~II~Sjp~~
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don't think State Road officials, for example, have either
the time or the knowledge needed for the sort of planning
we're discussing-other than planning for construction of
the roads themselves.
Q-What you have outlined, then, is a special type
of planning program not now being undertaken that you
know of by any department of our State Government?
A-That's right. The need for long-range planning
seems to be pretty generally recognized. But I don't
know of any qualified professional group that has been
given the job of coordinating local efforts.
Q-Do you see an important opportunity for the con-
struction industry in such a program?
A-Yes, indeed! Architects and engineers throughout
the State are going to have to assist in the over-all planning
job. And contractors also are going to have to lend what-
ever they can to their efforts.
Q-Mr. Rooney, your suggestion could have great
influence on the sound growth of Florida. Now, can
we point it up by coming back to the need for local
re-zoning. Do you think that expansion of Florida's cities
are creating sub-cities in suburban areas?
A-Yes. There's a definite movement-trend to out-
lying areas. You can see it in the development of our
(Continued on Page 8)


Frank J. Rooney was born in Brooklyn, New York, but has spent most of
his adult life in Florida and has headed his own construction organization for
the past 25 years. During World War II its entire facilities were devoted
to building more than 50 structures for the armed forces and thus earning
a citation from the U. S. Navy. The Rooney company is now specializing in
large construction projects in the South-Florida area, including the 163rd
Street Shopping Center, which on completion, will be the largest of its kind
in the South. The firm has just completed the Jordan Marsh store in Miami
and is working on three other large department store and warehouse buildings.
Mr. Rooney has long been active as an advisor on construction matters.
He served on the City of Miami Building Revision Committee and the Mayor's
Public Works Committee; was a member of a special committee serving the
Secretary of Labor, Washington, D. C.. and recently completed a survey of
needed construction in Germany for the U. S. Government-ECA. He is a
member of the Dade County Development Committee, the Florida Engineer-
ing Society and a past-president of the Miami Builders' Exchange. With a
long and active background in the AGC, he was installed last month as
President of the National AGC after serving on numerous AGC committees and
as Vice-President during 1955.


MARCH, 1956 7


I s ---


- -








"Planning's a community job. Our responsibility is to keep it on the right track."


big housing projects. When housing projects grow they
naturally create a need for shopping centers, schools,
hospitals, all sorts of commercial buildings.
Q-That is happening now, of course, around Miami.
Do you see the same sort of thing taking place else-
where-in Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlando, for example?
A-Not only in these cities, or in Florida, but all over
the country. I think there's a definite trend away from
the city out into the suburbs.
Q-Is the character of movement in Florida similar
to that in many other states-along major roads in a
kind of "strip-city" pattern?
A-No, not particularly. I think here we're witnessing
a general expansion movement. You can see it around
Miami in the growth of South Miami, Hialeah and Miami
Shores-even up into North Miami and North Miami
Beach. It's happening elsewhere, also-a pretty well-
defined expansion. Actually, the whole State is growing
very fast. But the growth isn't a strip development.
Q-In view of that, what steps should be taken now
to prevent zoning difficulties in these "sub-cities" similar
to those we are now encountering in our large cities?
A-Well, the more forward-thinking, overall, long-
range planning we can do now, the less difficulties we
will run into in years to come. In the case of city-
suburban growth, counties are working on over-all plan-
ning and zoning problems right now.
Q-That work is necessarily of fairly local character.
In view of that, you probably consider the coordination
of highway planning with local community planning as
particularly important. Is that correct?


A-Yes, it is. Our State Road Department is giving
a lot of consideration to that as proven by plans they've
given the city of Miami and Dade County on how to
handle some of the traffic problems.
That brings us to another important point. The
more planning we do for roads-wide roads that can
handle the traffic-the fewer costly bottlenecks we'll
have, not only in Miami, but in every city in the State.
No Florida City was laid out to handle the amount of
traffic that now exists. We have narrow streets in down-
town areas; and even our highways aren't wide enough.
So we're continually being faced with the need for buying
new rights-of-way. And that is expensive.
Q-Do you see a disposition on the State's part to
recognize the fact that better road planning is needed?
A-Yes. Everybody now realizes that use of the auto-
mobile as a primary means of transportation is going to
increase rather than decrease. So the traffic on all roads
is going to increase from now on. We've got to think
in terms of 4-lane highways rather than the 2-lane
streets we've been used to.
They can only come by planning for them. For
example, if a 150-foot right of way is plotted for a
future road instead of a 50-foot strip-and if it is then
acquired in line with a long-range program when the
price is reasonable-that looks like good planning. That
way we can do away with the present practice of letting
people build right up to the edge of a 50-foot strip-
then finding out later that a 150-foot strip is needed and
going through the whole messy procedure of condemna-
tion to get it.


Rapid community growth is creating the need for such large-scale shopping centers as this one at 163rd Street in Miami
for which Gamble, Pownall and Gilroy were architects. It is also revealing the inadequacy of spot-zoning as a means of
insuring the long-range value of community development or of solving such typical civic problems as traffic congestion.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Q-How do you think this job of better planning
can be accomplished-and what are logical groups to get
it started?
A-It's a community job-the desire for better plan-
ning, recognition of the need for it, has got to start
there. But I think the construction industry-architects,
engineers and contractors-has not only a special interest
in it, but also a special responsibility to keep to rolling
along the right track.
Q-Have you inr mind a methcd by which these con-
struction industry groups can become active along those
lines?
A-The method is already operating in some local
areas and now at the State level. It lies in the work
that can be done by various joint cooperative committees
of the AIA, the FES and the AGC. There is an excellent
one at Palm Beach which exemplifies a definite move
here in Florida. The Joint Cooperative Committees can
take up not only problems of our industry in relationship
to the professionals and the contractors, but also many
overall problems of city planning and zoning. They are
doing that as a unit in such communities as Palm Beach.
And it can also be done with county administrations and
at the State level.
This joint-cooperative movement is one of the best
things that could happen to our entire industry. This


past year I've visited about 70 of our AGC Chapters
throughout the country. And with each one I've held
up what the Joint Cooperative Committee movement
here in Florida is doing as a shining example of what
can be accomplished through cooperative action of the
professions with the general contractors.
Q-Does that indicate you will advocate expansion
of the Joint Cooperative Committee idea locally as well
as nationally in your capacity as AGC President?
A-Indeed I will. I've been advocating it as Vice-
President. This year I'm going to advocate that every
one of our local chapters take an active part in forming
such committees. Nationally we've had a Joint Coopera-
tive Committee with architects and engineers. But I
feel we can all accomplish a great deal more if we can
bring the work of these joint committees down to the
state and local levels. Then we can solve a lot of our
problems at the grass roots.
Don't forget that the construction business must oper-
ate as a team. Everybody's got to work-and work to-
gether-architects, engineers, the general contractors,
specialty contractors and labor. To do a good job, every
part of that team has got to cooperate., With sincere
cooperation on everybody's part anything can be built-
and there's not a problem I can think of that can't
finally be solved.


