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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Prosperity gets a new green...
 1956 construction may beat 1955...
 Educational planning
 News and notes
 Educational planning (continued...
 Prosperity gets a new green light...
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00019
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: January 1956
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00019
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Prosperity gets a new green light
        Page 3
        Page 4
    1956 construction may beat 1955 record
        Page 5
    Educational planning
        Page 6
        Page 7
    News and notes
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Educational planning (continued from page 6)
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Prosperity gets a new green light (continued from page 5)
        Page 15
    Producers' council program
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Page 17
        Page 18
Full Text







































































* 'a ;.








Every Product We Manufacture Is...





Chk an DK6W[Ch


That's why you can always rely on the quality
of Maule concrete, concrete products and
building materials.
To fulfill our pledge of quality products, not
only is our ready-mix concrete and every
concrete product we manufacture turned
inside out and put through every known
test in our own testing laboratory, but they
are double checked constantly by these three
independent laboratories: H. C. Nutting
Company, Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory
and Wingerter Testing Laboratories, Inc.
This continual process of checking and
double checking enables us to provide you
with uniform high quahty concrete and
concrete products.
So, whether you are adding a room, building
one or a dozen homes, a skyscraper or a
barn, call us, won't you? We'll appreciate
the privilege of serving you!





I N D U STIE, INC.

MIAMI
PHONE: 9-6631
51l2 INseyD Blvd.

FORT LAUDERDALE
PHONE: LOgan 4-1211
1135 Northeast 26th St

SOUTH DADE
SPHONE Homestead 1432,1459
-3 ^Seoth Allalptakt Road & Moody Drive





OFFICIAL JbURNAL OF THE FLORIDA -AS CIATION OFH ARCHITECTSOF THE AMIRICN INSTIiUT OFe IRCHI -C:

.. I CS-- OLU RME M .._AMI' AN( ,A R, c .i -










F.A.A. OFFICERS 1956 VOLUME 6 JANUARY, 1956 AuMl It v


PResient -


1407 C Ln.
Ola.- Blvd.
Fort Lauderdah


Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lak Worth


M. T. Jromongmer
1261 L Las
Olas Blvd.
Foret auderdale


ICE-PRESIDENTS.
Fraildin S. rundh . N*oth Fr i
Jh Ston. . South i
WIUuIm B. Harvard Central Florida
*'** s/ .


,ale Beach .....Frederick W. KeA or
leorge J. Votaw
Florida Central Ernest T. H. Bowen, II
Broward County William F. Bigoney,.Jr.
A. Courtney Stewart
Daytona Beach .. William R. Goon
Florida North...... Thomas Larrick
Florida No. Central. Albert P. Woodard


EXECUTIVE SECREtARY
Rowgr W. Shnemu
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43
Phone: MOhawk 7-0421

JANUARY, 1956


-0 F 1 l I C R' I D,.
Prosperity Gets A New Green Light .
By Brown L.-WhatIey

1956 Construction May Beat 1955 Record iSr

.News & Notes A-
-

State Board to HMd. o Sessions

Educational Plani ~i l4st Convention ,

Pre-Planning ..-.__
Dr. James T4i (epbeul

Economical Plami:l
James E. Garin ..
'' ^.** ..-, .. ; '" . *^ .
Planning at Th iCointmi I \
Chester L. ~-t. .

Planning for A i. ,,,,:_ .
SoWflord W. .AJ.A.o
Ad vetiser. Index .; i

BraAM*ounci egram



Bro L Whao., P seidr. t-
pony qyub- me tb. I* '^
I .iyo .... of th "ie

A. cithn at their Toa' .... ",
is by Fabian Bachrach.4 .
Asoulatfe *1 th. .e,, -,an.,ddt .bat ,a_


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE Edwin T. Re
Gamble, lopr B. Polevitzky. Editor-e-
The FLORIDA- M ClICT is tbi Offletal ujral
' ichitioT, a stat.w vnon.fT. s oe -the
Committee 82nd Cout, M flor
. n and editoriL cI buti B w


and services adaptable for use in Florida are waelar
illustrations of such materials and products, in
columns does not constitute endorsement by the
Florida Association of Architects Address all
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


- c.-.I.


or av er a
mnittoo or. Thu.'
to the Editdrg,
*-


dIorda South


DIW9CTOiS
....U Edward G.i .
James I.a Gr~atut


* ^.^.aass


..~ : i.2




* .. *' *- . .
'. *


Precast concrete slabs being hoisted
to top deck for tiered standing platform,


tbwCetio^ Int c(MWteteI



The Miami Seaquarium is another dramatic example *.
the versatility of concrete... The entire structure i
built on a concte foundation ... walls of the Mait
building are concrete block ... b ef the-floor tank is concrete s
thick . a concrete deck surround& the 50' reef tank. Roof sla
are concrete, with concrete slab terrace under the patio... fler-
of the 64' sea lion tank is monolithic concrete, and concrete beasi
support the roof of the main building. The 750' viewing channel
concrete circles the concrete tank where huge Tiger and Hamme,
head sharks, Loggerhead turtles and schools of spotted whip rays
will be on view... Here is concrete for strength, for maintenance
economy, and for architectural beauty.
-'-3


Architects: Steward and Skinner. Associate
architects: John E. Petersen and Frank H. Shuflin


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY T
FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA sSIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALUd
2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITEG




j


Prosperity Gets A NewGreen



By BROWN L WHATLEY. A banker examines the economic engine that dr
President, Stockton, Whatley, Davin struction industry -- and finds controls working
& Company of fuel at hand and all the power needed to




