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HIDE
 Front Cover
 Recipe for a good future
 New set-up for the state board
 A.I.A. to integrate state...
 F.A.A. operating committees,...
 The history of an idea
 Chapter news and notes
 41st annual F.A.A. convention
 History of an idea (continued from...
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00016
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: October 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00016
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Recipe for a good future
        Page 1
        Page 2
    New set-up for the state board
        Page 3
        Page 4
    A.I.A. to integrate state groups
        Page 5
    F.A.A. operating committees, 1954-1955
        Page 6
    The history of an idea
        Page 7
    Chapter news and notes
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    41st annual F.A.A. convention
        Page 12
    History of an idea (continued from page 7)
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Producers' council program
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Page 17
        Page 18
Full Text







Id ii It


October
S1955 *


Official Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


II













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Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


OCTOBER, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 10


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble -- President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman---- Secy:-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth
Morton T. Ironmonger Asst. Treas.
1229 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard- No. Central
Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph No. Central

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. kdi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford .. Forida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., allahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, Information on
Chapter and -individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
lect to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit Is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

McMURRAYea 26 MIAMI

OCTOBER, 1955


Recipe for


A Good Future


It's a good idea for every man to stop, now and then, take stock
of what he has and what he's doing and then look ahead to the future
that he's headed for. It's even better if he keeps the future he wants
to attain in mind and then periodically adjusts his current activities
to be sure he's on the road that will lead him to it.
That procedure is equally good for groups of men professional
organizations like the A.I,A. and state associations like the F.A.A.
General recognition that such a self-searching is worthwhile has brought
into being the Convention a chance for a membership to pause
collectively, check the progress of plans made, realign the course of
action in terms of changing conditions, make new plans for greater
accomplishment in the year ahead.
Most Conventions strive toward those objectives. To the extent that
full attainment is realized a Convention marks a definite period of
progress for its organization. Even if formal actions sometimes fall short
of hoped-for realization, the Convention has not been held in vain.
The collective pause, the exchange of ideas and opinions yes, even
the frolic part of an annual meeting period have inevitably clarified
points of issue and have formed a stable basis for action in the future.
Thinking back, that has certainly been true of recent Conventions
of both the Institute and the F.A.A. Much of the present virile surge
evident in both organizations can be attributed first to the general
recognition 'that Convention action was desirable, and second to the
action itself that made possible attainment of new goals.
But, like the tear that psychologists say lurks behind every smile,
Conventions carry the seeds of danger while reaping the good of their
accomplishments. That danger is complacency. It is the feeling on the
part of member chapters or individual chapter members that this once-
a-year pause-and-action is all that's needed to assure progress and bring
success to all pans made.
Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. Complacency
on the part of any organization's rank and file membership spells the
quick decline of the organization itself. It happened to the Roman
Empire. It could happen anywhere.
How to avoid it here? Individual by individual. Let each F.A.A
member pay his dues, attend all meetings, voice his ideas and opinions,
get mad, insist on action everyone?
The F.A.A. promises a tremendous future on your behalf. But only
YOU, yourself, can assure realization of its potentials.



OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent arnd act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








This picture of the Flor-
ida State Board of Archi-
tlecure was taken at the
lime of the Board's last
meeting in Jacksonville.
Back row, left to right,
Russell T. Pancoast,
F.A.I.A., Archie G. Parish,
S. Ralph Fetner, Richard
B. Rogers. Front row:
Mellen C. Creeley,
F.A.I.A., retiring Board
Secretary, Mrs. Frances E.
Eyles, assistant. Morton T.
Ironmonger, new Board
appointee and its recently
elected Secretary-Treasur-
er.











New Set-Up For The State Board


Office moves to Ft.
succeeding Mellen C.


Lauderdale with Morton T. Ironmonger
Greeley, F.A.I.A., as Secretary-Treasurer


As of October 1st, the Florida
State Board of Architecture will have
a new official headquarters at 1261
E. Las Olas Boulevard, Ft. Lauder-
dale. And when its equipment and
files are moved from the old head-
quarters at 218 W. Church Street,
Jacksonville, MELLEN C. GREELEY,
F.A.I.A., who has served as the Sec-
retary of the State Board continuously
for the past 32 years, will turn over
the Board's affairs to MORTON T.
IRONMONGER who was elected as the
new Secretary-Treasurer at a special
meeting in Jacksonville on August 13.
The move came as no surprise to
those acquainted with State Board
affairs and with the hopes and wishes
of the man who served it with skill,
diligence and distinction for more
than three decades. When MELLEN
CLARK GREELEY was appointed a
Board member in 1923 and elected
its Secretary-Treasurer at the same
time, he had already been practicing
architecture in Jacksonville-the city
of his birth-for 14 years. For the
past several years he has wished to
resign from a routine of duties that
OCTOBER, 1955


has grown increasingly heavy with
each succeeding year.
His term of appointment expired
July 1st, this year. In line with his
wishes, efforts were made to find an
able replacement to his office; and
on August 10, Governor LEROY
COLLINS commissioned MORTON T.
IRONMONGER in his stead, thus mak-
ing it possible for him to relinquish
his official duties on the Board as
soon as all practical formalities of a
transfer could be made.
So now, Mellen Greeley-"Mell"
to thousands of friends and colleagues
throughout the country-can close his
downtown Jacksonville office if he
wishes. He plans to do just that-
and plans further to build a small
library or "loafing place" at his coun-
try residence, "Rivermarshes." There,
he says, he hopes "to do such small
professional jobs and carry on such
civic activities as appear to be desir-
able or required."
"If that is retirement," he adds,
"Then I guess I'm retiring But I
think of it as an opportunity for
working at my two hobbies of grow-


