<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Why not a team?
 The contemporary Florida home
 The contemporary Florida home
 New beam design stands test
 Daytona beach presents...
 New beam design (continued from...
 News and notes
 The contemporary house (continued...
 A roster for reference
 The contemporary house (continued...
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00017
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00017
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Why not a team?
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The contemporary Florida home
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The contemporary Florida home
        Page 9
    New beam design stands test
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Daytona beach presents...
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    New beam design (continued from page 10)
        Page 17
    News and notes
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The contemporary house (continued from page 7)
        Page 25
    A roster for reference
        Page 26
    The contemporary house (continued from page 25)
        Page 27
    Producers' council program
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
        Page 30
Full Text



c7A







M0ida Ar ite
OFFICIAL JOURNAL of the FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS of the AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


November, 1955





o .


In ANNUAL
)NVENTION
//


00P--


FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OP ARCHITECTS
DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER HOSTS
NOVEMBER 17-18-Iq 1455


/IAVE


P-UN AT DAVTONA BEA CH

CONVENTION HEADQUARTERS
/ PRINCESS ISSNr MOTEL
ON SEA-BREEZE BOOILEVARD /
BETWEEN OLEANDER ANDWALD 0LI
56IStTRATION
MEETING S
EXHIBITS /
BANQUET
'aqs #Was
i -xib. r


ki -i


T I C


BEACH
0 C


s a -~~
?











FOR



^Millhmk


ThogotSuhFoiayulFideape
of Mal* rcsinMl r in homes
hoes aprmns pubic buies n
- Etuina uidns.
To prouc goo Milok ittksth ih
cobnto of men mahns aeil





and~~ a siner deiet d 5od o .
we hav the al


EAN D U:S T R I E S, INC.
MIAMI
PHONE: 89-6631
5220 Biscayne Boulevard
FORT LAUDERDALE
PHONE: LOgan 4-1211
1335 Northeast 26th Street
SOUTH DADE
PHONE: Homestead 1432 1459
South Allapattah Road & Moody Drive






SUtjar/erf 'icens
cusfm -bui stfe


* HOPKINS-SMITH, Architects' Sample Bureau,
5040 Biscayne Blvd., Miami . Also in
Hollywood and Ft. Lauderdale.
* TOMORROW'S KITCHENS (Division of Hop-
kins-Smith), The Eola Plaza, 431 East Cen-
tral Ave., Orlando.
* FLORIDA KITCHEN STYLISTS, 1430 4th
Street, South, St. Petersburg.


wadCt accc6 I.Cke 4
wc t& e weAr sCwt


...Specify the Finest!
....... I II-DL IOI C i11~~ii~ii~~ i .... ............


NOVEMBER, 1955











..way y AAD!
1 (AND OVERHEAD)










ROOF SLABS
Exterior corridor at the Stuart, Fla., elementary school, showing
& TEE JOISTS use of LEAP Double Tees supported on a cawtilevered concrete
&w TE J IT rigid frame.

Yes, LEAP Double Tee and the LEAP
Joists are way ahead in the field of modern
architecture and construction methods . .
used exposed they offer a high quality ceil-
ing and roof of great strength at unusually
low cost!

The LEAP roof is much stronger than
ordinary reinforced concrete because it is
scientifically prestressed-it will carry heav- Interior of classroom at the Stuart, Fla., elementary school
showing effect obtained through the use of exposed LEAP
ier loads for much longer spans. Double Tees.
LEAP roof slabs are widely used in low
cost construction in schools, offices, stores
and many other construction jobs.
Cantilevers up to 10' are possible with .
LEAP prestressing, making a pleasing cover
for store fronts, exterior corridors of schools .
and many other similar applications.
See the LEAP franchised yard in your Outdoor showroom of Stone Buick agency, Ft. Pierce, Fla.,
vicinity, or write, wire or phone: showing combination of LEAP exposed double tees and lighted
cove in modernistic design.

STM Reg. U.S. Pat Off.
LEAP (FRANCHISED) CASTING YARDS
Capitol Concrete Co., Inc. Noonan Construction Co. Frontier Dolomite Concrete
Jacksonville, Florida Pensacola, Florida Products Corp.
Duracrete, Inc. West Coast Shell Corp. Lockport Co. IncY.
N. C. Products Co. Inc.
a Leesburg, Florida Sarasota, Florida Raleigh, N. C.
R. H. Wright & Son Ryan Builders Supplies Ltd.
Gordon Brothers Concrete Fort Lauderdale, Florida Windsor, & London, Ontario,
a c Lakeland, Florida Permacrete, Inc.nTurbotville Block Co., Inc.
Holloway Concrete Products Daytona Beach, Florida Turbotville k Co., Inc.
P. O. BOX 495 Co., Inc. Carolina Concrete Pipe Co. K. D. Park & Alfred A. Yee
LAKELAND, FLORIDA Winter Park, Florida Columbia, S. C. Honolulu, Hawaii
2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


F.A.A. OFFICERS 1955


President
G. Clinton Gamble
1407 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale


Secretary-
Treasurer
Edgar S. Wortman
1.122 North Dixie
Lake Worth


Mo Assistant
Treasurer
M. T. Ironmonger
1261 E. Las
Olas Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale
VICE-PRESIDENTS
VICE-PRESIDENTS


Frank Watson .
John Stetson
Morton Ironmonger
Franklin Bunch
Ralph Lovelock
Joel Sayers, Jr.
Albert Woodard


SFlorida South
S. Palm Beach
S. Broward
SFlorida North
. Florida Central
.Daytona Beach
. North Central


DIRECTORS


Edward Grafton
Jefferson Powell
Robert Jahelka
Thomas Larrick
L. Alex Hatton
William Gomon
Ernest Stidolph


Florida South
S. Palm Beach
Broward County
Florida North
. Florida Central
.Daytona Beach
. North Central


74e




Florida Architect


VOLUME 5


NOVEMBER, 1955


NUMBER 11


CONTENTS


Why Not a Team?--
-HARVEY A. PIERCE


The Contemporary Florida House --
-IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A.

Two Chapters Elect 1956 Officers

New Beam Design Stands Test --


-.---_- 7


Daytona Beach Presents
-TED RUGG


News and Notes


A Roster for Reference

Producers' Council Program


.- 28


Index to Advertisers


THE COVER
All roads lead to Daytona Beach this month! This map will lead you
to Headquarters of the F.A.A.'s 41st Annual Convention whether
you come by airplane, train, bus, automobile or boat. It was generously
drawn for this issue of The Florida Architect by Delineators Haskell
and Hardwick in the office of Spicer and Gehlert, Architects.



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE--Edwin T. Reeder, Chairman, G. Clinton
Gamble, Igor B. Polevitzky. Editor--Roger W. Sherman.
The FLORIDA ARCHITECT is the Official Journal of the Florida Association of
Architects, a state organization of the American Institute of Architects, and is
published monthly under the authority and direction of the F.A.A. Publication
Committee at 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida. Telephone MOhawk 7-0421
. Correspondence and editorial contributions are welcomed; but publication cannot
be guaranteed and all copy is subject to approval by the Publication Committee.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Publication
Committee or the Florida Association of Architects. Editorial contents may be freely
reprinted by other official A.I.A. publications, provided credit is accorded The
FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author . Advertisements of products, materials
and services adaptable for use in Florida are welcomed; but mention of names, or
illustrations of such materials and products, in either editorial or advertising
columns does not constitute endorsement by the Publication Committee or The
Florida Association of Architects . Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Florida.


