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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Interama
 The profession and the press
 A new chapter gets its chapter
 FAA-FES agreement
 News and notes
 Gamble heads new AIA committee
 Nineteen slated as 42nd convention...
 F.A.A. directors hold first 1956...
 Architect does the impossible
 Advertiser's index
 Interama (continued from page...
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00020
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: February 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00020
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Interama
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The profession and the press
        Page 6
    A new chapter gets its chapter
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    FAA-FES agreement
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    News and notes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Gamble heads new AIA committee
        Page 18
    Nineteen slated as 42nd convention committee
        Page 19
    F.A.A. directors hold first 1956 meeting
        Page 20
    Architect does the impossible
        Page 21
    Advertiser's index
        Page 22
    Interama (continued from page 2)
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text































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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale



VICE-PRESIDENTS
Franklin S. Bunch . North Florida
John Stetson . . South Florida
William B. Harvard Central Florida


DIRECTORS
Broward County William F. Bigoney, Jr.
Daytona Beach .William R. Gomon
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Florida North Sanford W. Goin
Thomas Larrick
Fla. No. Central Albert P. Woodard
Florida South Edward G. Grafton
Irving E. Horsey
James E. Garland
Jacksonville . .George R. Fisher
Walter B. Schultz
Palm Beach Frederick W. Kessler

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Roger W. Sherman
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421


76e




Florida Architect

VOLUME 6 FEBRUARY, 1956 NUMBER 2



CONTENTS


Interama __ _______---------------------- 2

The Profession and The Press-- ----------- 6

A New Chapter Gets its Charter-- -------- 7

FAA-FES Agreement ---------------- 10

News and Notes ___ __-----------------------14

Gamble Heads AIA Committee ------18

Nineteen Slated as 42nd Convention Committee 19

Directors Hold First Meeting -----------20

Architect Does the Impossible -- --------- 21

Advertisers' Index __ ----------------22

Producers' Council Program -------- 24


THE COVER
This drawing, from one of Hugh Ferriss' characteristic sketches, is
one. of the most recent preliminary studies for the Interama Theme
Center. Its overall conception represents the combined thoughts
of the Board of Design's seven-man team and some ten consultants,
all of which have worked in close cooperation to bring this great
project to its present stage of development. Story of Interama
starts on Page 2.





PUBLICATION COMMITTEE H. Samuel Krus6, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor--Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects of the American Institute of Archiects. It is owned and operated by the
Florida Association of Architects Inc. a Florida Corporation not for profit, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. .Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.
1


FEBRUARY, 1956







A $200,000,000 dream is finally coming true


:' :- .. .
:i : .. ': *: "
-',-,.


InTERA IH...


Within three short years
it will have become an
international fact-and
the greatest feat of de-
velopment design
magic that men and ma-
chines, money and im-
agination have ever
wrought in Florida.
2


The most spectacular of all Flor-
ida's many miracles of development
is now well started on the road to
becoming a magnificent fact. And
along that road lie more splendid
opportunities for history-making ac-
complishment than any single project
has ever offered to architects of this
State.
The breadth of those statements is
justified by the scope of the project,
long dreamed-of and now on the very
eve of realization. On the lower east
coast, just north of Miami, lies the
Graves tract-a 1,750-acre expanse of
shoal flats and swampland. But right
now, for that very site, a high-powered
management team has set December,
1958, as the opening date for Inte-
rama, popular name for the Inter-
American Cultural and Trade Center.
Before Interama has reached ulti-
mate development, it will represent
an expenditure of more than $200,-
000,000, according to estimates of its


organizers. Preparation of the site
and construction of buildings needed
for a formal opening will require $70,-
000,000 of that total. This huge sum
has already been validated as bonds
(in December by the Florida Supreme
Court) and is expected to become
immediately available when the bonds
are offered for sale early this month.
At that time Interama development
activity will slip into high gear. Bids
will be let for the vast job of site
preparation. The task of obtaining
commitments for the many exhibit
and concession structures required
will get underway with a rush. And
the equally intense job of designing
the buildings themselves can then
proceed at full throttle.
Against that time the Interama
Board of Design has been working
steadily for many months. Actually,
the effort which will shortly become
all out began over six years ago when
DR. WILLIAM H. WALKER, spark-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


'r
9
t~


7 C


















































plug of the generating force behind
the entire project, asked ROBERT
FITCH SMITH to act as the archi-
tectural branch of what was then
a citizen's committee with little more
than a vision and an urge.
Some four years ago the State Leg-
islature formally recognized a rapidly
growing interest in the Inter-Ameri-
can project by establishing a State
Authority for its development. At that
time BOB SMITH became chairman
of the Interama design board and,
through his enthusiasm, sparked
others to help him give architectural
form and organization to Dr. Walk-
er's dream.
Now, all ready to steer a brilliant
path through the troubled waters of
design development and construction
is an expanded Design Board and a
growing list of specialists and con-
sultants who have expressed their
willingness to help. Its Chairman,
(Continued on Page 4)
FEBRUARY, 1956


Above, a preliminary sketch of the Theme Center by John E. Petersen,
and opposite, an aircraft-view of the Interama "core" as drawn by
Hugh Ferriss. Overall design for Interama is now being developed
by a seven-man Board of Design in consultation with a list of
specialists including Dr. Luis Malaussena, Venezuellan architect; Dr.
Fernando Belaunde, architect and Dean of the College of Architecture,
University of Lima, Peru; Pietro Belluschi, Dean of Architecture,
M.I.T.; Louis Rossetti, architect of Detroit; Paul Rudolph, Sarasota;
Dan Kiley, landscape architect from Vermont-; Donald Desky, New
York industrial designer; Wilbur Smith, traffic expert from New
Haven, Conn.; Hugh Ferriss, design-delineator of New York; and
Joseph Burgee and Samuel A. Marx, both Chicago architects. Invited
also as consultants are Erro Saarinen, architect from Bloomfield Hills,
Mich.; and Wallace K. Harrison and Max Harvey, both of New York.


Three of Interama's prime movers who have worked for six years
to bring their dreams into reality are, left to right: Dr. William H.
Walker, Chairman of the Inter-American Cultural and Trade Center
Authority, Robert Fitch Smith, chief of the Interama Design Board,
and A. Frank Katzentine, a member of the State-controlled Authority.