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MARCH, 1956









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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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MARCH, 1956





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.. :.


12 THE FLORIDA ARCHOT





Constitution and By-Laws
FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS












1*1-*


""' .. .. ._


,I I-O ". '..." ._. -.. .










.. '. o ,. ,. -. .






CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a
President; Vice-Presidents, one from each District; a
Secretary and a Treasurer. The immediate Past Presi-
dent automatically becomes a member of the Board of
Directors, which is not an elective office. All elective
officers shall be corporate members of the Institute.
(B) All Officers with the exception of the Vice-
Presidents shall be elected for terms of one year. No
officer shall be eligible for re-election to succeed himself
more than once, except the Secretary or Treasurer, who
may not hold office longer than two consecutive years,
unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at the annual
Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be
elected for a term of one year, one for a term of
two years, and one for a term of three years. There-
after, one Vice-President shall be elected each year
for a term of three years.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or
members of the Board for at least one year shall be
eligible for the office of President.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until
their successors have been elected and qualified. If a
vacancy occurs in any office of the Association, other
than the expiration of the term of office, then such
vacancy shall be filled for the unexpired term by the
Board of Directors.
(F) Officers of the Association shall take office
at the beginning of the fiscal year.

SECTION 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and of the Board, shall exercise general
supervision of its affairs, and shall perform all the
usual duties that are required to be performed by him
by law and by the Constitution and By-Laws, incidental,
to his office.

SECTION 3
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of the affairs
of his District. The Vice-Presidents in their order of
election shall, in the absence of the President, preside
and perform all the duties imposed upon the President.

SECTION 4-THE SECRETARY
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall act as its recording
and its corresponding secretary and as secretary of
meetings of this Association and of the Board of Di-
rectors. He shall, have custody of and shall safeguard
and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge
of the Treasurer. He shall issue all notices of this
Association, keep its membership rolls, have charge and
exercise general supervision of the Offices and employees
of this Association, sign all instruments and matters
that require the attest or approval of this Association,
except as otherwise provided in this Constitution; keep
its seal, and affix it on such instruments as require it,
prepare the reports of the Board of Directors and this
Association, in collaboration with the President, have
charge of all matters pertaining to the meetings of this
Association and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The ,Secretary may delegate to an assistant
secretary or other assistant employed by this Association
the actual performance of any or all of his duties as
recording or as corresponding secretary, but he shall
not delegate his responsibility for the property of this
Association, or the affixing of the seal of this Associa-
tion, or the making of any attestation or certification
required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
SECTION 5-THE TREASURER
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative


officer of this Association. He shall have charge and
shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs
and keep the records and books of account thereof. He
shall prepare the budgets, collect amounts due this
Association, and receipt for and have the custody of its
funds and monies and make all disbursements thereof.
He shall have custody of its securities and of its instru-
ments and papers involving finances and financial com-
mitments. He shall conduct the correspondence relating
to his office and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The Treasurer shall make a written report to
each annual meeting of this Association and a written
report at each meeting of the Board of Directors. Each
of said reports shall set forth the financial condition
of this Association, the state of its budget and appropria-
tions at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures for the period of the report, and the
treasurer's recommendations on matters relating to the
finances and general welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person
to sign any order, statement, agreement, check or other
financial instrument of this Association that requires
his signature, unless such delegation is expressly per-
mitted in this Constitution.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring
treasurer shall turn over to his successor a copy of the
closing financial statement and audit of the treasury,
all the records and books of account, and all monies,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belong-
ing to this Association that are in his custody and posses-
sion. The incoming treasurer shall check the same, and
if found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer
his receipt therefore and a complete release of the
retiring treasurer from any liability thereafter with
respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer, personally, shall not be liable
for any loss of money or funds of this Association or
for any decrease in the capital, surplus, income or
reserve of any fund or account resulting from any
of his acts performed in good faith in conducting the
usual business of his office.

ARTICLE- VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SECTION 1-MEMBERSHIP OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS
(A) The membership of the Board of Directors
shall consist of the same officers, with the same terms
of office, as of the Association, the immediate past
President of the Association, and one or more Directors
elected from each Florida Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects as provided in these articles.
Directors shall be Corporate Members of The American
Institute of Architects.
B) Each Florida Chapter having up to 19 Institute
Members, as listed in the current Membership Directory
of the Institute, shall have one Director. Each Florida
Chapter having from 20 to 59 Institute Members so
listed shall have two Directors. And each Florida Chap-
ter having 60 or more Institute members so listed shall
have three Directors.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall
be represented on the Board by a Student Representative
whose duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the
SAssociation and the Student Chapter.