NOVEMBER, 1955









































Seventeen Classroom Addition,
Lakeshore School, Jacksonville, Florida


S. Ralph Fetner, A.I.A., Architect;
Parker Construction Co., Builder


SWindow Walls Don't Cost--


$7.02 school proves They Save


....... .........
For Additional Information
in Your Locality, Call:
SPensacola ________-HE 8-1444
Tallahassee --________-2-0399
Jacksonville _______EX 8-6767
Daytona Beach _-______ 3-1421
Orlando __________ 4-9601
Ocala ------------MA 2-3755
Tampa --------------33-9231
Palm Beach __--------- 3-1832
Miami -------------48-4486
Hollywood ______ 2-5443
Ft. Lauderdale -____ JA 2-5235
Florida Sales Representative

GEORGE C. GRIFFIN
P. O. Box 5151, Jacksonville


Brown and Grist is pleased and proud that use of their product
helped, to keep the cost of this 17-classroom addition to $7.02 per
square foot. It's proof that even with a limited budget you can get
the best "B & G" custom-made, Window Wall Units that are
economical to install, inexpensive to maintain. Window Walls in-
corporate the rugged "B & G" awning window with factory-installed
and sealed-in insulated panels that are watertight, weigh less than
conventional walls (up to 6 Ibs. per sq. ft., glazed), and are usually
erected in less time that ordinary windows without panels . Also,
"B & G" 21/4" panels have a U-factor of about .16 which means
less heat loss and lower fuel bills, even in Florida.
Insulated panels may have an outside skin of asbestos, alum-
inum, Mirawall porcelain, porcelain on aluminum, or others -
and inside skins of the same materials, or hardboard, plywood,
Formica, etc.
Call us about your problems a representative can usually
meet with you within 24 to 48 hours.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT












Why Not A Team? I



By HARVEY F. PIERCE
President, Florida Engineering Society



In the May, 1955, issue of The FLORIDA ARCHI- gineer-does not keep this relationship. Suppose a
TECT I attempted to point out some of the reasons member of the team is called in by the Captain
for good Architect-Engineer relations. If I made after the owner has approved sketches. And sup-
my point, it is now time to spell out some of the pose he is instructed to prepare structural drawings
mechanics of cashing in on these relations. In this for a framing system which has already been frozen
day and age of great advances in engineering and in the sketch stage, or to design an air conditioning
their related effect on all types of structures, the system in a building where provisions for it have
importance of good engineering in a given project not been made, or where construction already set
very often outweigh the purely architectural ele- makes for an uneconomical design, inadequate serv-
ments. icing features, or other compromises. Will the work
In most buildings it is the prerogative of the of both Captain and team result in the best overall
architect to plan the space requirements, general solution? The answer is obviously negative.
arrangement of areas, detail of finish and material. It is high time that the entire team be used in
But it is obviously to the advantage of the owner the selling stage of the Prime Professional's opera-
to have a structural system which is safe and eco- tions. In other words, when the Prime Professional
nomical; an electrical system which will not be
noical; an electrical system which will not be discusses the owners' requirement with his client, he
obsolete before the building is 10 years old; a n s i s
should not stop with floor plans and perspectives,
lighting system which will be efficient to operate n precie
a s well as pleasing; a plumbing system which will bbut should round out the picture to include all the
as well as pleasing; a plumbing system which will ecs
be adequate, safe and quiet without gold plating; engieerig and architectural features of the pro-a
and an air conditioning system which will be eco- posed proect He should hav there owners o eet and
M nomical, satisfactory and adequate. discuss these items with other members of the team
norical, satisfactory and adequate.
Now at this point I would like to state that so that each will be better able to do his job. In this
both the Architect and the Engineer regards him- way the owner gains greater confidence in the Ar-
self as a professional and would like to have those ctect or Engineer because he not only knows the
with whom he works treat him as such. Each takes members of the team but also understands how the
pride in making a valuable contribution to any pro. team works. He can then feel that his desires are
ject large or small. And the Engineer appreciates being fully incorporated by professionals who under-
and responds to the opportunity to be in on the stand his requirements.
"ground floor", to make suggestions as to how best We can grow in professional stature by using the
to integrate his work with that of the Architect- team approach in this manner, as opposed to the
and to receive due credit for his contributions, prevalent practice of grand-standing-which we have
If the Engineer is to develop full professional seen in the past on the part of both Architects and
stature in his own eyes and in the eyes of the public, Engineers.
hi e must grow in ability, knowledge and esteem. The logic of such an approach cannot successfully
This he cannot do if he is generally regarded as be refuted. Large firms, in which both Architects
either a tradesman or a mere technician, and Engineers are principals, sell their services very
At the same time if the Architect is the prime eloquently by this method of emphasizing the
professional on any assignment, it is incumbent portance of both aspects o their work. This is good
upon him to be the team captain. He must use portance of both aspects of theirr work. This is good
the skills of the entire team to the best possible business for them, for their success can attest to
advantage, that. Then certainly it should be good business for
The theory of team work cannot be put to the Architect who used an independent Engineer
practice if the team captain-be he architect or en- on his work-or vice versa.



NOVEMBER, 1955 5





























l Daiy Products i concrete
sB' ^ *


v p


The new plant and office of the T. G. Lee Dairy
in Orlando is another fine example of the multiple
use of prestressed concrete units . Roof and
second floor are prestressed Double T concrete slabs.
Prestressed concrete columns, cast in one piece,
run the full height of the building in the two-story
area. Prestressed concrete beams-some with a length
of 43 feet support the second floor and roof.
The ground floor is concrete, and walls are concrete
blocks.
Prestressed concrete construction facilitates faster
erection and, of course, the use of concrete means
fire, storm and termite protection, greater sanitation,
and lower maintenance and insurance costs.


This progress photograph shows prestressed Double T
concrete slabs being placed on second floor.
Architects: Johnson-Edwards & Associates, Lakeland


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY ..
FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA* SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION, CHATTANOOGA *TRINITY DIVISION. DALLAS
6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


. I.








The Contemporary Florida -lome


Following a logical formula for de-
sign (the one I use, by the way), the
Architect takes three major consid-
erations: the People, the Site, and
the Climate, and, using his know-how
and imagination, creates the design.
In following this pattern, I think we
can most clearly examine and discuss
in their proper light, all the funda-
mentals involved in the design of the
contemporary Florida home.
First, the People: Your client and
mine in this category is the typical
American family: a pretty generalized
and nebulous client, perhaps, yet one
who on closer examination has a
pretty definite background, require-
ments, and aspirations.
The typical American family con-
sists of two adults and two children
of school age, and usually a dog. Tra-
ditionally, they love their land, home-
ly informal living, good home made
food-the wife cooks all the meals.
They love the outdoors-the typical
American's heart is as big as the geo-
graphy of his vast land. They are
practical and thrifty, yet they have
faith in the future to a point of being
willing to mortgage it for immediate
benefits accruing from the fantastic
productivity of American industry.
The parents have an ardent desire
to create a real home for their chil-
dren-there might be a third-and
realize that the children must have
some privacy and their own facilities
for study and for entertainment of
their young friends if they are to feel
that their home is truly their own,
and that they are not underfoot. The
parents have common interests with
their children and facilities for these
interests are reflected in the house-
hold.
Mealtime is an important, informal
and cozy affair, suggesting an inti-
mate proximity to the kitchen, as
there is no maid. Facilities for quick
snacks for the kids on holidays and
NOVEMBER, 1955


in the summer are a great help to the
wife. Their friends, both adults and
children, are just as informal as they,
and provision for formal dining is not
necessary. Larger parties and special
occasions are handled either buffet
style or by a barbecue picnic.
They own one car, but will soon
have a second one, for the wife is
stranded in the suburban area without
one, and the children soon will be
able to drive.
Floridians as a whole are a little
different from the average American
for pretty obvious reasons.
Even those of us who have lived in
Florida for a quarter century or more
are newcomers. We have moved here,
and in the moving we did more than
just move to another house or an-
other state we have moved into
a totally new pioneering environment
and climate. We have moved spirit-
ually, as well as physically. We still
remember and cherish traditions, but
as something in the past, not the
present.
The result is that the typical Flor-
idian family is just like any other
American family except more so; more
informal, more progressive, more sun
and fun loving, more nature minded.
I am convinced that the Florida fam-
ily will accept anything in home de-
sign that is pleasing to the eye, is
practical and solves its living prob-
lems. Here indeed is the perfect
client.
Secondly, the Site: In keeping with
the decentralization of American
cities, the average site is a suburban
one ranging from 75' x 100' lot to an
acre or more of ground. Here, again,
the American's traditional desire to
own more land which he can cherish
and improve is expressed.
The site is NOT a grassed piece of
fenced land on which the house is
planted. The site is the homestead -
an integral part of the living accom-


By IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, F.A.I.A.---A significant mes-
sage delivered in Tampa, October 21, before the 1955 State
Convention of the Florida Home Builders Association.


modations. Contiguous areas and en-
vironment also have a great bearing
on the site. Exposure, view, privacy,
and vegetation as regarding the site
require careful study in connection
with the design.
The typical Florida home site
leaves much to be desired from the
designer's and even the builder's
point of view. It is also "more so"
than the typical American site. It is
flatter, more rectangular and more
barren of vegetation, particularly with
the help of the speculative builder
who is "bulldozer happy", and the
developer who never heard of any-
thing but a straight line and a 90
degree angle.
Thirdly, the Climate: The statistics
of the climate are readily available to
all. But to a designer climate dic-
tates, impedes or inspires possibilities
of land utilization for living purposes
depending on its characteristics.
(And here in true and sincere
Chamber of Commerce style we can
really say Ah!)
Yes, our climate is wonderful, but
it also poses many a problem both
to the Architect and Builder. Our
air temperatures are fairly comfortable
the year around, but the sun is beast-
ly hot. We don't have many drizzles
but when the rains come, they come
in buckets and without warning.
Let's face it we have termites,
ants, sand flies and mosquitoes; ev-
erything propagates at a rapid rate in
Florida, and they are no exception.
We have hurricanes. Even in South
Florida we have cold snaps, two or
more weeks at a time. All these
factors must be considered, but in
their proper light, for it is true that
on the average we can expect 340
days of comfortable sunny weather
per year.
Now, let us see how the Architect,
the developer and the builder can
produce a good contemporary house
for this "perfect client", the Florida
family.
First, the developer must be a good
neighbor, and an intelligent one; and
he doesn't have to worry about the
money, because it is good business
and will pay off in the end. DON'T
(Continued on Page 25)









