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 Front Cover
 Is a good party always a good...
 "The architect and his communi...
 Important seminars planned for...
 A.G.C. cures for tax liability...
 "Architecture - U.S.A." is now...
 "Operation Dreamhouse" attacks...
 July 1st is the deadline for submitting...
 Construction for blast resista...
 Chapter news and notes
 Producer's council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00012
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: June 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00012
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Is a good party always a good policy?
        Page 1
        Page 2
    "The architect and his community"
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Important seminars planned for June meeting
        Page 7
    A.G.C. cures for tax liability and headache
        Page 7
    "Architecture - U.S.A." is now available to chapters
        Page 8
        Page 9
    "Operation Dreamhouse" attacks 20,000 visitors
        Page 10
    July 1st is the deadline for submitting designs for fall Munich exhibit
        Page 11
    Construction for blast resistance
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Chapter news and notes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Producer's council program
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.











I IAI


June 1955


Official Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS






















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74


Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


JUNE, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 6


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble------ President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman _-- Secy.-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard-No. Central

Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell- Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick- Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ergest Stidolph No. Central

0
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor.
7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

McMURRAY 26 MIAMI
JUNE, 1955


Is A Good Party


Always A Good Policy?

Could it be that architects are becoming convention-happy? Is it
possible that the convention itself is becoming more important to some
groups than the solid professional business that is the chief and basic
reason for having one?
We don't know for sure. But we have been disturbed recently by
what seems to be straws that show which way the wind is blowing.
Here are some.
Sloppy Planning You can get plenty of information relative
to fun sessions, sightseeing trips, cocktail parties. But the speakers,
their subjects and the significance of each to the betterment of the
architectural profession or its public are secrets up to the last minute.
Organized Confusion Luncheons are well-scheduled, dinners
served on time, parties are ticketed, docketed, well publicized. But
try and find out where committees are to meet, who is in charge of
what, what matters are up for consideration, what issues must be met,
who is coordinating actions. At a recent gathering one "seminar" was
listed twice, another not at all. Committee meetings, scheduled for
two periods, were finally cut to an informal, half-hour huddle.
More "fun" less "business" Analysis of one two-day con-
vention showed four hours allotted for group business including a
general business session and committee meetings an hour and one-
half for one seminar, none at all for another one. But there were three
cocktail parties, two afternoon tours, two "speaking" luncheons, an
evening party and a banquet!
Inadequate accommodations At that same convention,
VIP's were refused space at Convention headquarters, were finally
quartered at a hotel about 15 blocks away, or weren't quartered at all,
finally finding minimum accommodations at third rate hotels. No
rooms were available for committee meetings (as indicated on the
convention program) and the shabby space assigned for general meet-
ings was sandwiched between two special purpose rooms that were
constantly used and was separated from a hallway only by curtains.
Convention business including committee meetings in the same
area was conducted in competition with orchestras, speeches,
enthusiastic applause including whistles, the piercing conversation of
excited clubwomen, the merrymaking of a noon wedding, the bustle
of two dinner gatherings and the almost constant rattle of dishes.
All this is to say nothing of the manner in which guest and public
relations contacts were handled. But busy professional people had
been urged to spend their money and three days of time to travel
many miles to attend.
Maybe all this is picayune. Perhaps architects have no need for
periodic exchange of professional ideas like the doctors, for example.
Maybe the advancement of their profession, through solid, cooperative
efforts on a serious plane isn't as necessary a thing to architects as it
seems to dentists or to lawyers or to chiropractors.
Maybe so. But evidence points to the opposite conclusion. The
public doesn't care about an architectural party. But it wants lower
building costs, better building codes, safer, more economical building
construction, better design, more efficient planning. The architectural
profession should be satisfying those wants.
Couldn't conventions be used to better advantage as one potent
means for doing so? -THE EDITOR.







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"The Architect and his Community"


Report on the South Atlantic Region's Meeting at Charleston, S. C.


Beautiful Charleston, S. C. -
"America's most historic city" was
was the site of the 4th Annual Re-
gional Conference of the South At-
lantic District, A.I.A. May 5, 6 and 7.
South Carolina's A.I.A. Chapter
acted as hosts to delegates and visit-
ors; and the Fort Sumter hotel, swept
by the breezes of Charleston harbor,
was Conference headquarters.
First formal session was called for
Friday morning, May 6, when Re-
gional Director HERBERT C. MILL-
KEY welcomed conferees and outlined
the program for the coming two
days. The evening before had been
devoted largely to registration, which
started around Thursday noon, and
to a get-acquainted cocktail party,
held in the tent housing the build-
ing products and architectural exhi-
bitions.
Thursday evening was also taken
up by two important group meet-
ings that of the Regional Executive
Council at which Director Millkey
presided, and a gathering of repre-
sentatives of architectural registra-
tion boards in the four states that
comprise the South Atlantic A.I.A.
District No. Carolina, So. Caro-
lina, Georgia and Florida.
Last year, this meeting of state
architectural registration boards made
history when all four states decided
to adopt standards for examination
and registration as recommended by
the National Council of Architectur-
al Registration Boards. This .meeting
was more in the nature of a report on
progress toward that end than any-
thing else. Chairmanned by Florida
State Board Secretary MELLEN C.
GREELEY, State representatives ex-
changed comments, compared notes,
found that all had a common problem


relative to easy acceptance of NCARB
standards by state legislatures.
One important highlight of the Fri-
day morning meeting was an off-the-
cuff talk by GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS,
F.A.I.A., Secretary of the A.I.A., and
currently a nominee for A.I.A. Presi-
dency. Speaking of national A.I.A.
matters at the regional level, the Sec-
retary outlined three subjects which,
he said, would undoubtedly reach
the floor of the Minneapolis Conven-
tion in June.
One concerned the question of
national by-law changes relative to
A.I.A. judiciary procedure. The sub-
stance of the proposed changes would
provide for a reorganized judiciary
procedure to take complaints regard-
ing professional behavior out of local
chapter consideration, thus doing
away with chapter hearings and min-
imizing the chance that personal con-
siderations might tend to influence
chapter recommendations to the
A.I.A. disciplinary body.


"At present," said the A.I.A. Sec-
retary, "The A.I.A. Judiciary Com-
mittee operates as a 3-man board on
a national basis only. Procedure rel-
ative to disposition of professional
complaints is at best cumbersome. A
complaint is first forwarded to the
office of the A.I.A. Secretary. Then
it is sent to the local chapter con-
cerned for investigation and prepara-
tion of a report. This is then sent to
the National Judiciary Committee
which holds a hearing. The Com-
mittee then submits its findings to
the A.I.A. Executive Board. Only
then can the plaintiff and defendant
appear before the Board which sits
as a quasi-legal body ard at the con-
clusion of its own hearings renders
a final decision on the case.
"The proposed changes would
simplify this whole procedure with-
out relinquishing any legal or profes-
sional safeguards. Although the A.I.A.
Executive Board would be, as before,
(Continued on Page 4)


W,- w -5.
George Bain Cummings, F.A.I.A., Herbert C. Millkey, A.I.A., Di-
Secretary of the A.I.A. and nom- rector, South Atlantic Region,
inee for its Presidency, was the steered the Conference and pre-
guest of honor and chief sided at most of its business
speaker, sessions.


JUNE, 1955 3






Regional Conference
(Continued from Page 8)
a final arbiter on all judiciary mat-
ters, investigation of all complaints
would be taken from Chapters and
given to a regional judiciary board
compcsed of three members. The
12 regions of the A.I.A. would be
grouped into four Regional Judiciary
Boards, each composed of three re-
gions, with the director of each A.I.A.
region sitting as a member of one of
the four Judiciary Boards."
Another of the subjects discussed
by Secretary Cummings concerned
use of individual architect's pictures
in connection with advertising and
promotion of commercial products
and services.
"Evidence exists that feeling is
strong on both sides of this ques-
tion," the speaker told regional dele-
gates. "Since this is so, it will un-
doubtedly arise as a subject for debate
during the coming National Conven-
tion. The whole point is that exist-
ing A.I.A. mandatory rules against
advertising now prevent use of archi-
tects' portraits as proposed. Thus a
change in the rules will be needed to
permit such use; and convention
delegates should be prepared to vote
for or against such changes as may
e offered."
Secretary Cummings was also the
chief speaker during Friday's lunch-
eon at which JOHN LAMBERT, Presi-
dent of the South Carolina Chapter,
presided. His talk dealt largely with
the headquarters of the A.I.A. at
The Octagon in Washington. He
described in some detail the remark-
ably rapid progress of the A.I.A. dur-
ing the last decade and took his
audience on an imaginary tour of
A.I.A. offices and all personnel who
staff the various departments under
administrative direction of EDMUND
R. PURVES and the overall authority
of the A.I.A. Board of Directors.
Following luncheon various region-
al committees held a series of catch-
as-catch-can meetings. The Confer-
ence program said "See Bulletin
Board for meeting rooms." But as
sometimes happens, something went
snafu. Delegates wandered back to
the meeting room ostensibly to at-
tend a P.R. Workshop by WALTER
MEGRONIGLE and ANsoN CAMPBELL


During the 4th Regional Con-
ference Banquet, diners saw
plenty of stars besides the V.I.P.'s
at the Speaker's Table. The stars
were flashlight bulbs. Each sig-
naled the taking of a picture by
a gentleman who handled his
Graflex like a veteran.
Many of those pictures were
taken of the Florida delegation.
They were scheduled for pub-
lication in this issue of The Flor-
ida Architect; and the camera-
man promised faithfully they
would be special-delivered to
make the deadline.
No pictures!
We don't know what happen-
ed. Maybe the bulb-flasher for-
got to open the shutter at the
right time. Maybe the developer
got his formulas fouled up. May-


(which was also on the program for
Friday afternoon!) But on the agenda
of the conference the time should
have read Saturday morning. So skele-
ton committees huddled in little
groups and finally dissolved so that
those who wished could get the flavor
of ante-bellum Charleston via a series
of conducted tours through some of
the country's oldest and best-preserved
houses.
But at 5 PM everybody was on
hand for a trip across the harbor for
a cocktail party and an open-air buf-
fet dinner at historic Fort Sumter.
They were met two boatloads of
architects, product exhibitors, visitors
and wives- by a couple of slightly
bewildered National Park Service cus-
todians. These worthies had a rough
time getting off their time-tested
spiel about the old Fort's history.
But the bartenders worked harder
- and to better overall effect. For
when lights finally had to be turned
on, both boatloads were having a
wonderful time. It continued like
that until the boats finally returned
their singing cargos to the Hotel dock.
Next morning the meeting scheduled
at 9 AM didn't get really filled up
and rolling until close to 10. And at
least one "fishing party" on breezy
Charleston Harbor didn't come ashore
until sunup!


be no, certainly not! The chaps
from Florida have had pictures
taken many times before with no
such results. And, besides, press
cameras don't break that easily!
Anyway, in place of faces, here
are names of those Florida visi-
tors to Charleston of which we
have a record: Maurice E. Hol-
ley, Kenneth Jacobson, John
Stetson, Palm Beach Chapter;
Archie G. Parish, Richard Boone
Rogers, Florida Central Chapter;
Russell T. Pancoast, Bryan Flem-
ing, H. Samuel Kruse, Edwin T.
Reeder, Frank E. Watson, Florida
South Chapter; G. Clinton Gam-
ble, James K. Pownall, Broward
County Chapter; Mellen C. Gree-
ley, William T. Arnett, Sanford
W. Goin, John L. R. Grand, Jack
Moore, Florida North Chapter.


Saturday morning was a crowded
one--too crowded for what could
have been two intensely interesting
and practical seminars. WALTER
MEGRONIGLE and ANSON CAMPBELL,
in charge of the A.I.A. public rela-
tions program for KETCHUM, INC.,
did the best that a short time and a
meager audience made possible. Their
workshop was on public speaking.
They tied it to Ketchum's recently
issued Speakers Kit for Architects;
and those taking part in the session
left with some valuable hints on the
public relations side of public speak-
ing.
Not listed in the published pro-
gram, but very much at the meeting
was FREDERICK A. PAWLEY, of the
A.I.A. Staff from Washington. He
had come invited to present a report
of A.I.A. work in the field of school
planning, and construction. He was
prepared with full data and a series
of excellent full-color slide films. But
again the time was short. On one
side of the meeting hall a wedding
breakfast, complete with music and
conversation was in progress. Blinds
at the high windows couldn't exclude
the bright daylight sufficiently for
the slide films to show up well. Paw-
ley's audience couldn't hear well,
couldn't see well. Thus there was dis-
appointment all around for at least
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


What Happened To Those Pictures?






in Florida, schools are one of the
most important of all currently active
building types.
Saturday's luncheon was ably pre-
sided over by CARTER WILLIAMS,
President of the North Carolina
Chapter, who introduced ULYSSES
FLOYD RIBLE, past-president of the
Southern California Chapter, a mem-
ber of the National A.I.A. Board of
Examiners and President of the Cali-
fornia State Board of Architectural
Examiners. Mr. Rible was once a
teacher at the University of Southern
California and at the University of
Kansas. He is presently a member of
the firm of Allison and Rible, Los
Angeles; and his talk was all about
ways and means of getting jobs, win-
ning business friends, influencing peo-
ple and utilizing publicity.
The Conference adjourned Satur-
day evening with laughter from one
of ROGER ALLEN'S inimitable after-
dinner talks still ringing in its col-
lective ears. His topic was "Atom
and Eve and the Architect" and to
the delight of all went amiably no-
where and back again. As one dele-
gate put it -and he wasn't from
Florida, either!- "Maybe this Con-
ference didn't do too much in the
way of business. But that talk of
Roger Allen's was worth every bit of
what it took to hear it!"

P. R. Program To Be Issue
At June Convention
One of the topics discussed by
A. I. A. Secretary GEORGE BAIN CUM-
MINGS at the main business meeting
at Charleston concerned the matter
of Public Relations at the national
level. By the time the Minneapolis
Convention meets, the 3-year PR con-
tract of KETCHUM, INC., A. I. A. PR
counsellors, will have ended. The
A. I. A. Public Relations Committee,
chairmanned by JOHN ROOT, of Chi-
cago, will recommend that the firm
be retained for another three years.
This is one of the matters of par-
ticular importance that will come be-
fore convention delegates for decision,
next June at the A.I.A.'s 87th Annual
Meeting, according to Secretary Cum-
mings. The PR contract just ending
was authorized in 1952 and involved
an expenditure of about $30,000 per
year for the 3-year period. The new
3-year term proposed for authoriza-
(Continued on Page 20)
JUNE, 1955


A Traveler Looks at the Beach!
It's always interesting to learn what our contemporaries think of us!
The author of the following piece is MR. LAURENCE M. LOEB, editor of
THE BLUE PRINT, a monthly bulletin of the Westchester (N.Y.) Chapter,
A.I.A. The masthead of this publication marks it as "Devoted to the
interests of Westchester Architects".
Undoubtedly the Westchester architects have been well served by
learning of Editor Loeb's estimate of Miami Beach design, particularly
in view of the well-recognized fact that most of the buildings of which
he speaks were put up to house tourists, most of which seem to live in
the great State where Editor Loeb and his colleagues live.
In the accompanying reprint of Mr. Loeb's comments, we have
corrected his spelling of IGOR POLEVITZKY'S name in the interests of accur-
acy. And in that same vein we looked up two other architects he men-
tioned. None by the names of "SMALL or WAGNER" were listed in
either this year's or last year's Roster of Architects Registered in the
State of Florida as issued by the Florida State Board of Architecture.
We wonder Has Editor Loeb recently toured certain patches of


his own home-country parkways?