ing plants and working for the archi-
tectural profession."
His successor has been a practicing
architect in Ft. Lauderdale since
1940, a permanent resident of that
city since 1937, an intermittent one
since 1924. Like the former Board
Secretary, MORTON T. IRONMONGER
was born in Jacksonville. He was edu-
cated at Cornell University. He has
been Secretary-Treasurer of the Brow-
ard County Chapter for the past sev-
eral years and Assistant Treasurer of
the F.A.A. for the past year.
To conduct the heavy routine
schedule of State Board affairs at the
new Ft. Lauderdale office, the new
Secretary-Treasurer will have an able
assistant in MRS. FRANCES E. EYLE
who has been serving in that capacity
in the Board's former Jacksonville
office for the past 11 years. Mrs.
Eyles will move to Ft. Lauderdale
and continue her work at the new
Las Olas Boulevard address.
The retiring Secretary was not the
only State Board member whose
4-year term expired July 1. Both
(Continued on Page 4)










































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After 46 years of independent
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indulge his hobbies--plants, the
profession of architecture!
(Continued from Page 3)
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, Miami Beach,
and ARCHIE G. PARISH, St. Petersburg,
had completed the periods to which
they had been appointed. But.early
in August Governor Collins reap-
pointed both men for an additional
4-year term. As a result of these
actions, a continuity of the same type
of policy and action that has charac-
terized Board activities in the recent
past is assured to both the public
and the architectural profession of
Florida.
Both public and profession need it.
And to MELLEN CLARK GREELEY,
F.A.I.A., both owe a full measure of
thanks for his 32 years of wise coun-
sel and unceasing effort in helping
develop the high standards of pro-
fessional conduct and competence
that the Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture now represents, demands and
guards.


Morton T. Ironmonger, new State
Board Secretary-Treasurer, will es-
tablish a new Board office in Ft.
Lauderdale.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








A. I. A. To Integrate State Groups


Development of the Chapter as the
basic organizational unit of the A.I.A.
has always been one of the main con-
cerns of the Institute. Rapid strides
toward better Chapter operation have
already been taken by issuance of
Volumes 1 and 2 of the Institute's
Chapter Manual. Recent "streamlin-
ing" of committee organization on
the national level-and the urging of
A.I.A. headquarters that Chapters fol-
low suit-is having the happy effect
of simplifying Chapter organization
also.
One result of all this can be an
improvement in overall Institute ac-
tivities and better "internal public
relations." The importance of the
region as an organizational unit acting
as an operational liaison between
individual chapters and national head-
quarters is already becoming clear.
But in all planning for better working
relationship the Institute has done,
one glaring omission became evident
at the Chapter Affairs Seminar during
the A.I.A. Convention at Minnea-
polis.
That was the vital role which State
Associations are playing in the overall
A.I.A. set-up. Not until F.A.A. Presi-
dent CLINTON GAMBLE brought this
subject forcefully to the notice of
A.I.A. officials had the Institute ap-
parently considered the fact that state
organizations are currently outside the
A.I.A. chain or organization. Thus, the
Institute had ignored the extremely
important function that strong state
associations are now exercising in their
respective localities.
Prior to "unification" of the A.I.A.,
state associations of architects had
been of first importance as presenting
"regional fronts' relative to establish-
ment and maintenance of professional
standards. New Jersey had an espe-
cially strong one. So did Michigan
and New York, Texas and California.
In our own state the F.A.A. had been
operative for many years. But not
until now has the real and practical
significance of these associations been
highlighted.
Many of the state associations still
exist. But since membership in them
has, in the vast majority of cases,
OCTOBER, 1955


become synonymous with local mem-
bersip in the A.I.A., many have ceased
to operate as the virile, active guard-
ians of professional standards and the
proponents of individual professional
activities that they once were. Not
all, however. And among those whose
activity and importance is expanding,
lather than diminishing, is the F.A.A.
Actually, the F.A.A. holds a special
position among state associations.
Like Texas, Florida is a region largely
by virtue of geography, especially so
because our state has long been recog-
nized as "different," physically, eco-
nomically, socially. But unlike Texas,
Florida is not yet large enough to
operate as a full-fledged region in
the A.I.A. organization set-up.
As an association of A.I.A. chapters,
however, the F.A.A. must necessarily
-and does-operate in a regional
sense. Like other state associations,
the F.A.A. has within it seeds of
accomplishment that up to now have
been difficult to recognize-and per-
haps even impossible to realize. As
representing every A.I.A. chapter in
the State, the F.A.A. is in a position
to speak for the architectural profes-
sion on a state-wide basis more effec-
tively than any individual chapter
can speak for itself. It can guard and
promote the interests of the profession
fiom the same viewpoint with equal
effectiveness. And ultimately it can
become an adequately staffed regional
center with facilities for servicing its
member chapters and helping each
promote local efforts along lines of
common interests.
Only three things are really neces-
sary to develop the full potentials of
functions the F.A.A. is in a partic-
ularly good position to exercise. One
is recognition of these potentials in
fact by the Institute so the F.A.A.
may operate as a formal, integrated
unit of the A.I.A. organization.
Another is the continuing support of
A.I.A. chapters in the state-and an
increasing recognition by chapter
memberships that in the strength of
their state association lies expanding
opportunity in professional activity
and acceptance.
The third necessity for bringing


Full recognition by the A.I.A.
Chapter Affairs Committee will
widen scope of F.A.A. activities,
make possible more and better
services for -member Chapters.