ECONOMY
through simple design and
prefabrication


tapering from 16" to 6"


* The LIGHTWEIGHT TWIN T*
w has an insulating value equal to 10" of
solid concrete
The LIGHTWEIGHT TWIN T*
w effects large savings in dead weight
| The LIGHTWEIGHT TWIN T*
economy is a continuing economy through the
reduction of maintenance and insurance costs


0 Call and we will gladly send a representative to answer
your questions
Hollostone is the
ONLY manufacturer of
the LIGHTWEIGHT TWIN T


V "Twin T"


1


*Trade Mark Registered
Patent Pending


H J specializes in structural
Sl oa tone precast concrete
P. 0. Drawer 1980, Opa-Locka, Florida Phone MUrray 8-2526


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


__



























New Florida North officers: left to right, Arthur L. Campbell, Jr., Gainesville, secretary; A. Eugene Cellar, Jacksonville, vice-
president; Jack Moore, Gainesville, president; Thomas E. Ewart, Jr., Jacksonville, treasurer; James A. Meehan, Jr., director.





Two Chapters Elect 1956 Officers


Last month two of the State's
largest chapters, so far as territory is
concerned, elected new officers to
serve next year. They are Florida
North and Florida Central, both of
which have for some time held quart-
erly, instead of monthly meetings.
In both Chapters elections are sched-
uled for the last quarterly meeting
of the year.
The Florida North meeting was
held October 11 at the Skyroom of
the new Independent Life Insurance
Building at Jacksonville as the wind-
up of the business meeting. Election
results were: President, JACK MOORE
of Gainesville, to succeed himself;
Vice-President, A. EUGENE CELLAR,
Jacksonville, who will succeed MYRL
HANES of Gainesville; Secretary, AR-
THUR L. CAMPBELL, JR., Gainesville,
in place of JAMES A. MEEHAN, JR., of
Jacksonville, elected a director of the
Chapter. The new Treasurer is
THOMAS E. EWART, JR., of Jackson-
ville, who will succeed HARRY LEE
LINDSEY of Gainesville.
The Chapter also elected three ad-
ditional directors in line with their
membership proportionment as out-
lined in the F.A.A. Re-districting
plan. They were, TAYLOR HARDWICK,
Jacksonville; IVAN H. SMITH, Jackson-
ville, and THOMAS LARRICK, of
NOVEMBER, 1955


Gainesville. Under the new district-
ing plan, each section will be repre-
sented on the F.A.A. Board by a sec-
tional vice-president. The Chapter
voted to propose the name of FRANK-
LIN S. BUNCH as a nominee for North
Florida Section's vice-president for


the F.A.A. elections during the No-
vember Convention at Daytona
Beach.
Florida Central's meeting took
place October 15 at the Orange
Court Hotel in Orlando. As one re-
(Continued on Page 18)


Florida Central's new officers are: front row, Robert Levinson, Clearwater,
alternate director; Roland W. Sellew, Sarasota, president; Archie G. Par-
ish, St. Petersburg, director. Back row: A. Wynn Howell, Lakeland, vice-
president; John M. Crowell, Sarasota, secretary; Ernest T. H. Bowen, II,
Tampa, director.








New Beam Design Stands


Test


Judging by the growing enthusiasm
for use of pre-stressed concrete units,
engineers have hardly scratched the
surface of an important technical
field. And architects are just becom-
ing aware of the apparently limitless
design possibilities that the compara-
tively new prestressed and precast
units are rapidly bringing into sharp
focus.
Last month additional proof of
these statements was offered a group
of Miami architects and engineers in
the testing of four new types of pre-
stressed beams developed by the
Schilling-Crissey Company of South
Miami. The tests were conducted by


the Wingerter Laboratories of Miami
and were technically observed and
tabulated by DR. MURRAY T. MAN-
TELL and EDWIN F. HEYER of the
University of Miami's Civil Engineer-
ing Department.
All of the beams were I-sections.
Three were 16-inch units spanning 40
feet; the other spanned 20 feet with
an 8-inch depth. Tests were with con-
centrated loadings in all cases; and in
all of them units behaved almost ex-
actly as calculated with ultimate loads
averaging almost three times the nor-
mal loading for which the beams were
designed.
Two of the beams, all of which


were designed by MERRILL E. CRIS-
SEY, were loaded at mid-point of their
40-foot span. One was reinforced
with six 3/-inch cables; the other with
15 steel wires of .196 diameter. Steel
area of the cable reinforcing was .48
sq.in. and that of the wires, .45 sq.in.
Chief differences between these
beams and other types of prestressed
units was, first, incorporation of a
curved pattern in the prestressing ele-
ments, and, second, the design of each
end. Bearings were four inches; but
for about a foot from each end bear-
ings were only half depth, with the
design splayed to full depth at a 45
degree angle. Within the structure
reinforcing had been curved and pre-
tensioned to follow this design and in
addition, a minimum of mild steel
bars had been placed in the top web
at each end.
One objective of the concentrated
load tests was to determine ultimate
loadings, observe the extent of strand
slippage, record deflections and re-
coveries. Another was to discover if
performance of the end design match-
ed in all technical respects the charac-
teristics calculated for the full beam
section. Still a third was to determine
advantages, if any, of strand reinforc-
ing against wire reinforcing, or vice
versa.
Results were completely satisfac-
tory on every count. As predicted,
(Continued on Page 17)


Above, test operations being con-
ducted on a 40-foot span I-section
of 6,000 psi concrete, reinforced
with 6 % -inch cables of .48 sq. in.
steel area. This picture was taken
after twice the design load had been
applied and released. The guage
showed a deflection of 7 % inches
at failure with almost three times
the design load. Ultimate deflection
of the joist with wire reinforcing
was 9 inches. Right, two closeups of
the test loading and, right just prior
to release of twice the design load.
10


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

















































Rich walnut Weldwood paneling provides warmth and subtle luxury in reception room of Henry Holt & Co., New York City. Interiors by Designs For Business.


ACCENT ON CONTEMPORARY

Beautiful wood walls-natural companion to good design


See how wonderfully superb wood paneling by Weldwood
adds depth and richness to modern design!
In striking contemporary buildings throughout the world,
the traditional beauty of wood paneling accentuates vivid-
ly the clean, "balanced" look of fine modern interiors.
Specify Weldwood-choose from the world's finest woods.
Over 100 beautiful veneers available, many from stock in
regular sizes. For example we regularly stock Korina;
American elm; curly white and red birch; Samara*; bird's-
eye, curly and select white rock maple; plain and quarter


WeldwoodO

HARDWOOD PANELING
product of
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORPORATION
The World's Largest Plywood Organization


sliced American and French walnut; cherry; prima vera;
Nakora*; rotary red, plain sliced and rift sliced oak; Afri-
can, Philippine and Honduras mahogany; and many others.
Weldwood Architectural Grade Panels are also available-
manufactured to your exact specifications.
Famous guarantee all Weldwood paneling is guaranteed
unconditionally for the life of the building.
FREE 32-PAGE BOOKLET gives complete architectural details on
installing and specifying Weldwood paneling. Send for
your copy today.
I -----------------------------------------------
United States Plywood Corporation
Weldwood Building, 55 West 44th Street, New York 26, New York
BY RETURN MAIL send me a copy of your architectural paneling hand-
book ] and data on Weldwood Mineral Core Doors 0. FA-1 1-55
NAME.....................................
COMPANY..............................................................
ADDRESS.................................................................
CITY................................ .............. .....STATE ......


NOVEMBER, 1955











Daytona




Beach




Presents...


By TED RUGG
Daytona Beach Chamber of Commerce







Like every modern city, Daytona
Beach has its problems of delin-
quency. To help solve them the
firm of Griffin and Gomon design-
ed this Juvenile Detention Home to
provide as homelike as possible
surroundings for youngsters who
need discipline but only minimum
measures of detention.