IRTERAMRl

Snow also a member of the Inter-
American Management Board, is
ROBERT FITCH SMITH. Members
working with him include: RUSSELL
T. PANCOAST, F.A.I.A., ALFRED
BROWNING PARKER, JOHN E. PETER-
SEN, EDWIN T. REEDER, ROBERT LAW
WEED, and MAURICE H. CONNELL,
Sthe last being the sole engineering
member.
This team, working with some ten
invited consultants, has developed a
scheme for the Interama--shown
here in the overall perspectives. The
whole area has been planned traffic-
wise for easy access from arterial and
To- of local roads; and has been laid out to
SB -, l t facilitate transportation within its
own boundaries. All major engineer-
ing problems have already been
Preliminary sketch, by John E. Petersen, Design Board member and solved; and it now remains to refine
a principal in the Miami firm of Petersen and Shuflin. This is one the architectural theme of the Inter-
of many studies now being developed for the "core" layout of
Interama, buildings for which will be designed by Board members ama and to proceed with development
and consultants, but will be "farmed out" to established architectural of the buildings needed.
firms for development of working drawings, specifications and details. What will these buildings be? Who
will own and operate them? How will
they be brought into being? Who will
design them? Who will see to their
building?
Such questions as these are normal
to any architect who realizes the tre-
mendous scope of Interama's poten-
tials and understandably wants to
become party to their realization. Not
all can be answered completely at
this moment. But with six years of
dreaming and planning behind it, the
SInterama Design Board has crystal-
lized a policy that can provide answers
to some and offer at least a basis from
which future answers to others can
be projected.
About the buildings--Interama
managers quite honestly say they don't
yet know how many buildings nor
exactly what types will ultimately
be included in the Interama complex.
What exists right now is first of all
Two of Interama's Board of Design and four of its top-flight a scheme an extremely flexible lay-
design consultants huddle in a conference over a preliminary planning out that consists of space allocations
scheme. Back row, left to right: Dan Kiley, landscape architect
from Charlotte, Vermont; Robert Fitch Smith, Russell T. Pancoast, for more or less immediate construc-
F.A.I.A., and Hugh Ferriss, New York. Seated are consultants Xaul tion on the one hand and for the
Rudolph, of Sarasota and Cambridge, Mass., and Pietro Belluschi, possibility of expansion on the other.
SlDean, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.
Essentially, the Interama layout will
consist of a "core"- a theme center,
an administration building, a trade
mart structure, possibly an audi-
torium. Surrounding the core in a
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











planned disposition are a number of
"exhibit" buildings. These \~ ll pre-
sumabl\ be o%\ned and constructed
b\ organizations and concession \vn-
dicates of this country ; and b\ gov-
ernments or industries or concessioin-
naires of Latin American countries.
In addition, of course, %ill be the
several structures needed for Interama
operation management an opera-
tions building, waterfront structures,
transportation and connective facil-
ities.
The "core" buildings, the opera-
tions structures, the transportation
and connective facilities have all been
fairly well thought out. They will all
be constructed and owned by the
Inter-American Cultural and Trade
Center Authority. But all the other
buildings will be privately owned and
operated. And to this extent they
constitute as open an architectural
opportunity as can be found any-
where.

Who will design the buildings?
Interama management has estab-
lished a firm policy on this point. The
Board of Design will have final au-
thority relative to the design develop-
ment of all Interama structures. Idea
behind this, of course, is to assure an
overall harmony in the ultimate de-
velopment of this great project; and
toward this end the Board is charged
with approving the design of every
building element before construction
can proceed.
This applies to privately owned
structures as well as to the "core"
buildings. As to the latter, present
thinking is that designs for the trade
mart, the administration building, the
theme center and the auditorium-
when this is found necessary--will
be developed by the Board. But de-
velopment of the designs, through
working drawings, details and into
actual construction, will be done by
various architectural firms selected
by the Interama Design Board.
Practically, this means that the
Design Board will maintain as small
a staff as possible to do its work.
Current thinking is that Board mem-
bers will work together as a design-
initiation staff; and that design will
be developed, preliminary to working
FEBRUARY, 1956


Right, Hugh Ferriss and Dean
Belluschi ponder a problem of
layout as consultants to Inlerania's
Board of Design. Below. caught
al a recent meeting of the Inter-
American A.ulhorily, is an archi-
teclural group including Edwin T.
Reeder. left, Dr. Fernando Be-
launde, one of Peru's foremost
archilects, and Hugh Ferris. Be-
hind Ferris is John E. Petersen,
another Board of Design member.


drawings, by a staff of three senior
designers, two designers and two
draftsmen working directly under
Board members' supervision.
One important point must be made
clear: The Design Board's policy
will be to "farm out" as much archi-
tectural work on essential Interama
buildings as possible. It emphatically
does not contemplate formation of a
gigantic, cooperative new architectural
firm to execute all Interama build-
ings.
Nor will Design Board members
act as architects for those Interama
buildings which will be designed by
the Board. From the Board's incep-
tion, its function was set as a design-
coordinating and controlling agency.
Its members work as a team made up
of individual designers; and they have
been retained by the Inter-American
Center Authority as such. So far they
have given freely of their time and


talents, for their arrangements with
the Authority has been necessarily a
contingent one pending completion
of the Authority's financial plans.

Exhibit buildings planned-The
full name of Interama Inter-Ameri-
can Cultural and Trade Center-
gives at least a partial clue to the
tremendous scope of this tremendous
project. Management has repeatedly
emphasized the point that Interama
will not be a "fair"- even a world's
fair in the accepted sense of the
phrase. Primarily it will be a place
for the inter-change of information
and ideas. That says a great deal, how-
ever. Relative to inter-American re-
lations, it embodies the arts of the
peoples of both North and South
America quite as much as it does
the various products of their science
and industries.
(Continued on Page 23)
5







The Profession and The Press


As a kind of survey of what archi-
tects are doing to keep their names
and professional activities before the
public, we scan the newspapers
throughout the state each week.
Most stories relate to buildings pro-
posed or under construction and
most, too, give the credit to the
designers. But local news of interest
to each particular community, has a
variety of forms. Here are some recent
items, picked at random throughout
the State:

"Modernism plus Livability"
That's the headline the Pensacola
Journal put on the story of a medium-
priced house that RUFUs NIMS of
Miami designed as one of a series
commissioned by the Frigidaire Di-
vision of General Motors, for provo-
cative promotion of better kitchens.
The Times of St. Petersburg picked
up the stame story, using two pictures
of Nims' drawing in an 8-column
story.


In this case the originality of the
house design made the story news.
As both papers used it, the material
was a good report on the way archi-
tects are adapting new products of
industry toward the advancement of
design and construction and the
added comfort of the homeowner.

"Closer Cooperation Pledged"
Seeds planted at the Educational
Planning Seminar of the Daytona
Beach Convention are taking firm
root according to an item in the
Daily News of Palatka. Speaking at
a meeting of the County School Sup-
erintendents' Association at Tallahas-
see, WILLIAM H. THOMAS, 1956 pres-
ident, said his group had resolved to
work for "closer relationship between
the association and civic groups" dur-
ing the coming year. He indicated the
Assoication is planning meetings that
will include panels on building pro-
grams on which representatives of the
FAA and AGC will be represented.


This is a direct outgrowth of the
proposal made by Thomas at Daytona
that subjects discussed at the educa-
tional planning seminar be further
explored jointly by school superin-
tendents and architects. FAA Presi-
dent CLINTON GAMBLE immediately
pledged the availability of Joint Co-
operative Committee FAA AGC
members to that end.

"Judging a Yule Contest"
The Times-Union of Jacksonville
carried two stories about the annual
Christmas lighting and decorations
contest. In both a committee from
the newly-formed Jacksonville Chap-
ter, AIA, was named as judges. In-
cluded were RAY M. POOLEY, JR.,
HARRY A. BURNS, JR., A. EUGENE
CELLAR, LOGAN CHAPPELL and JAMES
A. MEEHAN, JR.
This is a heads-up example of good
professional public relations. Publicity
was on the organizational as well as
the personal level-but even more
important was the report of a service
rendered to the community by public-
spirited members of the architects'
(Continued on Page 21)


Packing House for H. L. Cox and Sons, Princeton, Florida, for which
Harry L. Penny was Architect and Linton Conner the Builder.