Home building's number one econ- of the nation's economy. of the same period
omist, MILES L. COLEAN, recently Effects of the home building in- 5-Savings and
named the business of. building dustry reach into every nook and put $9.9 billions
homes as the prize demonstration of cranny of our modem-day economy. ing the first 10 mo
the dynamic quality of today's econ- Irrespective of any man's vocation or increase over 1954
omy in this country-and that of place in the community, his well Never in our hi
tomorrow as well. being is directly and indirectly in- try had a more pro
Those of us who have been through fluenced to a larger degree by the The problein lat
the ups and downs of the home build- great home building. industry as we the reverse of that
ing industry during recent years and know it today than by any other the worry was whe
who have studied the reasonL for major sector of our economy. Under -business could be
these iups and downs should be able, these circumstances the importance of has been ,whether
perhaps, to appreciate more than most holding it:in balance, of keeping it' hlk- iii reasonable
other people that we in this country going at a steady normal pace is en- For the past ei
today are living under a managed firely understandable. total investment
economy. Let's take a look at some recent ers'investments in
Our monetary system itself with instrument readings on our great, com- goods, has been
all of its ramifications constitutes a plex economic machinery. Let's see The result-has bee
delicate and involved mechanism just what has been happening and of baik credit, t
equipped with an impressive array of what dangers have confronted us. feet of which has
intricate signals, gauges, valves, ac- Here, generally, was the situation as the price structure.
celerators and brakes- resembling, if 1955 was drawing to an end:
you please, the instrument panel and I-Private construction of all types A examples, t
controls to be found on the flight was at an all-time high. The year's modity price mde
deck of a modem airliner. total will probably run $30 billionss; .rom Noember I
1955. Wholesale b
The monetary managers-the pilots or 16 percent over 1954. 15 oe
of our economy-like the pilot of a 2-The number of private new 5.2 percent in the
transport plane have our very eco- dwelling units started will total ap- construction, costs
nomic lives in their hands. Whether proximately 1,300,000, or almost gone up about 32
we like it or not, we must leave it 100,000 more than during 1954 time.
to them in their wisdom to make vital and only'around 50,000 short of 1950, The increase in
decisions for our safety, welfare' and the country's peak building year. But being used to supj
comfort. i single-family house construction in mortgage areas car
By turning a valve here, applying 1955 is expected to far exceed any these points: The
the brakes there, accelerating power previous year in our history. standing commercial
or lowering flaps depending on 3-Recordings on mortgages of ing" loans to ibsur
what in their judgment is needed $20,000 or less (our only standard companies and oth
to make the big economic ship be- measure) were running 29 percent lions more in Augu
have and carry its passengers safely above 1954 during the first 10 months August of 195+-
and comfortably to their desired des- of last year. And recordings for the to November last
tination-they control our destiny, month of August hit an all-time high another $207 milli
We have all. come to realize that, for any month. gust the .amount
because of its tremendous impact 4-Life insurance company invest- vances by Home L-
upon the economy of the nation, ments, of all types were running 11 ber saving and .loa
home building activity and volume percent ahead of 1954 through the nearly $530 milli
is vital not alone to the industry first 10 months of the year; and their year ago. The -tot
itself, but to the entire national econ-. $4.8 billion volume of nonLfarm mort- use. of short-term
omy. It therefore must be kept in gage acquisitions for the first 10 time, therefore, ar
delicate balance with the whole fabric months of 1955 was 26 percent ahead (Continued
JANUARY, 1956

:fc'< ..... .. ... .........' ..;... : ..... .:... ......, .'- .- ,,*:, i.AJ-, .. _


I _


Ligh



ives our con-
Swell, p
do its job. .:




in 1954. ::
loan associations -
nto mortgages dui-
nths-a 35cpercent"

dtory has the copni---
sperous. year.. .
e in 1955:wvas ju't. ::
in 1954. Formerly
there. a recession in'-l
reversed. Lately it..'.
, a-boom can% be, .
e- heck.
lit to fen months, ::
including consum-
houses and durable .
exceeding savings.
n an increased use-'
he inflationary ef;-
become evident iin

ie wholesale com-,,'
Srose 1.1 percent-..
954 to Noveriim r" .'
building prices rose -.
same period; and ,-'
appear to havoc' !'
percent in a year'sr -:-

short-term credit
elementt savings in.,: A
i ,be measured hy
Amount of out-
l bank "warehous-' I
ance and mortgage. .
lers was $805 mit-.-'. '
st of .195'. than .-:"
and from Atiug ""
year itS increased c
ons. Alsd, last Au-'
of outstanding ad- ';'
)an Banks to mem-
n institutions was
ons more. than "
al increase in the-
credjf.in a year's :
nonited to about -
ot Pa6ge 4)

t. *-'-*-.^.*A jl''iai f






Prosperity's Green Light
(Continued from Page 3)
$1.3 billions. And, commercial banks
were reported to have outstanding
tu ore than $1.2 billions additional
_:"warehousing" committments.
.As we all know, you can -slow an
engine by reducing its fuel supply.
Likewise, the method for toning down
a boom that's being fed by easy credit
.:is to reduce the supply of money-
or, as we sometimes say, "make money
;.,tight." Here's what happened along
these lines during the past twelve
months:
I-On December 7, 1954, the Fed-
eral Reserve formally approved a shift
Sin open-market policy from "active
ease to ease."
2-On January' 4, 1955, the Fed.
eral Reserve increased stock market
margin requirements from 50 to 60
percent.
3--On February 1, the 'reasury
came out with a $1.9 billion refund-
ing, isue at 3 percent interest for, 40
years.
4--On April 14, the Federal Re-
serve Banks begarn to raise discount
rates from 1 2 to 1 percent.
S 5-On April 25, stock market mar-
g gin requirements were further, raised
to 70 percent.
6-On April 28, FHA and VA
prohibited the inclusion of closing
costs in insured and guaranteed mort-
gages.
7-On July 11, the Treasury of-
fered over $800 million more of its
.3 percent, 40-year obligations.
S 8-Ont August 1, FHA and VA
raised down payment requirements by
2 percentage paints and reduced max-
:. -imnum maturities to 25 years.
,I 9-On August 4, the Federal Re-
serve Banks began raising discount
-rates from 14 to 2 percent (except
Cleveland, which went to 2/4 -per-
cent).
I 0-In early August the Federal
Reserve cautioned banks on the ex-
* tension of consumer credit. Some-
what later, the President of the New
York Federal Reserve Bank strongly
discouraged additional mortgage ware-
housing. -
11-In late August the 2V4 dis-
count rate began to spread through-
out the Federal Reserve System. Dur-
ing the second half of November the
S rates for all of the banks increased
to 2V2 percent.
: 4.
L _ ... .' .


Income of Individuals . .
Total Population . . .
Per capital Income Increase .
Electric Power Production .
Life Insurance in Force . .
Bank Deposits . . .
Total Bank Assets . .
Telephones . .. ..
Federal Income Tax Collections


When a climbing airliner reaches
an altitude determined as best from
the standpoints of traffic, weather
and safety, the pilot levels it and
suddeAly reduces the throttle to
feather the propellors. Until the pas-
sengers realize what's happening, they
may have a moment of, uneasiness,
even discomfort, So it is when pres-
sures which cause credit to expand
in our monetary system are suddenly
withdrawn.
But the objectives of these actions,.
as it is,generally explained, is to
bring economic expansion into closer
relationship with the accumulation of
savings, and thus to eliminate or re-
duce the inflationary pressure which
is always brought about by an ex-
pansion of the economy which is
based on bank credit alone.
Let's analyze that explanation a
bit. Let's see why mortgage credit
beyond a certain point in relation to-
the savings of a people becomes an
inflationary influence.
Our system permits an individual
to live off the future, so to speak,
by borrowing from the pooled savings
of the community and by pledging a
portion of his future earnings to re-
pay the debt. The total borrowing
of this sort must obviously stay within
proper relationship to the total sav-
ings of the community.
Our great 'insurance: companies,
savings banks, and savings and loan.
institutions are our reservoirs of thrift
capital. The accumulated savings or
capital is employed as advantageously
as possible by these trustees who
hold it. A large portion of this money
has traditionally gone into mortgage
loans. Funds from these institutions
-available for mortgage loans--are
,accumulated from the following
sources:


.*** '*i
.? ,; -I


Percent increase, 1940-54
U.S.A. Florida
263 .441
22 86
197 214
233 . .. 566
189 .. 439
175 532
170 517
140 . 300
849 . 1,160


-1-Growth in assets and savings
deposits .of these thrift institutions.
2-Repayment by borrowers of ex-
isting outstanding mortgages.
3-Liquidation of other invest-
ments and funds which are switched
from such investments to mortgages.
When the volume of mortgages
being made overtaxes these sources
of money, two things are happening:
First, home purchasers are buying
more homes than the earniins and
the pooled savings of the community
will pay for. (Tlis assumes of course
that some portion of the accumulated
"thrift capital" will be required for
purposes other than home loans.)
Second, front-line> iiortgage lenders,
including mortgage bankers, savings
and loan institutions and life insur-
ance companies, are using short term
bank credit in order to continue to
make mortgages.
Because of the necessary depen-'.^
dency, during recent months, of the:'.
mortgage system on short term credit"'
loans, it has become more and more
sensitive to the changes in monetary
policy. Thus the wave of 1 and 2-
year "warehousing" deals in the fall
and winter of 1954 came about. When.
credit curtailment began to take ef- -
fect, mortgage lenders immediately
began a policy of selectivity which".
gradually increased as the supply of -
funds decreased.
Here are some manifestations of
credit restraint which occurred last.
year: *
1-The peak of liberal lending on'
VA guarantees (no-no downs and 30-b
year maturities) was reached in Marchs
and April. Since then the volume o
this type of loan has been gradual
receding. .
2-Interest rates on convention
mortgage loans stiffened. .
THE FLORIDA ARCHIT


These recently compiled figures show percentages of growth in nine
important economic categories during the past 15 years. They show
how Florida has spurted far in front of the rest of the country.





3-Discounts on FHA and' VA
loans increased, last spring. Discounts
of 2 to 6 points on VA's are now,
common in the most active building
areas of the country, as Florida, Texas
and California. Even higher figures
are being paid where the liquidity
pinch is more severe.
4-Bank loans, even for temporary
accommodation and construction pur-
poses, became more difficult to ob-
tain with the increasing shortage of.
free reserves.
5-FNMA's secondary market op-
erations, which are just beginning to
be well-known, steadily increased on
a monthly basis, from $2.5 million
in purchases in May, to $12.6 mil-
lion in October.
6-Home Loan Banks were forced
to borrow at the highest interest rate
in recent history so members could
meet outstanding commitments. In
turn, they. upped rates on advances
made to members.
7-The seasonally-adjusted qfgual
rate of new housing starts dropped
from well over 1.3 million in each of
the first six months of last year to
1.2 million in November.
8-Number of requests for VA
appraisals was lowest in November-
at 30,397 proposed tinits-for any
month last year, having receded from
the March peak of 71,939. FHA ac-
tivity has also receded.
What is the outlook ahead?
Those of us who have been around
in. Florida long enough to have some
unpleasant old memories of boom
and bust, I think are inclined to have
a lot of patience with efforts to keep
our economy in balance. There are
those of us who believe we. will be
Lucky indeed-after 15 years or more.
of mighty prosperous conditions, with
only minor ups'and dowiMs-if the
managers of our economy, our mone-
tary pilots, .if you please, can in fact
keep things under control at a com-
fortable speed without crashing.
How much better is this than to
continue on recklessly-without con-
sideration of the economic facts of
life-to a violent crack-up that will
-bring anguished suffering to our peo-
ple and to our industry for years to
come.
I have every confidence that the
Administration in Washington and
Sthe economic managers would be the
last to want to see anything but fa-
vorable results come from the manip-
.'ulation of the economic controls
JANUARY, 1956


which are iif theirliands. At any
rate, they are trying; and I believe
they will be successful.
It is up to us to do our best to un-
derstand their motives and actions
before we criticize them.
There are those who say, "That is
all very true of the United States as
a whole, but the applications cannot
be made to Florida. Here in we should
be permitted to go full speed ahead.
We have a steady growth of new in-
dustry and new citizens. We are grow-
ing at a tremendous rate. We need
the new homes."
And, I readily agree to these con-
clusions.
In Florida we often have reason
to take a somewhat different view-
point of economic indices than other
states which more closely conform
to average conditions for the nation
as a whole.
For example, in 1955, according to
United States Census figures, Florida
had two percent of the total civilian
population of the country. Yet Flor-
ida's growth from 1950 to 1955 alone
accounted for five percent of the total
United States population increase.
Furthermore, since 1940, Florida's
rate of growth has been three times
that of the nation as a whole. The


Construction during this year of
1956 may reach a record-breaking
total of $44 billions, topping by 5
percent the indicated peak of 1955,
according to estimates prepared joint-
ly by the U.S. Commerce and Labor
Departments. Substantial gains are
anticipated in private non-residental
. and public construction.
Estimates for 1956 are based on
the assumption of a moderate increase
in overall economic activity-with in-
vestment funds adequate to under-
write both private and public con-
struction. Construction costs are ex-
pected to continue their moderate
upward trend. But few material short-
ages are looked for in view of cur-
rently rising productivity.
New, non-residential building is ex-
.pected to rise to a whopping $8.7
billion this year with industrial
building showing the largest gain.
Probable expenditures of $2V4 billion

