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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 A challenge and an opportunity
 How 'informal fun' produced...
 F.A.A. officers for next year
 Good resolutions
 Engineers in joint cooperative...
 F.A.A. - F.E.S. fee program
 News and notes
 Joint cooperative committee (continued...
 Challenge and opportunity (continued...
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00018
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: December 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00018
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    A challenge and an opportunity
        Page 3
    How 'informal fun' produced results
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    F.A.A. officers for next year
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Good resolutions
        Page 12
    Engineers in joint cooperative committee
        Page 13
    F.A.A. - F.E.S. fee program
        Page 14
        Page 15
    News and notes
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Joint cooperative committee (continued from page 13)
        Page 18
    Challenge and opportunity (continued from page 3)
        Page 19
    Producers' council program
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
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OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1955


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary-
Treasurer
Edgar S. Wortman
1122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Assistant
Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


VICE-PRESIDENTS


Frank Watson .
John Stetson .
Morton Ironmonger
Franklin Bunch
Ralph Lovelock
Joel Sayers, Jr.
Albert Woodard


Florida South
SPalm Beach
Broward
Florida North
Florida Central
Daytona Beach
North Central


DIRECTORS


Edward Grafton
Jefferson Powell
Robert Jahelka
Thomas Larrick
L. Alex Hatton
William Gomon
Ernest Stidolph


SFlorida South
S. Palm Beach
Broward County
Florida North
.Florida Central
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74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 5


DECEMBER, 1955


NUMBER 12


CONTENTS


A Challenge and an Opportunity-


------------- 3


How "Informal Fun" Produced Results--....----- 4


F. A. A. Officers for Next Year ---------- 7


Good Resolutions


Engineers in Joint Cooperative Committee ------ 13


F. A. A. & F. E. S. Fee Program ----.


---14


News & Notes _-- --.---------------- 16


Advertisers' Index ----...------------- -----20


Producers' Council Program -------.


--.20


THE COVER
The F.A.A.'s 41st Annual Convention, at the Princess Issena Hotel,
Daytona Beach, was particularly honored by the presence and par-
ticipation of George Bain Cummings, F.A.I.A., of Binghamton, New
York, President of the A.I.A. This photograph, by John G. Von
of Daytona Beach, was taken during President Cummings' address
to Convention Banquet diners, November 18th.




PUBLICATION COMMITTEE Edwin T. Reeder, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects, a state organization of the American Institute of Architects, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the .Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


DECEMBER, 1955














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A Challenge and An Opportunity



Good schools, says FORREST M. KELLEY, JR., State School Architect, are needed more
than ever ---as are better planning and design to keep per-pupil costs low, building
performance high. A talk at the Convention luncheon meeting on Friday, November 18


The last time I had an opportunity
to speak to a group this size, I was
congratulating myself on being very
fortunate to have a topic that would
draw such a large group. In the midst
of my self-congratulation, a colleague
of mine who was seated on the plat-
form by me, slipped me a clipping
from the local press. On it he had
underscored a statement that I was
a graduate of the College of Agricul-
ture from the University of Florida.
Well, my friend reassured me later.
He told me I had covered my subject
about as well as any farmer would!
When preparing material for this
talk, I was reluctant to turn to sta-
tistics. But some parts of the story
cannot be told without relating them
to figures concerning the growth of
our state.
The story about the growth of
Florida is a rather romantic one. If
we take the information from the
U. S. Bureau of the Census for that
period between 1950 and 1954, we
discover that Florida's numerical
growth was the third in the nation,
exceeded only by California and by
Texas. California had a numerical
growth of 2,000,000 people in that
period. Texas had 757,000 new resi-
dents, Florida had 752,000 just
5,000 less than the state of Texas.
If we consider the growth percent-
age-wise, we find that Florida's 27.01
per cent of growth was exceeded only
by Nevada with 36.03 per cent and
by Arizona's 32.01 per cent. Florida's
numerical growth exceeded the com-
bined numerical growth of those two
states.
Now this growth has been reflected
in our student population. In the
last five years this has increased by
42V2 per cent. This means that we
have had an increase of 206,571 new
pupils in our schools in the last five
years. These are public schools I'm
talking about. These are schools ex-
clusive of kindergartens, or private
DECEMBER, 1955


schools or junior colleges or of gov-
ernment-operated schools. 206,571
new pupils to provide for-and it's
forecast that by 1960 this will be
increased by more than 300,000
pupils. A pupil enrollment of
i,004,265 is projected by 1960. This
is a conservative estimate. It is based
upon births already recorded in Flor-
ida with a reasonable proportion for
new residents moving to the state.
We are already faced with a criti-
cal school house shortage in this state.
Things leading up to this have been
the boom of the Twenties, the de-
pression which followed, the war and
then high prices. During this period
not too much school construction
was done. Now we have 27,944
pupils in this state on double sessions.
We have 78,710 pupils housed in
unsatisfactory rooms. We have 42,299
pupils in excess of normal classroom
capacity. All this adds up in terms
of classroom shortages to a need to-
day of 4,498 classrooms to house
pupils already in our schools.
Now, what are we doing about it?
Here are some figures based on a
fiscal year, from July 1st to July 1st.
For the year 1953-54 we spent
$19,000,000 and a little more to pro-
vide 827 classrooms. The following
year 1954-1955 we spent
$42,000,000 to build 1,624 class-
rooms.
What I'm referring to as a class-
room is a basic unit; and the cost is
for the complete facility. I'm not
referring to the auxiliary facilities that
are necessary for the accommodation
of the educational program. I'm not
converting the cost back to costs of
gymnasiums and auditoriums and
special service areas, shops and the
like.
For the first sixty days of the cur-
rent fiscal year we spent $6,633,000
to provide 306 classrooms. This adds
up to the fact that we have spent
$68,000,000 for 2,757 classrooms