John L. R. Grand, regional mem-
ber, A.I.A. Chapter Affairs Com-
mittee, supported demand that
F.A.A. be made formal part of
A.I.A. setup.

forth full potentials of the F.A.A. is
development of an operating head-
.quarters, staffed to carry on the affairs
-both internal and external-with
which the F.A.A. will be increasingly
concerned.
Action on the first point has al-
ready been initiated by Clinton
Gamble; and the A.I.A. Chapter Af-
fairs staff has promised quick and
definite action. The second and third
points are up to F.A.A. membership.
The potentials exist. But both interest
and economics are involved. Through
interest of individual A.I.A. members
and affiliates throughout the state,
the economic support of each F.A.A.
Chapter can easily become a reality.
Then-but not until then-the F.
A.A. can begin to do a full-scope job
for Florida's architectural profession,
locally, state-wide, regionally and na-
tionally.








F. A. A. Operating Committees 1954 1955



F.A.A. President Clinton Gamble has asked
that all Committee Reports be forwarded to
him in duplicate by or before, October 15
so necessary presentation before the No-
vember Convention can be scheduled. Mem-
bers who have a special interest in the work
of any particular committee are therefore
urged to get in touch with committee chair-
man at once in the interests of complete
and fully representative reports.
Clinton Gamble, President, F.A.A.


ARCHITECT-ENGINEER RELATIONS John
Stetson (Palm Beach), Chairman. Igor B. Pole-
vitzky (So.), G. Clinton Gamble (Broward),
Walter B. Schultz (No.), Jack Moore (No.),
Morton T. Ironmonger (Broward), Elliott B.
Hadley (Central), David A. Leete (Daytona
Beach).
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, F.A.A. LOAN FUND
- John L. R. Grand (No.), Chairman. Thomas
Larrick (No.), Edward M. Feamey (No.).
BY-LAWS Jefferson N. Powell (Palm Beach),
Chairman. Harold A. Obst (Palm Beach), Rob-
ert V. Murphy (Central), Raymond H. Plockel-
man (Palm Beach), A. Courtney Stewart (Brow-
ard). Benmont W. Tench, Legal Counsel.
EDUCATION AND REGISTRATION Sanford
W. Goin (No.), Chairman. Marion S. Wyeth
(Palm Beach), James Gamble Rogers, II (Cen-
tral), Alfred B. Parker (So.), R. Daniel Hart
(No.).
JOINT COOPERATIVE COMMITTEE, F.A.A.
-A.G.C. G. Clinton Gamble (Broward),
Chairman. John L. R. Grand (No.), Harry C.
Powell (No.), Wm. R. Gomon (Daytona Beach),
Joseph M. Shifalo (Central), George J. Votaw
Palm Beach), Robert G. Jahelka (Central), Miss
Marion I. Manley (So.), Franklin S. Bunch
(No.).
LEGISLATIVE Franklin S. Bunch (No.),
Chairman Edward G. Grafton (So.), Eliot C.
Fletcher (Central), Sanford W. Goin (No.),
Ralph F. Spicer (Daytona Beach), John B. Smith
(Central), R. Daniel Hart (No.), A. Wynn
Howell (Central), Ernest J. Stidolph (No. Cen-


tral), Raymond H. Plockelman (Palm Beach),
James Pownall (Broward), James Gamble Rogers
II (Central), William Stewart (Palm Beach),
William Zimmerman (Central).
MEMBERSHIP AND EXPANSION Edward
G. Grafton (So.), Chairman. H. George Fink
(So.), Wm. F. Bigoney Jr. (Broward), Hilliard
T. Smith Jr. (Palm Beach), J. A. Meehan, Jr.
(No.), Ernest T. H. Bowen (Central), Craig J.
Gehlert (Daytona Beach), David W. Potter (No.
Central).
PUBLICATION Edwin T. Reeder (So.),
Chairman. Igor B. Polevitzky (So.), G. Clinton
Gamble (Broward).
PUBLIC INFORMATION Andrew J. Feren-
dino (So.), Chairman. Members are Public Re-
lations Committee Chairmen of each F.A.A.
Chapter.
REDISTRICTING William T. Amett (No.),
Chairman. Laurance W. Hitt (Central), Willis
L. Stephens (No.), John Stetson (Palm Beach),
George J. Votaw (Palm Beach).
RELATIONS WITH CONSTRUCTION INDUS-
TRY Igor B. Polevitzky (So.), Chairman.
George J. Votaw (Palm Beach), Miss Marion I.
Manley (So.).
UNIFORM BUILDING CODES Joseph M.
Shifalo (Central), Chairman. Robert H. Levin-
son (Central), Robert E. Hansen (Broward),
Craig J. Gehlert (Daytona Beach), Myrl J. Hanes
(No.), Chester L. Craft (Central), Edward T.
Rempe, Jr. (So.), Jefferson N. Powell (Palm
Beach).


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








The History of An Idea




The Idea is Better Understanding between the

Architect and the .Electrical Contractor. It's

growing greater and stronger with every job.