,1' - '***'---EZ 13 1 ;* *I __ Z l


same holds for the period from 190 ,'
to date. .
If that holds true for the next ten
years-and there seems to be every -.
reason to believe that it will-we may ~
expect a growth for the Sunshihe _.
State of more than 50 percent in their
next ten years. Such an increase will
be roughly equivalent to the addition,
of another Jacksonville, another me-
tropolitan area the same size as tlit 'i
of Tampa and St. Petersburg ad-' -
three new MiamisI -
Florida is today a great and oi..t
standing success among the states':,C
of our nation. She has come a lo- ".
way in a comparatively few years, apd-.,9
her growth has only just begun. Th&
"Magic Peninsula" is still "piole~~'
territory and Florida is likely to cof -
tinue to improve her relative posi-
tion in comparison with that of.ot. .
states and of the nation as a whol
Even though, however, these fli
be true, it should be our burning
sire to sympathize with the effort.
keep things in balance nationally .
to avoid a rate of production in a
given area which will exceed the
mand for homes. 'Otherwise
market will be.damaged-not onliM
the area where the excess occurs,bu
(Continued on Page 15) -'


for stores and-other service es
ments will be 17 percent above
1955 total and 80-percent above-
total for 1954. This yeafs prospi .
for religious buildings is a cost
tion volume of $850 millions. .'
The value of private, non-falt:
residential construction during the
year will be near the 1955-level.of'
over $16 billion. Dollar outlays will-
not drop as much as housing starts; '
and expenditures for new housing. wll.
reflect a continuing trend tow rd.
larger homes of better quality.. "
The outlook (or ~ost types. of
lic construction in' 95,is'friar ,a
of about lI0pierce$t. 6 ovr. 193'5 '
with gains in al major ca ors ,
Percentage changes from," .9555 bj
some -other- conseft atn'i~ n
are estiniafed aifoll 'liA.
up 17 percent; 'Riigioirs, up-- p(rs -..
cent; Educational, up 5.percent; Social.
and recreational, ap 12 percent.


* "I r i "" ', '"* i


1956 CONSTRUCTION VOLUME MAY BREAK 1955 RECORD


ji h.9


li~Cl~ni~CL~~e~-~~










c


$.te~ N1


~~j.~ -- .


One of the highlights of the 41st Annual F. A. A. Conven-
tion at Daytona Beach was the Seminar at which a panel of
experts discussed the approach to modern school planning.


S 'LEAP Pre-Stressed concrete tee joists in
S this Mayflower warehouse give long, clear
S spans with no truss supports or posts to
taJke up valuable space.

It's LEAP
I le-Stressed
Concrete Roof
SSlabs & Tee Joists!
The "new look" in building these days fea-
tures LEAP pre-stressed concrete tee joists
ad LEAP Double Tee roof sldbs for maxi-
mum strength, quickeconomical construction
and post-free spans up to 60 feet to afford
full use of valuable floor space from wall
to wall
EAP pre-stressed concrete products maybe
used exposed for a modern architectural
-.ffect-and at great savings in construction
SestsZ"A4ipcal crew can erect and place
S1000'.square feet of roof slabs per dayl
S Strength of concrete in all LEAP pre-stressed
< products is extremely high. Compressive
strength is a minimum of 5,000 psi; running
Sas high as 6,000 psi on some. designs-
Sabout twice the strength of average con-
crete' used in building constfuction today
' itAPj pro-stressed concrete prdukisa are
Sywidely used in schools, commercial and in-
dustrial buildings where a low cost, perma-
nent,' modern roof of .high strength over.
I dngMpans is desired . mail the coupon
S below for full details at no obligation-let
this be your "LEAP" year for low cost,
highest, quality building (LEAP, franchised
casting yards are located in principal cities.)
'FRANCHISES AVAILABLE IN SOME
'. LOCALITIES-WRITE FOR DETAILS,
----.--------------------------------
i LEAP CONCRETE
P.O. Box 945 Dept. A-4
SLakeland, Florida
Please send me details about
L' LEAP Pre-Stressed concrete.
i NAMF
FIRM
CITY___________
STATF
S.. -----------------------------
WSJ ., ** *' f *. *"P' .' *** .****. **,


The edtcatipnal planning seminar
of the 41st F.A.A. Convention at Day-
tona Beach was one of the best-at-
tended meetings of the entire Con-
vention. Gathered Friday afternoon to
hear a panel of five speakers, moder-
ated by HERBERT C. MILLKEY, A.I.A.
Regional Director, were most of the
Convention delegates and guests, in-
cluding some twenty county school
superintendents.
In opening the meeting, Regional
Director Millkey commented on a'
survey of architectural activity recently
. made by the A.I.A. In addition to
Showing volume of work at an all-
time high, the survey indicated school
building to be a number-one concern
in every A.I.A. region but one.
."IIr the region where school build-
ing was not first," said Millkey, "it
was second in volume. And it has
brought tremendous problems with it,
especially in our own South Atlantic
region.
."ne is the time element. -Because
of the great need for schools, we must
crowd a great amount of work into
the shortest possible time. Another is
the economic factor. Particularly in
the South, we must do schools for a
very low cost per square foot."
SThe moderator emphasized the.im-
portance f mutual understanding be-
tweeai architects and .their clients---
,the educators and school boards. He
stressed the need for elear recognition
of mutual responsibilities and duties
and the necessity also for cooperative
teamwork between every factor con-
cerned with stool planning and con-
struction.
"The intent of: this meeting,'" he
said, 'is to discuss er mutual respon-,
sibilities-' with the optimistic' view-
point that conditions in this State
will, perhaps, be bWter because of it."
Members of. the pande included:
DR. JAMIES T. CAMPBEELL, State De-
partment of Education; JkMEs E. Gxi-
LAND, Dade County School Aichitect;
CHESTER L. CRAFT, JR., Polk County
School Architect; IGOR B. POLEVITZ-


KY, F.A.I.A.; SAIFQRD W. GoIN, F.A.
I.A., and FRANKLIN S. BUNCH. Each
spoke briefly, and the meeting was
then opened to questions and a gen-
eral discussion of the panel topic.
Following are talks of panelists.


PRE-PLANNING
--Dr. James T. Campbell
The planning of school buildings
is but the definition of the kind of
educational program a state and a
community wish for their people. I
use the word "people," rather than.
"children," because, as our educa-
tional program develops, we're think-
ing of it'as serving not only children,
but of its extension into adulthood.
also. .
The kind of educational program
a state or,com*i ilnty wants for its
people is shapd :y.' ts values-val-
-es it holds andi. has .developed. That
program is established in its customs
and traditions and practices; and also
in its constitutional and statutory laws.
'As to an educational program's
-effect on a building program, let's
first consider what we professional
educators call "the scope of the edu-
cational program." We say that the .
educational program has both vertical-'
and horizontal scope.
The term "vertical scope" refers-.1
to the span of years over which edu-.
cational opportunities are normally."
to be provided for people-primarily,
of course, children. The vertical scope
of education has been constantly in-
Screasing-oyer the )ears. Not many.
years ago it.started with the f .i
Grade and extended through the sixt.
grade. Then, for the greatest num,.
of people it was extended thro
the eighth grade, then through t
senior high school.
'Now we are extending it, in '
Stinking, through Junior College..
the same time we are enlarging
scope:. of the educational prog -
downward to include kinderga
'and even the nursery school. A d4
.THE FLORIDA ARCHl
!`iiA 45W.