SECTION 2-AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD
The Board shall be vested with the authority to
manage, direct, control, conduct and administer the
property, affairs and business of the Association, and
in the interim between Annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directions and instructions adopted at a meeting
of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems
expedient, and shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations, supplementing but not in conflict with this
Constitution and these By-Laws, to govern the use of
the property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of
the Association, to govern the affairs and business of
the Association. Each director (and alternate director
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


in the absence of the director) shall convey to the
Chapter which he represents all decisions and actions
of the Board and shall convey to the Board the actions
and requests of the Chapter he represents.
SECTION 3-VACANCIES ON THE BOARD
Vacancy of a Director on the Board shall be filled
by the Chapter so affected.
SECTION 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall
hold at least four regular meetings each year and shall
fix the time and place of its meetings. One meeting
shall be held immediately prior to the opening of the
Annual Convention of the Association and one meeting
within thirty days after. the beginning of the fiscal
year following the adjournment of said convention.
Ten members of the Board shall constitute a quorum,
and all decisions shall be rendered by concurring vote
of not less than the majority of its total membership
present, unless otherwise required by this constitution
and these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meet-
ing of the Board may be called by the President, or
on the written request of a majority of the Officers
of the Association, or of six members of the Board,
at time and place so designated by Party or Parties who
called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting
of the Board shall be sent in writing by the Secretary
to each member of the Board not less than five days
before the date fixed for the meeting. Minutes of the
meetings of the Board shall be recorded by the Secretary
and approved by the Board in its succeeding meeting.
ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
SECTION 1
(A) The President, at least thirty (30) days before
the annual Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Com-
mittee, composed of a Chairman and a member from
each District, whose duty is shall be to nominate mem-
bers qualified to hold office in the Association for each
of the Offices about to be vacated.
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by
the Nominating Committee, other Nominations for any
or all of the offices about to become vacant may be
made from the floor in the Convention. Elections may
proceed by acclamation or ballot at the will of the Con-
vention.
SECTION 2
The President shall appoint qualified members to
the yearly Standing Committees created by the Associa-
tion or the Board, whose duties and term of office shall
have been fixed when the Committee was created.
SECTION 3
Special Committees may be appointed at any time
for any specific purpose by the President, whose duties
shall be determined at the time of the creation of the
committee. Such committees shall not be established
for longer than the term of office of the President
appointing the Committee.
SECTION 4
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with the right to request and receive all information
in possession of the Association and all records necessary
to discharge the duties imposed upon them.
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the
Chairman and/or the members of the various committees
of their committee assignments, and furnish them the
names and addresses of all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member
of all committees, and the secretary may act as secretary
for the committee if so selected by the committee. The
majority of members of the committee shall constitute
a quorum. Committees shall report their findings,
recommendations and actions to the body which created
it. Decisions, recommendations and other actions of
the Committee shall be made in accordance with the
concurring vote of the majority of members present or
by a majority vote of a letter ballot.
MARCH, 1956


(D) Appropriations: The chairman of any com-
mittee requiring appropriations shall submit written re-
quest to the Board for the amount required and the
reasons thereof, and if granted, file with the final report
of the Committee a detailed statement of all monies,
if any expended.
ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
SECTION 1-FISCAL YEAR
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on
the first day of January and end on the thirty-first
day of December of the same calendar year.
SECTION 2-COLLECTION OF DUES
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually
from each corporate member and associate member
assigned to that chapter, and shall remit promptly to
the Treasurer of the Association, an amount for the
succeeding year, to be determined by the Association
at its Annual Convention which shall be contributed
by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expense of
every kind of the Association.
SECTION 3-CONTRIBUTIONS
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate
the privileges and rights of any member.
SECTION 4-DEPOSITS AND WITHDRAWALS OF
MONEY AND SECURITIES
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all
monies of this Association in the name of this Associa-
tion, when, as, and in the original form received by
him, in one or more depositories designated by the
Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Every disbursement of money
of this Association, except from the petty cash, shall
be by check of this Association, signed by the Treasurer
and countersigned by another officer designated by the
Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall
establish petty cash accounts as. authorized by the Board
which may be disbursed for the usual petty cash pur-
poses by the person designated in said authorization
of the Board. No such petty cash account shall exceed
$25.00 at any time and statements of the petty cash
expenditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and-
the expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the
cash is replenished.
SECTION 5-ANNUAL BUDGET
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual
budget, by the concurring vote of not less than two-
thirds of its membership present, showing in detail the
anticipated income and expenditures of the Association
for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial
liability of the Association and every expenditure of
money of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or persons properly authorized to incur the expense,
liability or expenditure, except a petty cash item as per
paragraph (c) of Section 4. Article VIII.
(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed
to do so at an annual Convention or Special Meeting
of the Association, the Board shall not adopt any
budget, make any appropriations, or authorize any ex-
penditures or in any way obligate or incur obligation
for the Association, which, in the aggregate of any
fiscal year, exceeds the estimated net income of the
Association for such year.
SECTION 6-AUDITS
The Board shall authorize the Treasurer to employ
a Certified Public Accountant to audit the books and






CONSTITUTION and BY-LAWS


accounts of the Treasurer for report at the annual
Convention.
ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION I-ANNUAL MEETINGS
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold
an Annual Meeting, herein called the Annual Conven-
tion; the time and place shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors if not fixed by the preceding Annual Con-
vention.
(B) Reports: The President, the Secretary and
the Treasurer of the Association shall each make an
annual report in writing to the Annual Convention.
(C) Election of Officers: New Officers for the
ensuing year shall be elected to succeed those whose
terms of office are about to expire.
SECTION 2-SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a
meeting of the Association or is voted by the Board
upon the concurring vote of two-thirds of the Board,
or is voted by not less than one-half of the Florida
Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of t enehe respective govern-
ing boards thereof, or by a written petition to the
Board, signed by not less than twenty-five percent of
the total number of members in good standing of the
Association.
SECTION 3-NOTICE OF MEETINGS
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association, by letter or in official publication
of the Association, stating time and place of meeting
thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention shall be
served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less
than fifteen (15) days before such meetings.
SECTION 4-VOTES
A concurring vote of the majority of the members
qualified to cast a vote or a ballot shall decide the
question unless otherwise required by this constitution.
A vote by ballot not being requested the voting shall
proceed accordingly. NOTE: Only corporate members
may vote on Institute matters in accordance with In-
stitute Constitution and By-Laws.
SECTION 5-PROXIES AND LETTER BALLOTS
(A) Proxies: There shall be no voting by proxy
at a meeting of this Association.
(B) Letter Ballots: No vote of the membership
shall be taken by letter ballot.
SECTION 6-DELEGATES TO AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS CONVENTION
The Association shall have delegate representation
at Annual American Institute of Architects Convention
in accordance with American Institute of Architects
By-Laws relating to State organizations.

ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS
SECTION I-AMENDMENTS BY MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION
(A) This Constitution and its By-Laws may be
amended at any meeting of this Association, provided
that a notice stating the purpose of each proposed
amendment and the reason therefore and a copy of the
proposed amendment is sent to every member and
associate not less than thirty (30) days prior to the
date of the meeting at which the proposed amendment is
to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the total number of corporate
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend this Constitution or its By-Laws relating to
matters of Institute affairs.
(C) It shall require a roll call concurring vote
of not less than two-thirds of the total number of
members present at a meeting of this Association to


amend this Constitution or its By-Laws on matters that
do not relate to Institute affairs.
(D) Every resolution of this Association amend-
ing this Constitution or its By-Laws shall state that
the amendment will become effective only if and when
it is approved by the Institute. Immediately following
the adoption of such a resolution, the Secretary shall
submit a copy of the amendment and the adopting
resolution to the Secretary of the Institute for such
approval. Upon receipt of said approval the amend-
ment shall become effective and the Secretary shall
enter the amendment and the approval at the proper
place in this Constitution or its By-Laws, with the date
of the amendment and approval.
SECTION 2-AMENDMENTS BY THE INSTITUTE
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may
amend any provision of this Constitution or its By-Laws
that the Association fails to amend after due notice
so to do from the Institute. Each amendment made
by said Board shall have the same force and effect as
if made by this Association in the manner hereinabove
provided, and shall be effective immediately on receipt
of the notice of the Secretary of The Institute con-
taining the ame amendment, and the Secretary shall enter
the amendment at the proper place in this Constitution,
%with the date it was made.
SECTION 3-TITLE AND NUMBERING
From time to time and without further action of
the Association, the Secretary may rearrange, retitle,
renumber or correct obvious errors in the various
articles, sections and paragraphs of the Constitution and
By-Laws as becomes necessary.
BY-LAWS
(1) AMENDMENTS
These By-Laws may be amended in the same manner
as the Constitution.
(2) SUSPENSION OF BY-LAWS
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting,
for the transaction of any special business by a two-
thirds vote of the members present. When the special
business has been disposed of, the By-Laws shall im-
mediately be in force again.
(3) RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any
vote or statement of its officers or members nor be
pledged or bound in any manner except by the approval
of the Board, in conformity with the Constitution and
By-Laws.
(4) MEETING NOTICES
Date, Time and Place of all meetings shall be
stated in the notice therefore.
(5) RULES OF ORDER
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance
with Robert's Rules of Order.
(6) RETIRED MEMBERS
A member who ceases to practice architecture as a
gainful occupation and further ceases all other gainful
occupation shall be eligible for "Retired Membership."
(7) OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIPS
Other types of memberships may be created as the
necessity arises in accordance with American Institute
of Architects chapter By-Laws.
(8) ELECTION OF OFFICERS
(A) Officers shall be elected at the annual meeting
of the Association by a majority vote of the Corporate
members present at said meeting.
(B) The Vice-Presidents, one from each district,
shall be designated as First, Second, and Third Vice-
Presidents by ballot at the Annual Meeting.
(C) The Directors, one or more from each cor-
porate Chapter as provided in Article VI, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting. An
Alternate Director, one for each Director, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting to
function for the Director in case of his inability to
serve.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








































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Florida Architects Win
Three P/A Design Awards
Florida architects walked off with
three awards in the Third Annual De-
sign Awards Program sponsored by
Piogreisive Architecture. From more
than 700 designs submitted, RUFUS
NIMS, of Miami, won one of the
seven Design Awards given in various
categories for the proposed Salhaven
Irealth and Welfare Village for'the
Upholsterers' International Union of
North America. The honor was given
in the Health Category for an ambi-
tious project slated for early construc-
tion in Palm Beach County.,
A design by ROBERT BRADFORD
BROWNE, also or iami, for the pro-
posed house of Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR
KING of Coconut Grove, won an
Award Citation in the Residential'
Category. Another Award Citation in
the Recreation Category was given
VICTOR A. LUNDY, of Sarasota, for the


proposed new tourist center at Silver'
Springs.
The P/A sponsored annual compe-
tition is designed to encourage devel-
opmentof, advanced design 'technique,
and is based on proposed, rather than:
complete, work of architects.
New Floor Hardener
What is said to be the first major:
improvement in color hardners for
concrete floors has recently been per-
fected by the-Lambert Corporation,
which has established a new plant in
Orlando for its manufacturer. It, is:
a chemically active "wetting agent"'
which, when added to -elemenits
needed to harden and color-finish:
concrete floors, acts as a plasticizer
to assure uniform hardness and color
distribution and to achieve deep pen-'
etration of the basic concrete surface.,
Tests of the new material, desig-
nated as "CD-39" by its manufac-
turer, have, indicated uniform color
distribution and high surface densities..


This design for a Coconut Grove house won an Award Citation in
the Residential Category for Miami architect Robert Bradford Browne. .:
THE FLORIDA ARCHIT
r '*


This design for Salhaven Health and Welfare Village by Rufus Nins
won the top Design Award in the Health Category of P/A's 3rd Annual
Competition. The award jury included Architects William Lescaze, Rob-
ert E. Alexander, Alfred L. Aydelott and Pietro Belluschi and Engineer
Paul Weidlinger.,..






