By HOWARD L. PALMER
First V-P, Florida Association of Electrical Contractors


It has often been said that the
S"complete architect" has to be every-
thing from a first-class laborer to a
full-fledged psychiatrist--at least a
psychologist. To use the architect's
own- words when selling his profes-
sioial services: "Architectural work-
ing drawings and specifications should
show every structural and mechanical
component of the building as well as
all materials employed and the meth-
od of their installation. To the mech-
anical trades they should show clearly
every pipe, conduit, wire and piece
of equipment."
So, one of the pairs of shoes the
architect is supposed to fill in his
ever-broadening field is that of an
electrical engineer. This particular
pair of shoes is a pretty big one to
fill-+-along with all the other trades,
crafts and professions involved in
architectural practice. It's getting
bigger every year. The electrical in-
dustry in Florida found that more
and more plans and specifications is-
sued rom architect's offices were far
fror# complete-sometimes hardly in-
telligible from the contractor's view-
poilt.
Sb, two years ago, the Florida
Ele ttical Contractors Association in-
itiad an effort to improve the end
of the Architect's business that con-
cerrnd them the most-electrical
plarit and specs. Through the Cen-
tral Florida Chapter of the Associa-
tion (and with some feeling of guilt
that existing conditions were as much
the fault of Electrical Contractors as
they were of Architects involved) a
joint meeting was arranged at Or-
lando in January, 1954, with the Or-
OCTOBER, 1955


ange County Architects Association
and the Electrical Contractors Asso-
ciation of Central Florida. Also in-
vited to attend this exploratory meet-
ing were leading architects of Lake,
Seminole, and Osceola Counties and
Electrical Inspectors of the munici-
palities in the four county areas rep-
resented. Key personnel of the various
architects offices were also invited
to attend.
All in all some 80 people as-
sembled at the Eola Plaza in Or-
lando to discuss one theme: "What
can Electrical Contractors and Archi-
tects do together, or in their separate
associations, to solve their mutual
problems and improve their common
industry?"
To save time, tempers, and per-
sonalities, the discussion was pro-


AXEL ORNBERG, President, F.A.E.C.,
is a strong believer in inter-associa-
tion programs based on active
cooperation.


moted from a moderator-lead- panel
composed of three Architects and
three Electrical Contractors who took
turns in trying to answer questions
from the floor in their respective
fields. The Electrical Contractors,
who played hosts at the meeting,
acknowledged they had practically
no experience at conducting such
meetings and were genuinely sincere
in their desire to see some "real good
develop from this meeting." The' Ar-
thitects, through their -Association,
indicated that they, too, hoped some
sound accomplishment would result
so that similar activity could be car-
ried on around the state-for as one
Architect so aptly put it, "the festerZ
ing of differences isn't local; it's a
state-wide sore."
(Continued on Page 13)


HOWRD L. PALMER, sparkplug of JAMES DANDELAKE, Chairman of
F.A.E.C. efforts to work with archi- F.A.E.C. Convention being held in
tects in solving a variety of mutual Jacksonville from September 30
problems. through October 2.
7












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Chapter News & Notes
Information from all F.A.A. Chapters is welcomed. Deadline for Nov. issue is Oct. 15.


Florida North
The Secretary, Jim Meehan, of
Jacksonville, has scheduled the follow-
ing events for coming meetings of the
Chapter. In October the meeting will
be an election of officers affair to be
held in Jacksonville, October 11. Fea-
ture of the evening will be a film
"Aluminum on the Skyline," a story
of the Alcoa Building.
The Pre-Convention meeting, to be
held November 13 in Jacksonville,
will include presentation of the A.I.-
A.'s most recent PR film, "Architec-
ture, U.S.A." Last meeting of the
year, slated for December 13 at
Gainesville, will feature a talk by ROB-
ERT PEACOCK, P.E., on the increasingly
important subject of Prestressed Con-
crete.
The Chapter's Committee on Rec-
ommended Fee Schedules has been
active in studying the question of
what fees should be charged Profes-
sional Engineers by Architects wl.o
work with an engineer to develop
projects for which the engineer has
been designated the prime profes-
sional. The Committee has prepared
a report containing a number of spe-
cific recommendations. It is a tenta-
tive one, however, not yet ready for
final approval or publication. The
draft is now under study by the Chap-
ter's Executive Committee and indi-
vidual members. After all comments
have been reviewed, a final draft will
be prepared for submission to the
F.A.A. Committee on Architect-Engi-
neer Relations. If approved by that
body, recommendations will presum-
ably be presented before the Daytona
Beach Convention for general F.A.A.
approval.