since July 1953. And you may have
noticed that in the first year I quoted,
1953-54, we spent $19,000,000. The
following year, in an equivalent length
of time, we spent $42,000,000. The
source of funds from which these
projects were built came primarily
from a constitutional amendment that
made the sale of bonds marketable
through earmarking automobile tag
funds to guarantee funds would be
available to service those bonds.
That amendment made available
to us approximately $100,000,000
for school construction. Under con-
tract at the present time in the state
is perhaps $40,000,000 worth of
school construction which is not re-
corded in the figures stated. This
means we have almost used up that
source of funds, though some are still
available. Because of this amendment
and the earmarking of automobile
tag funds, we were able to obtain
favorable interest rates on bonds
which were sold. This was significant,
because the difference between the
low interest rates obtained and the
high interest rates which might have
been necessary meant money to build
more classrooms. Interest that was
saved built many more classrooms for
us.
Counties are beginning to look for
possible sources of funds. It has been
mentioned that the Federal Govern-
ment may be a possible source. I'm
not going to discuss that, because I
have no more information on it than
you have. But local county units are
beginning to turn to local bond issues.
Last month Dade county carried a
$34,500,000 bond issue for the con-
struction of school facilities. Out of
77,000 people eligible to vote for it,
66,000 voted; and out of that total
61,000 were for the issue and 5,000
were opposed. Eleven out of 12 vot-
ers who were eligible participated-
and the same ratio favored the meas-
(Continued on Page 19)







I a 4 4 d ; )a 4 l! 1 c ue ceoavtwm t e 7 ? Vj e "-


"Informality and Fun" was evidenced at Friday's banquet when A.I.A. President George Bain Cummings ad-
dressed diners. At speaker's table above: G. Clinton Gamble, President, F.A.A; Mrs. Francis R. Walton; Francis
R. Walton, 41st Convention Chairman; President Cummings; Mrs. Cummings; Herbert A. Milikey, A.I.A. Reg-
ional Director; Mrs. Gamble; Igor B. Polevitzky, F.A.I.A., and Mrs. Polevitzky. Opposite page, top left: Fun
carried through elsewhere. At the registration desk, Eugene A. Cellar, Jacksonville, Mrs. Eugenia Edmondson,
Tampa, and Sanford W. Goin, F.A.I.A., Gainesville, laugh obligingly at a photographer's wisecrack. Mrs. Ed-
mondson, a Convention guest, is the only associate member of the Central Chapter's Auxiliary.


How


'Informal Fun


When proceedings of the 41st An-
nual Convention finally become items
in the F.A.A. archives, they may well
indicate last month's meeting at Day-
tona Beach to be one of the most im-
portant of all the F.A.A.'s annual
milestones.
Last year, speaking before the 40th
Convention at Palm Beach BENMONT
TENCH, JR., F.A.A. legal counsel said,
"What this Convention has ac-
complished points to one main fact.
The Florida Association of Architects
has grown up ... The Association has
suddenly assumed the adult status of
leadership in the building industry
of this State. It cannot possibly go
back on that responsibility."
Those same thoughts could have
been as pointedly phrased at the 41st
Convention. What last year's Con-
vention proposed as policy measures
to promote FAA. progress were
forged into a hard core of reality at
this session. What were hopes of last
year became concrete facts at Day-


tona Beach.
As last year, the Convention's ad-
vanced billing stressed "Fun" as one
of the inviting lures. Fun was there
in plenty. But delegates went to work
quickly; and during the two business
sessions of Friday ratified measures
that provided the Association with a
brand new Constitution and By-Laws.
made Re-Districting- an important
matter of organization for the last
two years-an accomplished fact and
approved, without a single dissenting
vote, a record-breaking budget that
opened the door to immediate estab-
lishment of an Executive Secretary's
office.
In addition to that significant rec-
ord of action, the Convention heard
and approved reports of F.A.A. com-
mittees working cooperatively with
professional engineers and general con-
tractors. These are detailed elsewhere
in this issue. As to other matters,
these are highlights of Convention
business:


By-Laws:
Prior publication of the new Con-
stitution and By-Laws had prepared
delegates for quick ratification which
was accomplished after Chairman
JEFFERSON POWELL presented a num-
ber of minor revisions. In approving
them, the Convention put an official
okay to a number of F.A.A. organiza-
tional changes. The Re-Districting
plan, approved in principle last year,
automatically went into effect. This
provides for three F.A.A. State Dis-
tricts, each represented on the F.A.A.
Board by a Vice-President with over-
lapping three-year terms. And it
opens an encouraging door for the
formation of new A.I.A. Chapters as
may be needed within each district.
The Convention was notified that
two new Chapters had already been
approved for formation. A. EUGENE
CELLAR reported that in the North
Florida District a new Jacksonville
Chapter would shortly hold its or-
ganizational meeting with 41 out of
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




























Publication Committeemen Edwin T.
Reeder, Igor B. Polevitzky exchange
opinion near Product Exhibit area.


Produced Results


an area potential of 43 members.
And for the new Mid-Florida Chap-
ter, JOSEPH M. SHIFALO announced
plans for election of officers with an
overall Chapter membership of 26.

