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 Front Cover
 Another piece of unfinished...
 "Designing for the community"
 Commercial services for new...
 New "prevailing wage rate law"...
 The central chapter holds its quarterly...
 News and notes
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00014
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: August 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00014
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Another piece of unfinished business
        Page 1
        Page 2
    "Designing for the community"
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Commercial services for new areas
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    New "prevailing wage rate law" adds to architects' responsibility
        Page 9
    The central chapter holds its quarterly meeting
        Page 10
        Page 11
    News and notes
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Producers' council program
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text



loid Il


August -1955


AIA
aI


Offleiial Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS







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Especially in a Rapidly
Growing Young Area
To design, manufacture and distribute the
basic building materials that go into the
actual building of a community, its homes,
office buildings, stores, schools, churches,
hospitals, industrial plants, its roads and
streets, is a grave responsibility. We
accepted this responsibility over four
decades ago, because we, too, always have
and shall continue to work for a greater
South Florida and, the safety, comfort
and security of our people.



S 5220 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida
Miami 89-6631 Ft. Lauderdale LOgan 4-1211
South Dade, Homestead 1432, 1459


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Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


AUGUST, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 8


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble------- President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman------Secy.-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth
Morton T. Ironmonger__Asst. Treas.
1229 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger-- Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard No. Central
Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell--Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick-- Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph No. Central

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
aunders, Jr, Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
I Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy Is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

MCMURRAY. 2e MIAMI
AUGUST, 1955


Another Piece of


Unfinished Business


Unless some administrative miracle takes place shortly at the
University of Florida, the College of Architecture and Allied Arts may
be forced into a drastic curtailment of its student enrollment next
month. Reason is a critical shortage of teachers for courses in archi-
tecture, building construction and community planning. Unless exist-
ing vacancies are filled, the number of students that can be accepted
must be limited to a number that faculty members then available can
teach.
Chief reason for this situation is lack of funds. To quote Dean
WILLA-. T. ARNET: "Within the past few weeks a number of our
staff members have accepted positions at other universities, in govern-
ment service, or in private offices because of the more favorable salary
situation that prevails elsewhere . ."
JOHN L. R. GRAND, head of the Department of Architecture, estimates
that nine new teachers will be needed to meet fall enrollments under
emergency conditions. The University's budget provides for only five!
And, since the 1955 Legislature failed to appropriate sufficient funds
to bring the salary structure of the College in line with competing
institutions, the problem of holding the present staff or of finding
qualified replacements is both critical and difficult of solution.
The whole matter of university teachers' salaries has become a
problem of national scope. DONALD G. McGRAW, president of the
McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, writing in the March, 1955, issue
of Construction Methods and Equipment said that since 1940 salaries
of faculty members have actually decreased by 5 per cent as com-
pared with a 10 per cent increase by lawyers, a 48 per cent increase by
industrial workers and a whopping 80 per cent by physicians.
"There is no way to know with any degree of precision," he con-
tinues, "What the underpayment of our college and university faculty
members over the past 14 years has actually cost the nation in terms
of reduced quality of intellectual performance of those institutions ...
If no grave deterioration in the intellectual performance of our colleges
and universities has occurred so far, it is because we have been living
on borrowed time. It is time borrowed from faculty members who
have, in effect, been subsidizing these institutions by their financial
sacrifice."
McGraw was writing about the situation nationally. But the present
situation in Gainesville brings his facts home with a force that cannot
help but touch every building professional in Florida. Our young
people are entitled to the best technical training in architecture and
building construction and community planning that can be obtained.
Qualified teachers are needed to provide it. And only through adequate
appropriations from a fully informed Legislature can these teachers
become available.
So it seems that the architectural profession in Florida has not one,
but two important pieces of unfinished buisness to contend with. One,
of course, is to see that plans for housing the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts become a reality. The other and equally important
one is to make sure that teaching budgets are sufficient to staff it
properly and to make it the educational force that our industry and
profession so vitally needs.









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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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"Designing


for


The Community




The Minneapolis Convention was fortunate in having
a distinguished citizen, an architect and a city plan-
ner as its keynote speaker. ALBERT MAYER,
F.A.I.A., is a member of the American Institute of
Planners, partner in the firm of Mayer and Whittle-
sey, and Director, National Housing Conference and
Regional Development Council of America. The
major portions of his provocative keynote address
are printed here.


Why is the problem of Community
r so overwhelmingly pressing? Well
the fact is that Community has been
breaking down in the Western world
ever since the Industrial Revolution
accelerated the creation of slums.
And the quantity and rate and multi-
plicity of deterioration is now bigger,
better and more headlong than ever.
Traffic has grown from a head-
ache into a desperate disease. And
the tragedy of this traffic tumult is
ironically this: that modern technol-
ogy with its automotive miracles and
its road-engineering brilliance which
could give us release, are actually
deepening and widening the diffi-
culties by superimposing themselves
on obsolete patterns, making ultimate
solutions more costly and maybe im-
possible. This seems the keynote:
that instead of using great new tools
for a great new life, we are using
them to prolong and to deepen obso-
lescence, to painfully prolong what
should be replaced.
The traffic debacle is perhaps the
best possible advertising for rebuild-
ing communities and cities. And it
is advertising with wonderful cover-
age: it almost equally affects rich and
poor, pedestrian and motorist, young
and old, Cadillac owner and bus pas-
senger.
The current boom in urban office
AUGUST, 1955


buildings and living quarters is not
only accentuating the spatial over-
crowded drabness of cities, but is
increasing traffic congestion in some
sort of geometric ratio.
The suburbs are rapidly becoming
continuous with the metropolis itself.
And the suburbs own local sprawl
and traffic confusion, and congestion
are rapidly permitting them to catch
up with many of the disadvantages
of the city-plus some shortcomings
of their own, such as the excessive
journey to work.
Another symptom is the galloping
slums, not only in cities, not only in
suburbs, but increasingly in rural
areas where big new factories plant
themselves and attract new labor,
without a housing or recreation or
community program. The atomic
energy plant at Savannah River is
the most spectacular instance, but
this is repeated endlessly around the
country, particularly in the migration
of industry to the South.
Add two symptoms to this indict-
ment of our environment: the in-
crease and increasing rate of increase,
of mental cases and mental institu-
tions, and of juvenile delinquency.
It would be absurd to link these two
last to our unsatisfactory and anarchic
physical environment alone or chiefly.
But it would be blind to ignore the


influence that a good or an unsatis-
factory environment can have on
these, for good or for ill.
How We Got Where We Are
I will not show what happened in
the Industrial Revolution, and trace
slums and dislocations from there.
We can assume that. But accelera-
tion of these tendencies in the pres-
ent are even more menacing, when
we could, now, be breaking away.
This is the point that must be ham-
mered home: we are not just deal-
ing with a wicked or mistaken accu-
mulated past. Dominant present
tendencies and developments are far
more devastating. Let us see.
The new means of transportation
which have displaced the horse and
buggy, have within the city made a
shambles of the equi-spaced gridiron
streets which were then suitable.
What were once Communities have
been mercilessly dissected. When I
was a boy we played ball on the
streets reasonably safely and without
much interruption. Today it is mur-
derous and we need playgrounds.
Beyond the city, the automobile could
and should have made the country-
side more accessible. Instead, hel-
ter-skelter development has been en-
abled to go further and further out,
(Continued on Page 4)






"Designing for The Community"
(Continued from Page 3)
so the country has receded and we
are further away than ever, in miles
and travel time.
The basic defect is that all our new
shiny tools-telecommunications, the
automobile, the airplane, electric pow-
er, highway engineering-all develop-
ments making for a new freedom-
make us, in a sense, too free and
permit an unprecedented indiscipline
in development. They are being
used without planned control or fore-
sight, the dynamics of city, suburban,
county, regional expansion being in
the hands of the speculative builder
with no permanent interest in his
product because he "borrows out"
and moves on.
In the long run, really, he has a
vested interest in instability and ob-
solescence, because he can then build
newly in fresh areas. Nor do public
agencies require him to build in
recreation or community facilities. In-
deed in the long run they have to
chase after him to complete his job.
Our public agencies of planning
and control are weak. Within the
city, the standards they set are only
a shade or two better than the run-
of-the-mine builder is doing anyway.
This is our Zoning, which follows
weakly and rcmedially, and on the
whole, especially avoids much change
in the most congested central areas
where it is most needed. Unless we
drastically change densities, and add
a drastic traffic congestion factor, we
are getting nowhere fast.
And the extent of the jurisdiction
is altogether inadequate. For the mo-
tor car, the airplane have made the
political unit of the city meaning-
less; have changed it operationally
and developmentally from a few
square miles at the beginning of the
century, to many hundreds of square
miles. It is now the interstitial
areas and the rural areas that are
the theater of almost unbridled de-
velopment.
Failure of Single Remedies
Now we are on the last map of
our negative side: the present prev-
alent naive use of single remedies in-
genious and spectacular. They some-
times bring no relief and sometimes
bring deceptive relief because after
a little while things are worse than
ever. It just isn't that easy. Let's


examine a few of these magic single
solutions, and see what happens with
them.
All right. Traffic. Brilliant and
gifted engineers have injected street
widening, parkways, freeways, park-
ing meters, parking garages, off-street
loading, 3-level intersections and mar-
velous clover-leaves. All wonderful,
all spectacular, all costly, and all ul-
timately, self-defeating or nearly so.
In the case of parkways, for example,
the knowing motorist, to save time,
finds himself forced at peak times
back to the old two-and-three-way
by-ways that these parkways were sup-
posed to relieve. In fact, in this
single remedy racket, it's often diffi.
cult to tell which is the remedy and
which is the disease in our urban
mix-up.
What's the gimmick? Answer:
There are always more cars waiting
to use the nice new facilities, at both
ends. There is a flood control anal-
ogy we have got to learn from. They
no longer hope to control floods
only by higher and higher levees and
dikes near the mouth, as they used
to do. They have finally grasped
that they have got to diminish the
amount of water to be handled by
means of afforestration and catch-
ment of the headwaters and all the
way down the line. Then only, when
the amount is rationally diminished,
can you handle the problem. Sim'
ilarly, you have got to work out a
comprehensive program of land and
people in relation to living, work,
play; and thus diminish by rational
disposal of people and functions, the
now ever-growing need for movement.
Then, the toll road throughways,
with limited access. Wonderfully
straight, wide and speedy. The en-
gineers who predict traffic volumes
are always pleased because their esti-
mates of volume are greatly exceeded.
This is wonderful for the bond-hold-
ers, but mournful news for us users,
and proves how we are chasing our
tails. The through-ways are also sin-
gle solutions, with two grave defects:
the traffic they dump out at the big
cities because of the excess volume,
plays hell with the cities. The second
is that the state regards them as a
single unrelated facility. But at their
widely-spaced points, with its concen-
tration of traffic on and off, we natu-
rally find the beginnings of all sorts
of slummy uses.
So it is with other single methods,


each clever in itself, each totally in-
adequate unless it is part of a sym-
phony. Industrial decentralization is
important, made feasible by cheap
electric power. It could and should
be creative, one major modern solu-
tion of Community. But of itself,
without an overall plan and without
low-cost housing and amenities to
accompany it, it just erupts into the
countryside which in its simplicity
has no machinery to cope with it. It
ruins the physical and social picture,
disrupts local relationships and cuts
deep scars in local living.
As for Urban Renewal, it too is a
single tool that is being relied on to
accomplish more than it possibly can.
As an adjunct and a pump-primer
for bold and incisive analyses, it could
probably do much. Aside from the in-
adequacy of its hundred or two hun-
dred acres-es with a little superficial
city-planning thrown in, it has al-
ready got into problems and crises
of re-location of people, and of eco-
nomic and racial segregation that may
well exceed its ameliorating advan-
tages.
A Way Out
There will be no standard solution.
What I want to suggest is a theory
and a method that is applicable; to
suggest how this might be energized;
and later, how the architect fits in.
First, as to theory. The general
approach so far has been to assume
that what we have must pretty well
stay and continue to grow, and to
see what we can devise to make it
more or less do. This we do, no
matter how often we are failing as of
now, no matter how costly it may
be to apply our remedies. The most
admired aspect of America in the
20th Century is its successful in-
dustry. Industry's success is not
due to patching up old plant, but to
analyzing its problems and then, if
necessary, building entirely anew.
I am not suggesting we can do so
drastic a job on human environment.
But I do suggest this. Present ap-
proaches assume that we must pre-
serve our present structure; and year
after year we spend many, many mil-
lions fruitlessly trying to achieve this
by expensive super-traffic systems
and far-flung water supply systems of
tremendous complexity. Instead, let
us make an approach the other way:
analyze and visualize what we would
do if we could start from scratch now
(Continued on Page 18)
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT























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AUGUST, 1955







Commercial Services for New Areas




The battle againstcommercial slums is the battle of every architect and planner. Here
VICTOR D. GRUEN discusses the campaigns that can be waged to defend suburbia.
A condensation of his address to a seminar of the Minneapolis A. I. A. Convention.


Architecture's most urgent mission
is to convert chaos into order and con-
vert mechanization from a tyrant into
a slave, thus making place for beauty
where there is vulgarity and ugli-
ness. Architecture today can no
longer concern itself only with that
particular set of structures which hap-
pen to stand upright and be hollow-
"buildings" in the conventional sense.
It must concern itself with all man
made elements which form our en-
vironment-with outdoor spaces as
created by structures, with roads and
highways, with signs and posters, with
cityscape and landscape.
The theme, "Public facilities and
commercial services for new areas,"
suggests that the architect will be
given virgin land and be asked to
create the ideal "cityscape."
Unfortunately, such "new areas"
do not exist any more near our large
cities. Something which I will call
"sub-cityscape" has reached up from
the cities along all major roads and
highways and has despoiled the virgin
landscape. Sub-cityscape consist of
elements which cling like leeches to
all of our roads: gas stations, shacks,
shanties, used car lots, billboards,
dump heaps, roadside stands, rubbish,
dirt and trash. Sub-cityscape fills up
the areas between cities and suburbs,
cities and towns, cities and other
cities.
The existence of sub-cityscape doc-
uments why city planning--even be-
fore it had a chance to become effec-
tive in our times-is obsolete and
has to be replaced by "Regional Plan-
ning." Whenever and wherever the
hinterland between roads and high-
ways gets settled with suburban dwell-
ings, there blossoms along the public
roads the parasitic vines of commerce
in the form of string developments.
They grow wildly and profusely and,
6


like parasites clinging to trees, they
choke the mother plant, the highway,
strangling it so that its life blood, ar-
terial traffic, cannot flow easily any
longer. As the leaves of an affected
tree wilt away and finally drop, so
the string-like growth along the roads
affects the surrounding residential
areas which, under the influence of
traffic-nuisance, noise, fumes and the
ugliness of blatant signs deteriorate
around a new store area. The stores,
having lost their best customers, move
up a mile or so and start anew. Build-
ings they have left are taken over by
the scavengers of trade: second-hand
stores, saloons, cut rate enterprises.
Thus a "commercial slum" is born.
The battle against the commercial
slum has been my personal concern
for a long time. I believe that with
the "planned, integrated shopping
center" we have found an effective
tool to bring about its obsolescence.
But I believe also that beyond that,
this new architectural planning con-
cept (the only new cityscape element
born in our century) is opening vistas
which show solutions with respect to
other serious problems of suburban
life.
Suburbia is an area which has lost
the advantages of the city without
gaining any of the country. The
cultural desert of suburb life needs an
oasis where a true social life can
develop.
The integrated shopping center can
be exactly that, just like the Greek
Agora or the old market place where
complete centers of human activities,
combining commercial activities with
civic, cultural, social, religious and
entertainment functions. It also can
become the place where art and archi-
tecture can be reunited.
All our attempts to bring art back
into architecture are the result of


wishful thinking if we cannot create
a new architectural environment in
which people can contemplate art
without being run over. If we can-
not do this, then we will continue to
drive art underground into the mu-
seums and galleries where it is ob-
served and cared for by the "experts"
and connoisseurs and with only little
genuine relationship to the people.
In order to create this new archi-
tectural environment, we have most
of all to create order. We have to
unscramble the melee of flesh and
machines, pedestrians and automo-
biles, junk yards and homes.
The integrated shopping center is
an attempt to do just that. The
principles which go into the design
of an integrated center, whether small
or large, are identical. The five most
important ones are:
1. Creation of effectively separated
spheres of activity: access, car
storage, service activities, selling,
walking and relaxation.
2. Creatiord of opportunities for so-
cial, cultural, civic and recrea-
tional activities.
3. Overall architectural planning as
related to function, structure and
esthetics.
4. Encouragement of individualis-
tic expression of commercial ele-
ments but subordinating these
expressions to overall discipline
by means of architectural co-or-
dination, sign control and a
code of behavior concerning
matters like show window stick-
ers, opening hours, show win-
dow lighting, etc.
5. Integration with the surround-
ing environment in matters of
traffic, usage, protection and es-
thetics.
These basic principles are applic-
able, also, to other types of projects.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






In two suburban areas we are plan-
ning at present the construction of
Recreational Health Centers. Their
concept is to combine, in one indi-
genous environment, related facilities
like hospitals, clinics, laboratories,
medical and dental offices, nurses'
homes, hotel accommodations for pa-
tient visitors, and the related com-
mercial services like restaurants, lunch
rooms, cafeterias, pharmacists medi-
ical supply stores.
Following the shopping center pat-
tern, we create on the one hand sep-
aration between various usages and,
on the other hand, combine the func-
tions of all buildings of the same de-
S nomination, thus creating a common
access road system, common parking
areas, common heating and air con-
ditioning services and common load-
ing, deliveries, repair and mainte-
nance areas. In the midst of the var-
ious buildings there will be outdoor
spaces reserved for pedestrians, richly
landscaped, offering restfulness and
creating a new segment of 20th cen-
tury cityscape.
These various plans for many cities
of the nation, it seems to me, might
be a weapon for a successful counter-
attack in the technological blitzkrieg.
If we use the weapon and if we can
create large numbers of these cluster-
like centers, we will be able to raze
the then tenantless strings of shanty
towns along our roads. When the
rubble is cleared away, we will plant
trees and shrubs and grass and flowers
where the suburban slums stood. We
will gain space to widen strangled tho-
roughfares, space for picnic grounds,
playgrounds, parks; we will get rid of
wide stretches of sub-cityscape.
SThese are not lofty plans; this is
practically reality. The fact that these
nuclei of a new cityscape are being
created by and for the same forces
which were always accused of being
the representatives of rugged indi-
vidualism, is a hopeful sign.
For success on a grand scale we
will need more than plans and en-
ergy. We will need the legal weap-
ons to fight the battle; we need more
effective legislation for condemnation
proceedings; we need better zoning
laws and zoning practice; and we need
a liberal policy of federally guaran-
teed loans. We need educational
programs for our architectural schools
stressing the needs of planning. Most
of all, we need understanding and
action in our profession.
AUGUST, 1955


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8 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






New "Prevailing Wage Rate Law"


Adds to Architects' Responsibility


To all architects concerned with
any type of public work in Florida,
the provisions of Senate Bill No. 497
of the 1955 Sessions of the State Leg-
islature have special application. As
of August 6, the date that these pro-
visions become operative, specifica-
tions covering practically all work for
the State, a county or a municipality,
must contain a schedule of prevailing
wage rates for the locality in which
the project is to be built.
The bill that makes this mandatory
was signed by Governor Collins June
3, 1955 and is now known as the
"Prevailing Wage Rate Law". Speci-
fically this law is an amendment to
Section 215.19, Florida Statutes, 1953,
which relates to the rate of wages
for laborers, mechanics and appren-
tices employed on public works. In
effect the new law does these things:
1. Makes mandatory the payment
of prevailing wage rates on all public
works contracts where the contract
exceeds $5,000. This includes bridges
on public roads and highways with
contract prices exceeding $50,000 or
which are located in a metropolitan
area defined as a county having a
population of 100,000 according to
the last census. But this provision
does not apply to the construction,
repair or maintenance of public roads
or highways themselves.
2. Designates the Florida Industrial
Commission as the agency that will
set wage rates to be regarded as "pre-
vailing" in any locality. It further
charges the Commission with the job
of furnishing rate information to ap-
pear in specifications as well as
responsibility for administering the
law.
3. Requires the contracting autho-
rity state, county or city, school
board, etc. to provide the Com-
mission with advance notice of the
nature, magnitude and location of
any contemplated public project.
The particular portion of the new
law that materially affects architects
AUGUST, 1955


is paragraph 1 (b) which reads as
follows:
"The provisions of this section shall
be called to the attention of all pros-
pective bidders on public contracts of
this nature by a notice in the speci-
fications, and by the insertion in the
specifications of a schedule of prevail-
ing wage rates in the locality or area
where the work is contemplated fur-
rtished by the Florida Industrial Com-
mission, and such schedule of prevail-
ing wage rates shall for the purpose
of the contract and for the duration
of the contract be deemed the prevail-
ing wage rates as contemplated by
this act regardless of any previous or
subsequent determination by the Flor-
ida Industrial Commission."
In effect the new law saddles the
architect with a double duty. He
must see that his public works client
-state, county, municipality or what-
ever-properly notifies the Industrial
Commission as to the character of the
contemplated project. Then he must
obtain from the Commission full
data on local wage rates for insertion
in specifications.
Heretofore many public works con-
tracts in the State have carried a gen-
eral clause providing that "the con-
tractor shall pay prevailing wage
rates". Such a generality is no longer
legal. After August 6, 1955, specifi-
cations for all public works covered by
the law must stipulate rates as fur-
nished by the Commission prior to
release of contract documents.
Information on wage rates are now
being compiled by the various A.G.C.
chapters throughout the State. The
Commission will be furnished with
this information as quickly as pos-
sible. According to A.G.C. spokes-
men, most areas will be covered. But
it is possible that rates in some lo-
calities may require study and subse-
quent decisions on the part of the
Commission. For such reasons it is
possible that contracts for certain
public works projects may be held up
pending full compliance with pro-
visions of the new law.


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Above, Secretary
Ernest T. H.
Bowen, II, and
President Richard
E. Jessen talk over
what seems to be
a matter of im-
portance in a se-
cluded corner of
the University
Club.


Eliot C. Fletcher,
left, the Chapter's
able chairman on
arrangements,
ponders a point
raised by Archie
G. Parish, educa-
tion committee
chairman, while
Elliott B. Hadley,
behind them,
watches the cam-
eraman work.


Relaxing at the University Club party are J. Bruce Smith and Blan-
chard E. Jolly, both of St. Petersburg, and E. Frank McLane, Jr.,
Tampa. Smith was last year's F.A.A. director for the Florida Central
Chapter.


The Central



Covering an area

and can now boas



Those who have any doubts re-
garding the active growth of the A.I.A. j
in Florida should learn something
about the Florida Central Chapter.
The most recent chance to do so
occurred Saturday, July 9, in Tampa,
when some 70 members and guests
attended an all-afternoon business
session in the Tampa Terrace hotel.
Later there was a cocktail party at
the University Club given by Clinton
L. Andavall, architectural representa-
tive of the U.S.-Mengel Plywood Com-
pany. It was followed by a smorgas-
bord dinner and the after-dinner en-
tertainment included an informal dis-
cussion of plywood and its various
modern uses by Mr. Andavall. His
talk was illustrated by a number of
excellent full-color slides of work done
by local architects, many of them
taken especially for this particular
showing. Final event of what every-
one hailed as a highly successful
meeting was the showing of a short
industrial film on glass-making pre-
sented by the Pittsburgh Glass Co.
Meetings that are "successful"
have been a matter of course within


The newly formed Women's Auxilial
Central Chapter was represented by I
secretary, Mrs. T. V. Talley, vice-pi
E. B. Hadley, treasurer.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







Chapter Holds Its Quarterly Meeting



of nineteen counties, this active group has grown almost four-fold in two years

st of having the first organized F. A. A. Women's Auxiliary in the entire state.


the Florida Central Chapter. Be-
cause the Chapter area is so large-
it embraces 19 counties at present and
stretches from east to west coasts-
meetings are held 6nly quarterly. They
are representative as to location-the
April one was in Lakeland, the very
.center of the Chapter's territory-
and in each an evening of fun has
been wisely included as an aftermath
of the afternoon's business.
For the Chapter's executive board
the meeting starts with a business
luncheon; and agendas of both board
and general business meetings cover
the full range of A.I.A. activities at the
local level. Possibly because of the
very infrequency of these gatherings,
reports of committees are more than
usually complete. Not all of them are
accepted with rubber-stamp approval,
either. Apparently, the extent of dis-
cussion on some of them is a measure
of the Chapter's overall vigor.
Certainly the membership represen-
tation and interest shown has had a
remarkable effect on Chapter growth.
During the last two years membership
has increased from 32 to a current


110, including corporate, associates
and junior associates. Growth has
been particularly heavy in the last
two classifications, a sure indication
that younger professional men are
finding Chapter affiliation to be so-
cially attractive as well as of practical
advantage in their work.
New members voted on at this
meeting include: Corporate, JAMES A.
HEIM, JOSEPH L. MILLS, JR., ASSoci-
ate, RICHARD P. JONES, JR., BOLTON
MCBRIDE, DONALD J. WEST; Junior
Associates, JOHN WARREN HAYES,
BRUCE A. RENFREE, JR., THEODORE
J. STUTOWICZ, CLIFFORD W. WRIGHT.
Chapter influence and activity has
grown in other directions, too. Re-
cently formed (last April at the Lake-
land meeting) is the first F.A.A. Aux-
iliary in the State. Organized "to
promote unification and advancement
of the profession, friendship and unity
within the group and to stimulate
greater public interest in the work of
the architectural profession," the new
group is open to wives of all Chapter
members; and plans for vigorous com-
mittee action are already under way.


The Auxiliary of the Central Chap-
ter developed from the devoted inter-
est of a group of "architectural wives"
in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area.
Officers elected at Lakeland include:
MRS. A. WYNN HOWELL, president;
MRS. T. V. TALLEY, vice-president;
MRS. A. G. PARISH, secretary; and
MRS. E. B. HADLEY, treasurer. In its
January editorial, The Florida Archi-
tect said this about formation of
F.A.A. Women's Auxiliaries: "Once
launched, the idea would grow rapid-
ly, we think." There is every reason
to think the statement will prove out
as the program of the first F.A.A.
Auxiliary develops.
On the public relations side of
Chapter activity, ELLIOTT HADLEY re-
ported that arrangements had finally
been made for presentation of a TV
program over Tampa's new station,
WTVT. RICHARD SMITH succeeded
in finding available time for a regu-
lar Wednesday noon presentation;
and HORACE HAMLIN will act for the
Chapter as program chairman. Broad-
casts are scheduled to begin the first
week in August on channel 13.


y of the Florida Joseph M. Shifalo and Mrs. Shifalo represented
rs. A. W. Parish, architects in Winter Park. During business
tsident and Mrs. meeting he spoke of new Chapter plans for
Orange County area.
AUGUST, 1955


Mr. and Mrs. Clinton L. Andavall were hosts
at the pre-dinner cocktail party. Later he en-
tertained with slide films and discussed new
applications of plywood.








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News & Not


Lights being what they are at the Pine Tree Inn, scene of the Florida
South's July 12th meeting, Trip Russell, pinch-hitting as chairman for
President Sam Kruse, obligingly helps Secretary H. George Fink to read
the minutes. With them is Russell T. Pancoast, F.A.I.A., who told some
70 members and guests about the background of fabulous Miami Beach.


Florida South Meeting
As was the June meeting, the July
12th gathering of the Florida South
Chapter membership was held at the
Pine Tree Inn where last month
the food merited a special note in
President Sam Kruse's Chapter Sum-
mary publication. This month the
dinner wasn't rouladen "stuff rolled
with meat". But it was solid fare and
enjoyed by all.
Enjoyed, too was the real highlight
of the evening the amazing back-
ground against which the growth of
Miami Beach appears as a modem
miracle. The background was skill-
fully sketched in an informal and
intensely interesting talk by RUSSELL
PANCOAST who illustrated portions of
it with a series of slides that showed
tangled mangroves where plush hotels
are today. As one of the few pro-
fessional men who knew and lived on
the Beach during boyhood, he told,
with first-hand knowledge, of "the
first house", "the first avocado grove",
the "first bridge to Miami" and the
"first coconut plantation" from


whence has come the thousands of
palms that mean South Florida to so
many tourists.
There were a few reports. And
after some discussion it was voted to
hold the next meeting, August 9th,
at the Hofbrau House in company
with members of the Broward County
Chapter. It will be ladies night as
well; and the outlook is a good time
for everyone who can attend.

Daytona Chapter Busy
Understandably enough, members
of the Daytona Beach Chapter are
concentrating all their collective en-
ergies to perfect plans for the F.A.A.
41st Annual Convention. Though
probably already marked on the
calendars of most F.A.A. members,
it will be held at the Princess Issena
Hotel in Daytona Beach November
17, 18 and 19.
Indications already are that attend-
ance will be particularly heavy. Thus
the registration committee, chair-
maned by JOEL W. SAYERS, urges early
reservations to assure the type of hotel
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


&MIM





accommodations desired. As soon as
details of the Convention program
are available, they will be published in
detail here.


The Daytona Beach firm of SPICER
AND GEHLERT, Architects, announces
removal of offices to 159 Broadway.
The firm's new telephone number is
Daytona Beach 3-5491.


University Needs Teachers
Dean William T. Arnett has an-
nounced that the College of Archi-
tecture and Allied Arts has vacancies
on its teaching staff for both instruc-
tors and assistant professors. Instruc-
tors' salaries for 10 months range
from $2,900 to $5,700 with a bache-
lor's degree required. For assistant
professors 10 months' salaries range
from $3,600 to $6,500, with a mas-
ter's degree or equivalent experience
required. Those interested should
write directly to Dean Arnett at the
University of Florida, Gainesville. Ap-
plication forms for positions will be
mailed at once.


Vacations at Palm Beach
From HILLIARD T. SMITH, JR., sec-
retary of the Palm Beach Chapter
comes news that regular chapter meet-
ings have been discontinued during
the months of July and August. But
the regular July dinner dance for
members and their wives was held at
the Palm Beach Cabana Club on Fri-
day evening, July 22.


*.," i


One Florida South member who
didn't get to eat his July meeting
dinner was C. Robert Abele. That
grin was his reaction to a phone
call saying he was a new father-
his third child and second baby girl.
AUGUST, 1955


SIGNS OF GOOD DESIGN



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cnottter


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The new Stone Buick Building in Fort Pierce . .Kendall P. Starratt, Architect ~
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Executive Board Holds
Third Quarterly Meeting

Eighteen Vice-Presidents, Directors
and Chapter officers, including a rep-
resentative from the Student Chapter
at Gainesville, met July 23 at the
Coral Gables Country Club for the
Executive Board's third quarterly
meeting of 1955. First order of busi-
ness, not on the official agenda, was
luncheon; and with that done, Pres-
ident CLINTON GAMBLE called the
meeting to order to consider a num-
ber of committee reports.
The group heard BENMONT TENCH,
JR., and FRANKLIN S. BUNCH present
a highlight report of legislative action
(see box in this column). Then JEF-
FERSON N. POWELL discussed needed
changes in the F.A.A. Constitution
and By-Laws. He presented the Board
with a fully detailed set of changes,
so extensive, in view of such matters
as re-districting, committee realign-
ment, etc., that it constituted virtu-
ally a complete revision. Since all such
changes require both due notice via



Legislative Report
The report on the F.A.A. Legislative
Program, promised for publication in
this month's issue, has been neces-
sarily delayed. Both Benmont Tench,
Jr., F.A.A. legal counsel, who repre-
sented the Association at Tallahassee,
and Franklin S. Bunch, chairman of
the F.A.A. Committee on Legislation,
devoted an extraordinary amount of
time and energy in following the in-
terests of architects through the devi-
ous paths of legislative action. It has
not been possible, thus far, to clearly
present the results of such action.
However a comprehensive legislative
report is now in the process of prepa-
ration and will be published in the
September issue.


publication and convention action for
ratification the Board directed that
they be published in the September
issue of The Florida Architect, thus
giving the full F.A.A. membership op-
portunity for comment and suggestion
for further revision in time for final
action in November.
On the basis of a letter-report from
SANFORD W. GOIN, chairman of the
Education and Registration Commit-
tee, the Board approved a plan for
awarding a $250 scholarship for a
(Continued on Page 16)
AUGUST, 1955


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Executive Board Meets
(Continued from Page 15)

College of Architecture and Allied
Arts student on the basis of a design
competition to be completed by, and
judged at, the November Convention
in Daytona Beach.
The Board heard FRANCIS WALTON,
who, with DAVID LEETE, represented
the Daytona Beach Chapter, present
a progress report on 1955 Convention
plans. Theme will be "Planning for
Education;" and many of the Con-
vention activities will be centered on
the problems of Florida schools and
advances currently being made in both
planning methods and construction
techniques applicable to local school
buildings. (A complete pre-view of
the 1955 F.A.A. Convention program
will be ready for publication in the
September issue of The Florida Arch-
itect.)
ITEM: Exhibitor booths for the
Daytona Beach meeting are being



Dues Are Due Again!
To Chapter Treasurers and Chapter
members alike: The Treasurer's report
to the F.A.A. Board of Directors
showed that a substantial proportion
of 1955 dues had not yet been paid.
Like every other organization pro-
gram, that of your F.A.A. depends on
association dues. If your dues as an
individual haven't yet been paid,
please, says your Treasurer, pay them
now!



rapidly sold. Of the 50 planned for,
only 16 are available at this writing;
and some of those have been tenta-
tively reserved. If you know of firms
wishing to obtain exhibit space, urge
them to contact immediately, William
R. Gomon, P. O. Box 1671, Daytona
Beach, in charge of arrangements.
President Gamble reported on his
discussion with A.I.A. officials at the
Minneapolis Convention relative to
the integration of State Associations
with the A.I.A. national organization
set-up. Of the 11 state organizations
now in existence, Florida is the strong-
est and best organized. There seems
to be a good chance that the F.A.A.
will shortly be used to test the prac-
ticality of bringing state associations
into closer integration with the A.I.A.
via regional chain of authority. Study
of the subject is now under way.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





State Board Announces
New Registrations
Registrations issued by the Florida
State Board of Architecture total 52
for the period from February 6 to
June 11, 1955. Of these, only 19
were to residents of Florida who had
taken the Junior examination. The
remaining 33 were issued to archi-
tects practicing in other states. Of
these latter, New York architects num-
bered 8, Illinois 7, No. Carolina 4,
Massachusetts 3, Connecticut 2, and
Ohio 2, and one each from Alabama,
Arizona, Georgia, Maryland, Michi-
gan, Minnesota and New Jersey.
Following are the new Florida reg-
istrants:
Ft. Lauderdale
GILBERT S. UNDERWOOD
Gainesville
GORDON DIRKES
Gulf Breeze
ROGER G. WEEKS
Jacksonville
EMIL G. BALL
ROBERT A. WARNER
ROBERT D. WILSON
Lakeland
RICHARD P. JONES, JR.
Miami
DONALD L. BROWN
JAMES E. FERGUSON, JR.
GEORGE C. HUDSON
EMORY L. JACKSON
WRAY G. SUCCOP
HECTOR V. TATE
Miami Beach
ERNEST WOLFMAN
Orlando
RODERICK DORSEY
Perrine
HENRY E. BROWN, JR.
St. Petersburg
WALTER H. MELODY
Stuart
RICHARD E. PRYOR
Tampa
CHARLES L. CRUMPTON


A.G.C. Chapters Now Total Nine
The new roster of the A.G.C. mem-
bership lists a total of 151 for Florida
as of last month. The Florida A.G.C.
Council now comprises nine chapters
with memberships as follows: North-
eastern Florida, 18; South Florida,
43; Florida West Coast, 19; North-
west Florida, 10; Florida East Coast,
29; Florida Central East Coast, 10;
Tallahassee, 9; and Central Florida,
13. Five chapters are served by man-
agers or executive secretaries.
AUGUST, 1955


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
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ENGINEERDI PRDe S


"Designing for The Community'
(Continued from Page 4)
in the midst of our new technological
opportunities, and see what we can
salvage from what we have in the
light of that. In other words, a bold
approach.
In still other words, we can no
longer afford to grow by continuous
accretion. Maybe we must in some
cases make the drastic decision that
continuing expansion is unhealthy,
that growth must be in new units,
and that to salvage a maximum, there
must be drastic limitation and re-
structuring of our present set-up of
growth which happened more or less
by accident. Bear in mind that even
the smaller city is no longer just a
city, but a Region, and that whether
it is a political unit or not, the ef-
fective area of a city has grown from
a few square miles at the beginning
of the century, to many hundreds of
square miles today.
Second, as to method: Let us plan
by combined operations and expertise,
and let not the single solution or the
single project fascinate us and pose
as the answer. We must use creat-
ively and jointly the very same tools
we now use piecemeal and futilely.
We will not solve traffic only in
terms of traffic. If we first explore
by drastic functional and land use
rearrangement, what the minimum of
traffic is that we require, then our
ingenious and brilliant solutions will
need to be used only sparingly to
make a good plan even better; and
not as now in a wholesale way, to
make up for bad planning.
We require a thorough-going and
unprejudiced Regional-Metropolitan
approach and plan and authority and
execution. The City Plan is too small
a basis, because the automobile has
made the political boundary meaning-
less. The disorder is regional. The
new order must be regional.
What other tools must we put to-
gether and create? We need drastic
density reductions especially at the
center, where opposition will be great-
est, not only for more humane con-
ditions that are acceptable to those
who are now abandoning it for dis-
tant points, but to avoid choking
the city to death with excessive traf-
fic. In other words, a vital new zon-
ing dimension and concept.
We need a public land acquisition
policy that is not just a hand-to-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





mouth affair making purchases for
each separate project as it arises. Only
in that way can we plan ahead, can
we have continuous open green
breathing spaces that separate one
built-up area from another, instead
of the deadly continuous metropoli-
tan build-up that drives us further and
further afield for release.
We have got to exercise much
more than minimal control on the
private developers who can build just
about anywhere they please, still fur-
ther stretching and confusing traffic
requirements; and he unbearably
stretches our utility requirements.
Our tool of FHA could be of com-
manding help in this because it makes
these operations possible. But it
also works in isolation.
And we've got to see to it that the
industrialist who decentralizes has
more definite civic and social respon-
sibility in his new location than mere-
ly to buy land and build his factory.
Recently, you may have seen, Gen-
eral Electric published a pamphlet
indicating what it expects of a com-
munity before it will consider settling
there. It seems to me there should
also be a code governing the mini-
mum to be required of the industry.
Now: how to energize? We need
Planning Bodies regional in scope,
but we need also to give them
strength and guts, to really plan bold-
ly and above all to be really in con-
trol. This requires the backing of
citizens who are on fire and who also
closely understand.
I was recently in England. It was
a thrilling experience, for there, it
seems to me, is a prototype demon-
strating A Way Out. For one thing,
the kind of planning we are discuss-
ing here is a live burning topic, with
active citizen participation and un-
derstanding. Analysis of big cities led
to the conclusion that certain ones
were already too big and too over-
crowded and that the solution lies
in a combination of New Towns, city
limitations by green belts, and inner-
city re-building. Of course, such a
bold program is bound to have head-
aches, such as, for example, not yet
enough economic cross-section in the
population of the new towns. But
in its main objectives it is working
really well. There we have fully
rounded planning, with no one spe-
cialist gone wild. This is creation.
(Continued on Page 20)
AUGUST, 1955


etJerm SAFE thd SORRY Jade

JONES STORM SHUTTERS
Sooner or later all industrial and commercial buildings in
this area require the protection of storm shutters. Plan now
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The best way to preserve the beauty of architectural de-
sign is to make provision for storm shutters at the time the
building plans are drawn. While construction is taking place
it is simple to conceal the hardware, such as headers, and thus
preserve the clean architectural lines of the structure. Later, as
the need arises, the full shutter installation can be made.
Our engineering group is available for consultation at any
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"Designing for The Community"
(Continued froif Page 19)
The Architect's Stake
Obviously, if we can achieve a less
helter-skelter environment, a sense
of serenity and of community, varied
and integrated functional require-
ments, green open spaces and less
density that will permit buildings to
stand out as really 3-dimensional, the
stimulus to creative architecture is
enhanced. However good and ef-
fective overall planning may become,
unless there is stirring quality in the
visible texture, our cities will con-
tinue dull.
The individual architect can make
another important contribution which
in general he does not yet do, it
seems to me. Within limits he can
affect his client's program more than
he generally does. He can propose
and prove out elements and func-
tions that the client does not visual-
ize. However radical zoning laws
may become, they will never be as
stringent as good arcihtecture and
good urbanity require. I know from
experience that one can get some
hard-boiled clients, even in hard-
boiled New York, to make some sac-
rifice in favor of a green space or a
private park. And one can do it in
the client's own economic terms, in
terms of enhanced prestige of the
enterprise, in terms of better rent and
less turnover.
So much .for the architect's oppor-
tunity and duty in affecting his
client's program and the city's tex-
ture, in the case of individual build-
ings. It is even more the case in
community building, whether for a
private developer client or for a pub-
lic authority For the sterilitiy of
most of these projects is appalling,
particularly in the light of the op-
portunity that theoretically exists.
I would raise two points here. If
the architect wants to play a really
creative role at this level, he has got
to achieve a better understanding of
community and urbanity and their
social and economic and adminis-
trative implications than I believe
most of us have, in addition to ar-
chitectural gifts and conviction. And
secondly, when we reach this scale,
the chapter should play an impor-
tant role in creating a public atmos-
phere, and in powerfully influencing
public bodies.


Producers' Council Program


New president of the Miami Chapter of the Producers' Council beams
a greeting at the July dinner meeting of the South Florida Chapter,
A.I.A. Right, Gosper W. Sistrunk, who takes over the reins from
retiring president Frank R. Goulding, extreme left. Between them is
Charles Coffin, A.I.A., long-time South Florida member.


At the last meeting of their fiscal
year, members of the Miami Chapter
of the Producers' Council, Inc., elect-
ed a new slate of officers for the
coming year. As president, the group
chose GOSPER W. SISTRUNK, president
of Sistrunk, Inc., and representing the
Hunter Douglas Corp. He succeeded
FRANK R. GOULDING, Aluminum Com-
pany of America.
NICHOLAS NORDONE, Richmond
Screw Anchor Co., last year's program
chairman, was elected vice-president.
The new secretary is O. CABOT
KYLE of the Peninsular Supply Com-
pany, representing the Celotex Cor-


Nicholas Nordone O. Cabot Kyle
Vice-president Secretary


portion. He succeeds ALLEN KERN
of the Mosaic Tile Company who
was chosen to replace last year's
elected secretary, FREDERICK H.
SMITH of the Roddis Plywood Com-
pany. Smith was transferred by his
company some four months ago.
Last year's public relations chair-
man, FRED W. CONNELL, Florida
Power and Light Co., representing the
Edison Electric Institute, was elect-
ed treasurer to succeed OTIs E. DUN-
AN. Dunan, of Dunan Brick Yards,
Inc., represents the Hanley Company
and has served the Producers' Coun-
cil as treasurer of the Miami Chapter
for the past two years.


Fred W. Connell
Treasurer


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










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C. J. Jones Lumber Company --- --... Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company ..._....Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ---------- Sebring, Fla.
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CONVENTION CITY...1955
.4. .
:,.:.-,,-;. .,.;..4 ...


NOVEMBER 17th, 18th, 19th
DAYTONA BEACH

That's the time and place of the Forty-First
Annual Convention of the F. A. A. It's your own
Convention. By attending you can help make it
the biggest and best one ever held.


PLAN NOW BE SURE TO ATTEND