Its founder would never know Daytona Beach today!
Hard to imagine what it was like in 1870 when old Mathias Day
forsook the rigors of his native Ohio winters to start a town that lives
in an eternal spring! Flagler's steam trains-with hotels to match-
weren't due to inch their way toward the Keys for another sixteen years.
The Greater Daytona Beach Recreational Area wasn't yet so much as a
gleam in anybody's eye. The elder Rockefeller was still dreaming up
an oil empire, blissfully ignorant that he was to become a legend of
Ormond Beach. And Sir Malcolm Campbell, the man who was to
discover the speedway possibilities of the world's most famous beach,
hadn't even been born.
But the promise of everything was there. That incomparable, 23-
mile stretch of hard-packed sand was there. The smiling, storm-pro-
tected Halifax River was there-and between them was that length of
breeze-swept, palm-studded island that today is one of America's most
justly popular resorts.
The extent to which the vision of old Mathias has come true-even
beyond his dreams, probably-is your privilege to discover. Daytona
Beach welcomes you to the 41st Annual F.A.A. Convention, just as
warmly as do the architect-members of the Daytona Beach Chapter who
will act as your Convention Hosts. In true Chamber of Commerce
fashion we could say much about our community today. But new visitors
will discover its charms quickly. And for those who already know it of
old the discovery of new developments will be as enjoyable.
For the old and new visitors alike, illustrations here may offer an
unsuspected professional interest-and may suggest that the dream of
Mathias Day is still as real and active as it was when he saw beauty here
and founded what is now known throughout the country as "The All-
America City".


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


BIYIPI~c-~IIL---- -
I '


- ----------- .......~;
:::::;:::h~:CI::::::

































. --f I .


Francis R. Walton and Francis W. Craig were
architects for the Peabody Auditorium, built
in 1947 for practically all types of cultural
entertainment for fully professional presenta-
tion to an audience of about 2,500.


On Cypress and Keech Streets is the Negro
Recreational Building for which Harry K. Grif-
fin was the architect. Faced with prceast con-
crete blocks, the structure is an important social
meeting place for Daytona's negro population.


-- ---~B1L~--~ II
.--r I~ -
: iiii. .-....
;-;:
j : ::"':~:: :. ::
:;::i:::': :::::;::i;:i::I'Z!~:~At::i;i:;':"': :v:Iiili)~:r
~"'~` -
:::
:: :~:.
::. :.: ...:..


NOVEMBER, 1955







VDaytona eacd Presenta-

The First Presbyterian
Church was designed by Har-
ry K. Griffin to provide a
church school, office and so-
cial rooms in addition to a
sanctuary seating 500. Anoth-
er of Daytona's churches is
now under construction at
North Halifax Avenue and
University Bouevard. It is
Our Lady of Lourdes chapel
and school for which Spicer
and Gehlert are supervising
architects.



















The stucco and stone build-
ing below is the YMCA build-
ing, designed by Harry M.
Griffin to include a swim-
ming pool and gymnasium in
addition to social and meet-
ing rooms.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT













































The firm of Craig and Snead
were architects for the Madi-
son Avenue Fire Station,
above. This is in a residen-
tial neighborhood; and one
of the design objectives was
to clothe the building with a
character and scale that would
be in complete harmony with
its surroundings.




















Scene of several meetings for
architects' wives during the
Convention is the Art League
on Palmetto Avenue. Francis
R. Walton was its architect;
and he has provided two gal-
leries, a working studio, two
craft shops and living quar-
ters for a managing director
within walls faced with Ten-
nessee stone.


NOVEMBER, 1955




















Living can be so

comfortable for your

clients the year 'round . .

:::::::especially when you

specify Oil or LP Gas

heating. It's so clean and
: :i::.:.:. : . .

S-::healthful, so wonderfully

warm and so economical!


Liquid fuel heating

Sis the practical way to beat

: t the cold snap problem ...

permanently.






... . ..-. ..-. ........ . .
: fli:i:i :i:i:
.......::,?






FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
INCORPORATED
State Headquarters: 326 S. E. 1st Street, Miami, Fla. Phone 3-2410


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






New Beam Design ...
(Continued from Page 10)
tracking loads were about 1.5 times
design loads. Deflection recovery im-
mediately after release of twice the
design load was within an eighth of
an inch of original position. And
when the cable-tensioned beam was
tested at a quarter-point adjacent to
one end, there was no diagonal ten-
sion failure and practically no deflec-
tion for a loading equivalent to
13,000 lbs. at mid-span. Tests showed
that in general the wire reinforcing,
with less actual steel area, to be some-
what superior to the cable reinforcing.
Significance of results' is the pos-
sibility of cutting overall story heights
with safety because of the new end
design; the fact that curving wires
gives a beam 38 per cent greater load
capacity than one without, thus per-
mitting wider spans with smaller sec-
tions; and the availability at beam
ends for pipes and ducts without need
for a hung ceiling.
Both designing and testing engi-
neers pointed out that incorporation
of the curve in pretensioned steel is
the chief factor that controls both the
characteristics of beams tested and
the designed performance of other
shapes. It is this trick of curving
wires or cables that makes the half-
height ends of beams practical and
provides them with the great strength
indicated in the tests.
This half-height design is similar
in general conformation to the overall
shape of a steel bar-joist. Just as bar-
joist construction allows space at both
ends of the span for installation of
utility pipes and ducts, so does use of
this new beam. Obviously this elimi-
nates the need-at least from the
mechanical installation point of view
-for a hung ceiling that steals valua-
ble cubage from a building envelope.
Thus far the curved-reinforcing
principle has been applied only to
joists. But since it permits longer
spans without increasing section
weights materially, other shapes are
now in the design stage. These in-
clude T's and double T-slabs that
will, in all probability, also utilize the
same space-saving design trick of half-
height ends.
NOVEMBER, 1955


everyone talks about the weather

...But Arcadia solved the weather problem with Twin-Seal
Wool Pile Weatherstripping-another important point of
difference between Arcadia and other sliding glass doors.
Twin-Seal Weatherstripping on Arcadia's new custom
aluminum door is shown below in a section at the latching
jamb. A positive weatherseal between jamb and sliding
panel is made by a double row of opposing wool pile
weatherstrips. Wind, rain, cold and dirt are locked out
tightly. Identical wool pile strips at head and interlocker,
and a spring-loaded wool pile sill strip complete the four-side
weatherseal. Arcadia's aluminum-backed weatherstripping,
fully silicoated for moisture and abrasion resistance, is
easily replaced without dismantling the sliding panel.
Twin-Seal Weatherstripping is just one Arcadia point of
difference you should know about. Other important Arcadia
features are detailed in our expanded 1955 Catalog 55-A.
For a copy, phone your Arcadia distributor or wire us collect.


S THERE'S MORE TO

a r d i sliding glass doors
P a W THAN MEETS THE EYE


help build a better america
... ee an architect


ARCADIA METAL PRiIUCTS.. FILLEITIN CALIFIRNIA
Ditribtor, in Caada, Puerto Rico. and throughout
the United States. National Member Producen' Coun-
cii. Inc., and National Asociation of Home Builder.













sOUnD

discuss it with

Bruce Equipment

TEN YEARS of field experi-
ence with the highly special-
ized problems of sound
distribution, and factory
training in electronic en-
gineering, have outstanding-
ly qualified Bruce Equipment
Company for consultation on
layout and designing of *
paging background music
and program distribution.
systems electronic and
telephonic intercommuni-
cation school and hospi-
tal systems.

To assure satisfactory per-
formance and to preclude
the many possible errors, the
best engineers call in Bruce
Equipment. Their service
entails no obligation.


Authorized
engineering distributors for

DUKANE PRODUCTS
Ask for A.I.A. File No. 31-1-51







. &RUCE
EQUIPMENT CO.

26 N. W. 36 St. Miami 32
Telephone 3-7496


News & Notes


(Continued from Page 9)
suit, an entirely new slate of officers
will administer Chapter affairs next
year. Elected were: President, RO-
LAND W. SELLEW, Sarasota, who will
wield the gavel in place of RICHARD
E. JESSEN of Tampa; Vice-President,
A. WYNN HOWELL, who succeeds
RALPH P. LOVELOCK of Winter
Park; Secretary JOHN M. CROWELL,
Sarasota, in place of ERNEST T. H.
BOWEN, II, of Tampa who became a
director; and Treasurer, JACK Mc-
CANDLESS, of St. Petersburg to suc-
ceed ANTHONY L. PULLARA of Tampa.
Others elected were ARCHIE G.
PARISH, director, of St. Petersburg,
and ROBERT H. LEVINSON, Clearwa-
ter, alternate director.