Education and Registration:
Chairman SANFORD W. GOING,
F.A.I.A., spoke beyond the bare re-
port of his committee. He com-
mented on the vital need of a new
building for the College of Architect-
ure and Allied Arts and indicated the
outlook was excellent for accomplish-
ing this at the next legislative ses-
sion. In this connection he paid trib-
ute to press support of the measure
during its consideration at the last
legislative session, naming the Gaines-
ville Sun, the Tampa Tribune, the
Orlando Sentinel, the Miami Herald
"and our own Florida Architect" for
their editorial understanding and en-
couragement. He reported that the
F.A.A. Scholarship Award competi-
tion is now under way and will be
DECEMBER, 1955


judged next April. And he spoke in
particular about the need in the
State's architectural schools for in-
structional help from practicing archi-
tects throughout the State.
"At the University of Florida," he
said, "The facts seem to be that
while the student load is continually
increasing, the college has lost a big
percentage of its faculty. I would
recommend that the President of the
F.A.A. direct a special study of this
matter during the coming year so a
report can be formulated and ways
and means found to correct the sit-
uation."
Though the Convention as a body
took no formal action on the sug-
gestion, it was warmly supported from
the floor. Among those speaking for
it JOHN STETSON said,
"We would do well to assist the
schools in every way we can. To get
a registration each year in many Euro-
peart countries, architects must de-
(Continued on Page 7)


Above, Herbert Millkey addresses
Saturday's business session. Below,
Jack Moore, left, No. Chapter pres-
ident, and Forrest M. Kelley, Jr.,
listen to a school seminar speaker.


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==


PAGE 6






F.A.A. Officers for Next Year


Gamble and Wortman
It was strictly a no-contest election on
Saturday morning when the Conven-
tion voted unanimously to continue the
F.A.A. President, G. Clinton Gamble,
and Secretary, Edgar S. Wortman, in
office for another year. Elected as
Treasurer to fill the office newly cre-
ated by the revised Constitution and
By-Laws, was Morton T. Ironmonger,
Secretary of the State Board of Archi-



Informal Fun Produced Results
(Continued from Page 5)
vote a certain amount of their time
to the educational system of the
country. In consequence, every prac-
ticing architect is part of the educa-
tional system. Even in large colleges
the faculty is limited to a few full-
paid deans and instructors. Most of
the rest of the work is handled by
practicing architects. The plan is
well integrated over there; and I think
the time is coming when we'll see
the same thing happen in this
country."

Legislative Committee:
Since this Committee's report had
already been fully published (see The
Florida Architect, September, 1955),
Chairman FRANKLIN S. BUNCH spoke
briefly to the point that this was a
"legislative off-year." He urged all
F.A.A. groups to submit legislative
questions they deem important at
once so that the Association's legis-
lative objectives for the next biennium
could be clarified well in advance of


Re-Elected for 1956
tecture and last year the F.A.A. Assis-
tant Treasurer. Elected as Vice-Presi-
dents were: Franklin S. Bunch, North
District, for three years; John Stetson,
South District, for two years, and Will-
iam B. Harvard, Central District, for
one year. Shown above at the adjourn-
ment of the 41st Convention are, left
to right, Wortman, Ironmonger, Presi-
dent Gamble, Bunch and Stetson.



the next meeting of the legislature.
and he urged also that each individual
architect meet, and learn to know,
his local state representative at the
earliest opportunity.
Budget:
As head of this committee, EDWIN
T. REEDER presented a recommenda-
tion of the F.A.A. Board that the
budget be set up to establish the
office of an F.A.A. Executive Secre-
tary on a permanent basis. On this
point, President CLINTON GAMBLE
outlined the plan for maintaining the
new F.A.A. office and explained what
its operation would entail.
"This matter of an Executive Sec-
retary's office," the F.A.A. president
said, "Is one for which we can't claim
leadership on a national basis. _An
increasing number of other Chapters
and State Organizations of the A.I.A.
have already established such offices.
The F.A.A. is fifth or sixth in line.
But we are now ready for it in all
respects.
"The chief functions of the office
(Continued on Page 8)


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DECEMBER, 1955













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PAGE 8


Informal Fun Produced Results
(Continued from Page 7)
will be to develop close and constant
liaison between Chapters, District of-
ficers and the F.A.A. Board; to stimu-
late improved public relations for the
profession throughout the State; and
to continue and strengthen the in-
formational service to every practic-
ing architect that already exists in
the pages of The Florida Architect."

Membership:
Chairman EDWARD GRAFTON'S re-
port revealed that during the past
year, membership of all F.A.A. classi-
fications has increased almost 24 per
cent and now represents almost 71
per cent of all architects registered
in Florida who reside in the State.
Gains totalled 100 new members to
bring the State's membership in the
A.I.A. to an all-time high.-



A.I.A. President's Address
Stresses Leadership Need
On Friday evening, at the Annual
Convention's traditional ban q u e t,
some 250 delegates, wives and guests
listened attentively as GEORGE BAIN
CUMMINGS, F.A.I.A. President of the
A.I.A. and the Convention's Honor
Guest, praised the F.A.A. for its rec-
ord of rapid progress, urged a wider
acceptance of the challenge of pro-


fessional leadership and gave a brief
report of his activities as the direct-
ing head of the Institute's expanding
program of service to its members.
Both laughter and applause punctu-
ated his speech which was marked
by a pleasant informality in character
with the overall tenor of the Con-
vention.
The A.I.A. President obviously ad-
dressed part of his talk to younger
members of the profession in calling
for a more general recognition of lead-
ership responsibility involved in the
practice of architecture.
"Today and in the future," he said,
"Architects must realize they are
prime agents of community growth.
Growth is not alone in buildings, but
in spirit, in community good will and
fellowship. Architects must become
increasingly active in community af-
fairs if they are to realize the full
values of their professional potentials
as leaders in their communities."
He congratulated the F.A.A. on its
past record and on the actions taken
during the Convention sessions he at-
tended. And his comment on authori-
zation of an Executive Secretary drew
a laugh when he said,
"Like the man who married the
widow, the F.A.A. can't be first in
everything! But this is a long and
progressive step forward. I congratu-
late the F.A.A. on the strength and
purpose that has made it possible."