TwTE F A

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























Regional Director Herbert C.
Millkey gave the gesture of
official approval when he
presented President James A.
Meehan with the Charter of
the recently-formed Jackson-
ville Chapter, AIA. .





A New Chapter Gets Its Charter



President Ike sent his best wishes--and the AIA's 119th Chapter was
officially launched in Jacksonville with due ceremony, fanfare and fun.


The newly-formed Jacksonville
Chapter, AIA, was formally launched
as Florida's eighth chapter Friday
evening, January 20, when its charter
was presented to President James A.
Meehan, by AIA Regional Director
Herbert C. Millkey. The occasion
was a cocktail party and dinner dance
at the Florida Yacht Club of Jack-
sonville, attended by about 125 chap-
ter members, FAA directors and chap-
ter officers, guests and wives.
James A. Meehan acted as master
of ceremonies and paid special tribute
to Roy M. Pooley, Jr., and Robert E.
Boardman for their skill in coordinat-
ing arrangements for the meeting.
After receiving the Chapter's charter
from Director Millkey, President
Meehan presented certificates of cor-
porate membership to five members.
Ceremonies were concluded about 10
pm; and the remainder of the eve-
ning was pleasantly spent dancing to
the music of the Revelers.
The eveiiing's address was made
by Herbert C. Millkey who noted that
FEBRUARY, 1956


FAA President Clinton Gamble was
not the only president to whom an
invitation to the affair had been sent.
About three weeks earlier the Chap-
ter's head had requested the presence
of President and Mrs. Eisenhower.
But a reply from the President's sec-
retary indicated the date conflicted
with other previously planned busi-
ness, including a return to Washing-
ton and a full presidential schedule!
"But that invitation," said the Re-
gional Director, "Is indicative of the
splendid start this new Jacksonville
Chapter has made."
As the first AIA group to be formed
in the whole South Atlantic Region
since,1950, the Jacksonville Chapter
becomes the 119th unit of the na-
tional AIA organization-which now
numbers more than 11,000 and will
next year celebrate 100 years of
growth.
"This growth," said Millkey, "Is
especially significant when considered
in the light of the vast influence
that the architectural profession now


enjoys. We are a relatively small
profession so far as numbers are con-
cerned. Architects number some
22,000--as compared with over 180,-
000 attorneys, almost 200,000 physi-
cians and nearly 350,000 engineers.
"But these architects are the
acknowledged leaders in the construc-
tion industry which now accounts
for a full ten percent of the nation's
gross yearly production."
The speaker named three points
as necessary for the continuance and
strengthening of professional leader-
ship in construction. First was each
individual architect's awareness of his
community obligations and a clear
understanding of how these could be
met.
"We must never forget for a mo-
ment," he said, "That our progress
as individuals and as a profession lies
in the service we render to our clients
and our community. We can serve
ourselves best as we serve our com-
munities better.
(Continued on Page 8)


































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Among the charter-
party's honored
guests were Mr. and
Mrs. George P. Coyle.
Mr. Coyle, a life-
long friend of many
Jacksonville Chapter
members, is the gen-
ial President of
Jacksonville Produc-
ers' Council Chapter.







Chapter's Charter
(Continued from Page 7)
"We architects still need to de-
velop a conscience for our commu-
nity. We must enlist ourselves in
such service groups as zoning and
school boards, in planning commis-
sions and as active supporters of our
local chambers of commerce. And we
should serve these groups unselfishly
and with a keen sense of our re-
sponsibility to contribute whatever
may be possible to advance the level
of their accomplishment.
"Only in this way can we create


in our clients and in our community
a true understanding of what the
architectural profession really is and
what it stands ready to do toward
making our towns and cities what
they can become."
High quality of professional and
chapter activity was named as the
speaker's second point toward sup-
porting the architect's current posi-
tion of leadership in the construction
industry. He cited technical and de-
sign abilities as one phase and men-
tioned that along these lines archi-
tects of the South Atlantic Region
(Continued on Page 14)


Other honored guests included Mellen C. Greeley, F.A.I.A., the only
Florida-born member of the AIA College of Fellows, Mrs. Greeley,
Morton T. Ironmonger, Secretary of the State Board of Architecture,
President of the Broward County Chapter and FAA Treasurer, and
Mrs. Ironmonger.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Be Happy You're Lucky !
Every so often the U. S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics takes time off from
its figure-fiddling via slide rules and
electronic calculators and makes a
statement. Recently it gave forth with
a tabulation showing the wages and
salaries of various professions and
trades throughout the country .
It may surprise some professional
men to learn that architects are
fourth highest on the list.
Heading it are physicians and sur-
geons with a net average income of
about $9,000. In second place are
lawyers and judges who average
around $7,000; and third are dentists
whose net average is almost the same.
Architects are next in line. Their
average yearly income is currently
better than $6,000--compared with
that of teachers, at a $3,600 average,
bookkeepers at about $3,000. The
median income for ministers and
clergy of all denominations is barely
$2,700; and lowest of all listing is
the income of farmers and farm
managers which averages only $1,555.
The chief trouble with such figures
is their lack of definite meaning with-
out interpretation. There are many
architects in the country-many in
our own State-with current net in-
comes bulking several times the stated
averages. And there probably are
others to which the median would
represent a very welcome increase.
Time, too, changes the meaning of
such figures as these. Many an elder
in our profession can remember when
$6,000 per year was an income un-
cluttered with taxes and represented
undeniable success with opportunity
for a fair amount of luxurious living.
Today it is somewhat less than that!
Actually, it is surprisingly low for
these days of booming and expanding
construction. The fact that archi-
tects' average income ranks fourth in
the professional scale seems largely a
reflection of the fact that the pro-
fession is busier today than at any
period during the last twenty-five
years. For no one should read into
the figure an assumption that pro-
fessional operating costs are not high-
er than ever before or that, in many
instances, architects' fees are not ade-
quately set to meet them.
But collectively the profession is
blessed beyond most gainful pursuits
of men. As the old gag has it-"We
don't make much money. But we
have a lot of fun doing it!"
FEBRUARY, 1956


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Formally titled "Agreement
By and Between The Archi-
tects and Engineers in the
State of Florida Governing
Services Rendered to the
Other Profession," this agree-
ment supercedes all prior fee
schedules or agreements in-
volving the rendering of pro-
fessional service by either
profession to the other.























The document published here
was approved for acceptance as
a guide to policy in professional
practice for architects by the
FAA Board of Directors at its
regular meeting in Jackson-
ville, January 21, 1956, that
action being authorized by
vote of the 41st Annual FAA
Convention at Daytona Beach.
It constitutes Part II of the
complete architect engineer
agreement-Part I being the
Preamble, approved and ac-
cepted by both FAA and FES,
and published officially in the
March, 1955, issue of The
Florida Architect.