New Chapter Forming
The Fall meeting of the Florida
Central Chapter, scheduled for Oc-
tober 15, at the Orange Court Hotel,
Orlando, may be the last meeting of
that Chapter as it now exists. Ar-
rangements are now virtually com-
plete for the formation of the new
Mid-Florida Chapter; and formal or-
ganization of the new group is antici-
pated by the end of this month.
Though under discussion for almost
two years, action toward forming a
new chapter was started some six


John Stetson, globe-hopping presi-
dent of the Palm Beach Chapter,
was one of seven A.I.A.s who at-
tended the 9th Pan American Con-
.ress of Architects in Caracas last
month.

months ago by a group of Orange
County architects headed by Joseph
Shifalo of Winter Park. Area covered
by the Chapter would include counties
of Brevard, Lake, Orange, Osceola
and Seminole; and a questionnaire
survey revealed that a nucleus of 26
A.I.A. corporate and eight associate
members approved plans for the new
Chapter.
With such a start, Mid-Florida
architects predict a rapid growth to
about 100 members within a year's
time-thus almost rivalling the cur-
rent membership of 108 of the Florida
Central Chapter. With junior and
student associates, the new chapter
should begin to function with a
roster of nearly 60, according to Jos-
eph Shifalo.
He estimates that the area contains
more than 100 potential additional
members. These are practicing archi-
tects and their associates who have
thus far formed no professional affili-
ation, but who recognize the value
of it. As an active local group the
Mid-Florida Chapter would be at-
tractive to them.
Formation of the new A.I.A. unit
is in line with developments antici-
pated by the Re-Districting Commit-
tee in plans and recommendations
presented to and approved by last
year's F.A.A. Convention. In addi-
tion to forming a new chapter of
professional activity in the busy mid-
land area of the state, it will permit
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


--






closer cooperation between architects
in the remaining area of the Florida
Central Chapter. Thus it should work
to the advantage of all concerned and
produce the net result of strengthen-
ing both the extent and the effect of
organized activity on behalf of the
architectural profession throughout
the state.

Florida South
In line with overall A.I.A. policy,
the Florida South Chapter is now in-
corpated; and at the September 13th
meeting members voted changes in
the by-laws necessary to reflect the
change in status of the organization
to a non-profit corporation.
That meeting was held at the Dixie
Bell Inn at Kendall and was attended
by about 80 thirsty and hungry indi-
viduals including members of the
Miami Draftsmen's Club. The Chap-
ter and its guests enjoyed cocktails
before dinner through the courtesy
of the Perlite Company, whose presi-
dent, PAUL WHITE and three asso-
ciates were present and later discussed
the manufacture and application of
Perlite as shown in a full-color movie.
The meeting program included the
appointment of a nominating commit-
tee to which ANDY FERENDINO was
named as chairman. It also included
. pointed discussion of A.I.A. mem-
bership-and particularly for the ben-
efit of the Chapter's guests, what
qualifications were entailed and what
procedure was necessary for attaining
membership status.
Finally, a new member was "initi-
ated" to the Chapter. He is THEO-
DORE GOTTFRIED, of Miami, and he
now enjoys the distinction of being
the first member of the Florida South
Chapter to be inducted with any sort
of ceremony. PRESIDENT KRUSE admin-
istered to him the Architect's Oath-
written, incidentally, by the A.I.A.'s
new President, GEORGE BAIN CUM-
MINGs-before presenting his mem-
bership certificate and welcoming him
to Chapter membership.
A new professional publication
"Presenting Your Architect" is now
nearing completion as an activity of
the Florida South Chapter. President
Kruse heads a committee including
TRIP RUSSELL and EDWARD GRAFTON,
that has prepared the document as a
single sheet, folded four times to a
size for use in a standard business
envelope. It will be available for dis-
(Continued on Page 10)
OCTOBER, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 9)
tribution shortly. Though developed
primarily for South Florida Chapter
use, it may be made available for
general F.A.A. distribution if the
Board of Directors- approve and de-
mands from other Chapters make
large-scale production feasible.


Office Changes
In Palm Beach, RAYMOND H.
PLOCKELMAN announces the forma-
tion of a partnership with JEFFERSON
N. POWELL. The partnership will
operate under the name of PLOCKEL-
MAN & POWELL, Architects, 230 South
County Road, Palm Beach.
In Orlando, ROBERT B. MURPHY,
Architect, has moved his office from
its old location in the Church & Main
Building to 1319 Edgewater Drive,
Orlando.
In Ft. Lauderdale, MORTON T.
IRONMONGER, Architect, has moved
from his old office at 1229 E. Las
Olas Blvd., to larger quarters at 1261
E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale.
The move was made to accommodate
equipment and files of the State Board
of Architecture; and the new address
will become the headquarters of the
State Board as of October 1st, 1955.


Revisions Suggested for
Proposed New Constitution
and By-Laws
Since publication of the proposed
revision of the Constitution and By-
Laws of the F.A.A. (in the September
issue of .The Florida Architect) the
Committee has received several valu-
able suggestions from members who
have studied the document. The
merits of these suggestions have been
considered by the Committee and
have resulted in the following
changes to the Constitution and By-
Laws published previously:
ARTICLE IV-Add the following as
a new Section 2; and renumber the
following Sections 3, 4, 5 and 6.
SECTION 2--Corporate and Asso-
ciate members of the Chapters in
North Florida shall constitute the
North Florida Section of the Associa-
tion, those in Central Florida shall
constitute the Central Florida Section,
and those in South Florida shall con-
stitute the South Florida Section.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 10)
Student members of the Student
Chapters shall constitute the Student
Section of the Association.
ARTICLE IV-New Section 6 (old
section 5)--omit "good standing."
ARTICLE V-Section 5, paragraph
B-Change first sentence to read:
The Treasurer shall make a written
report to each annual meeting of this
Association and a written report at
each meeting of the Board of Di-
rectors. .
ARTICLE VI-Section 3-Change
to read: Vacancy of a Director on the
Board shall be filled by the. Chapter
so affected and all other vacancies
shall be filled by action of the Board.
ARTICLE VI-Section 4, paragraph
A-Change "two" to "four" in the
first sentence.
Foregoing revisions represent the
sum total of the Committee's delibera-
tions after reviewing all criticism and
suggestions received to date (Septem-
ber 19, 1955). If other changes are
proposed, they will have to be made
and acted upon at the Convention in
November.
-JEFFERSON N. POWELL,
Chairman,
F.A.A. By-Laws Committee.


Interesting if True!
Heights to which the imaginative
mind of candidates for registration
may reach never ceases to be a source
of wonderment. As recent examples,
the following interesting facts were
gleaned from last June's examination
papers by the Examining Committee
of the State Board of Architecture.
Q-What is the difference between
direct and alternating current?
A-Direct current comes direct
from the original source. Alternating
current is current which is picked up
along the way.
Q-What is relative humidity?
A-Relative humidity is the
amount of moisture in the air relative
to the amount that is usually there.
Q-What is vapor seal?
A-Vapor seal is when water in a
trap causes the vapor to become
sealed in. Sealed-in vapor can be-
come very obnoxious.
Q-What is a sarcophagus?
A-A sacrophagus is a small flesh-
eating animal.
OCTOBER, 1955


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH H. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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Date: November 17, 18, 19


Plans for the 41st Annual F.A.A.
Convention are rapidly shaping up
to promise one of the most active-
and least expensive -gatherings in
F.A.A. history. Registrations have al-
ready begun to arrive; and Registra-
tion Secretary JOEL W. SAYERS, JR.,
urges that room reservations be made
at once to prevent possible disap-
pointment.
WILLIAM R. GOMON, chairman of
the Building Product and Student Ex-
hibits, both of which will be major
features of the Convention, writes:
"Efforts of our Daytona Beach
Chapter committee will provide a full
period of activity to Convention mem-
bers at practically no cost. For $37.50,
including registration, an architect
may have four days of interest and
fun-including all meals, room, enter-
tainment and refreshments--as well
as the chance to take home one or
more of the many fine 'prizes' that
will be available."
A full list of "prizes," many of
which have been generously donated
by product exhibitors, was not avail-
able at this writing. But the list is
headed by such luxury appliances as
a full-color television set, a 21" screen
standard television, six radios and


three office-type fans. Plans for their
distribution are now being perfected.
Entertainment plans are also well
along toward completion, though not
subject to detailed publication at pres-
ent. But the Committee says . .
entertainment is expected to be pro-
fessional and of a quality to make it
worth while by itself." The Women's
Committee, headed by RALPH SPICER,
is planning a "bang-up affair" for
wives.
The Product Exhibit may finally
become the largest in F.A.A. Con-
vention history. All 50 spaces in the
main exhibit area have been taken;
and additional space has been ar-
ranged in adjoining rooms at the
urgent request of firms wishing to
participate.
On the business side of the Con-
vention, there is the important matter
of adopting a new F.A.A. Consti-
tution and By-Laws to support the
decision on Re-districting made at
last year's Convention. And with the
Convention theme pointed at "Plan-
ning for Education," there should be
plenty of solid practical value to be
gained from technical discussions
headed by theme speaker FORREST
KELLEY, JR., architect for the State
Board of Education at Tallahassee.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





History of An Idea
(Continued from Page 7)
And what about the results of that
meeting? They were amazing! No
one, Electrical Contractors included,
expected any overnight cure for the
many problems confronting the
group. But all were surprised at how
much "down to earth" progress was
made that night.
What has happened to solidify and
further the progress made during that
historical meeting in January, 1954?
A great deal! Many programs and
projects now under way in both
groups, on both local and state-wide
basis, got their start at that initial
gathering. Some of the problems
bared at the meeting have already
been satisfactorily solved; others are
now the concern of committees of
both groups working throughout the
State. Some of the questions raised
have yet to be answered.
The important thing is that they
were raised. Here are some typical
ones voiced at the meeting as a
basis for improving the overall situa-
tion they outline:

ARCHTS.-Many Architects are
pressed at the last minute before bid
date and have to issue addenda to
electrical plans and specifications
even though plans may have been out
for bidding for many weeks. Is there
any way that Electrical Contractors
can call Architects attention to ques-
tions in plans and specs earlier in the
bidding period?

F.A.E.C.-Why is it that Archi-
tects sometimes specify fixtures, pan-
els, devices, etc., that are obsolete or
even out of manufacture?

ARCHTS.-Why do Electrical
Contractors make such a fuss when
lighting fixtures are set up as an al-
lowance to be installed by the suc-
cessful electrical contractor under his
base bid?

F.A.E.C.-Some of us Electrical
Contractors feel it isn't fair to have
to put up $40.00 or $50.00 deposits
on plans and specifications and get
only $10.00 or $15.00 back after we
have figured them. It seems that we
are paying a sizeable figure for the
questionable privilege of figuring a
job we may never get. Is there any-
(Continued on Page 14)
OCTOBER, 1955


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History of An Idea
(Continued from Page 1S)
thing Architects can do about this
without hurting their own pocket-
books?
ARCHTS.-Some Architects feel
that there is too much careless work
by some contractors men on the fin-
ishing of buildings. Even though we
specify good fixtures and electrical de-
vices, plates and covers, we still find
many plates not level and panel boxes
not smooth, with plaster and fixtures
out of line. What can Electrical Con-
tractors do to improve this situation?
F.A.E.C.-Architects many times
specify such pieces of equipment as
water heaters, exhaust fans, ventilat-
ing fans, etc., in other sub contract-
or's part of the specifications. Why
do they do this when it's under the
electrical contractor's job to connect
and to service this equipment?
ARCHTS.-Many architects do
house plans of various sizes as well as
commercial and industrial buildings.
We don't feel an electrical engineer
is always required to lay out a fairly
simple house. But we find great vari-
ations in service sizes, panels and load
centers and allied equipment in our
houses. What can we do to make
sure that the owners have enough cir-
cuits and heavy enough wire sizes and
room for future expansion without
spending excessively for the electrical
contract on their houses?
F.A.E.C.-What can Electrical
Contractors do to see to it that what
Architects intend when they draw up
plans and specs actually happens the
way they intend it in the finished
building?
ARCHTS.-Electrical contractors
insist that the National Electrical
Code is only a set of minimum stand-
ards and is not a set of "adequate"
standards. Why-and why isn't it
safe for an architect's reputation to
just say in his specs "Wire according
to the National Electrical Code stand-
ards as approved by the Board of Fire
Underwriters"?
F.A.E.C.-More and more reput-
able architects are writing into their
bidding procedure on all public and
commercial work that major sub con-
tractors names be listed by each bid-
ding general contractor to qualify him


for bidding. Why are some architects
still dragging their feet on this worth-
while improvement to the bidding
practices in the industry?
ARCHTS.-How can an Architect
who is letting work in an unfamiliar
area in the state make sure of getting
a thoroughly qualified electrical sub-
contractor on his job? Also, what is
this we hear about Electrical Con-
tractors Associations setting up "Se-
curity Funds" to make sure each
member lives up to the F.A.E.C.'s
standards and codes of ethics?
Most of the above questions were
proposed at the first of these joint
meetings at Orlando, although some
of them and many more were brought
up in open discussions at other sim-
ilar meetings held in various cities
around the state. Still more meetings
are being planned and the hope is
that most of the electrical contractors
and architects throughout the state
will have been brought together for
equally as frank discussions by early
1956. Because much solid work has
been accomplished by both Electrical
Contractors and Architects in their
separate associations-and together in
the areas covered a series of annual
Progress Report Meetings is now be-
ing planned in a few areas by the two
groups.
Here's a partial record of accom-
plishment by these two groups work-
ing together for a common goal in
just a little over a year:
1-Better plans and specs from
architects offices. (It's a little tougher
on some electrical contractors but
they are still for it it's fair to all -
and the architects are getting much
better jobs with less headaches!).
2-More and better public selling
on the use of an architect on all types
of buildings. (There are about 12
people in the electrical industry for
each architect 12 good salesmen if
they know the benefits of an owner
going to a good architect before plan-
ning his building)
3--Quicker screening of plans and
specs after they are issued for bidding
by architects. (Electrical contractors'
estimators are calling architects' at-
tention to possible clarifications ear-
lier in the bidding period.)
4-A "Guide to the Planning of
Residential Electrical Systems" is
(Continued on Page 16)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Standard Prestressed
Concrete members
were used in the con-
struction of scores of
modern structures
like these:
First State Bank
Building at
Lakeland
Dillard Elementary
School at Fort
Lauderdale
West Florida Tile 6-
Terrazzo Corp.
Warehouse
Concrete Stadium at
Plant City
Singer Building
Pompano Beach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Building at Orlando
Stone Buick Building
at Ft. Pierce


Load Test on 60-foot-long Channel Roof Slab produced in the "Double Tee"
pre-tensioning bed at the Pompano Beach plant of R. H. Wright and Son.
Conducted during 1955 Annual Convention of Prestressed Concrete Institute.
FL.


;i' r N kIP .;
--e


SPrestressed concrete units ao
not e" ties for any I ng. in wh
S are of special im rtuace.
long casting bedsyfthe p
has been thoroughly field-
is now being made dr c
: the Prestressed Co*i#te In
units are now availsfle. 1
shapes to meet a range of
Prestressed concrete units h
distance, high uniformity, l
flat slabs, dojble-tee slabs,


offer noew
ich.low cos
Standard 4
r-tensieoa ig
ti.ted; and a
ohtlplled cridi on
stitute. These pr-p
!hey 'capq d
span, lod Oci
ave low-mdi
w .cost.



lA. 1-t M
- ~1 c~


PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE
FLORIDA MEMBERS:
R. H. WRIGHT & SON, INC.-----------Ft. Lauderdale WEST COAST SHELL CORP.-------------- Sarasota
LAKELAND ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC. Lakeland DURACRETE, INC. -----------Leesburg
GORDON BROTHERS CONCRETE CO.---------Lakeland HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO.-Winter Park
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC._--Tampa PERMACRETE, INC..-------------- Daytona Beach
CAPITOL CONCRETE COMPANY, INC. --- Jacksonville NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY _- Pensacola
PRECAST CONCRETE, INC.--------------------Miami
A National Organization to establish and supervise Prestressed Concrete standards and procedures
S. whose members are pledged to uphold the production control and specifications set up by the
Prestressed Concrete Institute.