Among the student visitors from the University of Florida College of
Architecture and Allied Arts was this group snapped in Princess Issena
lobby. They include: Randy Wedding, Carl Decker, Gene Lawrence, Lynn
L. Bortles, Roberto Dugand, Don Minnich, Alan Green and German Torres.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






F.A.A. Astounds Millkey
And Also Vice Versa!
Opening the final business session
of the Daytona Beach Convention
Saturday morning, HERBERT A. MILL-
KEY, A.I.A. Director for the South
Atlantic Region, told 'attendants he
was "astounded" at the F.A.A. meet-
ing.
"I'm again astounded," he said,
"At how well your meetings are or-
ganized, at the hospitality here at your
Convention, at the confidence you
people have in yourselves.
"I'm particularly astounded at what
you have accomplished." he added.
Then Mr. Millkey proceeded to
astound the Convention itself by an-
nouncing, with a perfectly straight
face, that he had just heard rumors
about a new firm formed through
Convention contacts.
"I understand the new firm is to
be called 'Goins and Cummings' he
said.
The A.I.A. Director announced
also that the next meeting of the
South Atlantic Region would be held
in Durham, No. Carolina, April 12
to 14, 1956. The theme of the meet-
ing, "New Materials and New Con-
struction Methods," will be developed
by a roster of well-known and able
speakers. Millkey urged that attend-
ance of Florida architects be as large
as possible.






















Smallest Convention guest-under
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fourth year architectural student.
DECEMBER, 1955


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Good Resolutions---


The air was full of them at the Daytona Beach Convention. Here are those
formally presented and adopted at the final business session on Suturday


ON FAA-AIA ORGANIZATION
WHEREAS--The Florida Association of Architects is
an organization vital to the speedy solution of statewide
professional problems and the Association represents the
architects with vigor and wisdom in relations with other
organized segments of the Community; and WHEREAS-
The activities of the Association should be coordinated
and of closest cooperation with the activities of the na-
tional organization of the American Institute of Architects
in order that the activities of both shall be enhanced and
become more effective in the promotion of the welfare of
the Profession; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the President appoint a com-
mittee for the purpose: (1) of studying the position of the
Florida Association of Architects in its relationship with
the national organization of The American Institute of
Architects and (2) preparing recommendations to the
Board of Directors of the Association to guide their fur-
ther action in obtaining a more clearly defined and ef-
fective role for the Association in the national organiza-
tion of the Institute.

ON MEMBERSHIP
WHEREAS It is beneficial to the advancement of the
profession that all of its members and potential members
be able to combine and coordinate their efforts to solve
the problems within the profession and those arising be-
tween the profession and its community; and WHEREAS-
It is the declared prime effort of the American Institute
of Architects to advance the profession to the fullest po-
tential of each successive generation; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the policy of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects regarding memberships is threefold:
(1) The Association wants 100 per cent of the eligible
individuals of the State of Florida as members of the
Association; (2) It will institute and promulgate a vig-
orous and continuing campaign to seek and invite to mem-
bership those persons of the State who are eligible; (3)
The Association will make every effort to attract and en-
courage active participation in the affairs of the Associa-
tion by all of its members, but particularly the younger
members, so that the Association will develop to the
fullest with each successive generation.

ON INDIVIDUAL CHAPTER SUPPORT
WHEREAS-The Florida Central Chapter of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects is presently engaged upon a
course of action, the results of which can be highly
beneficial to the Architectural Profession in Florida; and
WHEREAS- The Florida Central Chapter of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects has sought an expression of
the attitude of this Association towards its approach to
common professional problems; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the Florida Association of Arch-


itects of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., ex-
presses its sympathy with the action presently contem-
plated by the Florida Central Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects and commends the support of that
Chapter and its problem to the American Institute of
Architect Chapters of the State of Florida and to the
members of the Florida Association of Architects in their
individual capacities.

ON PROFESSIONAL TRAINING
WHEREAS-The enrollment in Schools of Architecture
is increasing at an unprecedented rate, the increase in fac-
ulty is not increasing proportionally, and Schools of Archi-
tecture are experiencing great difficulty in retaining and
obtaining adequate faculty for a variety of reasons; and
WHEREAS--The proper training of students of archi-
tecture is of vital concern to the profession; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the President appoint a special
committee for the purpose: (1) of studying the problem
experienced by The Schools of Architecture with regard
to faculty, and (2) of preparing recommendations to be
submitted to the 1956 Convention of the Association for
action which can be taken by the Association to assist the
Schools of Architecture of this State in the solution of
their faculty problems;
AND FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED: That the Education
Committee be instructed to cooperate with The Schools
of Architecture of this State in formulating and instituting
an interim program which will assist the faculty of the
Schools in an organized and positive manner, enrich the
instruction and stimulate the enthusiasm of the students.