Schedule of Fees
Realizing the problems involved in
arriving at a fair fee schedule for the
consulting professional when em-
ployed by the prime professional, as
described in the Preamble, the fol-
lowing is suggested as an outline of
fees and the methods of adapting to
the work involved:
(A)-Hourly Rate In many in-
stances it would be advantageous to
the two professionals involved for
the sub-professional to charge for his
services on the basis of a fixed hourly
rate. This particularly applies to
projects of a nature where strictly a
consultation service might be re-
quired, and where the prime profes-
sional might be providing all draft-
ing services, and providing the owner
with all other services such as blue-
printing, inspection, etc., but where
the prime professional would require
the knowledge of the other profession
in arriving at designs involving pub-
lic welfare, health, safety, etc. This
sort of service might also prove help-
ful in smaller offices of either profes-
sion in which operational costs are
a prime factor. It is recommended
that a per-hour fee be charged by the
sub-professional for these services.
(B)-Flat Fee There are many
instances where a project requires a
given amount of work by the sub-
professional and a flat fee can be
agreed upon, enabling the prime pro-
fessional to establish his costs prior
to starting the project. Where the
sub-professional can accurately ar-
rive at the time required and his costs
involved, this fee is recommended.
This flat fee can either be determined
by a percentage of estimated costs,
by an estimated number of hours
involved by the sub-professional, or
by a combination of both.
(C) -Percentage of Total
Costs This type of fee could be
used where generally practical and
especially in the case of large projects
where extensive or complex planning
is involved. In view of variations in
fee structures which exist in profes-
sional organizations throughout the
State, acceptable fees in each area of


specified professional activities should
be used as a basis for inter-professional
agreement, the prime professional re-
ceiving a discounted fee from the
associate professional, the discount
being established on a basis of size,
complexity, and time consumed for
the project involved.
In all of the above fee arrange-
ments, superficial costs such as blue-
printing should be recognized and
provision for payment included as a
part of the professional agreement.
In cases where the prime professional
is accomplishing all of the drafting
service and providing the bulk of the
blueprints to the owner, and except
where the sub-professional is em-
ployed only as a consultant, it is
readily understood that the blue-
printing should be borne by the
prime professional. In cases where
the sub-professional performs a large
amount of the work and where draw-
ings would remain his property, the
matter of blueprinting costs should
be specifically considered.
In the event that projects are lo-
cated at some distance from the sub-
professional's office, transportation
costs should be considered, in the
event preliminary investigations or
supervision trips be required. Again
this applies particularly to an hourly
rate and a flat fee agreement where
a sub-professional's time is considered
a primary factor in arriving at the
fee. In this case, charges should be
based on a first-class rate of travel and
expenses.
Where the services of the sub-pro-
fessional are included under the prime
professional's agreement with the
owner, the final responsibility for all
of the services involved should be
determined in advance and such
eventualities included in a written
agreement between the two profes-
sionals involved. The basic concept of
this relationship is on a professional
basis; and it is the intent that each
professional shall have a responsibility
to the owner for the work involved,
with no basis for avoiding a responsi-
bility due to a sub-professional status.
It should be intended that each pro-
fessional enter into such an agree-


10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










ment with the full intention of pro-
viding the best services possible, and
that relative fees be adequate to cover
all eventualities.
Termination of agreement between
the prime and sub-professional should
follow established procedures. The
prime professional should not aban-
don a commission with impunity.
The termination of any agreement
should be recognized only:
A. By reason of termination
by the owner of his agree-
ment with the prime pro-
fessional.
B. The prime professional's
inability to fulfill his
agreement with the owner
by reason of failure of the
sub-professional to perform
his services.
C. By mutual agreement.
D. By breach of contract
through regular procedure.
In cases of disagreement, it is sug-
gested that standard methods of
arbitration be adopted. Because of
the possibility of this happening in
any location, it is urged that all mem-
bers of both professions make them-
selves fully aware of the responsibility
of both professions, one to the other,
and each to the owner; and that
every member stand ready to serve
either the other profession as a sub-
professional, or as an arbitrator, if the
case should arise.

Payments
It is necessary that any agreement
between the professions include a
schedule of payments agreed upon
by and between both the prime and
the sub-professional, either on a basis
of guaranteed duties or on amount
of work accomplished; and that in
every case the prime professional
make every effort to see that these
payments be made on time.
In every case it is urged that a
definite, detailed breakdown between
the professional services required be
agreed upon and, wherever possible,
be required as a part of any signed
agreement. This should include con-



FEBRUARY, 1956


ferences, preparation of preliminary
studies, working drawings, specifica-
tions, large scale details, breakdowns
and estimates, assistance in analysis
of bids, assistance in preparation of
schedules of payment, checking of
shop drawings, material sample selec-
tion, and supervision of construction
and installation.
If the sub-professional is required
by the prime professional to perform
additional services or incur additional
expense by reason of changes to or
additions to the original project by
reason of disagreement by and be-
tween the owner and the prime pro-
fessional, then the sub-professional
should be reimbursed for these ex-
penses. If the project be abandoned
prior to start of construction, then,
particularly in the case of a percentage
fee, the sub-professional should re-
duce his fee to be commensurate with
that fee collected by the prime pro-
fessional.


In every case the prime professional
should furnish the sub-professional
with all information which he might
require and which would be unavail-
able to him through any other source.
Any working agreement should in-
clude all services required in obtain-
ing this preliminary information and
the responsibility of the profession
involved in obtaining this informa-
tion.
The sub-professional should defend
any suits arising or claims of infringe-
ment on any copyright or patent
'rights arising out of the use or adop-
tion of any designs, drawings or spe-
cifications furnished by him; and
should indemnify the prime profes-
sional and the owner from loss or
damage on account thereof.
For the purposes of determining
who should be considered the prime
professional for a project, attention
is directed to paragraphs two, three
and four of the Preamble.


Florida's architects and engineers have just made
history. They have jointly developed, and have now
separately approved, the nation's first, mutually-accept-
able code of professional practice to govern the policy
of inter-profession relationships. It has been no easy
task. And its accomplishment, after four years of
conference and negotiation, is the more significant be-
cause of the very complexities involved.
Of even more significance from the standpoint of
our situation in Florida, is the fact that this important
document was the outgrowth of voluntary cooperation
on the parts of both professions involved. There was
no need for any legal ruling nor any arbitrator's decision.
Difficulties were recognized, differences aired, oppos-
ing viewpoints reconciled-all through frank discussion
of sincere men sincerely seeking a practical area for
final agreement.
In finding it, and in defining it as a policy code for
both professions, Florida's architects and engineers have
done two things of vital importance. First, they have
forged another strong link in the chain of mutual trust
and agreement that will finally produce integration in
Florida's sprawling construction industry. Second, they
have blazed a trail of inter-professional progress that
can, and hopefully will, be followed by other professional
groups everywhere.