Educonai PlannJing


i


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#0





the opposite direction, up into adu b1r
education. *


As the scope of an educational pro-
gram is enlarged vertically, it affects
a building program. That is so not
only because of the increased number
of people who are to be taught, but
also because of the kind of things
that are to be taught. Obviously, a-
kindergarten will teach a thing differ-
ently than will a Junior College. But
both must be defined within the
scope of the educational. program.
There is also the horizontal scope
of education to consider. By that we
mean the number of persons in any
age group for which educational op-
portunities are to be provided-and
also the things they are to be taught.
As of now, we have pretty much
,accepted the idea that we're going
to educate all of the children of all
of the people. That's a relatively new
thing. Ten years ago in Florida we
had not accepted the idea, in all
cases, that we were going to educate
all negro children, for example. We
have accepted that idea now. At one
time, too, our society contemplated
educating only children of the "bet-
-ter-off" people-the wealthier classes.
Working classes were not to'be edu-
cated. Today, however, the scope of
education covers everybody.
This horizontal scope also includes
what we are going to teach at any
particular level. That will certainly
affect our educational program. Take
the high school, for example. If we're
going to teach more than a classical,
traditional program, we're then ob-
ligated to provide teaching facilities
such as laboratories for science or
home economics, gymnasiums, music
facilities and the like. It's easy to
see that the length and breadth of
the educational, program affects, not
Only the need for buildings, but also
the kind of buildings we are going to
build.
It's obvious, too, that the kind of
buildings we build-and the number
of them-will be directly affected by
the methods we use in teaching. A
program based on the activities of
children, will be taught differently-
and thus require different space and
facilities-than one based entirely on
subject matter that is drilled into
children.
I think the significant fact to re-
member in addition to these obvious
-things, is the fact that our educa-
'tional program has changed over the
JANUARY, 1956


Dr. James T. Campbell, of .the.
Florida State Department of Edu-
cation, presented the professional
educator's side of the education
planning problem at a mid-after-
noon seminar moderated by
A.I.A. Director Herbert C. Milkey.
years. Many people think we've not
changed, that we're still using out-
moded methods. The' fact is we've.
changed greatly. Compare the schools
of 1925 with those of 1955 and you
can see the difference.
In view of the differences, there's
no reason for thinking that change
will not continue. So, when we plan
school buildings we must. take that
into account. We must contemplate
that change will be constant, that
the educational program will continue
.to develop. And we must design our
school buildings in so: far. as. possible
to take care of those changing develop-
ments. Frankly, that is- one of the
biggest problems: any of us face.

ECONOMICAL PLANNING
James E. Garland
It's probably trite, but still true, that
no one else can know the intricacies
of a person's life as well as the person
himself. A logical development of
that statement would be the recog-
nized principle that no one can wrap
a building around that person's life
without an explanation of the speci-
fic requirements which must be met
in that person's home..
No great mental jump is needed to
apply both statement and. principle
to schools. The educator is the per-
son; and the school is, in a manner of4
speaking, his house. I'm married to
the idea that the educator must de-;
velop the educational specifications...
(Continued on Page 10) .


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News & No"tes.--


SARASOTA-BRADENTONh
JOHN M. CROWELL, Secretary of
the Florida Central Chapter, has an-
nounced that at a recent meeting of
the Sarasota-Bradenton Association of
Architects, the following were elected
as officers for the coming year: Presi-
dent, EDWARD GREMLI, Ii, Sarasota;
Secretary, EDWARD DEAN WYKE, JR.,
Bradenton; and Treasurer, WILLIAM
J. RUPP, Sarasota.
The Association will act as hosts
to the first regular quarterly meeting
of the Florida Central Chapter to be
held January 14, at the Sarasota Bay
Country Club in Sarasota. Present
plans for the meeting include in ad-
dress by DR. ELLWOOD C. NANCE,
President of Tampa University.

BROWARD COUNTY
Some 40 members of, the Broward
County Chapter met at luncheon in
the Seahorse Restaurant, Ft. Lauder-
dale to hear President ROBERT GC.
JAHELKA and CLINTON 'GMBLE re-
port on happenings at the 41lst F.AA.
Convention at Daytona Beach and to
elect Chapter officers for the coming
year. Results of the election were:
President, MORTON T. IRONMTONGER,.
Ft. Lauderdale, wo: lhas served the
Chapter as secretary for the last five
years and was recently appointed to.
the State Board of Architecture for
which he has established a new Sec-
retary's office' in Ft. Lauderdale; Vice-
President, DONALD H. MOELLER, Hol-
lywood; Secretary, COURTNEY STEW-
ART, Ft. Lauderdale; arid Treasurer,
C. CRANFORD SPROUL, Pompano
Beach.
Chapter Directors chosen are:
WILLIAM G. CRAWFORD, Ft. Lauder-
dale; and ROBERT E. TODD, Pompano
Beach.
The membership okayed plans for
continuing the Chapter's cooperative


,advertising in the Ft. Lauderdale
Builders Exchange publication. It also
heard President Jahelka report on
Chapter efforts to gain the Broward
County School Board's approval for
full architectural service on all school
building projects plus a decision
against re-use of school plans by the
Board without payment of adequate
architectural service fees. Objectives,
said the Chapter president,- have not
yet been reached. Bit he reported
progress toward that elnd as being rea-
soziably satisfactory in view of condi-
tions now current in the county.

DAYTONA #EACH
Having covered themselves with
Convention glory, --members of the:
Daytona Beabh Chapter met last
month to elect'officers for the com-
ing year. Results were: President JOEL
.W. SAYERS, JR.; Vice-President, CRAIG
J. CERLERT; Secretary, WILLIAM P.
GREENING; and Treasurer, FRANIS
W. CRArc.'The Chapter also named
WitLrAM "k. GOMON *as an 'F.A..
Director and FRANCIS R. WALTON
as Alternate Director.
Final tabulation of the 1955 Con-
vention for which Chapter members
were both hosts arid operating ex-
ecutives, shows it to be one of the
most successful on record. It was a
financial as well as a social success;
and the roster of exhibitors and the,
size of their displays was the largest
of any F.A.A. convention.

F.A.A. BOARD MEETS JAN. 21
The first 1956 meeting of the new
F.A.A: Board of, Directors will be.
held at the Roosevelt Hotel in Jack-.
sonville on Saturday, January 21, 1956.
The meeting will start with luncheon
at 12:30.
On Friday evening, January 20, .)