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There are heater types to fit any home design. Compact
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MARCH, 1956 19
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News & Note


Mid-Florida Chapter
A report on activities of the Mid.
Florida Chapter has been long over-
due. Cause of the delay was a slight
official mix-up that resulted in the
absence of confirmation from AIA
headquarters in Washington that the
new Chapter's Charter had been
acted upon by the AIA Board of Di-
rectors and issued. Notice of such
action had not been received by FAA
officers up to the time of the FAA
Board of Directors' meeting in
January.
Actually, however, the Charter had
been issued from the Octagon as of
January 5. And even prior to that
date the new Mid-Florida group had
held its organizational meeting, had
elected officers and had begun to
formulate plans for an operating pro-
gram for the year. The first meeting
was held December 1st, last year. The
Chapter's second meeting took place
January 12.
At that time a number of impor-
tant matters relative to Chapter de-
velopment were discussed, among
them the formation of a local Joint
Cooperative Committee with general
contractors and engineers. Plans are
also underway to form a Women's
Auxiliary of the Chapter.
Officers of the Mid-Florida Chap-
ter are: President, EARL F. DELoE;
Vice-President, ROBERT B. MURPHY;
Secretary, JOSEPH M. SHIFALO; Treas-
urer, HILL STIGGINS. Directors named
were: L. ALEX HATTON, for three
years; RALPH P. LOVELOCK, for two
years; JAMES E. WINDHAM, III, for
one year. FRANCIs H. EMERSON was
elected as the Chapter's representa-
tive on.the FAA Board of Directors
with GEORGE H. SPOHN as the alter-
nate FAA Director.
President DeLoe appointed Joseph
M. Shifalo as chairman of commit-
tees on Membership and Relations
with the Construction Industry; and
he named Robert B. Murphy to head
the Committee on Public Relations.
Announcement will be made shortly
of appointments to fill out the full
roster of Chapter committees.
The Chapter's third meeting was
field February 17 at the Langford
* Hotel. It was a cocktail and dinner
gathering following a session of the


The Mid Florida Chapter's new
President, Earl F. DeLoe, with Mrs.:
DeLoe. This picture was taken at
a Florida Central meeting just prior
to formation 'of the new Chapter.

Board of Directors and was attended
by some 40 members and wives. As
such it was a forerunner of the Chap-
ter's plans to hold quarterly "party-
meetings" to which wives and guests
will be welcomed. '
Plans are now underway for a spe-
cial meeting of the Chapter which
will be marked by formal presenta-
tion of the Charter to President
DeLoe by AIA Regional Director
HERBERT C. MILLKEY. This will be
held in March; and as soon as a defi-
nite date has been set, invitations will
be extended to officers of other Flor-
ida Chapters and to a list of local
honor guests..

Florida South
As the largest AIA Chapter in Flor-
ida and one of the largest in the
country, administration of the Florida
South Chapter entails an unusually
extensive roster of committees. This ;
year these have been separated into
three distinct groups. Standing Com-;,
mittees, which total twelve, have been,
carefully designated and set up to cons
firm with similar committees of the.;
Institute; and for many of them the
chairman has been named to repre-.:
sent the Chapter on the companion
committee of the Institute's Regionalj
District.
A second group comprises seven
special committees, all of which are.
closely concerned, with either the con-:
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT"
.B nI


, 0_.W






duct of Chapter affairs or the main-
tenance of, the Chapter's, local activ-
ities. The third list includes commit-
tees for special purposes. These last
are "temporary," in that they are not
of a standing character; but they are
regarded as continuing unit the pur-
pose for which -they were organized
has been accomplished.
For the first two groups President
TRIP RUSSELL has initiated a step that
might well be attempted by other
Chapters to an overall advantage. As
chairmen he has appointed the
younger members of the Chapter. But
in each case also he has named an
"Advisor" to the chairman in the
person of a more experienced member,
in many cases a former chairman or


OOPS SO SORRY!
As the onetime Mayor of New
York, peppery Fiorello La Guardia
used to say, "When we make a
mistake it's a beaut!'
In last month's issue, we made
two beauts! First, we got the jobs
and titles of two Florida South
officers mixed up. Verner Johnson
isn't the Vice-president as report-
ed on page 14. He's Treasurer.
And former treasurer Wahl John
Snyder, II, is the Vice-president.
Our second was even worse! On
the back cover, the 42nd FAA
Convention to be held in the Se-
ville Hotel at Miami Beach was
billed as a full week later than
it has actually been scheduled. Our
faces were red even before we saw
the letters from careful readers
who had noticed the difference in
dates between the cover and the
Convention announcement story on
page 19.
The correct dates for the 42nd
Annual FAA Convention are No-
vember 8, 9 and 10.


member of the particular committee
involved. These two form the admin-
istrative nucleus of the committee;
and additional membership varies
from one to four depending on the
anticipated amount of committee
work involved.
This new committee organiza-
tion and its planned operation was
the chief subject of discussion at the
Chapter'i February 14th meeting at
The Pine Tree Inn, Coral Gables.
The other important business of the
evening was presentation of Crafts-
man Awards on the recommendation
of the Special Committee on Cita-
tions and Awards for which ALFRED
B. PARKER was chairman last year.
(Continued on Page 22)
MARCH, 1956


Architect, J. Brooks Haas, A.I.A., Jacksonville
Contractor, E. C. Kenyon, Jacksonville


This striking design was developed with aluminum
letters, of the channel type, formed of heavy-
gauge sheet and continuously welded by the he!iarc
process. Surfaces are of translucent plastic, lighted
from behind by neon tubing. Letters are bolted to
the canopy facia formed of two 6-inch aluminum
channels that provide a raceway for necessary
wiring ... .A wide choice of stock styles and sizes,
of letters are available in cast aluminum or endur-
ing plexiglas--or signs of any size and style can
be fabricated to specification.




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MANU FACTURERS
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville, Florida

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'-21


















,I .




TO YOU?

At the very least it should mean
good. workmanship good mate-
rials properly installed. That's min-
Simum. And you have the right
to expect it from any electrical
contractor worthy of the name.
But with Satehwell, Service means
something more.
It means the diversified technical
knowledge needed to complete any
job given us from repairing a
lamp (our smallest) to the layout
and installation of the complex
Electrical services and controls for
a huge paper mill. This, a recent
job, was one of our largest, with
the electrical work alone running
over $1,500,000.
Then there's experience. Our com-
pany has been in business continu-
ously for 39 years-since 1917.
Our technical staff represents an
aggregate of more than 100 years
in their special fields of electrical
work. We know what quality is,
how to get it, how to build it into
all our jobs.
There's good organization, too.
That means team work, coordina-
tion between staff and field men,
keeping pace with schedules,:-,
and keeping job performance high
and job costs low at the same
time.
That's what Service means to
Satchwell. It can mean the same
for you if you'll let us figure your
next job.