New Chapters Proposed
As reported in these columns last
month, formal organization of the
new Mid-Florida Chapter, A.I.A., is
scheduled for completion prior to the
start of the Daytona Beach Cinven-
tion in November. A poll of Florida
Central membership from which
the new Chapter will be formed -
indicated substantial approval; and
during its October 15 business meet-
ing Florida Central made its blessing
unanimous. Thus, by 1956 Florida
will have eight, instead of seven
A.I.A. Cahpters.
By the end of next year the num-
ber may be nine. At the Florida
North Chapter meeting last month,


A. EUGENE CELLAR proposed forma-
tion of a new chapter for the Jack-
sonville metropolitan area which
would "probably come to include
Duval, Nassau and St. Johns count-
ies." The proposal was supported by
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH who stressed the
difficulty of distances in the present
North Chapter set-up (17 counties
in the north-east part of the State,
seven more in the western tip) and
indicated the need for vigorous local
programs that might be better
achieved through support of a local
group.
When finally put to a vote, Chap-
ter members approved the proposal
by substantial majority, thus clear-
ing the way for application of a
charter by the Jacksonville group.
Sponsors of the proposal said that the
new chapter would probably start
with a nucleus of 18 to 25 active
corporate members, from the more
than 40 registered architects listed
for the Jacksonville area.
South Florida Chapter
The October meeting was held at
Pine Tree Inn on the first Tuesday
of the month as usual; and after din-
ner and a short business meeting,
some 65 members listened to a first
hand report on the atomic tests of
"Disaster Village", the doomstown
built at Yucca Flats to determine
resistance of various types of residen-
tial construction to the effects of
bomb blasts.


Honored guests at the Florida Central Chapter's dinner dance, held at the
Orange Court hotel in Orlando last month was this foursome representing
the A.G.C. Left to right are: Mrs. J. A. Riviere, J. Hilbert Sapp, presi-
dent of the Florida A.G.C. Council, Mrs. Sapp and J. A. Riviere, a director
of the general contractors' organization.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT

























Having a wonderful time was
charming Mrs. William Austin
whose husband, an official of the
Florida Steel Products Company,
was one of the hosts to Florida
Central members at a pre-dinner
cocktail party last month in
Orlando.

Miss MARGARET CANN, an admin-
istrative officer of the Miami Civil
Defense organization was the witness-
speaker. Her account of what hap-
pened was both gripping and graphic;
and it was visually heightened by an
Air Force color movie of a series of
atomic explosions, from baby bombs
to some of the largest yet developed.
During the business meeting, it
was announced that next month (No-
vember 8) would be an election meet-
ing. ALFRED B. PARKER was appoint-
ed as chairman of the Craftsman-of-
the-Year Committee, with craftsman
awards scheduled for presentation at
the Chapter's December meeting.
WAHL J. (JACK) SNYDER, II, was
named chairman of the Annual Ball
Committee.
These new Coporate members were
announced: SCOTT B. ARNOLD; JAMES
L. DEEN; CURTIS E. HALEY; LEWIS
M. HITT, III. JERRY P. SIMMONS and
CLEARANCE P. HAMER were welcomed
as associate members.

Daytona Beach Chapter
Plans are now complete for the
l.A.A.'s 41st Annual Convention.
Reservations are arriving in a steady
stream; and present indications are
that the Convention will be one of
the largest on record.
Host Committeemen emphasize
that space in the Princess Issena Ho-
tel, Convention headquarters, is def-
initely limited and urge immediate
(Continued on Page 20)
NOVEMBER, 1955


IA
C




















r '

-y-
4









0



I'

















WAINSCOT and FLOOR


Nothing matches the beauty and enduring "
quality of Suntile ceramics for corridor
wainscot and floors. Perfect for school,
factory, hotel, office buildings and -
general institutional use. Here's a
scratch resistant building material that
-9





thrives on abuse. High traffic areas o
look sparkling clean and new-year after 10
year. Specify Suntile for low-cost
mainten ace and lasting beauty.

Samples, colors and textures can be
obtained by writing or phoning our office.
P.O. BOX 428 BUENA VISTA STATION ,
a


UTOR


4000 N. MIAMI AVE. MIAMI, FLA. PHONE: PLaza 8-2571









What


Makes


A Good


Job? a


FIRST -
Good Design, Functional
Layout; with drawings
and specifications by
qualified Architects and
and Engineers.

SECOND -
Qualified and Experienced
General Contractors.

THIRD -
Qualified and Experienced
Sub-Contractors and
Specialists-like Miller
Electric Company who
have stood the acid-test
for over twenty-five years.


MEMBER MILLER

ELECTRIC

COMPANY

of Florida

Electrical Contractors,
serving the southeastern
states, and all of Florida.
P. O. BOX 1827
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
PHONE ELGIN 4-4461


News & Notes


Attending the Florida North Chapter meeting in Jacksonville last month
were Stanley Greene and Robert Denyse, scholarship students at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Between them is Professor Joseph Wilkes of the U. of F.
College of Architecture, faculty advisor to the Student Chapter, A.I.A.


(Continued from Page 19)
action on reservations to assure ade-
quate accommodations.
If you have not already done so,
send your Convention registrations
at once to JOEL W. SAYERS, JR.,
Reservation Secretary, P.O. Box 1671,
Daytona Beach.
Room reservations should be made
directly to The Princess Issena Hotel,
Daytona Beach. Ask for one of two
"package deals". The first starts with
dinner Wednesday night, Novembei
16, extends through luncheon Sun-
day, November 20. The second starts
with dinner Thursday night, Novem-
ber 17 and extends through Sunday's
luncheon. Both include room charges
and all meals for the period.
The Host Chapter estimates that a
total of $37.50 will cover all Conven-
tion expenses for you and your wife.
And attendance will also put you in


Inconspicuous


line to take home one of the many
items that are being made available
in connection with the product ex-
hibit.
This is the Last Call! Plan the 5-
day week-end as a fall vacation by
following the Committee's urging to
"Come Early and Stay Late".
42nd Convention May Repeat
Records show that this year's Con-
vention is the first since 1947 to re-
peat a locality. But it is probable that
next year's gathering-the F.A.A.'s
42nd annual affair-may do likewise
in selecting a city that has been a
Convention site within the past nine
years. Here are Convention locations
back to 1947: 40th-1954-P a 1 m
Beach; 39th-1953-St. Petersburg;
38th 1952 Tallahassee; 37th-
1951 -Jacksonville; 36th 1950-
Miami; 35th-1949-Daytona; 34th


. ..until fire strikes!
The Moore Flush-Type Ceiling Sprinkler
provides inconspicuous fire protection 24
hours a day.


E T The time to plan for fire protection is
at the start. Wise planning in the archi-
tect's office can result in a system de-
signed for attractive modern interiors.
iCall in the Moore Engineer- let
him show you the advantages of
Moore Automatic Sprinklers.
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Company iACKSONVLLE
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





-1948--Winter Park; 33rd-1947
-Gainesville.
Either Tampa and Orlando might
be selected as the 42nd Convention
City, since the former has a substan-
tial representation as part of the Flor-
ida Central Chapter and Orlando will
be headquarters for the new Mid-
Florida Chapter. Otherwise the Con-
vention at Daytona might decide to
repeat a former location, with either
Jacksonville or Miami as prime possi-
bilities.

Office Notes
The Tampa firm of PULLARA,
BowEN AND WATSON, architects and
engineers, has announced the associa-
tion of WILLIAM B. EATON as head
of its architectural department. Eaton,
a member of the Florida Central
Chapter, is a native of Albany, New
York and a graduate of Rensselear
Polytechnic Institute with an addi-
tional master's degree in City Plan-
ning. He taught architectural design
there for six years prior to joining the
teaching staff of the College of Ar-
chitecture and Allied Arts of the U.
of F. in Gainesville. He recently re-
signed from the U. of F. faculty to
accept his appointment in Tampa.
In Daytona Beach, the firm of
GRIFFIN AND GOMON, Architects,
announce the appointment of JOEL
W. SAYERS, JR., as Associate Archi-
tect. The firm's new associate has
been active in affairs of the Daytona
Beach Chapter and is a Vice-presi-
dent of the F.A.A.
(Continued on Page 22)


Presiding at the organizational
meeting of the Auxiliary of the
Florida Central Chapter, the first
architectural group of its kind in
the State, was Mrs. A. Wynn Howell
of Lakeland.
NOVEMBER, 1955


Architect, J. Brooks Haas, A.I.A., Jacksonville
Contractor, E. C. Kenyon, Jacksonville


A/ Sign 5



9ood VDesc



This striking design was developed with aluminum
letters, of the channel type, formed of heavy-
gauge sheet and continuously welded by the heliarc
process. Surfaces are of translucent plastic, lighted
from behind by neon tubing. Letters are bolted to
the canopy facia formed of two 6-inch aluminum
channels that provide a raceway for necessary
wiring ... A wide choice of stock styles and sizes
of letters are available in cast aluminum or endur-
ing plexiglas-or signs of any size and style can
be fabricated to specification.