OBJ ECT IV ES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
Sencourage continual improvement within the profession, to-cooperate with
the other professions! to promote and participate in the matters of general :
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the-.:.i
State. and to promote educational and public relations programs for the..
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIA ARCHITE


. I





the new Jacksonville, A.I.A. Chapter
will be presented with its new char-
ter by an official of the Institute at
a dinner dance to be held at the
Florida Yacht Club, Jacksonville. The
affair will begin with a reception at
6:30 p.m. Members of the new chap-
ter have,extended an invitation to
all FAA. Directors to be present.
The Jacksonville group is .the first
of the two new Florida Chapters (the
other is the Mid-Florida Chapter with
headquarters in Orlando) to have
been granted a charter. It was for-
merly a part of the Florida North
Chapter and brings to three the num-
ber of A.I.A. chapters in the North
Florida District of the FAA. Names
of officers and an outline of the new
Chapter's program for this year will
be reported in these columns next
month.


STATE BOARD TO HOLD ,
TWO EXAMINATION SESSIONS

With more than 140 applicants
already slated to take mid-winter ex-
aminations for architectural registra-
tion, the State Board of Architecture
has perfected plans for holding the
examinations in both Jacksonville and
Miami. Decision to divide examina-
tion headquarters for the first time
this year was the result of the record-
breaking number of applicants which
made it impractical to conduct ex-
aminations at one location within
the time required by the regulations
of The State Board.
Sessions in both Jacksonville and
Miami will be held simultaneously,
beginning on Monday, January 9, and
continuing through Thursday, Jan-
uary 12. In Jacksonville, examinations
will be conducted at the Roosevelt
Hotel, 33 West Adams Street. In
Miami, examination headquarters will
be the Alcazar Hotel, 500 Biscayne
Boulevard. All sessions at each locality
will be supervised by a State Board
monitor.
Some 70 applicants are scheduled
for the four-day session in Jackson-
ville, with approximately 75 listed for
an identical program in Miami. Papers
from both examination headquarters
will be graded by State Board mem-
bers or their official assistants at the
office of the Board's Secretary at 1261
East Las Olas Boulevard, Ft. Lauder-
dale.
JANUARY, 1956

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:.' duclibnal: a ng :. dririking0 fountain. Therefore, you
(Continued f Pag 7) get two fixtures per 30 children in-
Continued from Page ) stead of one toilet for 30 girls and one
Of coree. f.educators don't do toilet for 70 boys and One urinal for
so, the arty itect cpan do a good Job every 30 boys and one wash basin for
on a typical schoolapla for there's every 50 children-with a minimum
considerable research and book-learn- of two of each in every toilet room.
ing on the subject, But if the educa- So you can see the advantage right
tor can explain what's needed, what there in pure economy.
will be going on in classrooms; and But the biggest economy is in the
if he can develop the details of this use of this arrangement. Out of a
explanation so that it gets across to teacher's six-hour work day' about
the architect-then by all means the 45 minutes is pent in tip-toe recess.
result will be a finer plan. Relate this to a salary schedule, and
Most architects are trained in plan- it's easy to see that-without this
ning, but not necessarily in school little classroom toilet--over a year's
planning. "Planning 'is a much broad- time you'll spend' about $800 per
er term tha "Schpoo planning." So class just to get Johnnie to the john
an explanation is needed to pin down Thats one of, the big economies.
the actual specifications for educa- Another is ,the fact that the health
tion about which school planning department has agreed that a child
must' be developed. That t~nia "edu- is .more likely to wash his or her
catibnal specifioatio"' -is abig one. hands at a wash basin in the class-
But actually is lioils down to the room than at one in the toilet room.
simple: terms of "What's wanted," Another is that all children can wash
"What's neededf'-and "Why." their hands before going to the lunch-
Most particularly the educator room. And they can get a drink
should state "Why!' He can then easily without having to go down the "
draw from architects the best of their hall to a separate fountain.
talents. For architects excel at work- We've found other things to do. '.
ing out more economical and efficient One is combining cafeteria and audi-
ways of accomplishing tasks if they torium in a cafetobtitm. The com-,
first know "Why." Once the' objec- bination unit, does t-hej 'job of de-
tive, the goal, is clearly explained, veloping tour children's ability to
they can come up with some pretty stand up in front of people and not
ingenious, efficient and economical get stage fright. And it does that for
ways of reaching it. only about $15,000 over the cost of-
That's being proved constantly, not a cafeteria -alone-as compared withJ
through work of any one' school the approximately $80000. needed
board or any individual architect, but td do the same job with an audi-
through a general development. We torium of the same size. We're- then
have come on some really good over- able to put the saved moiey back
all economies. Economy in school into additional' classrooms.
building doesn't necessarily mean a Other examples could be cited..
cheaper price. As a matter of fact But they would all re-state the two
it's often the opposite. But it always important points I want to make:
means better utilization. After all, Eitrt, that economy does not necessari-
the cheapest course would be not to ly mean cheaper price; and second,'
build the building at alll As you that the greatest economy of allli 's
progress from that, the thing that in the careful design of equipment tt
really matter is the question of how provide a maximum'of useful sen ice.
good the .~i hiding is ultimately going
to become. THE EDUCATIONAL PLAN
Here's a concrete example of what AT A COUNTY LEVEL
I mean. The greatest single economy Chiter L. Craft, Jr.
we've developed in school Building By that term "educational plan,"'
-in a decade has been to put a little -I mean the specifications for an ed
: toilet room right in the classroom national program for which the archj
itself. The little classroom toilet is tect must provide a building.
Exactly the size of a stall in a big school project can be successful ..
toilet room. But we put the sink less there is smooth coordi
'itn the classroom instead of in the between the job of the educator(
toilet room-aird immediately it the job of the architect. Basically
doubles as a wash basin and as a job of the educator is to det
THE. FLORIDA ARCQrl


0





the educational program and draw uip
the educational specification. Then -
the architect takes over the job of "
developing site and building facilities. '
to provide the actual mechanics for
all the activities covered in the edu-
cator's specified program.
There are mechanics to developing
an educational plan- as well as an
architectural one. They might best
be explained by commenting on such
questions as Why? By Whom? How?
and When?
Why -Essentially an educational
specification is a means for obtaining
a meeting of the minds between the
architect and his client-the educator,
or the school board. Aside from the
fact that it provides the architect.
with a series of concrete require-
ments on which to base his work,
I think it is a particularly important
means for developing and maintain-
ing good relations among all the
people concerned with it. It creates
sincere and unselfish interest, 'fr it
is concerned with an interest basic
to all, the children of a.community.
By Whom The school personnel
develop the data. They are the edu-
cators. Parts of the, job maybe done
by various committees, some members
of which should be laymen to stim-
nlate further good personal relations
in the community. Once assembled,
thie data should be placed in the
hands of-a single coordinator who will This str
work directly with the architect. He letters,
will be responsible for re-wording corn-
mittee reports, organizing. the data gauge s
and having it printed in clear, usable process
fom., His appointment will eliminate
the need .for the architect working from be
1iitA numbers of people on "various the ta
Scbmmittees, thus centralizing contacts
and streamlining the entire operation. channel
How-Data for an educational wiring.
specification is developed by first an-
alyzing what information is needed of letter
to clarify requirements. Then the in- ing pie:
formation itself is collected through be fabr
a series of committees-from those r
concerned with such -things as com-
i" unity, economics, to those consid-
ering such detailed matters as'teach-
ing methods, classroom requirements. I
When An educational specifica- I
tion should certainly be completed
Before the architect begins: even a
preliminary plan. It's not only diffi-
cult, but can be costly also for the
.architect to work on building -plans
Sand specifications while the eduea- FOR CONSUI
S (Continued On Page 1S)
J JANUARY, 1956.
K^ fi **"-^ '>. ..;.*>'*S s. '' *. ; :: ._ ,- -. ,'1- -. .' '. '.P.; .