SATCW ELL
ELECTRIC
CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY, INC.
2922 Old St. Augustine Rd., Jacksonville'
P. 0. Box 5777 Phones FL9-1643-4-5


News & Notes___
(Continued from. Page 21)
The Chapter honored RALPH C.
WOOLSEY, painter, as an individual
meriting the Chapter's "Craftsman of
the Year" award. Citations for out-
standing skill in their respective crafts
went to: NATHAN BETROCK, mason;
ALBERT SOSKIN, painter; J. T. KNIGHT,
nietal worker; Roy FIDLER, mason;
STANLEY KOVALESKY, iron worker;
JIMMY DISMUKE, carpenter foreman;
R. I. DICKERSON, painter; MARK M.
HEATON, marble setter, and JOHN
MARCHION, tile setter.

Palm Beach
At its February 9 meeting the
Chapter considered a request from the
Florida East Chapter, AGC, that
architects in the area permit use
of plans and specifications' on private
work for bidding purposes by ACC
members and associates without the
heretofore customary deposit. The
idea has been 'tried out in one case
by a Lake Worth architect on private
work; but results as to the success of
the idea are inot as yet conclusive.
Members found both good and bad
sides to the proposal. As a result of
the discussion on it a committee of
President JEFFERSON POWELL, GEORGE
J. VOTAW and JOHN STETSON was
named to take the matter up with
local AGC headquarters and to report
back recommendations as to Chapter.
policy.
As pointed out in a recent AGC
bulletin, the idea would constitute
a courtesy by the architects to AGC
contractors. Whether or not that cour-
tesy could prove practical would be
up to the contractors-by returning
plans and specifications promptly and
in good useable condition at the close
of bidding.

National Convention May 15-18
"Architecture for the Good Life"
will be the theme of the 88th Annual
AIA Convention which. this year will
be held May 15-18-in Los Angeles,
with headquarters at the Biltmore
Hotel. Seminars relating to the overall
-theme will explore such subjects as
community planning, safety, new ma-
--terials and techniques. In addition,
several ATA national committees are
scheduling round-tables on'such. sb-
jects as school and hospital build-
ings, architectural education and
office, practice.






Ethics for Air-Conditioning
The trend toward better business
practices and a greater emphasis on
ethical standards in Florida's construc-
tion industry was recently re-affirmed
by action of the Air Conditioning and
Refrigerating Association of Florida.
ARMAND CowAN, of Miami Beach, was
named as president of the organiza-
tion and voiced a policy of adherence
to the spirit as well as the letter of
good business.
He announced also that the Associ-.
ation had adopted a standard service
policy for use by all members as a
step toward more uniform trade prac-
tices by installers and services of air-
conditioning equipment. Other offi-
cers elected are: GEORGE F. KLIEN,
vice-president; HOWARD S. DAvIS, ex-
ecutive secretary, and C. E. KIRBY,
treasurer. DUDLEY M. CAWTHON was
recently elected as president of the
national association.
U of F Short Course
S for Building Officials
An intensive short course to keep
municipal building officials abreast of
technical developments in construc-
tion will be given April 2 through
April 6 at the University of Florida.
The course is being sponsored by the
General Extension DIision of Florida
in cooperation with the, UF College
of Architecture and Allied Arts.
Subject matter for the course has
been programmed by a planning com-
mittee including DEAN WILLIAM T.
ARNETT, of the UF College of Archi-
tecture, W. W. YOUNG, course coor-
dinator for the General Extension
Division and 0. M. PusHeKN, presi-
dent of the Building Officials.Asso-
ciation of Florida. It will fall into
five main categories; and the course
faculty will include representatives of
the U. S. Government, various muni-
cipal building departments, the UF
faculty, building code experts and
architects, engineers and contractors.
The course will cover discusisons
on new structural materials such as
prestressed concrete; inspection of
mechanical equipment installations;
building codes; problems of planning,
zoning and licensing; and office man-
agement problems. This Building
Officials Short Course 'has been en-
thusiastically endorsed by the FAA-
AGC Joint Cooperative Committee
which has urged as high as possible
(Continued on Page 24)
MARCH, 1956


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News & Notes__
(Continued from Page 23)
an attending by building officials, ar-
chitects and general contractors
throughout the State. Application for
enrollment may be obtained froni
W. W. Young, General Extension
Division of Florida, 802 Seagle Build-
ing, Gainesville.

Small House Competition
A series of prizes and commissions
totaling $15,000, with the possibility
of a $5,000 maximum to a single in-
dividual, constitutes the incentive in
a competition for small houses just
announced by HOWARD T. FISHER,,
AIA, Chicago architect acting as a
professional advisor. The competi-
tion is being -sponsored by THE MOR-
-TON ARBORETUM in cooperation with
the AIA, the Chicago Building Con-
gress and the Chicago Museum of
Science and Industry. It is open to;
all. architects, architectural drafts-
men and students.
Developed to "stimulate and dem-'
onstrate original thinking on the re-
lationship between the interior and-
exterior of houses", the competition
cAlls for the "contemporary or mod-
em design" of small two- and three-
bedroom suburban and country
houses. Prizes will be awarded on the
basis of design excellence and practi-
cability for actual construction.
The competition has been approv-
ed by the AIA. It will close May 7,;
with judgement completed by Junei
4. Programs have been forwarded
to all Florida AIA Chapters; and they
may be obtained by writing Howard
T. Fisher, AIA, Professional Advisor;
MAoron Arboretun Small House
Competition, 322 West Washington
Street, Chicago 6, Illinois.