JACKSONVILLE METAL & PLASTICS CO.
MANUFACTURERS
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville, Florida
OUR ENGINEERING, ART AND DESIGN DEPARTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE
FOR CONSULTATION WITHOUT OBLIGATION. PHONE ELGIN 6-4885.





1 News & Notes


Vmcttp SAFE tda SORRY mot


JONES STORM SHUTTER
Sooner or later all industrial and commercial buildings in
this area require the protection of storm shutters. Plan now
to install the best-JONES STORM SHUTTERS-tested and ap-
proved by the University of Miami.
The best way to preserve the beauty of architectural de-
sign is to make provision for storm shutters at the time the
building plans are drawn. While construction is taking place
it is simple to conceal the hardware, such as headers, and thus
preserve the dean architectural lines of the structure. Later, as
the need arises, the full shutter installation can be made.
Our engineering group is available for consultation at any
time regarding details of header design or complete shutter
installation.
.o,. .. :. ,


I on r i



SLIP IN HEADERS AIRLINER HEADER
DESIGN FABRICATION e INSTALLATION

GIFFEN INDUSTRIES, INC.
CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA


et Ceast Co.
LAKE WORTH W
Products Co.
JACKSONVILLE
Mlky Way BuildIng
MOUNT DO
Nutting Electric ec c
aCO
aSaeota-Electread
SARASOTA
ThHalma Heating
R Apwpane Ceorp.

,et reMr easy-to-install
ST. PETERSBURG
t E s Convenient, quiet
& Service
CLEARWATER Thermostat control
in each room
Conrws Heating
NA *E i Requires no floor
space
Mitch's Electrend
Sakle & Service
PENSACOLA
L A. ates Now, get dean, even, convenient electric heat at
TALLAS EE far less money than you ever thought possible.
0 See, the revolutionary new electric circulating air
Nell Rice Ekctr heating system-Electrend-today.
SEBRING DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
Rowland's Electrend OF FLORIDA
Sales & Servie 2541 Central Avenue
DAYTONA BEACH St. Petersburg, Florida
WRITE FOR FREE MANUAL AND A.I.A. FILE FOLDER.


I.
/r^B


Snapped during a jovial interlude
in the Florida Central's quarterly
business meeting were these three
long-time members of th F.A.A.:
Franklin O. Adams, Jr., F.A.I.A.,
Tampa, left; and George A. Spohn
and Henry P. Whitworth, both of
Winter Park.


(Continued from Page 21)
Developments in New Law
Covering Determination of
Prevaliing Wage Rates
As of August 6 this year, Florida's
Prevailing Wage Rate Law went into
effect (see August issue, page 9) and
under its provisions the Industrial
Commission took steps to set rates
S "prevailing" in all localities involving
public work throughout the State.
Presumably to make a difficult job
easier, the Commission first attempted
to set rates covering widely inclusive
districts. But at a September hearing
in Tallahassee inequities of that at-
tempt were pointed out and now the
Commission's policy is apparently to
confine rate areas to county bound-
aries.
However, studies of payrolls inci-
dent to setting up rate patterns cov-
ered Federal projects, which carry
wage schedules (Davis-Bacon) that
are in some cases considerably higher
than those pertaining to State public
works projects. Use of the Davis-
Bacon scales as a basis for the Indus-
trial Commission's wage determina-
tion would thus undoubtedly result in
increasing the labor costs of State
projects.
The Florida A.G.C. Council has
recently brought this matter to the
attention of the Industrial Council.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1






ELTON J. MOUGHTON, A.I.A.
From Jack Moore. president of the
Florida North Chapter, comes news
of the death of Elton J. Moughtroi. of
Sanford. Mr. Moughton, whose regis-
tration certificate was number 153,
was one of the Florida Cli.pttr's
charter members and had practiced
architecture in Sanford since 1909.



A.I.A. Rules on Phone Listings
In the current issue of the Blue-
print, monthly bulletin of the West-
chester (N.Y.) Clu.pkr. A.I.A., is a
reference to a ruling by EDMUND
PURVES, A.I.A. Executive Director,
relative to listings in the yellow pages
of local telephone directories. The
communication, originally addressed
to the Massachusetts State Associa-
tion of Architects read:
"The Board of Directors of the
A.I.A. has ruled that it is perfectly
proper for a Chapter to advertise,
even though it is not proper for indi-
vidual architects to do so.
"With respect to listing in yellow
pages of the telephone book, it it
proper for the Chapter to make such
a listing only if it includes all the
members of the Chapter and repre-
sents each of them equally. No sup-
plemeitary individual purchases of
advertising space in the yellow pages
iv permitted, nor is the use of bold-
faced type."


I ed/Ic r


I 8 rz-lCf .a- /



IS A GLAZED, LOAD-BEARING
STRUCTURAL UNIT WITH
THESE OUTSTANDING ADVANTAGES:


* Load-bearing widths
* Modular dimensions
* Permanent color
* Straight, true edges
* Chemical and stain resistance


I ~ Satin finish
ECONOMIZE WITH SPECTRA GLAZE BY HOLLOWAY!
Extreme flexibility of design is permitted when Spectra
Glaze is chosen for sills, baths, kitchens, or commercial
buildings.
BUILD AND FINISH IN ONE OPERATION ...
A delightful swimming pool, for instance, in which the
entire veneering operation is eliminated . may be
constructed faster and more economically.
Edges are straight and true . lay fast and accurately
S. .choice of beautiful colors.


FOR
INFORMATION,
WRITE


h$P -mOld


At Jacksonville business was on the
serious side as Arthur L Campbell,
Gainesville, left, discusses the North
Chapter's future with Franklin S.
Bunch and Walter B. Schultz,
both of Jacksonville.
NOVEMBER, 1955


'o (RETE PRODUCTS
Winter Park, Florida
Phone, Orlando 5-3446
Winter Park 5-8601













another prestressed concrete achievement...
a


Standard Prestressed
Concrete members
were used in the con-
struction of scores of
modem structures
like these:

Bank of Lakeland
Building
West Florida Tile 6-
Terrazzo Corp.
warehouse
Concrete Stadium at
Plit City
Singer Building,
Pompano Beach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Building at Orlando
Stone Buick Building
at Ft. Pierce


- C ---


t I






. showing prestressed concrete construction used on the new Elementary
School at Stuart, Florida . .The prestressing was performed by R. H.
Wright fr Son, Fort Lauderdale, Florida . The architect Kendall P.
Starrett of Ft. Pierce, Florida . BELOW Typical classroom.


.Prestressed concrete units offer new structural design possibili-
ties for any building in which low cost and high performance
are of special importance. Standard unit designs are made in
long casting beds by the pre-tensioning bonded system. Each
has been thoroughly field-tested; and a wide variety of units
is now being made under controlled conditions by members of
the Prestressed Concrete Institute. These prestressed concrete
units are now available. They can be specified in sizes and
shapes to meet a range of span, load and design conditions.
Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
sistance, high uniformity, low cost. Standard designs include
flat slabs, double-tee slabs, beams, columns and pilings.

PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE
FLORIDA MEMBERS:
R. H. WRIGHT & SON, INC. ------------------------- -----Ft. Lauderdale
LAKELAND ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC. _------------------------Lakeland
GORDON BROTHERS CONCRETE CO. _--------------- -------------Lakeland
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC. ---------------------------Tampa
WEST COAST SHELL CORP. ------------------ ----------------- Sarasota
DURACRETE, INC. ___- -------- ----------------_---_ Leesburg
HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. --__------------------- Winter Park
PERMACRETE, INC. _-----------------------------Daytona Beach
CAPITOL CONCRETE COMPANY, INC. ----..----------------------Jacksonville
NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY -- -------- ----------- -Pensacola
PRECAST CONCRETE, INC. -----___------ --- ------------------ Miami


A National Organization to establish and supervise Prestressed Concrete standards and procedures .. whose members
are pledged to uphold the production control and specifications set up by the Prestressed Concrete Institute.