OCTOBER, 1955






History of An Idea
(Continued from Page 14)
now available. (Prepared by the
F.A.E.C. for distribution to archi-
tects and draftsmen. A post card to
the State Manager, Florida Associa-
tion of Electrical Contractors, Stoval
Professional Building, Tampa, Flor-
ida, will get you as many copies as
you need for your office at no
charge.)
5-A "Check List" for Electrical
Plans and Specs for Commercial and
Industrial Installations" is also on
hand. (Prepared by the F.A.E.C. -
just a post card again.)
6-Higher standards of perform-
ance by members of the F.A.E.C.
(Members appreciated being told
their shortcomings by interested ar-
chitects they get so close to the
forest they can't see the trees in their
business too!)
7-Promotion of more adequacy
in wiring and the use of more mod-
ern devices, methods and equipment.
(Still a long way to go on this one!)
8-Better bidding practices. (Still
no Utopia but better all the time.)
9.-Wiser use of electrical engi-
neering talent by Architects. (Gives
him more time to do his basic job
better!)
10-Better plan and spec availa-
bility for subs. (Better plan rooms,
more sets sent to builders exchanges,
more outright sales of electrical sheets
to electrical contractors they only
need the full sets for a relatively short
time.)
11 -More complete fixture lists
appearing on plans and specifications.
(Gives the architect better control of
future lighting and the "night-time
beauty" of his building.)
12-More help for the Architect
through "Adequate Wiring Bureaus"
being set up around the state under
the co-sponsorship of the F.A.E.C.
13-A guage for Architects on
"out-of-town" work. (A roster of all
F.A.E.C. members is available for any
area- a letter to the State Manager
at Tampa on your letterhead is all
that is needed.)
Although both Electrical Contract-
ors and Architects still feel they have
a long way to go together, progress
made in the relatively short period
of less than two years does show what
cooperation between building indus-
try associations can do for the com-
mon good of all concerned.
16


Producers' Council Program


. . But the other side didn't even get warm! Interested guests at the
Producers Council "Parade of Plywood" show, examine results of tests
on a new insulated door demonstrated by the U. S. Plywood Corporation.


On Tuesday evening, August 23,
the Coral Gables Country Club was.
again the scene of a Producers' Coun-
cil "Informational Meeting" held by
the Miami Chapter. As usual, it was
a chance for local architects to par-
take of good food and drink and to
deepen their acquaintance with local
building product, distributors who
make up the membership of this na-
tional organization.
As an evening of good fun laced
with the acquisition of useful facts
on the specification and use of
quality materials, these Informational
Meetings have become famous among
architects of Greater Miami. This
August one, sponsored by the United
States Plywood Corporation, seemed
of special interest. The Country Club
was actually crowded-and it wasn't
just because of the bar and the buffet
board either. The sponsor had set up
an excellent display of plywood panels
around the big dining area. Before
and after dinner architects displayed
plenty of interest in them. And the
highlight was a demonstration of fire-
proof qualities of a new type of insu-
lated door to provide a high rating


with the good looks inherent in a
wide range of fine wood surfacing.
The demonstration was eye-catch-
ing to say the least. One of the doors
was placed, table-wise, on two saw
horses. Below it a jumbo-sized plumb-
er's torch was placed to direct a con-
stant flame to the middle of the under
surface. And on the door itself re-
clined a gorgeous blonde, aptly clad
in a cool bathing costume. Only the
door shielded her from the open
flame. But for most of an hour she
was as comfortably relaxed as one
could be on top of a door. And plenty
of visitors who got near enough to
test, learned at first hand that the
surface on which she was reclining
was quite as cool as her nonchalance
suggested.
In addition, the hosts did a fine
job of presenting plywood. Of par-
ticular interest was a new type of
pre-fabricated interior partition that
evidently has wide use possibilities.
The Miami Chapter's next Informa-
tional Meeting took place September
27, when the Florida Power and Light
Company dealt with "Moder Light
Conditioning."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










IU N


BRICK


Specialists In

DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS

FOR WALLS, WALKS AND FLOORS

MATERIALS OF CLAY, SHALE

CONCRETE AND NATURAL STONE




Manufacturers Of




(A Concrete Product)

In The Following Color Ranges

OYSTER WHITE . CHARCOAL . CHALK WHITE

RAINBOW RANGE ... TAN RANGE . RED RANGE . PINK RANGE

GRAY RANGE . TAUPE RANGE . GREEN RANGE
*T.M. REG.

StC5m*ed C sold in Florida by:


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ..--. Avon Park, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ...------ Bartow, Fla
Fort Myers Ready-Mix Concrete, Inc. .....-.._--. Fort Myers, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ... Frostproof, Fla.
Baird Hardware Company ---- -------------.Gainesville, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company Haines City, Fla.
Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company ...---- Jacksonville, Fla.
Strunk Lumber Yard --- - Key West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company..... Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company ..-------- Marathon, Fla.
Gandy Block & Supply Company- --- Melbourne, Fla.
C. J. Jones Lumber Company --.......----------- Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company-------- --------- Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company _........ Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply........-- ..-..------- Tallahassee, Fla.
Burnup & Sims, Inc. ----..-.- -- West Palm Beach, Fla.


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, PHONE 80-1525, MIAMI, FLORIDA
INCORPORATED






CONVENTION CITY...1955
. *. ,


NOVEMBER 17th, 18th, 19th
DAYTONA BEACH
That's the time and place of the Forty-First
Annual Convention of the F. A. A. It's your own
Convention. By attending you can- help make it
the biggest and best one ever held.,



PLAN NOW BE SURE TO ATTEND!