U of F Business Conference
The significant topic of "Planning
Florida's Growth" will be the overall
subject of the Eighth Annual Uni-
versity of Florida Business Confer-"
ence to be held in St. Petersburg on'-
April 19 and 20. The Conference,-
designed to clarify the business, pro--I
fessional and development problems
of the nation's fastest-growing state;1
has this year included the construction
industry in its agenda, coupled witlIi
a consideration of the business ancd
industrial use of atomic energy andu,
,ways of financing the growth of both.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT.,






small and large businesses throughout
the State.
SSANFORD W. GOING, F.A.I.A., for
the past two years the F.A.A. member
of the Conference Steering Commit-
tee, recently highlighted the impor-
tance of such discussions as a back-
ground for progress of both business
and professional activities.
"Each annual Business Confer-
ence," he said, "is actually a forum
of creative ideas proposed by top-
flight business and profesisonal men
for the sound development of our
State. Because architects, particularly,
have a tremendous stake in that de-
velopment, I urge attendance at the
Conference by as many as can pos-
sibly make it."
On the program this year ROGER
ALLEN, F.A.I.A., will discuss, in his
own inimitable fashion, "The place
of Construction in an expanding mar-
ket." This, in itself, should be worth
the $25 registration fee covering all
Conference sessions. Also slated to
speak are FRANK PACE, former Sec-
retary of the Army and Executive VP
of General Dynamics Corp.; JOHN
Fox, President, Minute Maid Corp.,
and WENDELL BARNES, Administra-
tor, Small Business Administration,
Washington, D. C.
The Conference will be held at the
Tides Hotel, Redington Beach, St.
Petersburg. Reservations and informa-
tion are available from General Ex-
tensibn Divison, University of Florida,
707 Seagle Building, Gainesville.

New Addresses
ROBERT CHARLES BROWARD has an-
nounced the opening of an office for
the practice of architecture at 1974
San Marco Boulevard, Jacksonville.
The new office location of FRED-
ERICK W. KESSLER, AIA, is 361 South
County Road, Palm Beach.
ANKER F. HANSEN, AIA, has re-
cently closed his office at Memphis,
Tenn., and has established a perma-
nent Florida address at 12 West Main
Street, Ft. Walton Beach, Florida.

State Board Registers 59
New registrations for architectural
practice in, Florida total 59 for the
six-month's 'period 'from June, 1955,
to January 14, -1956, according to
information released by MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, Secretary of the State
(Continued on Page 26)
MARCH, 1956


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New Registrations
(Continued from Page 25)
Board of Architecture. Of these, 24
are residents of Florida. The remain-
ing 35 represent registrations granted
architects already in professional prac-
tice in other states.
Following is the list, including two
women:
Clearwater
Eugene H. Beach
Joseph L. Coggan
Ft. Lauderdale
Harry L. Lane
William C. Presto
Joseph T. Romano
Paul R. Werking
Louis Wolff
Ft. Walton Beach
Roy L. Ricks
Gainesville
Raymond W. Graham
Gordon S. Johnson
Hollywood
Charles C. Reed, Jr,
Jacksonville
Harry L. Drake
John T. Foster
Miami
Dorothy A. McKenna
S Samuel M. Puder
Ocala
Berry J, C. Walker
-Orlando
George W. Bagley, Jr.
Pompano Beach
Olga E. Petters "
St. Petersburg
Albert L. Reese
Sarasota
Harvey R. Jernigan
Switzerland
Robert C. Broward
Tampa
James A. Hearon, Jr.
James H. Kennedy
West Palm Beach
SNorman N. Robson
Sixteen states Iwere represented by
applications for Senior examination
or on the basis of an NCARB record.
Greatest number came from Illinois,
with New York State next. Illinois
applications totaled seven, those from
New York five, with three each from
Georgia and. Alabama. Two registra-
tions were granted applicants from
each of these states: California, Con-
necticut, Louisiana, Michigan and"l
New Jersey, and one each from Indi-'
ana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island an2
Wisconsin.
THE FLORIDA ARCHIT






Precedent for Policy...
(Continued from Page .)
ing problem. The preluninarv studies.
the proposals and contracts, the issu-
ance of certificates of payments. the
general administration ot the buinces
and the supervision of the i ork-all
these constitute the architect's service.
The success of this service is depend-
ent on each of its component parts.
As a protessionul, the architect is re-
sponsible under the rigid regulations
of the Florida State Law' and his pro-
fessional sen'ices are never to be con-
fused with a product nlnchh can be
bought or traded in the market place.
"If drawings of buildings were pur-
chased and used in a public hool
building program, the agency buying
the drawiings would have to establish
and run a complete bureau to handle
the work. Such a bureaucratic organi-
:ation is uniweild). expensive to op-
erate, the producer of mediocre archi-
tecture. And such a bureau wcoulhc be
detrimental to the progress of our
schools and not in the best interests
of the taxpayers or 'of our children."
The r~tslt of the Chaptcr's action
5a:s fa orable--that is. the Board
withdreww consideration of it, plan-
purchase idea. But the ern existence
of the idea itself points up the griat
and continuing need for educating
public officials on what architectural
service is and how it operates in the
public interest.
Practicing architects cannot blame
school boards for attempting, in all
sincerity, to save taxpayers' money.
Nor does the Jacksonville Chapter feel
unkindly toward ALRERT R. BROAD-
FOOT. the Duval Count\ Board's sup-
enising architect, for following the
Board's instructions in first proposing
the plan-purchase idea. The important
point to be made is that the Board
did not ha\e sufficient knowledge of
architectural practice to reject the idea
when it was firsi proposed and before
it had e\en been committed to paper
as part of the Board's business.
The only practical solution for
avoiding periodic repetitions of the
Jacksontille situation throughout the
State is a continuing effort on the
part of architects. That effort must
be directed toward a better under-
standing of architects and their pro-
fessional services by the elected
officials with uhom the needs of the
community must be developed.
MARCH, 1956


r. CRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres JAMES H BARRON, JR, Secy.Treas.
FRANK D WILLIAMS, Vice Pres. JOSEPH A COLE, Vice-Pres





ESTABLISHED 1910

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED


"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


ELGIN 1084
LONG DISTANCE 470


ATLANTA

GA.


FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
ALBERENE STONE
SERPENTINE STONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING


1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND YARD


PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMSTONE
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STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
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UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS
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AND ALUMINUM
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BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS

ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.




Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. 83-6554













































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affording full use of valuable floor
space from wall to wall, and floor
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More and more engineers, archi-
tects and contractors are specifying
LEAP Concrete products for all
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similar jobs . .cost of LEAP Con-
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28


Producers' Council Program


The Jacksonville Chapter of the
Producers' Council will play host to
architects, engineers and their office
personnel on the evening of March
16. Place will be the Roosevelt Hotel,
Jacksonville. Time will be from 6 p.m.
till closing. And the occasion will be
another in the Producer's Council pro-
gram of "information-panel" meet-
ings for which both Miami and Jack-
sonville Chapters have become fam-
ous.
According to custom, the evening
will start off with cocktails and will
proceed through a dinner-at 7:00
sharp-as a preliminary ,to a three-
company demonstration of building
equipment. This will be put on by
CARL E. STONE, representing Ameri-
can Standard Plumbing and Heating
Division; EMMETT H. JONES, Jackson-
ville Chapter secretary and representa-
tive for the Sanymetal Products Com-
pany, and RAY A. LITKENHAUS, Jack-
sonville representative of the J. A.
Zurn Company.