RECOGNITION OF A JOB WELL DONE
WHEREAS -The Daytona Beach Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects played the role of host
for the 41st Annual Convention of the Florida Associ-
ation of Architects and played their role with cordiality
and efficiency; WHEREAS It has elevated to a new level
the high standards of hospitality and organization of prev-
ious convention hosts; and WHEREAS it is the custom
to send greetings which proclaim the Association's appre-
ciation for hospitality to the President of the Host Chapter
although such greetings are intended for all Chapter mem-
bers, especially the Chairman and members of the Con-
vention Committee and sub-committees, and those indi-
viduals who, although not members, through marriage, or
by persuasion, or for hire participated in the success of the
convention as if therein listed by name with address and
vital statistics; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the President of The Florida
Association of Architects express the Association's sincere
appreciation of a job well done by sending greetings to
the President of the Daytona Beach Chapter saying, "Con-
gratulations and thank you."
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





RECOGNITION OF MELLEN C. GREELEY
WHEREAS for over a period of thirty years, MELLEN
C. GREELEY, F.A.I.A., of Jacksonville, as secretary of The
State Board of Architecture, has safeguarded the standards
of the architectural profession of the State of Florida with
his unceasing devotion to our interest; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That The Florida Association of
Architects expresses the appreciation of The Florida Asso-
ciation for the zealous and devoted services of Mellen C.
Greeley in advancing the interests and raising the stand-
ards of the profession of architecture in the State of Flor-
ida; and be it further resolved that the President of The
Florida Association of Architects appoint a Committee
to word appropriately the expressions of the sentiments
herein contained and present, at the next annual conven-
tion of The Association, evidence of such appreciation to
Mellen C. Greeley.

RECOGNITION OF BENMONT TENCH, JR.
WHEREAS This Association has received the bene-
fits of the wisdom and legal counsel of BENMONT TENCH,


JR., of Gainesville, for the past several years, during which
time the interests of this body have been safeguarded and
promoted by his constant vigilance; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the President of the Association
express the appreciation that is felt by all members of
The Florida Association of Architects of The American
Institute of Architects for the invaluable services rendered
by Benmont Tench, Jr.

ELTON J. MOUGHTON, DECEASED
WHEREAS In His infinite wisdom, the Heavenly
Father has taken from us ELTON J. MOUGHTON, of San-
ford, Charter member of The Florida North Chapter, and
whereas his presence and wisdom in our council is sorely
missed; therefore,
BE IT RESOLVED: That the Florida Association of
Architects of The American Institute of Architects extend
their most heartfelt condolences and sympathy to Mrs.
Moughton and Family, together with this expression of
the deep loss sustained by the profession; and be it
further resolved that a copy hereof be forwarded to Mrs.
Elton J. Moughton.


Engineers In Joint Cooperative Committee


The F.E.S. was welcomed by the
F.A.A. and A.G.C. in a pre-Con-
vention dinner discussion of policy

Of the two important committee
meetings prior to the opening of the
41st Convention, the one held
Wednesday evening by the Joint Co-
operative Committee, was of special
importance on two counts. It was
the first meeting of the inter-industry
body at which representatives of the
Florida Engineering Society sat as
active members. And it was the oc-
casion for some straight-from-the-
shoulder talking on the role that the
newly-expanded committee should
adopt for its guidance in development
of future plans and policies.
As now set up, the Joint Coopera-
tive Committee roster lists nine rep-
resentatives from each of its three
component bodies. Of these 16 were
at the Wednesday meeting and an
additional three sat as observers in
the persons of WILLIAM P. BOBB,
JR., the Committee's secretary, PAUL
H. HINDS, Executive Secretary of the
A.G.C.'s South Florida Chapter, and
ROGER W. SHERMAN, of The Florida
Architect.
C o-C h a i r m a n W. H. ARNOLD,
DECEMBER, 1955


Head-table members of J.C.C.: Clinton Gamble, re-elected Chairman; J. Hilbert
Sapp, Pres., A.G.C. Council; Co-Chairman W. H. Arnold, A.G.C., and William P.
Bobb, Jr., who continues as next year's Joint Cooperative Committee secretary.


A.G.C., presided at the meeting
which started with a dinner scheduled
for 7:00 PM and was adjourned some
three talk-filled hours later. Reports
were few-a brief one from the Sec-
retary on finances; and an equally
brief one from JOHN L. R. GRAND,
the Awards Committee Chairman,
stating that the Joint Cooperative
Committee's first architectural award
had been made to CHARLES WORLEY,


student at the University of Florida.
The delegation from the F.E.S.
were welcomed formally and officially
seated. And almost immediately after
the routine of reports, the meeting
became a discussion of purpose, poli-
cies and programs.
As to purpose, Chairman CLINTON
GAMBLE spoke briefly of the need in
Florida for an industry-wide organiza-
(Continued on Page 18)









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Among the most generally signifi-
cant reports heard by the Convention
wvas that detailing accomplishments
of the Committee on Architect-Engi-
neer Relations, chairmaned by JOHN
STETSON of Palm Beach and co-chair-
maned by RICHARD C. JENSEN. of the
Florida Engineering Society. A brief
of this Committee's actions prior to
its pre-Convention meeting on No-
-ember 17, appeared in the 41st Con-
vention Program Issue of The Florida
Architect. But accomplishments of
the November 17th session proved so
definite and important, that a com-
pletely revised report was essential for
presentation on the Convention floor.
Former meetings of the two-pro-
fession committee had made it appear
that any firm decision on a mutually
acceptable schedule of fees for use
by one prime professional when work-
ing with the other was so fraught
with complications as to be almost
impossible of achievement. But in the
November 17 meeting, a complete
reversal of this situation occurred.
What caused this was the proposal
that an hourly rate be used as the
basis for a fee schedule that both pro-
fessions could accept. That proposal
was made by the architects; but it
was immediately recognized as sound
by the engineers. And it acted as a
fuse to trigger committee action in
developing recommendations to both
the F.A.A. and the F.E.S. which
seemed to promise ultimate and quick
solutions to many architect-engineer
problems.
Essentially, the committee's action
produced a plan for the application
and negotiation of fees rather than
any specific schedule of fees in terms
of sums- or percentages of project
costs. The plan recognizes that fees
may vary in type and character de-
pending on the project and the pro-
fessional relationships involved. It
recognizes also that costs of certain
professional services are difficult to
establish, others relatively simple.