4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1-4






The Contemporary House
(Continued from Page 7)
squeeze the last possible lot out of
an acre. Study the site from the
point of view of a good neighborhood
and it will be a good investment.
Since very few areas in Florida pro-
vide any change in elevation, the
planning of streets has to be two
dimensional. Get professional advice
on planning: curvilinear streets are
more pleasant than straight ones--
houses grouped on such streets are
less monotonous, more attractive.
Provide segregation of the develop-
ment from high traffic areas; there
will be less accidents fewer children
killed. Provide play grounds and
parks if at all possible. Communities
will be glad to maintain them until
the municipality can take over.
Both the developer and builder
should strive to leave as many of the
natural assets of the site in place.
Bulldozing a site bare just because
it is "handier" for the operations is
little short of criminal.
Once we have an adequate site
with a few native trees in a pleasant
community, the Architect and Builder
can go to work. In the speculative or
project housing field the Architect is
a relative novice and has much to
learn. The first thing he should learn
is that if he doesn't intend to con-
tribute substantially in know-how,
ideas and imagination, he might as
well stay out of it. The Builder should
learn that the Architect is not the
man who is going to turn out some
plans, but is someone whose ideas and
imagination he needs. Otherwise, lhe
might as well not call him in.
But in a spirit of mutual respect
for each other's ability and problems
and in an atmosphere of complete
cooperation, the team can really go
places. The main problem facing
them both at the start is that the
growing requirements of the Florida
family means more space, more house
and presumably more money. With
the cost of labor and materials on the
rise out of proportion with the real
estate market, what is the solution?
I don't think the answer is a
skimpier, smaller house, nor do I
think that it is in mass produced
prefabrication.
I think in Florida the answer lies
for one in the exploitation of our
(Continued on Page 27)
NOVEMBER, 1955


"Greetings and Best Wishes to the
Florida Association of Architects"

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH H. COLE, Vice-Pros.





rTABLUSHD 191

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.
INCORPORATED

"Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials"


A m1" A N-m r


ELGIN 1084 A LA
LONG DISTANCE 470




FACE BRICK
HANDMADE BRICK
"VITRICOTTA" PAVERS
GRANITE
LIMESTONE
ALBERENE STONE
SERPENTINE STONE
BRIAR HILL STONE
CRAB ORCHARD FLAGSTONE
CRAB ORCHARD RUBBLE STONE
CRAB ORCHARD STONE ROOFING
PENN. WILLIAMSTONE
"NOR-CARLA BLUESTONE"


A


.TlY A 1690 BOULEVARD, N. E.
OFFICES AND TARD




STRUCTURAL CERAMIC
GLAZED TILE
SALT GLAZED TILE
UNGLAZED FACING TILE
HOLLOW TILE
ALUMINUM WINDOWS

ARCHITECTURAL BRONZE
AND ALUMINUM
ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA

PORETE CHANNEL SLABS
PORETE NAILABLE PLANK
POREX ROOF DECKS

BUCKINGHAM AND VERMONT
SLATE FOR ROOFS AND FLOORS

ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


We are prepared to give the fullest cooperation and the best
quality and service to the ARCHITECTS, CONTRACTORS and
OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.



Represented in Florida by
LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


Coral Gables, Florida


Telephone No. 83-6554












A Roster for Reference-Jan.-Nov.,'55



Listed below are the firms which have helped this Official Journal of the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects achieve solid, healthy growth during past months of this year. Through
their advertisements here these firms seek more than merely the sale of services or products
they offer. As members of the same great industry of building that provides livelihood
for architects and engineers, they seek opportunity to work with designers--to help in


the development of better buildings, a sound industry and a


ACOUSTI ENGINEERING CO.
OF FLORIDA
101 Copeland Street, Jacksonville
Distribution and installation of cem-
esto, insulrock, celetex, wascolite sky-
domes
AIR CONTROL PRODUCTS,
INCORPORATED
3601 N.W. 54th Street, Miami
Awning windows and jalousies.
Agency-E. M. Eisfeld, Inc., Adver-
tising, 308 Roper Bldg., Miami
ARCADIA METAL PRODUCTS
Fullerton, California
Sliding glass doors
Agency- Stiller-Rouse Advertising
250 So. 'LaCienega, Beverly Hills, Calif.
ARNOLD PRODUCTS SALES
CORPORATION
6721 N. W. 36th Avenue, Miami
Awning windows and window walls.
Agency Bishopric-Green & Assoc.
Inc., 1236 duPont Bldg., Miami
AUFFORD-KELLEY COMPANY
298 N. E. 59th Street, Miami
Dwyer Cabinet Kitchens
HARVEY J. BARNWELL
1330 June Road, Jacksonville
Plastering and stucco contractor
BRUCE EQUIPMENT COMPANY
24 N. W. 36th Street, Miami
Electronic Sound Systems
DAY & NIGHT
Monrovia, California
Panelray heaters
Agency -Hixson & Jorgensen, Inc.
Adv., 3257 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, Calif.
DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
1001 S. E. 1th Street, Hialeah
Slumped brick, decorative masonry
materials
ELECTREND DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
OF FLORIDA
2541 Central Avenue, St. Petersburg
Electric heating systems
ENGINEERED PRODUCTS, INC.
1064 E. 29th Street, Hialeah
Jalocrete windows
Agency-Curt LeWald Advertising
1400 N. W. 36th Street, Miami
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
DIVISION
General Portland Cement Co., Tampa
Manufacturers of cement
Agency R. E. McCarthy & Assoc.,
Inc.
206 So. Franklin Street, Tampa


FLORIDA HOME HEATING INSTITUTE
INC.
326 S. E. 1st St. Miami
Oil and gas heating
Agency Bevis Associates, Adver-
tising, Ingraham Bldg., Miami
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Electric Utility
Agency- Grant Advertising, Inc.
Penthouse, Langford Bldg, Miami
GARCIA CUBAN TILE
1941 N. W. 1st Avenue, Miami
Manufacturers of Cuban tile
Agency Ben Wakes Advertising
500 N. W. 119th Street, Miami
GATE CITY SASH & DOOR COMPANY
Ft. Lauderdale
Jalousies and awning windows
Agency- J. Walter Thompson Co.
420 Lexington Avenue, New York City
GIFFEN INDUSTRIES, INC.
4112 Aurora, Coral Gables
Jones storm shutters
GEORGE C. GRIFFIN COMPANY
4201 St. Augustine Road, Jacksonville
"B & G" aluminum awning windows
HOLLOSTONE COMPANY OF MIAMI
480 Ali Baba Avenue, Opa Locka
Precast concrete products
Agency Bishop-Green & Assoc., Inc.
1236 duPont Bldg., Miami
HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS
Winter Park
Concrete products; Spectra-glaze _
Agency David H. Obermeyer
60A W. Robinson Avenue, Orlando
HOPKINS-SMITH
5040 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Distributors St. Charles Custom kitchens
THE INTER-OCEAN INSURANCE CO.
1202 Florida Title Bldg., Jacksonville
FAA Group disability insurance
INTER-STATE MARBLE & TILE CO.
4000 No. Miami Avenue, Miami
Marble and ceramic tile
Agency-Miller, Bacon, Avrutis &
Simons, Inc., 503 Ainsley Bldg, Miami
JACKSONVILLE METAL & PLASTIC CO.
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville
Architectural signs of aluminum
and plastic
LIFETIME FIBERGLAS SCREENING CO.
Canton, Massachusetts
Fiberglas screening
Agency-Arnold & Company, Inc.
262 Washington St., Boston, Mass.


stable, prosperous future.


LEAP CONCRETE, INC.
Lakeland
Prestressed concrete units
Agency-Sanborn Advertising Agency
1706 Holly Road, Lakeland
MAULE INDUSTRIES, INC.
5220 Biscayne Blvd., Miami
Concrete and building products
Agency -Robert E. Clarke & Assoc.,
Inc.
Suite 1614 duPont Bldg., Miami
MILLER ELECTRIC CO. OF FLORIDA
575 Dora Street, Jacksonville
Electrical contractors
MIRACLE ADHESIVE SALES COMPANY
Lake Worth
Radiant heating panels
MODERNFOLD ... Fla. dealers in Miami,
Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Or-
lando, St. Petersburg and Tallahassee
Modernfold doors
Agency Fuchs, Zemp & Celander,
Inc., 151 107th Ave., St. Petersburg
MOORE PIPE & SPRINKLER COMPANY
Jacksonville
Automatic sprinkler systems
PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE
Florida Members throughout the State
Prestressed concrete units
Agency-A. P. Phillips Company
Legion Place at Lake Ivanhoe, Orlando
PRODUCTION FACILITIES CO. INC.
4000 N.W. 28th Street, Miami
Aluminum sliding door cabinets
Agency E. M. Eisfeld, Inc., Adver-
tising, 308 Roper Bldg., Miami
SISTRUNK, INCORPORATED
400 N. W. 71st Street, Miami
West Indies shutters
STEWARD-MELLON COMPANY
2210 Alden Road, Orlando
945 Liberty Street, Jacksonville
Tile, marble, terrazzo, composition
floors
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORP.
55 West 44th Street, New York City
Interior and exterior plywood,
related products
Agency Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc.,
247 Park Avenue, New York City
F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO., INC.
1690 Boulevard, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia
Masonry building materials, roofing,
tile, aluminum windows, roof decks


1, THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





The Contemporary House
(Continued from Page 25)
wonderful climate which, with im-
agination and careful study, much
useful living space can be created by
integrating the site with the house
through inexpensively constructed
areas, partially shielded from the ele-
ments.
I think also that in Florida, as
elsewhere, the Architect and Builder
will have to evolve simpler, faster tech-
niques of construction utilizing al-
ready available materials which are
being overlooked by the home builder
now, as well as others which are being
and will be developed.
With these principles in mind we
can now proceed to evolve a design
which will accommodate the require-
ments of the typical Florida family.
Primarily it should be a home with
the integrity and honesty both of de-
sign and construction which the word
designates. It should make provisions
for all requirements of the family as
previously stated. Materials used in it
should be as maintenance-free as pos-
sible. The home can be compact but
spacious in feeling. Outdoor areas,
especially immediately adjacent to the
house should be developed and plan-
ned to assure their useability and in-
tegration with the house.
Adequate protection must be pro-
vided both from torrential rains, from
the high solar radiation and from in-
sects. In south Florida the house
should be easily made hurricane proof.
Glass must be used carefully and in
the proper places. It is expensive,
subject to wind damage and carelessly
used, an invader of privacy. Let us not
think of windows as windows and
doors as doors, but rather in each
case as a means of vision, ventilation,
access or privacy.
The home must be well equipped,
but not at the expense of the other
more important qualities.
The important thing for all of us
in the industry to keep in mind is that
we are now building homes for Amer-
icans- not houses for sale. Let us
not get too intrigued with gadgets.
But let us remember that we are to
a great extent responsible for the cre-
ation of a healthy and happy environ-
ment for the American family; and
that in the strength of the American
family is the strength of the Amer-
ican nation.


Vwye Kctche i-
A Florida Standard For Over 20 Years
Full Kitchen Convenience
In a Minimum Space ..
For Gold-Coast Apartments
. or Cabins on the Keys

Sold in Florida by:

AUFFORD-KELLEY CO., Inc.
298 N. E. 59th STREET MIAMI




e Sare t ELECTRIC...


NOVEMBER, 1955


For flexibility in
planning . Spec-
ify ELECTRIC
water heaters.
They tuck away
anywhere . .
need no special
flues or vents.
They eliminate
heat radiation...
designed to heat
the water NOT
the house. Im-
portant too . .
electric water
heaters are clean,
safe, fast and
economical.


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


44

THE
ODERN

M A]
01Z
WA Y







REVOLUTIONARY


Miracle

Heat Panel

LOW WATTAGE
CONSUMPTION

CAN ALSO BE USED
AS A WALL PANEL
Will be shown for
the first time in
FLORIDA
at
F.A.A. CONVENTION
DAYTONA BEACH
Booths # 34 and # 35

MIRACLE ADHESIVE
SALES COMPANY
Lake Worth
P. O. Box 17 Phone 6846


---------------------------------------p m

ADVERTISERS' INDEX

Arcadia Mfg. Co.. . . 17
Aufford-Kelly Co., Inc. . .27
Bruce Equipment Company . 18
Electrend Distributing Co. . 22
Florida Home Heating Institute . 16
Florida Portland Cement Division 6
Florida Power & Light Co. . .27


Producers' Council Program


The banquet room of the Coral Gables Country Club was turned into a
combination of home, garden and store window as part of the informa-
tional display sponsored by the Florida Power and Light Co., Sept. 27th.


Sparked by FRED W. CONNELL,
Miami Chapter treasurer, the Flor-
ida Power and Light Company was
sponsor for September's Information-
al Meeting held at the Coral Gables
Country Club. The theme of the
meeting, which was actually an
elaborately-staged exhibit, was "Mod-
em Light Conditioning"; and over
250 architects, and engineers, were
on hand to listen and look.
The meeting was worth while on
both counts. After cocktails and an
excellent dinner, the Chapter's guests
listened to a lighting expert from
Nela Park, light-conditioning head-


quarters in Cleveland, Ohio, pour
out facts and figures on both interior
and exterior home lighting, on com-
mercial display lighting and on ways
and means of using light to heighten
effects of architectural design and to
emphasize the sales.
As to looking, the Power Company
was assisted in its lighting demon-
stration by two of Miami's ranking
beauties, SANDY WIRTH and JOAN
RAWLINCS. And in addition to the
three-dimensional_ illumination dis-
plays architects saw a full-color movie
showing how color could be used as
another tool of architectural design.


Gate City Sash & Door Co. 3rd Cover
Giffen Industries, Inc ... . 22
George C. Griffin . . . 4
Hollostone Company of Miami . 8
Holloway Concrete Products 23
Hopkins-Smith. . . .
Inter-State Marble & Tile Company 19
Jacksonville Metal & Plastics Co. 21
Leap Concrete . . .. 2


Maule Industries, Inc.
Miller Electric Co. of Fla.
Miracle Adhesive Sales Co.
Modemfold .. . .
Moore Pipe & Sprinkler Co..


2nd Cover
20
28
4th Cover
. 20


Prestressed Concrete Institute 24
U. S. Plywood Corp. .... . 1
F. Graham Williams Co. Inc. 25
nnn n 111111 ,11 1 l


An expertly lighted interior was part of the display which was built with
cooperation of several Producers' Council members in the Miami Chapter.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





















































Gate City Aluminum Windows

are the most outstanding achievement
in window design and construction
in the past 40 years!


and here's why...

"Push-Button Ventilation":
The unique incorporation of the motorized
principle permits Gate City windows to
be used for clerestory or otherwise
inaccessible installations. The motor and
clutch mechanism is so compact that it fits
into the same identical frame used for
the regular crank operated model, or you
may place the control switch anywhere!
Master switches are also available for
multi-unit operation.


"No-Splash" Rain Protection:
Even during showers this true awning window
can stay open with no danger of the rain
back-splashing over the top vent.


Easy Operation:
A few effortless turns of the easy to reach
operating handle adjust all sash simultaneously
...specially designed gearing in the dual-action
hardware equalizes the lifting effort
regardless of sash angle.


Lasting Permanized Finish:
Salt spray and salt air have no effect on
the Gate City Aluminum Awning Window.
Exhaustive tests have proven that the special
etch and lacquer treatment applied to this
aluminum window will preserve the smooth,
satin finish for years.


Self-Adjusting Sash: The new Gate City
Aluminum Window eliminates the need for
compensating screws and manual adjustment
by its use of Gate City's exclusive split-quadrant
sash arms. Enclosed in the jambs, they permit
the sash automatic adjustment for perfect,
tight closure.


Aluminum Strip Glazing: Gate City
eliminates all putty problems in its aluminum
window by using extruded aluminum glazing
strips instead. Secured by hidden, yet easily
accessible screws, these extrusions provide
the sash with strength and rigidity; they also
allow for factory glazing.


Completely Enclosed Hardware:
Open or closed, no unsightly projecting arms
or locking devices blemish the clean, uncluttered
appearance of this window. All operating
hardware is completely enclosed from all sides.
The entire mechanism may be fully exposed
for oiling or inspection by simply
removing the cover plates.


Full Factory Weatherstripping:
An absolutely tight all-around seal is provided
by tough resilient vinyl...factory applied at
jambs, sill and meeting rails.




AWNING WINDOWS


"Window Craftsmen for over 40 years"


GATE CITY SASH & DOOR COMPANY of FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA












pw 2ontainebleau


,goes modernfold


a r

, _-." pocket with doors


*Forrey's Wholesale Hardware
Co., Inc. Miami
McCann-Freeman Co. Acme Jalousie Co.
F. Lauderdale St. Petersburg
Alexander Goedon & Son Achel Steel & Supply Co.
West Palm Beach Jacksonville
Midland Disributors Dan Carter Co.
Orlando Tallahassee


Mr. Morris Lapidus, architect for Fontainebleau,
solved an interesting problem with Modernfold.
Regarded as "the largest luxury resort of its kind"
Fontainebleau had to have the last word in
design, function and permanence.
Modernfold was chosen to attractively divide the men's
and women's card rooms on the Mezzanine floor.
Notice particularly the unique manner in which the
doors stack into the basic wall partition, which acts
as a concealing pocket for the doors. Doors enter
the pocket traveling along a 90 curved track.
Opened, the doors extend 51 feet and are 9 feet high.
See your local dealer and learn the many reasons for Modern-
fold's increased demand in both residential and commercial
applications.


"The architect's imagination is Modern-
fold's only limitation."


See your A.I.A. File No. 16-M


n = 1"Fon -.


Tr:


r: