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 Front Cover
 Advertising
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 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00015
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text



I gA
laida A^ hiv


September
- 1955 *


Official
FLORIDA
AMERICA


Journal
ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
N INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS














K


/2


Our new general office building at 5220 Biscayne
Boulevard is a good example of the unusual and
pleasing effects architects can achieve with
exposed concrete masonry. And, as it should be ...
our new office building is so designed that it
becomes a "show case" for many of our products.
We believe you will find it interesting to see the
manner in which we have used "Concrete in the Raw"
... for instance, pre-cast walls on exterior and concrete
blocks on interior. Here we can only hint at the beauty
and effectiveness of this modern and economical use
of concrete and concrete products.
Come to see us soon, won't you? We'll be delighted
to show you around. You can see what we have done
I.... and what you, too, can do by using "Concrete
in the Raw". We've plenty of parking space
in our own private parking lot.

MIAMI FORT LAUDERDALE SOUTH DADE
PHONE: 89-6631 PHONE: LOgan 4-1211 PHONE: Homestead 1432, 1459
5220 Biscayne Blvd. 1335 Northeast 26th Street South Allapattah Road & Moody Drive


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SEPTEMBER, 1955


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2


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







74


Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


SEPTEMBER, 1955 -VOL. 5, NO. 9


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble---- --President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman __ Secy.-Treas.
1 122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth
Morton T. Ironmonger -Asst. Treas.
1229 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson -Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard-No. Central

Directors
Edward Grafton -- Fla. South
Jefferson Powell-Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph-No. Central

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford . Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor.
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

MCMURRAY 26 MIAMI

SEPTEMBER, 1955


Standards Are


What You Make Them



The tumult and the shouting have finally died at Tallahassee; and
the FAA Committeemen caught up in it are resting on the laurels of
a job well done. The legislative results in terms of what the FAA was
trying to accomplish are reported elsewhere in this issue. But a brief
comment at least seems in order on changes made in that part of
Florida's statutes known as the "Architectural Registration Law."
Because the 1955 Legislature did not grant every one of its proposed
revisions-and in addition threw in a few of its own-there now exists
a divergence of opinion as to whether the law is "better" or "worse"
than before. Actually, it appears that the divergence rests largely on the
basis of technicalities. On the one hand, the law as amended, still
falls short of meeting all requisites of the N.C.A.R.B.-the basic ob-
jective of the proposed changes. On the other hand, diversified experi-
ence as a requirement for examination for architectural registration has,
for the first time, been legally recognized in this state.
WVhat practical effect will the amendments have on the status of
Florida's comparative standing relative to N.C.A.R.B. standards? That
seems to be largely up to the individuals who will be applying for regis-
tration examinations. For the law is permissive to considerable degree.
The State Board, as its administrative body, must, of course, abide
by the letter of all of the law's provisions. But the individual need not
do so, except so far as minimum provisions are concerned. Examina-
tion and subsequent registration are only a threshold to a career. Any
young man who looks at architecture as a bright professional future
for himself can, and should, gear his program of progress to the highest
professional standards he can find. Thus, in terms of his own career
he would do well to take the law into his own hands-to go beyond its
minimum provisions first in order to assure himself later of undoubted
professional acceptance beyond the boundaries of his own State.
Specifically, Florida's statutes now require one year's diversified
experience as a requisite for examination. The N.C.A.R.B. has set
three years as a minimum for "internship". The point is a simple, but
nonc-the-less cogent one: The State Board cannot refuse to examine
an applicant with but one year's experience who otherwise meets all
requirements. But no potential architect need apply for examination
until his personal background, in training and practical experience,
meets N.C.A.R.B. provisions in every respect. Thus the new law isn't
a barrier to opportunity. But the wise applicant will reach beyond it
in his first long step toward a sound future.


0 BJECTI VES

The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.


3







N
N
S.


5'
S.
'S -.
S. ~~-*-- 113
a


-& -


N1


Ilnlik11 I 1 11 ETE

INTEGRITY 1IX CONCRETE


The architects and engineers on the
Hillsborough County Court House
in Tampa captured in its design and
construction the true spirit of in-
tegrity in good government.
Using architectural concrete for
strength, protection and durability
. . and precast white portland
cement wall panels and white cement
terrazzo floors for styling and beauty
.. .. they have erected a noble edifice.

Architects and engineers were: The late
William 0. Sparklin; R. S. Himes; R. A.
Menendez; Reynolds, Smith and Hills.


-
=-


GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY
FLORIDA DIVISION. TAMPA* SIGNAL MOUNTAIN DIVISION. CHATTANOOGA TRINITY DIVISION, DALLAS
4 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


-I-







Legislative


Committee


Report


This account of the Legislative Program of the Florida Association of
Architects, Chairmanned by FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, is designed to give the
general membership an understanding of our operations in the 1955 Regular
Session of the Florida State Legislature. At the risk of oversimplification
of complex matters, it will serve to advise Florida architects of the activities
of your Legislative Committee in Tallahassee this Spring.


One of the Association's primary
interests that is constantly a part of
our Legislative Program is the im-
provement of the Florida Statutes
relative to activities of the Florida
State Board of Architecture. As the
1955 Regular Session opened, we
were prepared to offer an amendment
to the then-existing law governing
the entrance to examination by in-
corporating requisites established by
the National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards. In this way we
hoped to improve Florida's registra-
tion picture vis-a-vis the remaining
forty-eight states.
Our revision of the law provided
that all applicants for examination
be citizens of the United States; that
applicants for examination who had
graduated from an accredited archi-
tectural school have three years of
diversified training in offices of reg-
istered, practicing architects prior to
taking the examination and that ap-
plicants not having an appropriate
degree from an accredited architect-
ural school have a minimum of nine
years of diversified training in the
offices of registered, practicing archi-
tects; and that examinations be given
under supervision of the State Board
of Architecture rather than being
"made directly by the Board, or a
committee of two members delegated
by the Board."
It also provided that the minimum
age for entrance to examination be
twenty-five years of age; and that
those persons presently qualified, or
attempting to qualify, for entrance
to examination under the law as it
existed prior to the 1955 Session of
the Legislature be extended a one
year period of time during which, by
giving notice to the State Board,
they would be permitted to take the
SEPTEMBER, 1955


examination under the existing law,
rather than under the law as set up
in our proposed amendment to the
registration law. Finally, the revision
proposed that those applicants who
successfully passed the examination
and whose certificates are dated less
than six months previous to re-reg-
istration date not be required to re-
new their certificate until July of the
following year.
It quickly became obvious that
legislators who gathered in Tallahas-
see were not entirely sympathetic to
our suggested amendment. Among
their chief objections were the re-
quirements for three years of diversi-
fied training (and its attendant nine
year diversified training for those
who were not graduates of accredited


architectural schools) and the raising
of the age limit for entrance to ex-
amination from twenty-one to twen-
ty-five years. In fairness to, the leg-
islators who were not sympathetic
with our amendment, it must be said
that they opposed our bill from sin-
cere convictions, usually after con-
siderable discussion with our legis-
l:tive consultant, BENMONT TENCH,
Ja., and frequently after discussion
with various architects located within
their counties or senatorial districts.
Without detailing the numerous
committee hearings or technical de-
velopments and our efforts to persu-
ade the Legislature to accept the bill,
it can be said that the Legislature
was willing to go along with a one
(Continued on Page 20)


FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, Chairman BENMONT TENCH, JR., has been
of the F.A.A. Legislative Commit- associated with the F.A.A. as its le-
tee, is a member of the Jackson- gal counsel since 1947. A member
ville firm of Kemp, Bunch & of the firm of Tench and Reynolds,
Jackson and a past pr e s i d e nt Attorneys at Law, of Gainesville, he
(1947-48) of the F.A.A. A member ,
of the Florida North Chapter, he has ably represented the architec-
heads the Jacksonville Building tural profession of Florida in many
Code Advisory Board. legislative sessions.









"Inexpensive,




Iftor4ma




dand gagn--"V


FRANCIS R. WALTON
41st Convention Chairman


Official theme of the 41st Annual
FAA Convention, slated for mid-
November at Daytona Beach, is
"Planning for Education". But word
has leaked out of various committee
rooms that the three by-words of this
Convention will be "Inexpensive,
Informal and Fun". And it is on this
implication of casual good fellowship,
quite as much as on the formal struc-
ture of "education" that plans for the
Convention are rapidly shaping up.
This 41st Annual Convention prom-
ises to be unusual in more ways than
one. First, it hopes to establish a
precedent by attracting delegates, ex-
hibitors and guests-not to speak of
visiting VIP's-to a four-day, rather
than a two day, gathering. The
blanket invitation of the Daytona
Beach host Chapter is to "come
early and stay late"; and toward that


JOEL W. SAYERS, JR.
Registration Secretary


end a full program is developing that
will contain something for everyone
from Wednesday, November 16,
through the following Sunday, No-
vember 20, a full day after Conven-
tion business has officially ended.
Unusual also is the manner in
which the official Convention theme
will be developed. Schools, of course,
are one of Florida's most active build-
ing types; and school planning, de-
sign, construction and equipment will
be subjects for consideration during
the round-table discussion planned
in lieu of a formal seminar session for
Friday afternoon. A large proportion
of product exhibitors will beam their
informational material toward this
important building category. And it
is anticipated that the guest roster
will include many county school ad-
ministrators and officials of the


HARRY M. GRIFFIN
Convention Treisurer


School Board Members Association
who will be invited to take part in
both formal and informal discussions
throughout the Convention period.
This year, also, the two traditional
exhibits-one of building products
the other of architectural designs-
will be more. part and parcel of Con-
vention activities than ever before.
Early in its program planning deliber-
ations the Convention Committee
decided to make these exhibits im-
portant focal points of Convention
interest. More than any other FAA
Convention, this one at Daytona
Beach will tie exhibitors into practic-
ally all Convention sessions except,
of course, the three FAA business
meetings.
Exhibits will open Wednesday
afternoon; and present plans call for
them to remain open until Sunday


DAVID A. LEETE
Program and Entertainment
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







"Come Early and Stay Late" That's the invitation of the nine-man

Committee of the Daytona Beach Chapter which, as host to the F.A.A.

41st Annual Convention, is planning an unusually interesting program


noon to give the Daytona Beach pub-
lic a chance to view them after the
41st Annual Convention is officially
ended. WVednesday evening will be
devoted to a gala welcoming party-
starting with cocktails in the exhibit
area and winding up with a two-hour
boat ride that will include dancing
under the stars and refreshments as
may be needed or desired. Thursday
there will be an equally gala buffet
dinner at which product exhibitors
will be honored guests of the Con-
vention-to be the recipients of
awards and to be entertained with a
variety show sparkling with top tal-
ent. Exhibitors will also be welcome
as "open house" guests at the party
following the Convention Banquet
at which AIA President GEORGE BAIN
CUMMINGS will speak as the Conven-
tion's Honor Guest.
Convention Chairman FRANCIS R.
WALTON and Program DIRECTOR
DAVID A. LEETE reflect the tenor of
the whole Convention committee in
emphasizing that informality and fun
will rule every Convention session to
the greatest possible extent. They
have lined up a general schedule of
activities (outlined in the chart on
page 8) that includes a minimum of
formalized meetings, a maximum of
what they hope will be opportunities
for interesting discussion.
For example, most Convention ses-


sions will be open to all guests and
visitors who wish to attend. The
luncheon meeting on Friday, the
Convention's peak business day, will
feature a talk by FORREST KELLEY,
JR., architect for the State Board of
Education, and will be open to as
many public school administrators
throughout the state as can attend.
And the "round-table discussion"-
taking place of a more formal seminar
-will be moderated by FAA Re-
gional Director HERBERT C. MILLKEY
to provide an opportunity for both
delegates and guests to exchange ideas
and comments on a variety of topics
touching on the Convention's school-
planning theme.
"There'll be no long winded
speeches," declares Chairman Wal-
ton. "And no harangues, no sleep-
inducing readings from mimeograph-
ed pages. The whole idea of this Con-
vention-aside from the brief sessions
necessary to transact important FAA
business-is to bring people together
informally to discuss common inter-
ests, to relax, to enjoy themselves.
You can get a lot of fun and plenty
of worthwhile ideas from meetings
like that without having to sit still
and listen to a bunch of boring talks."
"And it won't cost much, either!"
he added.
Convention business will be con-
(Continued on Page 8)


RALPH F. SPICER
Hospitality Ladies Entertainment


FRANCIS W. CRAIG
Architectural Exhibits


CRAIG J. GEHLERT ALFRED G. KEMMERER
Publicity Transportation
SEPTEMBER, 1955


WILLIAM R. GOMON
Products and Students Exhibits









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Ifonwm acnd 57n
(Continued from Page 7)
fined to the two-hours sessions on
Friday and Saturday mornings and a
three-hour period Friday afternoon.
Preceeding these will be meetings of
important FAA committees. The
Joint Cooperative Committee, FAA-
AGC will hold its dinner meeting
Wednesday evening; and the Archi-
tect-Engineer Relations Committee


will conduct its session Thursday
morning, followed by a luncheon
which is open to all Convention par-
ticipants on a Dutch-treat basis. The
customary pre-Convention meeting of
the FAA Board of Directors will oc-
cupy Thursday afternoon. As arc all
Board meetings, it is open to attend-
ance by all members and associates.
In connection with both product
and architectural exhibits, there will
be opportunity to view both slide


The Princess Issena Hotel and Cottages-just a minute's walk from
Daytona's world-famed beach-will be completely at the F.A.A.'s disposal
during the entire convention period. Not shown in this air-view is the brand-
new 60-foot swimming pool and sunning terrace that's an important part
of the Hotel's recreational features. Low-cost reservations are available in
two Package Plans.


Here's a "blueprint" of how general
plans for the Convention shape up.

films and movies; and FRANK CRAIG,
chairman of the architectural exhibit,
urges that both types of film be sent
to him for use in the exhibit. Due
to lack of space, models are being
ruled out of this year's show. But
panels of all building types-either
completed, under construction, or
merely proposed-are welcome. Pan-
els should include plans and photo-
graphs or sketches. Details relative to
panel size, method of shipment, iden-
tification, delivery deadline, etc., can
be obtained from FRANCIS MW. CRAIG,
15 N. Wild Olive St., Daytona
Beach.
Headquarters of the Convention
will be the Princess Issena Hotel.
Meeting rooms and exhibit spaces for
both architectural and product shows
adjoin one another on the same floor.
Registration and Comnmittee offices
-which will also double as a press
and information center-will be cen-
trally located near them; and plans
are now under way to locate what
Committee members have dubbed
"hospitality bars" at strategic loca-
tions near exhibit areas.
Obviously, the Daytona Beach
Chapter, acting as Convention hosts,
are going all-out to make this 41st
(Continued on Page 10)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











H olostonel CONCRETE PRODUCTS PRECAST CONCRETE CRANE SERVICE
COMPANY OF MIAMI P.O. DRAWER 1980 OPA-LOCKA, FLORIDA PHONE MUrray 8-2526


With pride . we say thanks.

We say thanks to our many satisfied customers who have
shown their confidence in our organization by constantly
specifying the use of Hollostone structural beams and Twin
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assures consistently dependable quality in an economical
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roof construction attained by the use of our product.

Naturally, as with any worthwhile product, there are imita-
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father, he lacks the wisdom and knowledge that is devel-
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our customers realize the knowledge and wisdom we have
developed since we first originated the Twin T structural
panel for floors and roofs.

We feel proud that more and more architects, builders and
owners of residential and commercial structures are
recognizing the values of, and are specifying . .
Hollostone precast structural beams and Twin T floor and
roof panels. We suggest that you investigate further and
invite you to call upon us.

Sincerely,







"Twin T

Trade Mark Registered
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SEPTEMBER, 1955 4









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Infortwmat and Fun
(Continued from Page 8)
FAA Annual Convention an unquali-
fied, history making success. Reserva-
tions should be made early, for ac-
commodations at the Princess Issena
hotel, Inn and Cottages must be as-
signed on a first come, first served
basis. Overflow arrangements are
now being made at two other hotels
in the immediate area of Convention
headquarters.


CONVENTION BROCHURE
For the first time in FAA history,
a "Souvenir Program" will be avail-
able to all 41st Convention dele-
gates, guests, exhibitors and visi-
tors. The November issue of the
FAA's only Official Journal, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, will be ex-
panded to include pre-Convention
reports, a full schedule of meetings
and events, a roster of all Conven-
tion personnel and product ex-
hibitors. An extra printing of the
November issue will be made; and
those distributed at the Convention
will contain a special program in-
sert with full details.


Regarding specific arrangements,
the Princess Issena Hotel contains
200 rooms; and in addition operates
18 cottages of 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms
each. Rates in the Hotel are, $4.50
for a single, $7.00 for a double room,
both types air-conditioned. Air-con-
ditioned cottages, with a minimum
of 4 occupants, $4.00 per person;
with a minimum of 3 occupants
$4.00 for non-air-conditioned cot-
tages. Dormitory rate for students (8
to a cottage ) is $3.00 per person.
These rates are exclusive of meals
or the $3.50 charge for the Friday
evening banquet. For those FAA
members who wish to "come early
and stay late", the Registration Com-
mittee has arranged two "Package
Plans" with the hotel management.
Plan Number 1 includes 4 nights
and 5 days, starting with dinner
Wednesday evening and extending
through luncheon, Sunday. Per per-
son charges include room and all
meals for the period, including the
Friday evening banquet. They are:
(Continued on Page 17)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Constitution


and


By hawus


FOR THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS

OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS



To make effective the Re-districting Plan presented to, and approved by, the
F.A.A. Convention last year, changes in the Constitution and By-Laws were neces-
sary. These became so numerous that the By-Laws Committee recommended, and
the Board of Directors approved at its July meeting, that an entirely new draft
be made for consideration at the 41st Annual Convention in November. Pub-
lication here constitutes the legal notice necessary for such formal action.


ARTICLE I.-NAME OF SOCIETY
SECTION 1
(A) The NAME of this organization shall be the
"FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS," herein-
after referred to as the "Association," which is a non-
profit incorporated State organization duly chartered
by the American Institute of Architects and the State
of Florida.
(B) Application of terms. All reference in the
Constitution and by-laws to "Association," "board,"
"committee," "officer," "members," "meeting," or other
similar designations shall pertain or refer to the Florida
Association of Architects of The American Institute of
Architects.

ARTICLE II.-THE OBJECTS OF THE
ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
SECTION 1
(A) To unite the Architectural profession within
the S ace of Florida to promote and forward the objects
of the American Institute of Architects.
(B) To stimulate and encourage continual improve-
ment within the profession, cooperate with other pro-
fessions, promote and participate in the matters of gen-
eral public welfare, and represent and act for the
architectural profession in the State.
(C) To promote educational and public relation
programs for the advancement of the profession.

ARTICLE III.-ORGANIZATION
SECTION 1
The Association shall be a non-profit organization
composed of members of classifications and with quali-
fications, dues, and privileges as set forth in these
Articles.
ARTICLE IV.-MEMBERSHIP
SECTION 1
(A) The Association shall consist of all corporate
members and all associate members of all Florida Chap-
ters of The American Institute of Architects. Every
registered architect in the State of Florida is assigned
to the jurisdiction of the Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects which covers the area in which
he practices or resides.
(B) A corporate member shall be defined for use
throughout this document to be a bonafide member in
good standing of the American Institute of Architects.
A corporate member shall have all of the rights, privi-
leges and obligations embodied in full membership in-
cluding the right to vote, hold office and represent the
Association as a delegate or otherwise.
An Associate member shall be defined for use
throughout this Constitution and By-Laws as any other


classification of Chapter membership recognized by the
Institute, including Unassigned Corporate members,
members Emeritus, Associates, and Junior Associates.
Student Associates shall consist of upper division
and graduate students in Architecture in Colleges and
Schools of Architecture in the State of Florida who are
members of a Student Chapter of the American Institute
of Architects.
(C) The Association may sponsor Student Asso-
ciate Branches in Colleges and Schools of Architecture
in the -State of Florida as may be recognized by the
Association.
Student Associate Branches may function under
the sponsorship of Chapters or under the direct spon-
sorship of the Association. When they function under
Chapters, their relationship to the Association shall be
through the sponsoring Chapter. When they function
directly under the Association, their relationship shall
be directly with the Board of Directors of the Association
who shall be authorized to approve the Constitution and
By-Laws under which the Student Associate Branch
operates.
SECTION 2
Each year the Association shall promote Corporate
or Associate membership in The American Institute of
Architects for all Registered Architects in Florida who
are not then Corporate or Associate Members. Applica-
tions, as received, shall be referred for action to the
respective Chapter to which the applicant would be
assigned.
SECTION 3
HONORARY MEMBERSHIP: Any person of good
character who is in sympathy with the objects of this
Association and who has rendered meritorious service
to it or the profession of architecture or its allied arts,
shall be eligible for Honorary Membership, without the
right to vote.
SECTION 4
The Secretary of each Florida Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects shall file with the
Secretary of the Association the names of all corporate
members and associate members in good standing at
the beginning of each year and shall keep said list
up-to-date at all times. The Association shall issue to
all persons, who have been thus certified, cards indicat-
ing their membership in the Association.

SECTION 5
The grant to and the exercise and use by a member
of each and every right and privilege granted by the
Constitution and By-Laws shall be conditioned upon
the professional conduct and good standing by payment
of Association and Chapter dues of the member in
his Chapter.


SEPTEMBER, 1955 11







6 m ia ee ant d V V, Ial11 e11 i 1ic1il liiaI IIIIIIIt1111111111111111iiiatIIiIIiIIIl l illlillllil i ilil Iil11 1il1IIII


ARTICLE V.-OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1
(A) The Officers of the Association shall be a
President; Vice-Presidents, one from each corporate
Section; a Secretary and a Treasurer. The immediate
Past President automatically becomes a member of the
Board of Directors, which is not an elective office. All
elective officers shall be corporate members of the
Institute.
(B) All Officers with the exception of the Vice-
Presidents shall be elected for terms of one year. No
officer shall be eligible for re-election to succeed himself
more than once, except the Secretary or Treasurer, who
may not hold office longer than two consecutive years,
unless so voted by a two-thirds ballot vote at the annual
Convention.
(C) Beginning in 1955, one Vice-President shall be
elected for a term of one year, one for a term of
two years, and one for a term of three years. There-
after, one Vice-President shall be elected each year
for a term of three years.
(D) Only such members as have been officers or
members of the Board for at least one year shall be
eligible for the office of President.
(E) Any and all officers shall hold office until
their successors have been elected and qualified. If a
vacancy occurs in any office of the Association, other
than the expiration of the term of office, then such
vacancy shall be filled for the unexpired term by the
Board of Directors.
(F) Officers of the Association shall take office
at the beginning of the fiscal year.
SECTION 2
The President shall preside at all meetings of the
Association and of the Board, shall exercise general
supervision of its affairs, and shall perform all the
usual duties that are required to be performed by him
by law and by the Constitution and By-Laws, incidental
to his office.
SECTION 3
Under the direction of the President, each Vice-
President shall exercise general supervision of the affairs
of his section. The Vice-Presidents in their order of
election shall, in the absence of the President, preside
and perform all the duties imposed upon the President.
SECTION 4-THE SECRETARY
(A) The Secretary shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall act as its recording
and its corresponding secretary and as secretary of
meetings of this Association and of the Board of Di-
rectors. He shall have custody of and shall safeguard
and keep in good order all property of this Association,
except such thereof that is placed under the charge
of the Treasurer. He shall issue all notices of this
Association, keep its membership rolls, have charge and
exercise general oversight of the officers and employees
of this Association, sign all instruments and matters
that require the attest or approval of this Association,
except as otherwise provided in this Constitution; keep
its seal, and affix it on such instruments as require it,
prepare the reports of the Board of Directors and this
Association, in collaboration with the President, have
charge of all matters pertaining to the meetings of this
Association and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The .Secretary may delegate to an assistant
secretary or other assistant employed by this Association
the actual performance of any or all of his duties a-,
recording or as corresponding secretary, but he shall
not delegate his responsibility for the property of this
Association, or the affixing of the seal of this Associa-
tion, or the making of any attestation or certification
required to be given by him, or the signing of any
document requiring his signature.
SECTION 5-THE TREASURER
(A) The Treasurer shall be an administrative
officer of this Association. He shall have charge and


shall exercise general supervision of its financial affairs
and keep the records and books of account thereof. He
shall prepare the budgets, collect amounts due this
Association, and receipt for and have the custody of its
funds and monies and make all disbursements thereof.
He shall have custody of its securities and of its instru-
ments and papers involving finances and financial com-
mitments. He shall conduct the correspondence relating
to his office and perform all duties usual and incidental
to his office.
(B) The Treasurer shall make a written annual
report to each annual meeting of this Association and
a written report monthly to the Board of Directors. Each
of said reports shall set forth the financial condition
of this Association, the state of its budget and appropria-
tions at the date of the report, and its income and
expenditures for the period of the report, and the
treasurer's recommendations on matters relating to the
finances and general welfare of this Association.
(C) The Treasurer shall not authorize any person
to sign any order, statement, agreement, check or other
financial instrument of this Association that requires
his signature, unless such delegation is expressly per-
mitted in this Constitution.
(D) When a new treasurer takes office the retiring
treasurer shall turn over to his successor a copy of the
closing financial statement and audit of the treasury,
all the records and books of account, and all monies,
securities, and other valuable items and papers belong-
ing to this Association that are in his custody and posses-
sion. The incoming treasurer shall check the same, and
if found correct, shall give to the retiring treasurer
his receipt therefore and a complete release of the
retiring treasurer from any liability thereafter with
respect thereto.
(E) The Treasurer, personally, shall not be liable
for any loss of money or funds of this Association or
for any decrease in the capital, surplus, income or
reserve of any fund or account resulting from any
of his acts performed in good faith in conducting the
usual business of his office.

ARTICLE VI.-BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SECTION 1-MEMBERSHIP OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS
(A) The membership of the Board of Directors
shall consist of the same officers, with the same terms
of office, as of the Association, the immediate past
President of the Association, and one or more Directors
elected from each Florida Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects as provided in these articles.
Directors shall be Corporate Members of The American
Institute of Architects.
B) Each Florida Chapter having up to 19 Institute
Members, as listed in the current Membership Directory
of the Institute, shall have one Director. Each Florida
Chapter having from 20 to 59 Institute Members so
listed shall have two Directors. And each Florida Chap-
ter having 60 or more Institute members so listed shall
have three Directors.
(C) The University of Florida Student Chapter shall
be represented on the Board by a Student Representative
whose duty it shall be to maintain liaison between the
Association and the Student Chapter.
SECTION 2-AUTHORITY OF THE BOARD
The Board shall be vested with the authority to
manage, direct, control, conduct and administer the
property, affairs and business of the Association, and
in the interim between Annual Conventions, within the
appropriations made therefore, put into effect all general
policies, directions and instructions adopted at a meeting
of the Association, to issue and mail such bulletins and
publications to its members and others as it deems
expedient, and shall establish and adopt rules and
regulations, supplementing but not in conflict with this
Constitution and these By-Laws, to govern the use of
the property, name, initials, symbol and insignia of
the Association, to govern the affairs and business of
the Association. Each director (and alternate director
in the absence of the director) shall convey to the


12 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






~?Guf4~1t.1!CdtC~E2tPC ~i#ct -


Chapter which he represents all decisions and actions
of the Board and shall convey to the Board the actions
and requests of the Chapter he represents.
SECTION 3-VACANCIES ON THE BOARD
Vacancies of the Director of the Board shall be
filled by the Chapter so affected and all other vacancies
shall be filled by the Board.
SECTION 4
(A) Regular meeting of the Board: The Board shall
hold at least two regular meetings each year and shall
fix the time and place of its meetings. One meeting
shall be held immediately prior to the opening of the
Annual Convention of the Association and one meeting
within thirty days after the beginning of the fiscal
year following the adjournment of said convention.
Ten members of the Board shall constitute a quorum,
and all decisions shall be rendered by concurring vote
of not less than the majority of its total membership
present, unless otherwise required by this constitution
and these By-Laws.
(B) Special Meetings of the Board: A Special Meet-
ing of the Board may be called by the President, or
on the written request of a majority of the Officers
of the Association, or of six members of the Board,
at time and place so designated by Party or Parties who
called the meeting.
(C) Notices and Minutes: A notice of each meeting
of the Board shall be sent in writing by the Secretary
to each member of the Board not less than five days
before the date fixed for the meeting. Minutes of the
meetings of the Board shall be recorded by the Secretary
and approved by the Board in its succeeding meeting.

ARTICLE VII.-COMMITTEES
SECTION 1
(A) The President, at least thirty (30) days before
the annual Convention, shall appoint a Nominating Com-
mittee, composed of Chairman and a member from each
Chapter, whose duty it shall be to nominate members
qualified to hold office in the Association for each of
the Offices about to be vacated.
(B) In addition to the Nominations presented by
the Nominating Committee, other Nominations for any
or all of the offices about to become vacant may be
made from the floor in the Convention. Elections may
proceed by acclamation or ballot at the will of the Con-
vention.
SECTION 2
The President shall appoint qualified members to
the yearly Standing Committees created by the Associa-
tion or the Board, whose duties and term of office shall
have been fixed when the Committee was created.
SECTION 3
Special Committees may be appointed at any time
for any specific purpose by the President, whose duties
shall be determined at the time of the creation of the
committee. Such committees shall not be established
for longer than the term of office of the President
appointing the Committee.
SECTION 4
(A) Committees shall act in an advisory capacity
with the right to request and receive all information
in possession of the Association and all records necessary
to discharge the duties imposed upon them.
(B) Notification: The Secretary shall notify the
Chairman and/or the members of the various committees
of their committee assignments, and furnish them the
names and addresses of all members thereof.
(C) The President shall be ex-officio a member
of all committees, and the secretary may act as secretary
for the committee if so selected by the committee. The
majority of members of the committee shall constitute
a quorum. Committees shall report their findings,
recommendations and actions to the body which created


it. Decisions, recommendations and other actions of
the Committee shall be made in accordance with the
concurring vote of the majority of members present or
by a majority vote of a letter ballot.
(D) Appropriations: The chairman of any com-
mittee requiring appropriations shall submit written re-
quest to the Board for the amount required and the
reasons thereof, and if granted, file with the final report
of the Committee a detailed statement of all monies,
if any expended.

ARTICLE VIII.-FINANCIAL
SECTION 1-FISCAL YEAR
The Fiscal Year of the Association shall begin on
the first day of January and end on the thirty-first
day of December of the same calendar year.
SECTION 2-COLLECTION OF DUES
The Treasurer of each Chapter shall collect annually
from each corporate member and associate member
assigned to that chapter, and shall remit promptly to
the Treasurer of the Association, an amount for the
succeeding year, to be determined by the Association
at its Annual Convention which shall be contributed
by each such member and shall be equal to the prorata
share required to defray all of the current expense of
every kind of the Association.
SECTION 3-CONTRIBUTIONS
The Board, at any regular meeting, by a concurring
vote of two-thirds of the members present, or at any
special meeting called therefore, may authorize the raising
of, and thereupon raise, money by voluntary contribution
from its members, in addition to annual dues, for any
designated special purpose consistent with the objectives
of the Association, and prescribe the manner in which
such contributions shall be collected. Non-payment of
contributions shall not abridge, suspend or terminate
the privileges and rights of any member.
SECTION 4-DEPOSITS AND WITHDRAWALS OF
MONEY AND SECURITIES
(A) Depositories. The Treasurer shall deposit all
monies of this Association in the name of this Associa-
tion, when, as, and in the original form received by
him, in one or more depositories designated by the
Board of Directors.
(B) Disbursements. Every disbursement of money
of this Association, except from the petty cash, shall
be by check of this Association, signed by the Treasurer
and countersigned by another officer designated by the
Board of Directors.
(C) Petty Cash Accounts. The Treasurer shall
establish petty cash accounts as authorized by the Board
which may be disbursed for the usual petty cash pur-
poses by the person designated in said authorization
of the Board. No such petty cash account shall exceed
$25.00 at any time and statements of the petty cash
expenditures shall be duly recorded by said persons and
the expenditures approved by the Treasurer before the
cash is replenished.
SECTION 5-ANNUAL BUDGET
(A) Adoption: The Board shall adopt an annual
budget, by the concurring vote of not less than two-
thirds of its membership present, showing in detail the
anticipated income and expenditures of the Association
for the fiscal year.
(B) Expenditures: Every expense and financial
liability of the Association and every expenditure of
money of the Association shall be evidenced by a voucher
or other appropriate instrument signed by the person
or persons properly authorized to incur the expense,
liability or expenditure, except a petty cash item as per
paragraph (c) of Section 4, Article VIII.
(C) Limitations: Unless authorized and directed
to do so at an annual Convention or Special Meeting
of the Association, the Board shall not adopt any
budget, make any appropriations, or authorize any ex-
penditures or in any way obligate or incur obligation


SEPTEMBER, 1955 13









for the Association, which, in the aggregate of any
fiscal year, exceeds the estimated net income of the
Association for such year.
SECTION 6-AUDITS
The Board shall authorize the Treasurer to employ
a Certified Public Accountant to audit the books and
accounts of the Treasurer for report at the annual
Convention.
ARTICLE IX.-MEETINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION
SECTION 1-ANNUAL MEETINGS
(A) Time of Meeting: The Association shall hold
an Annual Meeting, herein called the Annual Conven-
tion; the time and place shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors if not fixed by the preceding Annual Con-
vention.
(B) Reports: The President, the Secretary and
the Treasurer of the Association shall each make an
annual report in writing to the Annual Convention.
(C) Election of Officers: New Officers for the
ensuing year shall be elected to succeed those whose
terms of office are about to expire.
SECTION 2-SPECIAL MEETINGS
A Special Meeting of the Association shall be held
if a call therefore, stating its purpose, is voted by a
meeting of the Association or is voted by the Board
upon the concurring vote of two-thirds of the Board,
or is voted by not less than one-half of the Florida
Chapters upon the concurring votes of two-thirds of
the entire membership of each of the respective govern-
ing boards thereof, or by a written petition to the
Board, signed by not less than twenty-five percent of
the total number of members in good standing of the
Association.
SECTION 3-NOTICE OF MEETINGS
Notice of an Annual or Special Meeting of the
Association shall be served on each member and Chapter
of the Association, by letter or in official publication
of the Association, stating time and place of meeting
thereof. Notice of the Annual Convention shall be
served not less than thirty days before the opening
session, and in the case of Special Meetings, not less
than fifteen (15) days before such meetings.
SECTION 4-VOTES
A concurring vote of the majority of the members
qualified to cast a vote or a ballot shall decide the
question unless otherwise required by this constitution.
A vote by ballot not being requested the voting shall
proceed accordingly. NOTE: Only corporate members
may vote on Institute matters in accordance with In-
stitute Constitution and By-Laws.
SECTION 5-PROXIES AND LETTER BALLOTS
(A) Proxies: There shall be no voting by proxy
at a meeting of this Association.
(B) Letter Ballots: No vote of the membership
shall be taken by letter ballot.
SECTION 6-DELEGATES TO AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS CONVENTION
The Association shall have delegate representation
at Annual American Institute of Architects Convention
in accordance with American Institute of Architects
By-Laws relating to State organizations.

ARTICLE X.-AMENDMENTS
SECTION I-AMENDMENTS BY MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION
(A) This Constitution and its By-Laws may be
amended at any meeting of this Association, provided
that a notice stating the purpose of each proposed
amendment and the reason therefore and a copy of the
proposed amendment is sent to every member and
associate not less than thirty (30) days prior to the
date of the meeting at which the proposed amendment is
to be voted on.
(B) It shall require a roll call concurring vote of
not less than two-thirds of the total number of corporate


members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend this Constitution or its By-Laws relating to
matters of Institute affairs.
(C) It shall require a roll call concurring vote
of not less than two-thirds of the total number of
members present at a meeting of this Association to
amend this Constitution or its By-Laws on matters that
do not relate to Institute affairs.
(D) Every resolution of this Association amend-
ing this Constitution or its By-Laws shall state that
the amendment will become effective only if and when
it is approved by the Institute. Immediately following
the adoption of such a resolution, the Secretary shall
submit a copy of the amendment and the adopting
resolution to the Secretary of the Institute for such
approval. Upon receipt of said approval the amend-
ment shall become effective and the Secretary shall
enter the amendment and the approval at the proper
place in this Constitution or its By-Laws, with the date
of the amendment and approval.
SECTION 2-AMENDMENTS BY THE INSTITUTE
The Institute Board, unless the statutes forbid, may
amend any provision of this Constitution or its By-Laws
that the Association fails to amend after due notice
so to do from the Institute. Each amendment made
by said Board shall have the same force and effect as
if made by this Association in the manner hereinabove
provided, and shall be effective immediately on receipt
of the notice of the Secretary of The Institute con-
taining the amendment, and the Secretary shall enter
the amendment at the proper place in this Constitution,
with the date it was made.
BY-LAWS
(1) AMENDMENTS
These By-Laws may be amended in the same manner
as the Constitution.
(2) SUSPENSION OF BY-LAWS
These By-Laws may be suspended at any meeting,
for the transaction of any special business by a two-
thirds vote of the members present. When the special
business has been disposed of, the By-Laws shall im-
mediately be in force again.
(3) RESPONSIBILITY
The Association shall not be responsible for any
vote or statement of its officers or members nor be
pledged or bound in any manner except by the approval
of the Board, in conformity with the Constitution and
By-Laws.
(4) MEETING NOTICES
Date, Time and Place of all meetings shall be
stated in the notice therefore.
(5) RULES OF ORDER
All meetings shall be conducted in accordance
with Robert's Rules of Order.
(6) RETIRED MEMBERS
A member who ceases to practice architecture as a
gainful occupation and further ceases all other gainful
occupation shall be eligible for "Retired Membership."
(7) OTHER TYPES OF MEMBERSHIPS
Other types of memberships may be created as the
necessity arises in accordance with American Institute
of Architects chapter By-Laws.
(8) ELECTION OF OFFICERS
(A) Officers shall be elected at the annual meeting
of the Association by a majority vote of the Corporate
members present at said meeting.
(B) The Vice-Presidents, one from each section,
shall be designated as First, Second, and Third Vice-
Presidents by ballot at the Annual Meeting.
(C) The Directors, one or more from each cor-
porate Chapter as provided in Article VI, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting. An
Alternate Director, one for each Director, shall be
elected by each Chapter at its Annual Meeting to
function for the Director in case of his inability to
serve.


14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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SEPTEMBER, 1955 15
SEPTEMBER, 1955 15







Comment on Prefabrication


Architects in England are quite as much concerned
with the subject as those in Florida. Here, in an excerpt
from an address to the Royal Institute of British Archi-
tects, CHARLES HERBERT ASLIN, CBE, FRIBA,
reports on progress of the idea. Mr. Aslin was recently
awarded an Honorary Fellowship in the A. I. A.


By prefabrication I mean the pro-
duction of standard units of building
such as walls, bases, doors, windows,
wall blocks, roof blocks, and indeed
anything which can be made in a
factory. I do not mean the produc-
tion of whole units of buildings such
as sheds, houses, school-rooms, etc.,
sold as a standard answer to any given
problem. Some members of the pro-
fession still think that the idea of
factory-made components after the
war had no object beyond obtaining
a quick solution to some of our build-
ing problems. I believe however that
it is a natural development of the
machine age in which we live, and I
further think that architecture can be
produced by this method.
In 1945-46 it was, almost an im-
possibility to find prefabricated units
or to induce manufacturers to make
them or indeed to find builders
who would assemble them. Since that
date the idea has made much progress.
These methods are being used in all
the countries on the Continent and
there are modular societies whose
membership includes architects in-


Florida North Chapter
Fights Plan Duplication
The Florida North Chapter had an
opportunity recently to present its
views on the ever-recurring question
of the duplication of school plans to
the school board of Duval County.
Through the school board Architect,
ALBERT BROADFOOT, an invitation to
the chapter for this discussion was
extended and Chapter Vice-President
MYRL HAYNES and JOE WILKES, an
assistant professor at the College of
A. & A. A. at the U. of F. attended
a school board meeting for that pur-
pose.
Prof. Wilkes started by pointing
out that as parents and taxpayers the
problem of school building and their


terested in this method all over the
world.
It may to some appear as an expedi-
ent arising out of the difficulties in
which we found ourselves immedi-
ately after the war, but experience
seems to show that it is a matter
which will not only endure but will
expand. Those people who are not in
sympathy with this approach to pres-
ent-day architecture are inclined to
imagine that tradition stopped with
the normal methods of building with
bricks, stone, and reinforced concrete
in situ, and tradition is only carried
on by using the same methods as in
the past.
My view however is that this
method is a tradition continuing from
the past. And in spite of the danger
of prophecy, I suggest that it may
well be the appropriate method of
a machine age of production. Up to
the moment it has only been fostered
by local authorities with large and
continuing programmes. But I believe
that before long we shall have so
many manufacturers making compon-
ents that it will be quite simple for


costs is one that affects almost every
family in a community. Also that the
great need for additional school class-
rooms and facilities is a' nationwide
problem rather than a local one and
that the question of school duplica-
tion had been raised before and even
tried with less than satisfactory results
in other sections of the country.
The architect's reluctance to repeat
plans stems not from his considera-
tion of fee, but rather from his knowl-
odge of the process of architectural
design and the many varying condi-
tions which affect the design. Prof.
Wilkes used a chart to show the
board the many factors which influ-
ence the design of a school and the
improbability of finding a duplication
of all factors on two sets of conditions.


an individual architect with an indi-
vidual job to use any of these ma-
terials which will be manufactured for
sale, either in large or small quantities,
after they have been established by
the large buyer.
In other words, I think it has taken
too strong a hold to be dislodged, and
it is an unwise thing for those people
who think it is a passing phase to
wait for the time which I think
will never come when a return can
be made from this excursion to bricks,
and stone, and mortar.
One thing which I am sure will
prevent it is the changed outlook on
design. In the not very recent past
seme architects designed from outside
inwards. They built in a pattern in
what was then considered to be an
appropriate manner, and fitted in the
rooms which they hoped would satisfy
the inhabitants; though if they did
not it was of less importance to the
architects than that the structure as a
whole should present an imposing pat-
tern.
The method nowadays, which is
being more and more accepted, is that
the architect should supply his client's
needs, whether for a house, school,
factory or any other building, and
having satisfied that demand he must
produce a structure of architectural
quality. One of the things which in
my opinion is bound to provide the
appropriate answer is that we are get-
ting much greater co-operation be-
tween the client, architect, and engi-
neer ,and indeed with everyone con-
cerned with the building, than we did
formerly.


Duplication .of schools would not
only result in the construction of
buildings less suited to the site and
other varying conditions for which
the original school was designed, but
would ultimately mean an end to
progress in this field. It was pointed
out that schools today are better
lighted, heated and ventilated, easier
to clean and supervise and are less ex-
pensive to build through the constant
efforts of the architect towards im-
provement.
The architect serves his client in
his capacity to design and any at-
tempt to relieve him of this duty
through duplication would represent
a false economy.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Inftoermal eald ut
(Continued from Page 10)
Single, $36.00; Double, $32.00; Cot-
tages, $34.00; Students, $30.00.
Plan Number 2 includes 3 nights
and 4 days, starting with dinner
Thursday night and extending
through luncheon, Sunday. Per per-
son charges include room and all
meals for the period. However, ad-
mission to the Friday banquet in-
volves payment of $1.50 above the
following rates: Single, $27.00; Dou-
ble, $24.00; Cottages, $25.50; Stu-
dents, $22.50.
Room reservations should be made
directly to the Princess Issena Hotel.
Registrations for the Convention and
all inquiries relative to registration
should be addressed to JOEL W.
SAYERS, JR., Reservation Secretary,
P. 0. Box 1671, Daytona Beach.

Bob Little Placed Third
In Golf Tournament
July 22nd was a red-letter day for
architects and architectural draftsmen
of the Southeast, and especially so
for ROBERT M. LITTLE of the South
Florida Chapter. The date signalled
the 32nd Annual Golf Tournament
and Dinner given at the East Lake
Country Club in Atlanta by the F.
GRAHAM WILLIAMS COMPANY. Bob
Little came within two strokes of
winning the Southeastern Architects'
Cup for the second time. He won
(Continued on Page 18)


At the 19th Hole Dinner, F. Gra-
ham Williams, extreme left, con-
gratulates Bob Little for his fine
showing. Behind Mr. Williams is
Herbert R. Millkey, A.I.A. Regional
Director, who acted as Master of
Ceremonies at the dinner, and John
F. Hallman, Jr., president of the
F. Graham Williams Co.
SEPTEMBER, 1955


SWindows and


9 IWindow Walls


Complete units like this rugged, all-aluminum windows
combined with insulated panels mean lighter loads,
speedier installation for many types of commercial and
institutional buildings. They give the architect a greater
flexibility of design and can produce lower building
costs, better building performance, for his client.
A phone call will bring detailed information on them.

IN YOUR LOCALITY CALL:
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Tallahassee 2-0399 Orlando . 4-9601 Palm Beach ... 3-1832
Jacksonville EX 8-6767 Ocala .... MA 2-3755 Miami . . 48-4486
Hollywood . 2-5443 Ft. Lauderdale JA 2-5235

Florida Sales Representative:
P. 0. Box 5151,
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Sooner or later all industrial and commercial buildings in
this area require the protection of storm shutters. Plan now
to install the best-JONES STORM SHUTTERS-tested and ap-
proved by the University of Miami.
The best way to preserve the beauty of architectural de-
sign is to make provision for storm shutters at the time the
building plans are drawn. While construction is taking place
it is simple to conceal the hardware, such as headers, and thus
preserve the clean architectural lines of the structure. Later, as
the need arises, the full shutter installation can be made.
Our engineering group is available for consultation at any
time regarding details of header design or complete shutter
installation.

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Golf Tournament
(Continued from Page 17)
the Cup in the 1951 with a net of
71, the exact par for the Druid Hills
Course on which the Tournament
was played that year. He enjoys the
distinction of being the only Florida
architect ever to have won the tour-
nament which has become a tradi-
tional summer event in the south-
east.
The Golf Tournament was start-
ed in 1923, by F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS
to promote good fellowship among
architects. The first year it was re-
stricted to architects of Atlanta of
which 72 participated. Since then it
has been expanded to include all ar-
chitects and architectural draftsmen
in the entire southeast; and this year's
attendance totaled 262. Winner of
the Architect's cup this year was LEE
C. McCLURE of Atlanta. McClure
is also chairman of the Tournament
handicap committee of which Bob
Little is also a member.



Special Note For
Committee Chairmen

In line with current A.I.A. proce-
dure, started in connection with the
Minneapolis Convention last June,
it is hoped that reports of all F.A.A.
standing committees which may re-
quire discussion and decisive action
at the 41st Convention in Novem-
ber can be made available prior to the
Convention for study by all F.A.A.
members and especially by Chapter
delegates.
President CLINTON GAMBLE re-
quests that Committee Chairmen
begin now to consolidate work of
their individual committee members
toward the end of developing at least
a skeletonized report well in advance
of the Convention. It is highly de-
sirable that such reports be published
in the November issue of the F.A.A.
Official Journal, which will reach all
Chapter members at least two weeks
prior to the Convention, thus allow-
ing time for individual Chapter dis-
cussion and the instruction of dele-
gates if desired.
For November publication Com-
mittee reports must be in President
Gamble's hands by October 1st.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Office Changes

In Daytona Beach, WILLIAM P.
GREENING, A.I.A., announces the
opening of his professional office at
356 South Beach Street.
In Jacksonville, CECIL BRUCE
BURNS announces the opening of his
office for the practice of architecture
at 3991 St. Johns Avenue, Jackson-
ville.
A new architectural firm has been
formed in M i a mn i, COULTON
SKINNER, A.I.A., formerly of the firm
of Steward & Skinner, of Miami, and
the firm of Coughlin and Deutsch, of
Coconut Grove, have combined to
practice architecture under the firm
name of COULTON SKINNER, Archi-
tect, EDWARD J. COUGHLIN and
WILLIAM L. DEUTSCH, Associates.
The new firm has established offices
at 309 Plaza Building, 245 S.E. First
Street, Miami.


Newest A.I.A. PR Tool


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, Chairman
JOHN F. HALLMAN, President J JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JOSEPH H. COLE, Vice-Pres.





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ERIE PORCELAIN ENAMELING


A new teaching manual, planned
for ultimate use in schools throughout
the nation, has been completed and
will be tested in three cities in Texas
during the coming school year. De-
veloped by the A.I.A.'s PR Counsel
in conjunction with two A.I.A. com-
mittees and educators, "At Home
With Architecture" is a guide for
teachers in primary, elementary and
junior high schools, contains a kit of
25 photographic panels for classroom
exhibit and includes a bibliography
of 75 books and periodicals on all
aspects of architecture.
SEPTEMBER, 1955


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OWNERS on any of the many Beautiful and Permanent Building
Materials we handle. Write, wire or telephone us COLLECT for
complete information, samples and prices.



Represented in Florida by

LEUDEMAN and TERRY
3709 Harlano Street


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Telephone No. 83-6554






Legislative Committee Report


What



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A Good



J ob?


FIRST -
Good Design, Functional
Layout; with drawings
and specifications by
qualified Architects and
and Engineers.

SECOND -
Qualified and Experienced
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THIRD -
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(Continued from Page 5)
year period of diversified training for
those men who had graduated from
accredited architectural schools and
with a seven year period of training
for those men who had graduated
from an acceptable high school but
who had not pursued a college de-
gree. Thus, for the first time in
Florida, we now have a period of
diversified training required by law
prior to the entrance to examination.
Both houses of the Legislature
were willing to accept the clause per-
mitting those presently working to-
wards entrance to examination to
give notice to the Board within a
year and take it under the law exist-
ing at the time the 1955 Session
opened. And both houses were will-
ing to accept the provision re the re-
newal of the certificate not being re-
quired until July of the following
year. However, the House was unable
to accept the proposed citizenship re-
quirement, and preferred to see the
law remain as it had existed, permit-
ting the taking of the examination by
one who had filed his declaration of
intent to become a citizen. Relief
was provided for applicants in the
military service by permitting them
to credit in the required diversified
training period the time spent in ar-
chitectural activities while on active
duty.
While we were not able to come
completely within the requisites es-
tablished by the N.C.A.R.B., we
have made a step forward in raising
the standards for admission to prac-
tice. Because of legislative opposi-
tion which developed particularly to
the twenty-five year provision and
to the three year diversified training
provision, we were faced with the
choice of losing the entire bill, or
accepting the twenty-one year pro-
vision and the provision relating to
one year of diversified training. Your
legislative chairman was of the opin-
ion-as was your legislative represent-
ative in Tallahassee and your Presi-
dent-that the over-all position of the
Association and the profession would
be strengthened by accepting the
twenty-one year and three year diver-
sified training provisions rather than
by losing the entire proposed legisla-
tion. It was upon this basis that the
matter was finally resolved.


School Code Legislation
For some time prior to the open-
ing of the 1955 Legislature, architects
engaged in school construction had
been experiencing difficulty with
change orders in excess of $300. The
law provided that such change orders
required competitive bidding, a cum-
bersome and unwieldly procedure,
working a hardship upon contractor,
architect and school board alike. Be-
cause this was of importance to a
considerable portion of the profes-
sion, changes in the law consonant
with the recommendations of the
Sub-committee, School Facilities Con-
ference, which met in Jacksonville
in late March 1955, were made a
part of our legislative program. These
recommendations set up a sliding
scale with reference to change orders,
and considerably improved the pro-
cedure involved in such matters.
By contacting officials of the Su-
perintendent of Public Instruction's
office we were able to work out de-
tails of bills which they had then un-
dei consideration, and include as a
part of their legislation recommenda-
tions of the sub-committee referred
to above. By co-ordinating our activi-
ties with those of the school author-
ities, we were able to accomplish our
purpose without engaging directly in
legislative activity.

Lien Law Revision
One of the principal objectives of
the Associated General Contractors
was the repeal of the twenty per cent
boldback provision, or an acceptable
modification of it. Although we had
agreed to give the A. G. C. our un-
qualified support in eliminating this
objectionable feature of the Florida
Lien Law-which was passed during
the closing days of the last session
and which works a hardship on the
contractor-the A. G. C. was to spon-
sor the bill and to accept primary re-
sponsibility for its passage.
When the Legislature opened we
co-ordinated our efforts with the
A. G. C. representative in Tallahas-
see. He was strenuously opposed by
some material dealers, and his activi-
ties were not successful. Thus, this
aspect of the lien law, which affects
architects only incidentally but which
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






does work a hardship on general con-
tractors, remains on the statutes.
With reference to the entire lien
law picture, most organizations in-
volved in the construction industry
recognize that the mechanic's lien
law, which covers materialmen, labor-
crs, architects, etc., is badly in need
of revision. It is quite probable that
during the coming two years a sug-
gestion will come from some other
organization in the building industry
that the entire law be redrafted. In
the event such a situation arises, it
is suggested that your legislative
committee be given authority to es-
tablish liaison with other groups in
the industry, and to take such steps
as will protect the interests of the
architects in the event a new draft
is proposed in the 1957 Legislature.
Appropriations
As a part of the Association's con-
tinuing legislative program we arc
constantly striving to maintain the
State Board of Architecture in a
healthy political and economic cli.-
mate. Part of our operations in Tal-
lahassee at each session involves a
protection of the Board's appropria-
tion, and at this recent session of the
Legislature we were able to secure
for the Board the same appropria-
tions which sustained it during the
previous biennium.
During the last two or three weeks
of the Legislature of the Regular
Session much of our effort was di-
rected toward an adequate appropria-
tion for a construction industries
building at the University of Florida.
In this connection we operated as
closely as possible with SANFORD
GoIN's committee, which had this
particular project as its primary con-
cern. Without question, the activi-
ties of the Goin committee directly
resulted in an improved understand-
ing of the profession of architecture
and of the needs of the construction
industry for adequate housing at the
University. Largely through Sanford's
efforts editorials appeared in the
leading daily newspapers in Florida;
and in each instance these were called
to the attention of the individual
members of the House and of the
Senate.
The splendid job done by the Goin
committee in advancing the reasons
for appropriations for a building for
the College of Architecture and Al-
(Continued on Page 22)
SEPTEMBER, 1955


Architect, J. Brooks Haas, A.I.A., Jacksonville
Contractor, E. C. Kenyon, Jacksonville


A1 Sign of



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This striking design was developed with aluminum
letters, of the channel type, formed of heavy-
gauge sheet and continuously welded by the heliarc
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from behind by neon tubing. Letters are bolted to
the canopy facia formed of two 6-inch aluminum
channels that provide a raceway for necessary
wiring . A wide choice of stock styles and sizes
of letters are available in cast aluminum or endur-
ing plexiglas-or signs of any size and style can
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Legislative Report
(Continued from Page 21)
lied Arts in Gainesville and the dili-
gent effort of this committee to se-
cure this appropriation failed to se-
cure legislative approval. Primarily
this was because of previous commit-
ments that had been lined up for a
considerable period of time in the
educational institutions which de-
pend upon the Legislature for ap-
propriations. Certainly efforts in
this connection should bear fruit at
the next session of the Legislature.

Other Legislative Action
In addition to the matters set out
above there were some 40 bills of in-
terest to the profession introduced,
and action was taken on them con-
sonant with the general policies of
the Association. One of the prin-
cipal of these was the enabling act
granting wider powers to counties
and cities to set up favorable zoning
procedures. Although this bill ap-
peared to be successfully passing the
Legislature, it became amended to
eliminate counties in such number
that the bill eventually was of no
practical importance.
The customary bill limiting the
power of the State Board to control
its own legal activities and returning
these responsibilities to the Attorney
General's office was introduced, but
it was not enacted into law. A bill was
introduced in the House of Repre-
sentatives to require boards and bu-
reaus, such as the State Board of Ar-
chitecture, to retain examination
papers of the various applicants for
their inspection; and before we point-
ed out the inequity of the law to
its sponsor, the bill required that a
tape recording be made of any oral
interviews, and preserved by the
State Board. This was a particularly
offensive piece of legislation, because
it would have required the keeping of
tremendous numbers of papers in
storage for an unlimited period of
time. It was not accepted by the
Legislature.

Summary
Although we did not gain all that
we asked in our amendment to the
registration act, we have again taken
a great step forward in our continu-
(Continued on Page 24)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









Standard Prestrcssed
Concrete members
were used in the con-
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forty-foot-long Tee joists being erected at the open air show room of the
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. Tom Rawls, General Contractor . Prestressed Joists supplied by
Gordon Brothers Concrete Company, Lakeland, Florida.





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the Prestressed Concrete Institute. These prestressed concrete
units are now available. They can be specified in sizes and
shapes to meet a range of span, load and design conditions.
Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
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SEPTEMBER, 1955






Legislative Report
(Continued from Page 22)
ing program to raise standards for ad-
mission to practice and to improve
the law relating to architecture. In
addition, we have joined forces with
the F. E. S. and demonstrated our
willingness to work shoulder to shoul-
der with engineers in those areas
where the interests of the two profes-
sions overlap. This demonstration of
our understanding of the problems
in which we share a common interest
with others concerned with the con-
struction industry, such as the F.E.S.
and the A.G.C., cannot fail to make
the entire industry aware of our will-
ingness to accept responsibility and
establish leadership in public affairs
related to the building professions
and trades.
Moreover, although it was not a
primary objective of this committee's
program, the admirable legislative ef-
fort put forward by Sanford Goin's
committee, in which we had only a
small part, resulted in the finest kind
of public relations. In the total leg-
islative picture the Goin committee's
work must be assessed as a positive
action of exceptional force.
Your committee feels that the suc-
ccssful session recently experienced
by the F.A.A. must be attributed to
the individual architect and principal-
ly to the work of members of this
committee, who so tirelessly worked
to make clear to individual legislators
the importance of the profession to
Florida. It is chiefly to them that
we owe thanks for another successful
legislative season.
Members of the Legislative Com-
mittee, wh ich individually and
collectively, did much to make the
1955 legislative season successful, in-
duded the following: EDWARD G.
CRAFTON, Miami; ELIOT FLETCHER,
Tampa; SANFORD GOIN, Gainesville;
RALPH F. SPICER, Daytona Beach;
JOHN BRUCE SMITH, St. Petersburg;
R. DANIEL HART, Pensacola; A.
WYNN HOWELL, Lakeland; ERNEST
J. STIDOLPH, Tallahassee; RAYMOND
H. PLOCKELMAN, Palm Beach; JAMES
POWNALL, Ft. Lauderdale; JAMES
GAMBLE ROGERS, II, Winter Park;
WILLIAM STEWART, Vero Beach, and
WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN, Sarasota.


Producers' Council Program











--
/*,.







Y" "


EMMETT H. JONES, Secretary-
Treasurer, is owner-manager of the
Builders Products Company, in
Jacksonville, w h i c h represents
Sanymetal Products Co., and Se-
curity Fire Door Co. as Producers'
Council members. His company
was established in 1924. Mr. Jones
is a member of the Jacksonville
Chamber of Commerce and an as-
sociate member, A.G.C.

Jacksonville Chapter
Elects New Officers
A new year of activity started for
the Jacksonville Chapter at its meet-
ing last month when members se-
lected a new roster of officers. The
new President, who served as first-
vice-president last year, is genial
GEORGE P. COYLE, of the George P.
Coyle & Sons Co. First Vice-Presi-
dent is DAVID WILSON, of the Johns-
Mansville Company, who will be in
charge of Chapter programming dur-
ing the coming year.
Newly elected second Vice-Presi-
dent is DEAN M. JOLLEY, of the Seco
Steel Company who held the office
of secretary-treasurer last year. Suc-
ceeding him to the Secretary-treas-
urer's post is EMMENT H. JONES, of
the Builders Products Company.
President Coyle succeeded WALTER
F. BALDWIN, JR., of the Jacksonville
Sash and Door Company, who, as the
sparkplug of Chapter activities last
year, proposed development of a cen-
tral headquarters for building prod-
ucts and building industry services for
Jacksonville.


GEORGE P. COYLE is the newly-
elected President of the Jackson-
ville Chapter, as well as a Charter
Member. His firm, George P.
Coyle & Sons, was established in
1927 and now represents such
Producers' Council firms as: Rol-
screen Co., Mills Co., Master Build-
ers Co., Overly Manufacturing Co.,
Universal Corporation, and Hol-
comb & Hoke Manufacturing Co.

Named to the important post of
Chairman of the Caravan Commit-
tee for Jacksonville was JOHN
NORMAN, long active in local Pro-
ducers' Council affairs as branch
manager of the Pittsburgh Glass
Company.
Plans for the Chapter's yearly
program are now under consideration
and will be announced shortly, ac-
cording to President Coyle.

JOHN R. SOUTHWOOD, Miami Chap-
ter Public Relations Chairman, has
announced that the first of the year's
informational meetings was sponsored
by the United States Plywood Cor-
poration and was held at the Coral
Gables Country Club August 23.
Last year's Miami Chapter Presi-
dent, FRANK R. GOULDING, has been
appointed Chairman of the Joint
Technical Information Committee.
Other Chapter appointments were:
Membership, EDWARD J. COLEMAN,
JR.; Program, ALLEN KERN; Arrange-
ments, ROBERT LYNN; Attendance,
FRANK W. BUHRMASTER.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT























































Gate City Aluminum Windows

are the most outstanding achievement
in window design and construction
in the past 40 years!


and here's why...

"Push-Button Ventilation":
The unique incorporation of the motorized
principle permits Gate City windows to
be used for clerestory or otherwise
inaccessible installations. The motor and
clutch mechanism is so compact that it fits
into the same identical frame used for
the regular crank operated model, or you
may place the control switch anywhere!
Master switches are also available for
multi-unit operation.


"No-Splash" Rain Protection:
Even during showers this true awning window
can stay open with no danger of the rain
back-splashing over the top vent.


Easy Operation:
A few effortless turns of the easy to reach
operating handle adjust all sash simultaneously
... specially designed gearing in the dual-action
hardware equalizes the lifting effort
regardless of sash angle.


Lasting Permanized Finish:
Salt spray and salt air have no effect on
the Gate City Aluminum Awning Window.
Exhaustive tests have proven that the special
etch and lacquer treatment applied to this
aluminum window will preserve the smooth,
satin finish for years.


Self-Adjusting Sash: The new Gate City
Aluminum Window eliminates the need for
compensating screws and manual adjustment
by its use of Gate City's exclusive split-quadrant
sash arms. Enclosed in the jambs, they permit
the sash automatic adjustment for perfect,
tight closure.


Aluminum Strip Glazing: Gate City
eliminates all putty problems in its aluminum
window by using extruded aluminum glazing
strips instead. Secured by hidden, yet easily
accessible screws, these extrusions provide
the sash with strength and rigidity; they also
allow for factory glazing.


Completely Enclosed Hardware:
Open or closed, no unsightly projecting arms
or locking devices blemish the clean, uncluttered
appearance of this window. All operating
hardware is completely enclosed from all sides.
The entire mechanism may be fully exposed
for oiling or inspection by simply
removing the cover plates.


Full Factory Weatherstripping:
An absolutely tight all-around seal is provided
by tough resilient vinyl ...factory applied at
jambs, sill and meeting rails.




A W N AWNING WINDOWS 7

aW d anw Wita n


"Window Craftsmen for over 40 years"


GATE CITY SASH & DOOR COMPANY of FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA










goes to work"tKING SIZE"







Modern [id con err. po: p -a-,1 and
efficienIly inlo custom :i:zed areas The
architect s imagination is Modernfold's only

limitation. Reasonable ;iiI il cc.l, Ino
mainte.ncince, and lihfe.Ilorng :er.c,,e has
made Modernfold the ,rrst co rsidrtion

b, orchtect fr..nm co. t r.- _.- t
Paniogrophic acor n I rh e.lu.e do,.,ble

hinge places at top, Lcttori and ir, rrr, r-doae
ri:.,ir, citrich, d or higed inrer:secton g,.e

"todiernfold.,. the rgi, iold t Idrng jdoor -
the sIrerglh arid durable thot is rnrrchle,.s
Ihroughout th, Ird:. ir, ionri :uIt /our


I.h rather i or rD o ".',,".: r'.r,,e





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har:.. K ,T~p B... r.:h & 1 k: .l. L. .. l. 1 1. F I


See your A.I.A. File No. 16-M




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