And, further, the plan admits the
possibility that any inter-professional
relationship may involve several types
of activity that could well involve
various methods of compensation.
As a result, the plan is flexible.
And its ultimate ratification by the
F.A.A. and the F.E.S. should-with
the Architect-Engineer Policy Code,
(see Florida Architect for March,
1955, page 14)-provide a sound and
practical basis for active association
of both types of professionals. Thus,
its general application could go far
in preventing misunderstanding and
dissatisfaction that have marked many
working relationships between the two
professions.
As outlined by the Committee, the
Architect Engineer Compensationt
Plan has been proposed as a three-
part code:
1 Hourly Rate: An overall
rate would be ascertained by doubling
the cost of drafting and adding a per-
centage or flat amount as office profit.
The' total would therefore include the
essential items of labor, overhead and
profit; and it is the Committee's be-
lief that this overall hourly rate could
be satisfactorily applied to a wide
range of small, medium-sized, or rela-
tively simple jobs where either the
architect or the engineer constitutes
the prime professional. In every ap-
plication, however, such supplement-
ary costs as blueprinting should be
recognized and provision for payment
included as part of the inter-profes-
sional agreement.
2 Flat Fee: This would cover
cases where a prime professional re-
quires assistance from a member of
the other profession on a consultant
basis; or in cases where the scope
and extent of professional services
needed are easily defined. The sum
involved should be established by
mutual agreement and should be
based on the type and extent of serv-
ices required, consistent with the size
and character of the project involved.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA.A.A.-F.E.S. Fee Program


By proposing a practical plan for a reciprocal fee schedule of
mutual benefit and adaptability, the Architect-Engineer Rela-
tions Committee is making professional history in the import-
ant business of strengthening inter-professional cooperation





3- Percentage Fee: To be
used where generally practical and
especially in the case (of large, proI(cts
where extensive or complex planning
is involved. In view of variations in
fee structures that exist in profes-
sional organizations throughout the
State, acceptable fees current in each
area of specific professional activity
should be used as the basis for inter-
professional agreement the prime
professional receiving a discounted
fee from the associated professional,
the discount being negotiated on the
basis of size, complexity and time
considerations of the project involved.
The Committee hopes that a more
definite and complete schedule of
inter-professional fees can be worked
out prior to meetings of the Board
of Directors of both professional or-
ganizations in January of next year.
Toward that end, the chairman urges
careful consideration of the whole
matter by each F.A.A. member-and
prompt communication to him of any
comments and recommendations for
clarification or basic improvement.
Such communications should be
forwarded directly to John Stetson,
Box 2174, Palm Beach, Florida. Each
will be carefully considered for in-
clusion in the document to be pre-
sented to Boards of the F.A.A. and
F.E.S. in January. The Committee
hopes that action can be expedited
sufficiently on this important subject
to justify completion of an inter-pro-
fessional policy and fee agreement
that will be acceptable for adoption
by the F.E.S. at its Convention in
April of next year-and that. can be
approved by the F.A.A. Board of Di-
rectors at its quarterly meeting during
the same month:
At completion of its current work,
the Architect Engineer Relations
Committee looks to the preparation
of a comprehensive inter-professional
manual containing definitions, ex-
planations and examples as needed
to cover the widest possible range of
conditions-in addition to the pre-
viously approved Code of Policy and
the joint fee schedule.
As pointed out by the Committee's
chairman, the resulting document will
have no legal force. Its provisions
will be recommendations only and
not mandatory on-the part of either
profession. But behind them will be
the force of professional leadership
and the considered approval of both
architects and engineers.
DECEMBER, 1955


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smile as he recalls, with H. Samuel
Kruse, President of South Chapter,
the days when they were master and
student at Wright's Taliesin school.

News & Notes
To the North Miami home of
WAHL SNYDER, members of the Flor-
ida South Chapter gathered en masse
on November 5. The occasion was
a 5-to-7 cocktail party in honor of
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, the now-
venerable genius who once spurned
membership in the A.I.A., but also ac-
cepted its highest professional honor,
the Gold Medal of the Intitute.
Earlier that day, at a luncheon
meeting of the Fashion Group, at-
tended by many architects as well as
fashion and interior designers, Mr.
Wright had told his audience that
Miami architecture was "horrible";
had advised them to boycott the ho-
tels "whose design is hideous"; and
had called on all who heard him to
"stop living like this" and build better
through organic architecture.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


NEXT MONTH'S ISSUE

Lack of space in this issue pre-
vented publication of material on
Educational Planning, their subject
of the Convention's Round-Table
discussion at the Friday afternoon
seminar session. Results of the dis-
cussion were valuable as a source
of information on school planning
and provocative as well. Look for
it next month.






.At the Ch.iptcr'\ N.\.rmhb.r Sth
nmettilw. election of 'ifhcir brujliht
these results: President, T. ThiP Rii.
SELL; Vice-Preident. WAHL SNYDER;
Secretary, IRVIN K1R k- H, and Treas-
urer, VERNER JOHNSON. Elected as a
Chapter Director for a three-year term
was H. SAMUEL KRUSE, last year's
president. IRVING E. HORSEY was
chosen as an F.A.A. Director, with
JAMES E. GARLAND as Alternate.