These 'three Producers' Council
members will put on the Jackson- ':
ville Chapter's next panel show. Left
to right, Carl F. Stone, Emmett H.
Jones, Ray A. Litkentaus.

Chapter President CEORCGE:P
COYLE will exercise his undeniable
talents as the meeting's genial master
oi ceremonies to introduce speakers
who will sketch the history of modems
sanitation equipment and at least hint
on what may be expected for the imi-
mediate future.


SERVING FLORIDA

ARCHITECTS & BUILDERS

* REINFORCING STEEL
* BAR JOISTS
* STEEL SASH
* ALUMINUM SASH
* JALOUSIES
* STEEL DOORS & FRAMES
" MISC. IRON AND
ALUMINUM
* ORNAMENTAL IRON
* STEEL ROOF DECK
* STEELTEX
* HIGHWAY PRODUCTS
* COMPLETE ENGINEER-
ING SERVICE
* MODERN FABRICATING
FACILITIES


FLORIDA STEEL
PRODUCTS, INC.


TAMPA 8-4824
ORLANDO 2-4539
JACKSONVILLE ELgin 5-1662

THE FLORIDA ARCHITEJ


ADVERTISERS' INDEX
Belmar Shades . . 22
Blumcraft . . 17
Bruce Equipment Company 18
Dixie Style . . 4
Electrend Distributing Co. .26
Florida Home, Heating
Institute . . . 19
Florida Portland Cement . 5
Florida Power & Light Co. 9
Florida Steel .Products, Inc. 28
George C. Griffin . 25
Hollostone Company
of Miami 2
Holloway Concrete Products 23
Interstate Tile & Marble
Company... . . 24
Jacksonville Metal
and Plastics Co. . 21
Leap Concrete . . 28
Maule . .2nd Cover
Miami Window . 10 and 11
Miller Electric Company
of Florida ... 20
Modernfold . . 12
Moore Pipe and Sprinkler
Company . .. 26
Palmer Electric Compahy. 26
Satchwell Electric C6nstruction
Co. Inc .. ;. . 22
Southern Venetian Blind Co. 22
F. Graham Williams Co., Inc. 27


ill' WaRFANss~p~ap-~Ma~










Publicity vs.


Better Public Relations I


It would be difficult to find a better etxampl of the difference between ,shccr '
publicity% and sound public relations than this clipping from a Jacksonville paper.
"School children took a kick in the pant.- when the weiight of the local chapter
of the American Institute of Architects prevailed on the school board to back up on
its plan to reuse the same plans for more than one building and thus reduce the
architect's cost from 6" o, to 3%." .
That publicity. all right! But it's an thing but good public relations-from either
the architects' standpoint or that of the general public.
That small paragraph implies: One. that architects ha\e a callous disregard of
school children's needs; Two. that the local AIA Chapter is fraught \\ith some sort
of sinister political influence; Three. that architects' fees are twice what they should
be: and. Four, that architects are thwarting efforts to sase school building dollars.
No architect need to be told the complete falsity of such implications. But some -
s: ~body does! Every architect knows that the truth is the precise opposite to the impression
Scon\e\ed by that paragraph. But. obviously, the editor of the paper doesn't! And
because of his ignorance, the public gets another erroneous impression of architec-
tural service and its \alue to a community.
How can such bad publicity be a oidcd-and how can it be replaced by good
publicity that fosters a more accurate understanding of what the architectural pro-
.fession offers as a service to the community?
We know of only one way to reach that objective. That is to get across the real
facts of thi situation to those who have taken on the responsibility of shaping public
opinion or stimulating public action. That. of course, covers a ide range of both
n major and minor leaders in an\ communlt\.
lI A lack of good relations between all these peopk and the architectural profesion
is essentially a lack of understanding. In many cases, that lack exists solel\ because
- architects ha\e not developed the kinds of contacts and communications that can bridge
the gap of misunderstanding betweecn them. Seeing all angles of their problem clear, .
they assume others do also. And so communication breaks down and a common under-
standing dies aborning.
Argument don't t bring it alive. But explanation will.
Architects have mountains of background to prove any point of explanation they
Smay need to make. Are they helping school childrrci instead of giving them "a kick
in the pants"? Marshall just one-hundredth of the published school improvements
Before any ediftr. Are their charging fair fees or gouging the taxpayers? Proee. with
\ our own books, what it costs to operate an office..\rL thc\ sa % ng the community
money\ or lasting the school board's budget in expensive frills? Exhibit lust a fews
of the space and momne-sauing innovations that Florida architects ha;e developed to
keep school costs low, educational and administratie \alues high.
These are the "facts and figures" that the public can understand. This is the kind '
of language the public talks. And this is the kind of communication channel that arch-
;itcts need to build between themselves and leaders in communities the\ serxe.
Communications of this sort can lead quickly to mutual understanding and respect.
Both are basic to good public relations. Once these are established in \our community.
the publicity\ \\ill take care of itself.

IIlu u lI lIIII in l luu lIIIIIlIIII ulIIIIIlIII lIIIIIIIII lIIIIIIlu IIIIIluII ilIIIIIIlu IIIIIIIIIIII llIIlIIIIIIIIlllIII lIIIIIII








7fft&, ?




APRIL 12th, 13th, 14th -
5th Regional AIA Conference, Washington Duke Hotel,
Durham; N. C. :A program packed with professionaL pleasure
.and profit from every point of view., Don't mis- it! Make
reservations now!
NOVEMBER 8th,: 9th, 10th -
42nd Annual FAA Convention, Seville Hotel, Miami Beach,
Plais promise one of the most important and complete
Conventions in FAA history. Details will come later but
plan to attend now!