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12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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FEBRUARY, 1956


I" THE FIRST
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x13


V I Vi







News & Notes


(Continued from Page 8)

had taken 13 of the 35 awards given
in a recent Progressive Architecture
competition.
"I'm naturally proud of that," said
Millkey. "That competition was on
a national scale; and the results gave
our Region-only one-eighth of the
country-about 40 percent of the
awards for excellence in design."
He cautioned his audience, how-
ever, against complacency. And he
suggested that one of the most prac-
tical bulwarks against this was a regu-
lar program of professional re-educa-
tion. In this connection he urged
Florida architects to follow the lead
of their Georgia colleagues and en-
roll at universities for a continuing
program of refresher courses, particu-
larly in new methods of construction
and building finance.
"At a recent course at Georgia
Tech," said the speaker, "Some 80
architects were enrolled in a total
of 200. And all of them were able
practising architects who had long
ago finished college."
Closer ties between various factors
of the industry were named as the
third requisite for continuing archi-
tectural leadership in construction.
Millkey noted with evident satisfac-
tion the start made along these lines
by several AIA chapters in Florida
and particularly the programs of the
FAA on the state level with general
contractors and engineers.
"You just can't over-estimate the
value of such programs as these."
he said. "But cooperation and friend-
ship between architects and other
elements of the building industry
should go even further. Every one
of us should be on close terms with
local legislators, with building offi-
cials, with realtors, with material and
equipment people-as well as with
contractors and engineers.
"There is a whole broad field to
work on along these lines." he added.
And it needs cultivation by Chapters
and the FAA as well as by indi-
viduals."
Certificates of Corporate Member-
ship were awarded by President Mee-
han to the following: ROY M. POOLEY,
JR., WILLIAM S. GORDON; NORMAN
H. FREEDMAN, JAMES E. CLEMENTS;
and FREDERICK W. BUCKY, JR.


Palm Beach and AGC
One of the finest possible testimo-
nials of good inter-industry relations
took place the evening of January 23
at the Polo Club of West Palm
Beach. Gathered for cocktails, a
broiled steak dinner, speeches and
merit awards were 356 people. In-
cluded were members of the Palm
Beach Chapters of the AIA, AGC and
FES, a substantial delegation of local
building material dealers (who were
generous hosts for cocktails) and their
wives.
Prime purpose of the joint meeting
was installation of new presidents for
for both FAA and AGC chapters and
the award of merit certificates to arch-
itects, engineers and craftsmen. The
main speaker of the evening was Hon.
FRED A. HARTLEY, former Congress-
man, co-author of the Taft-Hartley
Act, and currently President of the
National Committee on Right to
Work. His talk was an explanation
of some controversional phases of the
Taft-Hartley law.
FRANK J. ROONEY, President-elect
of the National AGC, spoke briefly
to introduce Mr. Hartley. J. HILBERT
SAPP, president of the Florida State
AGC Council, greeted guests for the
Contractors; and IGOR B. POLEVITZKY,
F.A.I.A., as past-President of the FAA,
did the honors for the architects in
place of FAA President CLINTON
GAMBLE who was unable to be
present.
Awards to architects for outstand-
ing professional achievement during


the past year were made to JOHN
STETSON, GEORGE J. VOTAW (both
second-time winners) and MAURICE
E. HOLLEY. Engineers similar hon-
ored by the AIA Chapter were
GEORGE BROCKWAY, NORMAN SCHMID
and JAMES N. BOROWSKI.
Brief ceremonies marked installa-
tion of JEFFERSON POWELL as the
new AIA Chapter president and C.
W. TRIESTE as the AGC's 1956 pres-
ident.
Contractors also honored by the
Palm Beach Chapter included BUTLER
& OENBRINK, WILLIAM F. BOOTHE,
INC., J. R. HIME ELECTRIC CO., O.
D. BURNS, INC., WALDEN PAINT CO.,
CARPENTER'S SHEET METAL WORKS,
and JOHN H. COUSE REFRIGERATION
AND AIR CONDITIONING.

Florida North
The first meeting of this Chapter
since formation of the newly-chartered
Jacksonville group was held in Gaines-
ville early last month. About 30 mem-
bers were present, and the chief busi-
ness of the evening was election of
a new roster of officers, to replace
those offices vacated by the Jackson-
ville group.
Results were: President, JACK
MOORE; Vice-President, JOHN L. R.
GRAND; Secretary, ARTHUR LEE
CAMPBELL; Treasurer, LESTER N.
MAY. SANFORD W. GOING, F.A.I.A.,
and THOMAS LARRICK were named as
the Chapter's representatives on the
FAA Board of Directors.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Here are the recently-elected officers of the Florida South Chapter.
Left to right: Irvin S. Korach, Secretary; Wahl John Snyder, II, Treas-
urer; T. Trip Russell, President; and Verner Johnson, Vice-president.







Encourage a Good Idea
The year-end holiday mail of most
architects is usually flooded with va-
rious types of advertising mementos
from manufacturers or sales repre-
sentatives. Many are "gadgets"; few
of them are useful; hardly any are
wanted by their recipients. But all
cost money that some wise firms have
finally decided could be put to more
constructive use.
In place of gadgetry this year, some
firms sent architects a simple letter.
It offered holiday wishes and then
told the reader that money formerly
spent on useless mementos was this
year being sent to a charitable insti-


Announcement was made that the
Student Chapter's annual Home
Show this year has been scheduled
for April 26 to 29. The meeting was
concluded with a showing of the
AIA film "Architecture U.S.A." which
has been presented by the Chapter
to the College of Architecture and
Allied Arts, U. of F.

About People . .
The Miami Beach firm of Pan-
coast, Ferendino, Skeels and Burnham
has announced the addition of ED-
WARD G. GRAFTON to the partner-
ship. Grafton, an FAA Director, re-
ceived architectural training at Biar-
ritz University, France, and also grad-
uated from the U. of F. College of
Architecture and Allied Arts in 1949.
Prior to joining his present firm he
served three years with the Dade
County Board of Public Instruction.
Of eight young men named by
the Gainesville Junior Chamber of


tution. Some named the Community
Chest; others one of the several orga-
nizations to aid crippled children.
Among Florida firms known to
have made this fine gesture are FLOR-
IDA STEEL PRODUCTS, GEORGE C.
GRFIFIN INC., for its parent organi-
zation, Brown & Grist, and the PI-
NELLAS LUMBER COMPANY.
If you know of others, write us
so they can be congratulated publicly.
The Central Chapter voted to write
these three firms the membership's
thanks and approval of the idea.
Others could well do likewise, for
it's a gesture that should be encour-
aged as a good policy and practice.


Commerce for distinguished awards,
two were architects. LESTER N. MAY
was cited for his work as chairman
of the cancer drive; and MYRL HANES
for his contributions as a Gainesville
City Commissioner.

Northwestern Chapter Proposed
Before the first quarter of this
year has ended, Florida may have
added one more unit to the list of
AIA Chapters that was recently in-
creased by formation of the Jackson-
ville and Mid-Florida Chapters.
Headed by ROGER G. WEEKS, a
group of architects in Pensacola have
already taken preliminary steps neces-
sary to form the Florida Northwest
Chapter, AIA, embracing the coun-
ties of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Oka-
loosa and Walton.
Membership release from the Flor-
ida North Central Chapter has
already been negotiated; and the new
group is now completing a formal,






At the first quarterly
meeting of the Flor-
ida Central Chapter,
President Roland W.
Sellew greets the
speaker of the eve-
ning, Dr. Charles W.
Logue, of the Univer-
sity of Tampa, while
Chapter Secretary
John M. Crowell looks
on.


new-chapter application for submis-
sion to the Octagon. It is hoped this
can be forwarded to Washington in
time so that hoped-for favorable
action may be taken on it by the
AIA Board of Directors during their
February 27th meeting.
Action of the Pensacola group has
long been regarded as an ultimate
development of AIA organization in
Florida. It is in line with expansion
plans outlined in the Re-Districting
proposal adopted by the FAA two
years ago. There are now eleven firms
operating in the Pensacola area. These
represent some twenty registered arch-
itects and about fifty draftsmen,
designers and architectural engineer-
ing associates, many of whom would
ultimately be eligible for Chapter af-
filiation.
Florida Central
The Sarasota Bay Country Club
was the scene of the first quarterly
meeting of the Florida Central Chap-
ter on the afternoon of Saturday,
January 14. Because of reduction of
Chapter membership and the con-
sequent absence of several committee
chairmen due to formation, from the
Central Chapter's ranks, of the new
Mid-Florida Chapter, President RO-
LAND W. SELLEW presided at what
might be called a "lame duck" session.
From the absence of committee
reports, it was evident to officers
that a substantial repair of Chapter
organization was necessary. President
Sellew spoke briefly on this point.
He told some thirty members attend-
ing that he would make new com-
mittee appointments at the next
Chapter meeting.
This will take place at Lakeland,
on specific dates to be announced
later. A WYNN HOWELL and CHESTER
L. CRAFT were named as co-chairmen
of arrangements for the meeting.
Membership voted favorably on a
number of new membership appli-
cations which brought the Chapter's
current roster to 87. Associates ad-
vanced to Corporate status were MAR-
TIN P. FISHBACK, JR., St. Petersburg,
and E. ERWIN GREMLI, II, Sarasota.
New chapter members included
CHARLES L. CALDWELL, EDGAR HANE-
BERG, JOHN D. PARISH, WINFIELD
REIFF and EDWIN J. SEIBERT as As-
sociates, and JOSEPH ALVEGO as Junior
Associate.
On public relations, ELLIOTT HAD-
LEY reported, with HORACE HAMLIN,
(Continued on Page 16)


FEBRUARY, 1956


"r *** ulr Jul





News & Notes


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that the Chapter's TV program had
been necessarily halted, with no time
spot for it available at present. Presi-
dent Sellew reminded members that
AIA regulations prohibited profes-
sional telephone listings in bold-face
type; and he urged those whose names
are so listed now through misunder-
standing to take immediate steps to
change them in conformation with
Octagon rulings.
The Chapter acted favorably on a
suggestion that could well be adopted
by all others. It was voted to purchase
name badges for use at all Chapter
meetings--the badge to state not
only the name, but the home locality
and chapter status of each member.
Authorized also was the purchase of
a new steel filing cabinet to facilitate
keeping of permanent chapter records.
Later chapter members and guests
were joined by their wives for a cock-
tail party and dinner. At the dinner,
President Sellew introduced head-table
guests that included PERCY PADER-
EWSKI, the Chapter's legal counsel,
and his wife; Honorable JOHN KICK-
LITER, Mayor of Sarasota, and Mrs.
KICKLITER, and DR. CHARLES W.
LOGUE, associate professor of English,
Tampa University. Dr. Logue, attend-
ing the dinner in place of Tampa
University President ELWOOD C.
NANCE, spoke on "New designs for
creative living."


While the Central Chapter meet-
ing was in progress, a meeting was
also held by the State's first AIA
Women's Auxiliary. The ten members
present voted to accept two additional
new associate members and decided
to name Auxiliary Chapter directors
at the April meeting to be held in
Lakeland.
Officers are: MRS. A. WYNN
HOWELL, Lakeland, president; MRS.
THOMAS V. TALLEY, vice-president;
MRS. ELLIOTT HADLEY, St. Peters-
burg, secretary, and MRS. ARCHIE G.
PARISH, St. Petersburg, treasurer.
After the business session, the
group heard a discussion of con-
temporary art by SYD SOLOMON, Sara-
sota artist who is currently working
with creative children in art classes
at the Ringling Museum. He defined
worthwhile contemporary art as "the
true expression of the artist's person-
ality and philosophy" and named
Picasso as the artist most likely to
be recognized in years to come.
Broward County
Plans for the first meeting of the
year had included a brief, but spirited
ceremony marking the change of ad-
ministration. Retiring President BOB
JAHELKA was to have handed over
the gavel to MORT IRONMONGER, the
Chapter's new prexy. There were to
have been a few appropriate remarks


Shown here are the principals of Jacksonville's newest architectural
firm, Cellar and Warner, with offices at 502 Riverside Avenue.
Robert A. Warner, left, is a graduate of Alabama Polytechnic
Institute and came to Jacksonville in 1954 after four years in a
Texas architectural office, joining the organization of A. Eugene
Cellar about a year ago. Cellar, a Jacksonville resident since 1912,
opened his own office in 1932. He was one of the chief organizers
of the new Jacksonville Chapter, A.I.A., and is also a member of
the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





on the part of both gentlemen with
applause as a vote of confidence from
the membership.
This touching ceremony was to
have taken place outdoors. It was
to have been the climax for a lawn
buffet dinner on one of those beau-
tifully balmy evenings for which Ft.
Lauderdale is famed. Mort and his
charming wife had planned it to the
last pleasant touch. There were chairs
and tables ready on the lawn. The
doors of the Ironmongers' garden
cabana had been opened wide to the
paved terrace. Tables had been ar-
ranged and set with wonderful food
and drink so guests could visit them
easily and often. Trees and shrubs
had been artfully spotlighted to make
the gardened setting even more gla-
morouos than usual. There was even
soft music everywhere.
Everything was perfect. Everything,
that is, but the weather!
Wherever you live you know
what it was like on January 5th!
It was that way in Ft. Lauderdale,
too! But it didn't chill the Iron-
monger's Chapter party in the least.
With virtually every member present,
plus wives and a number of guests,


Mort rigged a tarpaulin as a wind-
break for the buffet, graciously apol-
ogized for the cold weather, steered
everybody toward a bar hastily set
up in the garage and let the party
take its course!
There was no gavel ceremony, no
speeches, no formal kind of applause.


But the Broward County Chapter got
off to one of the best starts of any
year's program. And everybody had
fun- with every indication that the
Ironmongers- host and hostess -
will be one of the most popular
presidential couples that any Chapter
could have.


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FEBRUARY, 1956 1


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Broward County Chapter's new slate of officers face. up cheerfully in
spite of the cold wave that attended their first party-meeting of the
year. They are, left to right, Donald H. Moeller, Vice-President;
Morton T. Ironmongr, President; A. Courtney Stewart, Secretary; and
C. Cranford Sproul, Treasurer.







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Gamble Heads AIA Committee
CLINTON GAMBLE, Ft. Lauderdale,
has been named by AIA President
GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS as Chair-
man of the newly-formed AIA Com-
mittee on Hurricane Resistance.
Membership includes HERBERT C.
MILLKEY, Atlanta, Director of the
South Atlantic Region, AIA; AUSTIN
W. MATHER of Bridgeport, Conn.;
MATTHEW DEL GAUDIO, New York
Regional Director, and JOSEPH W.
WELLS of Norfolk, Va.
Formation of the new committee
marks the first concrete recognition
by AIA headquarters that hurricane
resistance is a problem of vital im-
portance to all areas of the eastern
seaboard. Since 1938 these so-called
"tropical" storms have plowed wide
paths of devastation through north-
eastern states with increasing fre-
quency. In the past two years, par-
ticularly, storms of hurricane velocity
have left such a trail of death and
states, New York and Pennsylvania
that the technical possibility of mini-
mizing their destructive effects has
become a matter of national concern.
Importance of research on this sub-
ject was spotlighted by FAA President
Gamble at last fall's FAA Convention
at Daytona Beach. At that time
Gamble suggested formation of a
hurricane research committee and
pledged full cooperation of technically
informed Florida architects in
development of hurricane resistance
standards that might be utilized by
architects and engineers of northern
states whose communities have been
caught ill-prepared by devastating
storms in two successive years.
AIA President Cummings com-
mented on the suggestion during
his address to the Convention and
promised its serious consideration by
AIA headquarters. Importance of the
subject as viewed by AIA officers is
suggested by the fact that an entirely
new, self-contained committee was
appointed to study it.
Work of organizing the program
of the new committee has already
begun. Chairman Gamble has sche-
duled a meeting with other mem-
bers in New York City the latter
part of February, just prior to the
meeting of the AIA Board of Di-
rectors. WALTER A. TAYLOR, Of the
Institute's Washington staff, has been
named as the Committee's technical
and research advisor.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























Edward G. Grafton


Nineteen Slated as 42nd
Convention Committee

Plans for the FAA's 42nd Annual
Convention have already begun to
take form, according to EDWARD G.
GRAFTON, named by the Florida South
Chapter as General Convention
Chairman. The annual meeting will
be held at Miami Beach this year;
and has been scheduled for Novem-
ber 8, 9 and 10. Site will be the
new Seville Hotel on the oceanside
at 29th Street and famed Collins
Avenue.
Grafton has named eighteen others
to handle various phases of Conven-
tion activities. They are: FRANCIS E.
TELESCA, Assistant Chairman; ROB-
ERT L. WEED, Treasurer; IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A., Program; SAM-
UEL H. KRUSE, Publicity; FRANK
SHUFFLIN, Products Exhibit; ALFRED
B. PARKER, Hospitality; WAYNE F.
SESSIONS, Entertainment; LEONARD
H. GLASSER, Architectural Exhibit;
JAMES L. DEEN, Student Exhibit.
Awards will be in charge of IRVIN
S. KORACH, for the exhibitors, and
EDWIN T. REEDER for architect and
student exhibits. MRS. HERBERT H.
JOHNSON will head a group develop-
ing a Ladies' Program. EDWARD M.
GHEZZI and MAX GRUEN were named
co-chairmen of Arrangements.
Representing the Chapter as hosts
to various Convention visitors will
be T. TRIP RUSSELL, Chapter Presi-
dents; ROBERT M. LITTLE, Honored
Guests; and GEORGE H. FINK, Civic
Officials. Registration will be han-
dled through the office of the FAA's
Exec. Secretary, ROGER W. SHERMAN.
FEBRUARY, 1956


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Promptly at 1:30 on the afternoon
of Saturday, January 21, FAA Presi-
dent CLINTON GAMBLE gaveled to
order the first Board of Directors'
meeting of this year. Around the long
table in the Hotel Roosevelt's.Trop-
ical Room at Jacksonville were 18
men officers and vice-presidents,
10 of the Chapter directors, the As-
sociation's legal counsel and the newly
appointed Executive Secretary. They
had gathered to set a course for FAA
action during 1956, to hear Commit-
tee reports, to appoint new Commit-
tee personnel, to consider whatever
new business might be proposed.
Some three and a half hours later
the stated job had been accomplished.
BEN W. BALAY, agent for the
FAA's Group Disability Insurance
Program reported briefly on its status.
Detailed presentation of the program
has not as yet been made before most
Chapters of the FAA. Thus personal
solicitation has been minor and actual
sales of policies relatively few. But
Balay promised a wide coverage this
year, stressed the relatively low cost
and high advantages of the program
and asked Directors to report favorably
on continuing the program to their
respective chapters.
EDWARD G. GRAFTON reported
briefly on the 42nd Annual Conven-
tion plans (reported elsewhere in this
issue). BENMONT TENCH, JR., spoke
briefly on the program of incorporat-
ing the FAA as a non-profit organi-
zation pursuant to the constitution
and by-laws adopted as revised at the
Daytona Beach Convention.
President Gamble appointed the
following as Committee chairmen-
with committee personnel to be
named at later dates upon advice of,
and consultation with, each chairman:
Education and Registration, SANFORD
W. GOIN, F.A.I.A.; Public Informa-
tion, FREDERICK W. KESSLER; Rela-
tions with the Construction Industry,
JOHN STETSON. Relative to the last,
the Chair ruled that this committee
would combine functions and duties
of two past committees, the Archi-
tect-Engineer and the Joint Coopera-


tive Committee, FAA-AGC. This
decision was made to bring the FAA
committee organization in line with
committee nomenclature and pur-
pose of AIA headquarters.
Other committee chairmen named
were: Building Codes, JOSEPH M.
SHIFALO; Membership, WILLIAM R.
GOMON; Professional Practice, MEL-
LEN C. GREELEY. F.A.I.A.; Budget,
EDWIN T. REEDER; Board of Trustees,
U. of F. Fund, JOHN L. R. GRAND.
As chairman of the Publicationi Com-
mittee, to serve for a three-year term,
the Chairman named H. SAMUEL
KRUSE.
Also named was WILLIAM T. AR-
NETT as Chairman of an FAA Plan-
ning and Zoning Committee to act
as liaison with the Florida Planning
and Zoning Association. WILLIAM
B. HARVARD was designated as Chair-
man of a special FAA committee to
coordinate Chapter activities with the
AIA's Centennial observance program
now in preparation for next year.
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, named by the
Chairman to continue as head of the
important Legislative Committee, in-
dicated it would be necessary for him
to defer a decision on acceptance until
a later date.
President Gamble spoke at length
on the importance of promoting good
public relation procedure in every
chapter in the State. He urged that
an improved, overall public relations
program be made a main objective
of this year's organizational activity.
The Board's next meeting was set
for April 21, at the Tides Hotel, Red-
dington Beach, St. Petersburg, with
the mid-summer meeting scheduled
for July 14 at Palm Beach.
The April date was scheduled to
make possible the Directors' easy at-
tendance at the Florida Business Con-
ference to be held at the same loca-
tion during the two days prior to
the FAA Board meeting. Sanford W.
Goin, F.A.I.A., outlined the scope of
the Business Conference to the Board,
and he was asked to continue his
representation of the FAA in Con-
ference activities.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


F.A.A. Directors Hold


First 1956 Meeting






Profession & Press
(Continued from Page 6)
professional body. The Jacksonville
Chapter has started early and well to
"do gocd and take due credit for it."