Newly-elected officers for the Palm
Beach Chapter are: President, JEFF-
ERSON N. POWELL; Vice-President,
HILLIARD T. SMITH; Secretary, FRED-
ERICK W. KESSLER; and Treasurer,
WILLIAM K. CALER.

JAMES A. STRIPLING, A.I.A., an-
nounces a change of office address to
the Florida Education Association
Building, West Pensacola Street, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.

ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II, of the
Tampa firm of Pullara, Bowen and
Watson, has been appointed to serve
as' a member of the Building Re-
search Advisory Board, a unit of the
National Academy of Science Na-
tional Research Council.

PRESS COVERAGE GOOD
News coverage of the 41st Con-
vention was constant, varied and ex-
tensive. Both morning and evening
papers in Daytona Beach carried
stories throughout the latter part of
the week-and varied the types of
stories between page one news, fea-
ture stories and society items. Reports
in the local press included use of ex-
cellent photos as well as accurate
and comprehensive reporting.
The Convention was also recog-
nized nationally by the three major
wire services, AP, UP and INS. CLIN-
TON GAMBLE'S proposal 'that the
A.I.A. offer technical assistance to
architects in northern states which
had been hardest hit by the season's
hurricanes was the chief topic of wire-
service stories.
At least one reaction to the sug-
gestion came from a Connecticut
architect, KEITH HEINE, Of West
Hartford. In a story carried by the
AP and published in several Florida
newspapers, Heine said, "Connecticut
has plenty of good architects and
engineers. But we'll be glad to listen."
DECEMBER, 1955


F. GRAHAM
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.


WILLIAI.1 Chairman
IACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
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Joint Cooperative Committee
(Continued from Page 13)
tion acting as a Construction Con-
gress (see The Florida Architect for
July, 1955, page 7), but voiced his
conviction that the Joint Coopera-
tive Committee shouldbe confined to
S its present three-fold membership.
IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, acting as al-
ternate for Miss MARION I. MANLEY
who was absent because of illness,
called on the Committee member-
ship to recognize fully its responsi-
bility for initiating cooperative de-
velopments to which each member-
ship organization could subscribe.
And he called on members for defi-
nite action toward those ends.
Out of discussion centering on this
main subject came a general agree-
ment that the function of the Com-
mittee covered three fronts: Design
and construction techniques; Matters
relating to inter-professional relation-
ships; and Promotion of public un-
derstanding of the construction in-
dustry's place in the economical and
social progress of Florida.
As one overall result, the Com-
mittee voted to establish three new
sub-committees. Each charged with
the job of developing a program in
its assigned field; and the report of
each-to be presented at the Com-
mittee's next meeting in April-
would outline not only broad ob-
ectives, but would also offer what
ever specific programs might appear
S necessary to provide concrete and
S immediate action toward solution of
S existing problems.
Full membership of the sub-com-
mittees was not announced. But as
chairman, the following were named
by Go-Chairman Arnold: Research,
IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A.; Build-
S ing Codes, MEYER W. DEUTSCHMAN,
S F.E.S.; and Professional Practice,
THEORDORE B. JENSEN, F.E.S. A
S sub-committee of Testing Procedures
S and Standards is already operating
under chairmanship of JAMES M. AL-
S BERT, A.G.C.
By unanimous vote CLINTON GAM-
BLE, A.I.A., was re-elected as the
S Committee's chairman for the coming
year; W. H. ARNOLD was retained as
the A.G.C.'s Co-Chairman; and
S HAROLD D. BRILEY, F.E.S., was
elected to serve as Co-Chairman rep-
S resentative of the engineers.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I


!






Challenge and Opportunity
(Continued from Page 3)
ure. This is heartening-the fact
that so many voters took an active
interest and the fact that the vote
was so overwhelming by citizens who
recognized the need. Many other
counties are considering the same
source of funds. But there are con-
stitutional limitations on the amount
for which a county can bond itself.
Many counties have recently bonded
themselves and they are thus limited.
I mentioned earlier the influence
of rising costs on school construction.
During a period of time when con-
struction costs went up 180 per cent
the cost per pupil of our new school
buildings went up only 80 per cent.
Now how was this accomplished? It
was accomplished through effective
educational planning-planning which
obtained the maximum utilization of
all facilities which were constructed.
Instead of building a facility for a
special purpose so it could not be
used for any other purpose-and per-
haps having an enrollment in the
school which permitted that facility to
lie idle for four out of five class periods
during the day-educator and archi-
tect alike sought means to keep all
spaces in constant use. They used
devices such as arranging fixed items
of furniture around the perimeter of
a room leaving the middle open for
assembly or lecture purposes. In this
way a science room might be used for
general class purposes when it was
not being used as a science room.
We invented many such combina-
tion facilities. We did so through
effective educational planning; and
that effective educational planning
did provide a better dollar purchase
for the public-80 per cent increase
per pupil, as opposed to 180 per cent
increase on construction costs.
Despite that favorable figure, one
of our greatest challenges still lies in
the field of educational, planning.
There is still much room for im-
provement. During the last year there
have been high schools with equiva-
lent capacity and relatively equivalent
facilities built with per-pupil costs
in contrast'to each other. One school
cost in excess of $1,200 per pupil
while the other was built at a cost of
less than $700 per pupil. The differ-
(Continued on Page 20)
DECEMBER, 1955