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Educational Planning
(Continued from Page 11)
tional specification is still developing.
The architect should not be asked to
take over until the educational plan
has been completed in every respect.
Completion of the educational spec-
ification means consideration and
decision on every phase of the project
including the site, the budget, the
instructional program and whatever
extra-curricular program on a, com-
munity basis may be involves. Co-
ordination of budget and educational
program is, of course, the most im-
portant part of the whole project. If
the architect is to do the kind of a
job demanded of him, he must have
-complete information on which to
plan. He needs full data on educa-, .
tional requirements and programming.
But he also needs a truthful, realistic
.budget that will indicate allocationss.
for all the various phases of the pro- ":
gram as well as a clear statement of A
funds available for actual building 'j
construction.

PLANNING FROM A PROGRAM
Saunfed W. Ghm, FA.A.A
SThe fu~ i on, ol tie educator is tp
state the problem. A'ld A e An ctit
of` t.he arittx i.to provide the.
S building solution to that problem.
The 'biggest problem we have in
S1 this iirer-elationuship betweeneduc-
S ftor. ad arc tect is think, the
,r I matter of communication. When the.
10 educator attempts to commune
16 his ideas in the architects medium
tr hat is, by making little diagrams an
ver drawings -he immediately ties
S hands of the architect to a
5 extent: Because a drawing isn't asta
ment of a problem. A drawing
- usually interpreted .as a solution,
at least a partial solution, to a pro
lem. And when any problem is stat
S tinclearly, in terms of such pat
solutions, the net result is that
ler final plan may not represent the
24 efforts of either architect or,edue
My advice to the educator -i:
s stay with his own, medium. of
hi- munication. Use the spoken and j
de- ten word to te the problem.
Let the arltect then make the
let ings to se it and interpret w
of been writt. '
I believe that both timing an
of the educational secificati
al more. important than may beP-
erally realized. My suggestion -
THE FLARiDA AR


-





an educational specification be divided
into three parts primarily to pre-
vent cluttering everybody's mind with
small details at the beginning when
it's necessary to think in broad terms.
This suggested division could be
made easily. Here, for example, is a
schedule of classes. In itself that's a
pretty broad statement of general re-
Squirements. The schedule shows the
number of teachers involved, the
number of pupils involved and just
where each of them is going to be
at any given time during the day.
Obviously, the building must house
that full number of pupils.
SSo, let the first part of the educa-
tional specification be the statement
of these basic facts. Combined with
information on the budget, that's
enough for the first part. Then let
the architect develop a broad plan,
generally suitable to .cover this basic,
overall situation.
Don't clutter his mind with. details
at first. Consideration of "lot of
electric outlets" and "lots of storage
space" is foolishness in the first pre-
liminary sketches. Encourage the arch-
itect to make a broad, fluid solution
to an educator's equally broad state-
ment of educational need at first.
Then each has got something to get
their teeth into for developing the
next phase of the program.
That next phase would probably be
the sub-division of areas so as to meet
more fully the requirements of a.
specific educational plan. From here
you can easily proceed into the third
phase of the project which would be
the study of specific details to round
out the facilities needed to solve
classroom and administrative prob-
lems.

IGoR B. POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A., com-
mented briefly on the responsibilities
of architects engaged with school
work.
"I don't think the architect dons
a different set of laws or a different
set of legal responsibilities for that
particular type of work than he does
for any other type of work." he said.
"From the legal angle I see no dif.
ference, except in one point. School
boards are composed largely of lay-
men not particularly conversant with
problems of the construction industry.
So I think the architect should be
particularly careful to make sure he
has instructions in writing from the
(Continued on Page 14)
JANUARY, 1956


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At the annual meeting of the Jack
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December 15, 1956, WILLIAM IK'
JACKSON, partner in the firm of KEMPi;
BUNCH AND JACKSON, was introduct
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Governors of that organization. 1
appointment was recognition of'
new Board member's long and act..
interest in Chamber affairs. A.5
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FLORIDA POWER A LIGHT COMPAmINY


Educational Planning
(Continued from Page 18)
school board on various phases of the
work."
In commenting on the architect's
supervision of school construction,
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH called attention
of the educators present to the A.I.A.
Handbook of Architectural Practice
and the A.I.A. Standard Contract
Forms as reference guides on the suc-
cessful conduct of a school building
project. He stated his opinion that
the architect's service of supervision
was not the most important part of
his work during construction phases
of a project.
"The first and most important,"
he said,"Is that he checks on the
actual work of the contractor and
certifies to how much of the contract
has been completed at each phase of.
payment. ':
"Bonding companies," he.added,
"Have even come up with the idea .
that the owner has a definite respon-
sibility not to overpay the contractor
during progress of the work. They
are trying to get out of their bonds
if the owner overpays his contractor
along the way. That's where the archi-
tect can be of most value during the
construction stage of a school project,"
For the benefit of the educators
present, Bunch also made the point .
that the architect, during execution
of the work, does not guarantee the
services of the contractor.
"Many owners. get the erroneous
opinion," he said, "That merely by
hiring an architect and having him
handle all details of the work through
to completion, that the services of
the contractor and the fire quality
of the building are guaranteed."


I I I


i






Prosperity's Green Light
(Continued from Page 5)
the adverse effect of such a situation
will flow over and expand into other
areas and buyers will be discouraged
even where the supply may remain
inadequate,
For this reason, I think we in
Florida .within the bounds of reason,
must string along'with Federal policy.
Certainly I think we should do so
until we are really hurt by such policy.
A continuation, nation-wide, of the
expanding volume of housing starts
which we have witnessed during 1955 5
would inevitably bring on dangerous
conditions.
We have already seen the effects of
our rate of building on acreage prices.
We 'have already seen the effects on
many items of material and labor.
We should know that a continuation
of the same rate of building generally
could not help but dangerously in-
crease prices sooner or later.
If we have a little patience at*this
point during this period of economic
adjustment, and put our house in or-
der for the great future which is in
store for this state and his country,
we can obtain some real benefits.
Within the next twenty years in this
country there will be one-third again
as many people as there are today
to be fed and clothed and housed.
We have never known such growth
before.
Our market is still strong. And
there are good reasons for it. Among
them is the important one of migra-
tion. Each year 5,000,000 people are
said to move across state lines-and a
large portion of them are moving into
Florida. Migration from urban to
suburban areas is another factor.
The number of marriages is still
high and will remain so, even though
there may be some dip between now
and -the expected increases-which
will occur in the 1960's due to the
high birth rate of the 40's.
Our people are saving more money;
and family incomes are increasing.
There will be. a greater accumula-
tion of loanable funds this year than
during the record-breaking 1955.
Here's why: If recent growth trends
continue, life insurance assets are
likely to grow one half to three-quar-
ter billion dollars more in 1956 than
in 1955. On the same basis, savings
and loan associations will increase
(Continued on Page 16)
JANUARY, 1956:


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MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


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JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
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S Prosperity'~ Green Light
(Continued from Pagel5)
Their funds close to $1 billion ii
1956. And mutual savings banks wil
Shave at least'as much monhy t len
in 1956 as d 'ingl11955.
This additional growth is greatly
in excess of any possible reduction
Sin the amount of short-term fund
for market-expansion purposes tha
may occur as a result of current
policies.
S The only question then .is simply
one of timing.
With evidence of new money cleal
at the end of the year, 1956 should
get off to a fairly good start-though
at a rate lower than beginning 1955
This year the start might be at an
annual rate of 1.2 million new dwell
i ng units instead of the 1.4 million
of last year.
Nevertheless, if the demand foi
Housing remains as strong asmit cur.
rently appears to be, especially in
Florida, the volume should pick up
as the year'advances, with the end
Total in 1956 not much different from
that of 1955.



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Proldcers' Coincil Program


The Caravan Is Coming


For the third successive year, archi-
tects in the localities of Jacksonville
and Miami will have an opportunity
to view one of the most complete
traveling exhibits ever put together.
It is the Producers' Council Caravan
of Quality Building Products, a col-
lection of 45 exhibits displaying prod
ucts of 43 manufacturers and trade
associations. Like last year the exhib ts
have been designed for transportation
in a huge trailer van. This year the
Caravan will cover a coast-to-coast
tour of over 25,000 miles for showings
in 36 of the country's major marketing
centers.
In Jacksonville, the showing will be
held in the Roosevelt Hotel, January
16 and 17. It is scheduled to visit
Miami January 24, Miami head-
quarters will be the Bayfront Audi-
torium. Both exhibit parties are being
sponsored by local Producers' Council
chapters.
Though Producers' Council "infor-
..mational meetings" which feature ex-
hibits of one or two manufacturers
S are usually-limited to attendance by
architects -and designing engineers,
the Caravan shows will be open to
other elements of the building indus-
try who are concerned with :the use
of products in construction. Last.year
both Florida showings attracted a
substantial visitor list. This year, with


an enlarged exhibit, an even greater
interest is expected.
An added feature of this year's Cara--
van will be showings by several ex-.
hibit6rs of modular materials and'
their applicatin- in building. Modular
materials differ from .bther building:
materials in thatthey are dimensioned'c
in increments of 4 inches. In practice,
modular measure has eliminated un-.
necessary wastage, thus permitting.
substantial savings in building cost|
By featuring modular appliatio
Council members hope to promote
more general use of the dimensioning
system.


The annual Christmas Party of the
Miami Chapter was held Decemb
15 at the ballroom of the Miarmin
Shores Villas. As usual, it was afine
party, attended by about 400 incud.
ing visitors and wives of Chapter mem,
bers and the architects. The meeting
started with cocktails at .6:30, and
before tie evening was over guests
had enjoyed an excellent dinner,
"concert" by a remarkably versati
group called "The Harmonicaires,"'
duet by master-of-ceremonies B
Lynn and a local TV songstr
and an opportunity to join a Con
line led by Bob Lynn.
. .


THE FORIDA












Good Resolutions
U U


Good Relations-
I I






what good architects can do for them.
J Over the past years we have established good working arrangements
within our own organization, begun cooperative efforts with other groups A
in the building industry, enlarged our membership.
This year is not a year for.legislative action, nor for any further re-
organization. -
We have a full-time Executive Secretary to coordinate and keep us '
informed of our activities statewide. '
How best can we tell the public of our services?- Here is our three-
point program:
1. Do the best possible jobs on the projects we are commissioned
to do. |
2. In every personal contact, see that we maintain the highest
professional attitude. I
3. Devote some definite amount of time to the objective job of
S explaining our profession and its work to others than just our
own clients.
n he FAA, working closely with chapters, can act as the cohesive medium
to make our individual efforts more effective. My most earnest hope for the
w Year is that we me aintainve S ere nthusia sti goodwill together
we now have; and that we shall make our public relations e 'good relations.

CLINTONK GAMBLE
wPresdent, FAA
nIII nonew YeaInonr i that weo cainiu muUintinnthen simu ntulusiII awti ninc godwinuull totIueur Bum
. ..N













ad so" space uw.51..u.. ra


The multiplication of students in every school
across the nation, calls for division-by
Modernfold. Architect Jaimes Gamble Rogers,
. AIA,'made effe'divyosai of -pair-of Modern-
fbfdi ddors in the WilliamiR:"Boone Senior
High .School, Orlando. The' school library
was divided into-two separate roomuto
providB facilities .cr additional claSses and
discussion seisionsa O well ds more effective
teaching. The flick oft- wvrjst 6brn~A ti
.20 foot aIltnto pl ~ -i


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*Audio-Visual teaching: Moderpft,
separates the auditorium, from
the. classroom, when ai dio-visua
training is being employed.

SStageecurtain, or divisions: Grace-
ful Modernfold. iflanip-reslstant- .
eosilywaAthdwif soap qhid: wafer.
ZPuts an end to costlfd~ipery
maintenance and-deaning; tangled,
droopig ..overhEad words -



^^^BP'"^ '
I i *;i-*& ^


SLmited pade' in s3cois is 'more effectively utilize.d :
ith Modernfold doors as room dividers. "

*School-room division for multiple',
classes: A large Modernfold door serves
ds a- folding-Wll to- assure privoa ty
in each classroom. Folded backW
unobtrusively, Modernfold makes the
entire area again available for com-
bined classroom activity.


SDoubleduty rooms: Modernfold func.
tions- efficiently in school lunch-rooms,-
to create several smaller units for
Si rvatoe study, classrooms or other
activity while irmh' is nof in session; -



. . .... ... -. ...... - .......


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