"Architect Does the Impossible"
That intangible quality called "hu-
man interest" was the basis for a story
about Onus EASH, Sarasota architect,
that appeared in the Sarasota News
around Christmas time. To carry the
headline, the lead on the story went
like this:
"In the rush to join his wife and
son for Christmas, a Sarasota arch-
itect has done the impossible. He
flew from Newark, N. J., to Chicago,
to Tampa on the wrong day--and
got away with it!"
Orus Eash had planned a business
trip north including Dayton, Ohio,
and New York, to get him back to
Sarasota early Wednesday morning.
Sunday he arrived at the Newark air-
port from Dayton. He checked on his
return flight, heard the agent say,
"okay, we'll see you tomorrow," and
headed for New York for a round of
conferences Monday. He finished his
work early and returned to Newark
airport in time for his flight.
Without a hitch Eash boarded a
plane for Chicago-for he'd prev-
iously been unable to get reservations
direct from Newark to Tampa. But
it wasn't until he'd arrived in Chicago
that he got the feeling something was
wrong. It seemed like Monday night.
But it should have been Tuesday on
Eash's timetable, for he'd wired his
wife from Dayton that he would ar-
rive at Tampa Wednesday morning.
While the girl was checking his
Chicago-Tampa reservation through,
he began to wonder. Was today Tues-
day, as his schedule called for-or
was it Monday? Come to think of it,
he'd spent only one day in New York.
So-what day was it? Eash couldn't
remember and at that stage he
wasn't asking any airline people to
answer his question!
His flight to Tampa was quickly
cleared-though he had heard the
girl comment over the checking tele-
phone that something was "unusual."
In fifteen minutes Eash was in the
air, bound for Tampa and away from
the snowy plains of Illinois. He walked
(Continued on Page 22)
FEBRUARY, 1956


Architect, J. Brooks Haas, A.I.A., Jacksonville
Contractor, E. C. Kenyon, Jacksonville


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Profession & Press
(Continued from Page 21)
into the Tampa airport on the dot of
schedule. But no one was on hand
to meet him as previously arranged.
Finally he called his wife.
"What time did someone leave to
pick me up?" he asked.
"Tomorrow at six," she replied.
Then, with dawning realization.
"Where are you? You aren't due back
till tomorrow!"
"I'm in Tampa," said Eash. There
was a long pause while he checked
the stubs of his airline ticket. His
premonition had been right. His flight
had been scheduled from Newark to
Chicago on December 20; from Chi-
cago to Tampa on December 21.
Finally he spoke again to his wife.
"What's today?"
: The answer came promptly and
definitely:
S "Today is Tuesday, the twentieth.
You're not supposed to be here until
S tomorrow morning at seven!"
S "Oh well," Orus Eash murmured,
! "tell somebody to come and get me.
It's certainly nice to be home for
S Christmas!"


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ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Aufford-Kelley Co., Inc. . 22
Belmar Shades . . .18
Brown & Grist . . 16
Bruce Equipment Company . 24
Decor Shades .. 18
Dunan Brick Yards . 3rd Cover
Electrend Distributing Co. . 22
Florida Power & Light Co. . 17
George C. Griffin .... 16
Hollostone Company .. 6
Holloway Concrete Products 9
Interstate Marble & Tile Co. .19
Jacksonville Metal & Plastics Co. 21
Leap Concrete . . . 8
Maule .... .2nd cover
Miami Window . 12 and 13
Miller Electric Co. of Florida 20
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Co. 24
Southern Venetian Blind Co. 18
F. Graham Williams Co., Inc. 23


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


!
i
i




i

i






INTERAMA...
(Continued from Page 5)
The whole scheme of Interama is
based on the assumption that the life
of one people is interesting--and
quite probably instructive to the
neighbors of that people. Interama
will provide a central place where
neighbor nations in the Western
Hemisphere can get to know one
another--from the grass roots up-
where they can view accomplish-
ments, exchange ideas, do business.
And the range of such activities is
virtually without limit.
Interama will be a setting for all
this a sort of living show window
of constant activity and constantly
varying contents. The setting will re-
quire almost as many and varied
types of structures as there are activ-
ities. Office buildings will be needed.
So will exhibit halls, concert stages,
dance pavillions, picture galleries, res-
taurants, theaters, a marina even
a land of fantasy. A list of possible
building needs could be extended at
length.
The point is that all such buildings
represent opportunity for all archi-
tects in Florida. Land for them will
be leased by the Authority. But
beyond general supervision of their
design by the Board of Design, the
Authority will not develop or con-
struct them. Their owners their
architects' clients will be industrial
and commercial firms or states in
this country; governments, industrial
organizations and business men of
South America. And the total of their
number and value is even now viewed
as more than $150,000,000. It may
conceivably swell far beyond that as
Interama areas now marked "Expan-
sion" are progressively developed.



REGIONAL MEETING NEXT

Mark the three days of April 12,
13 and 14 Thursday through
Saturday on your calendar right
now. Those are dates of the 1956
Conference for the South Atlantic
Region, AIA. The place is Durham,
North Carolina, at the Washington
Duke Hotel. A high-powered Con-
ference Committee has been work-
ing on the program for many
months, and full details of it will
be published next month.


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH A. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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FEBRUARY, 1956









fit's


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Producers' Council Program


The Caravan of Quality Building
Products-one of the country's most
novel travelling shows-played to
audiences in both Jacksonville and
Miami last month. Local chapter
officials rated both shows as "satis-
factory" so far as architects' atten-
dance was concerned. Each drew a
crowd of approximately 300.
In Jacksonville the showing was
held at the Roosevelt Hotel on Jan-
uary 16 and 17. In Miami the loca-
tion was the Bay Front Auditorium;
and the date, January 24. Both shows
were sponsored by local Producers'
Council Chapters who acted as hosts
to architects at opening cocktail
parties.


This is the third successive year
in which Florida architects, engineers
and builders have had the opportunity
of viewing this ingeniously contrived
travelling exhibit. This year 45 manu-
facturers and trade associations col-
laborated in the presentation of 43
exhibits-including a special added
attraction on application of modu-
lar materials to building.
Modular coordination, a joint pro-
ject of the AIA and Producers' Coun-
cil firms, is gaining impetus as one
means of simplifying construction
techniques and producing construc-
tion economies through use of size-
standardizations in increments of 4
inches.


This equipment-demonstration booth at the 1956 Caravan Show is typical
of the type of exhibit included in the unique travelling presentation




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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












UI N


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Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ---
Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company ---..
Strunk Lumber Yard ---.- ..-


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Bartow, Fla
Fort Myers, Fla.
Frostproof, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla.
Haines City, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla.
SKey West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company. Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company ---.-- Marathon, Fla.
Gandy Block & Supply Company -- Melbourne, Fla.
C. J. Jones Lumber Company -- -- -- Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company ----.......----_ .. -Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company -----.. Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply .------- Tallahassee, Fla.
Burnup & Sims, Inc. ....-- West Palm Beach, Fla.


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NOVEMBER 15th, 16th, 17th