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Challenge and Opportunity
(Continued from Page 19)
ence is a reflection of the effective-
ness of the educational planning that
was done.
Another significant factor of those
two schools is that the square foot
cost of the one built for $1,200 per
pupil, was less than the square foot
cost of the school with the lower per-
pupil cost. That means the county
could obtain more durable construc-
tion by spending more money-but
it would still have a more economical
school because per-pupil cost was less.
Now, I am using the term educa-
tional planning as opposed to archi-
tectural planning.
Educational planning is organiza-
tion of a program which appropriately
should be done by the educator. De-
velopment of the plan may be done
later by a team composed of educator
and architect. But the statement of
a program should be done by the
educator. In many counties it is being
done. But I'm not saying it"is done
by all educators-it is a challenge to
them..
Some counties have been accus-
tomed to having more than minimum
facilities; and the philosophy exists
that these should be permitted to
continue building in the manner to


which they have been accustomed.
I concur with this philosophy except
in the case where a county in so doing
at one school center deprives itself
of the ability to meet minimum naeds
in other areas of the county-or where
the county bonds its future income
so that it may not provide for future
growth.
In the midst of all this we have
architects who are concerned about
their own selection for the commis-
sion to design a school. Maybe all
of us are concerned about that. Some
become more concerned than others;
and some propose a reduced fee to
attract the client.
Well, I believe architects should
seek a different approach to the con-
sideration of their services. An archi-
tect who gives the maximum service
of which he is capable will be con-
sidered. An architect who reduces
his fee in all probability evaluates
correctly the value of the service he
proposes to render. I tell that story
to the school boards and I'm sincere
about it. But members of our pro-
fession come along on the same day
and say "He's all wet, I can do it for
less." I know that the service is less;
and I know further that when the
service is less, tint service is ,expen-
sive. Perhaps the square foot Cost is
less. But the cost of operation and
the cost hidden in the educational


planning is there to a greater extent
than would exist if full service is pro-
vided by the architect.
As we think of designing schools
for the future, we are faced with un-
Storseen conditions which might arise.
Recently a newspaper reported that
a study was being made to determine
the feasibility of a 12-months' school.
I don't know what the results of that
study will be. We've heard similar
proposals phrased for the last two or
three years. If it is found necessary
to occupy our schools twelve months
each year, will the buildings have
been designed to be comfortably
usable during the summer months?
Have they been designed so that spe-
cial facilities can be scheduled effec-
tively for new groups entering the
schools-perhaps every three months?
I know of studies now being con-
ducted to determine whether thirty
is a valid size for a class or whether
it should be increased to forty-five.
Without commenting on the desir-
ability of one size or the other, I will
say that the answer could be a decid-
ing factor in the design of schools,
and a vital consideration in the de-
velopment of any educational pro-
gram. Thus it is evident that while
we must be practical in meeting cur-
rent demands, we need to be vision-
ary in designing our schools for the
future.


.- s, jC";


Producers' Council Program

The November Informational MANUFACTURING COMPANY, both of
meeting of the Miami Chapter was whom had arranged displays.
held at the banquet room of the Mi- ROBERT LYNN introduced the Zurn
ami Springs Villas on Tuesday eve- representative who described the com-
ning, November 22 just in time to pany's system of pre-fabricated sani-
squeak past a tight deadline for re- tary systems after a slide-film pre-
porting the meeting in this issue. sentation of a bit of classic doggerel
Local architects and some engineers by James Whitcomb Riley. The
joined with a good turn-out of the Hauserman program was introduced
Chapter to make up a crowd of some by JOHN R. SOUTHWOOD. Primarily it
250 people who enjoyed th tradi- was a demonstration of the quick de-
250 people who enoyed the tradi- mountability of the Hauserman office
tionally good food and drink for partition. Two technicians in spotless
which information meeting hosts white removed two panels, changed
have become justly famous. the location of a door and replaced
Two producers collaborated, as every part in working order in exactly
hosts at the November meeting; and nine minutes. It wasn't a record, said
also shared the spotlight as product the Hauserman representative; but it
exhibitors. They were E. F. HAUSER- wasn't so slow either And it certainly
MAN COMPANY and the J. A. ZURN was convincing.


ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Altex Engineering Co. 10-11
Aufford-Kelley Co. Inc. 18
Bruce Equipment Company 8
Day & Night .. .. 6
Dunan Brick . 3rd cover
Electrend Distributing Co. 18
Florida Power & Light Co. 16
George C. Griffin . . 7
Holloway Concrete Products 9
Inter-State Marble
& Tile Company . 19
Jacksonville Metal
& Plastics Company 15
Leap Concrete . .. 2
Maule Industries, Inc. 2nd cover
Miller Electric Co. of Florida 14
Miracle Adhesive Sales Co. 16
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Co. 16
F. Graham Williams
Company, Inc ... .. 17

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.a. a y3 !':-'' ,, ..


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Fort Myers Ready-Mix Concrete, Inc. ----...
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Baird Hardware Company. ..-. .....
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Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company --
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Bartow, Fla
SFort Myers, Fla.
... Frostproof, Fla.
SGainesville, Fla.
.. Haines City, Fla.
-. Jacksonville, Fla.
----- Key West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company .. Lake Wales,
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company Marathon,
Gandy Block & Supply Company ......------- Melbourne,
C. J. Jones Lumber Company - ----- Naples,
Marion Hardware Company ....-.----...._........ Ocala,
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ---... Sebring,
Tallahassee Builders' Supply ---- - Tallahassee,
Burnup & Sims, Inc. -..-. .- West Palm Beach,


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