FLORIDA "ARCHITECTURE"
Last week it was necessary for
me to drive on route A1A (the
Ocean Highway) from Fort Lau-
derdale into Miami. Up to a few
years ago, this stretch was mostly
undeveloped. About 1952 an im-
posing new bridge was built over
Baker's Haulover, the northern
boundary of the Miami Beach-
Surfside area. From this bridge,
into Hollywood, route A1A was
widened and developed into a
beautiful highway with continu-
ous views of the ocean.
The ocean there, with the gulf
stream a short distance offshore,
provided a changing panorama in
peacock blues and greens. Previ-
ously, I had looked forward to
this drive which I had always en-
joyed very much and which I had
taken at every opportunity. I had
expected to see the property along
this highway be developed with
Hotels and Motels of some attrac-
tive and festive type of architec-
tural design which, in Florida, on
other less thrilling sites had previ-
ously been accomplished most ap-
propriately and interestingly.
Here, of all places, modern archi-
tecture of merit would have been
most suitable. When well done, it
fitted into the Florida scene and
became an integral part of it.
Florida buildings designed by such
artists as Polevitzky, Small, and
Steward and Wagner, convinced


the author, trained as a traditional-
ist, of the possibilities of artistically
designed architecture in the con-
temporary manner. One could en-
vision here, a boulevard without
parallel in the entire continent.
Imagine my great disappoint-
ment at finding that this beautiful
five mile stretch of A1A was almost
entirely "developed" since my last
visit with buildings of the most
hideous design and offensive color.
Not only that but they were mostly
so substantially and expensively
constructed that there is little
chance in the lifetime of the young-
est of us that their tawdry gaudi-
ness might be softened or better
yet possibly be eliminated. Where
the buildings themselves do not
entirely block that ocean view, fan-
tastically ugly walls on each side
of them parallel to the road com-
plete the block-out of this view.
Most of the "architects" who
designed these abortions had them
published in the local press when
construction of each was about to
be started. The description of them
in the accompanying text invari-
ably termed them of "Moder" or
"Functional" architecture.
As a result of all this, many pros-
pective clients for new buildings
in southeast Florida are now most
ridiculously prejudiced against any
architect who might be termed a
"Modernist" or even "Functional-
ist."














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Building
West Florida Tile &
Terrazzo Corp.
warehouse
Concrete Stadium at
Plant City
Singer Building,
Pompano Beach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Building at Orlando
Stone Buick Building
at Ft. Pierce


. showing prestressed concrete construction used on the new Elementary
School at Stuart, Florida The prestressing was performed by R. H.
Wright & Son, Fort Lauderdale, Florida The architect Kendall P.
Starrett of Ft. Pierce, Florida BELOW Typical classroom.



.Prestressed concrete units offer new structural design possibili-
ties for any building in which low cost and high performance
are of special importance. Standard unit designs are made in
long casting beds by the pre-tensioning bonded system. Each
has been thoroughly field-tested; and a wide variety of units
is now being made under controlled conditions by members of
the Prestressed Concrete Institute. These prestressed concrete
units are now available. They can be specified in sizes and
shapes to meet a range of span, load and design conditions.
Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
sistance, high uniformity, low cost. Standard designs include
flat slabs, double-tee slabs, beams, columns and pilings.

PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE
FLORIDA MEMBERS:


R. H. WRIGHT & SON, INC. _________
LAKELAND ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC. ______
GORDON BROTHERS CONCRETE CO.
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC. _________
WEST COAST SHELL CORP. __________- ____ -___
DURACRETE, INC. _--____-
HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO.
PERMACRETE, INC. ----_-___.___ .. ___.__
CAPITOL CONCRETE COMPANY, INC. ____ _-- __
NOONAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY -_


----___ _____Ft. Lauderdale
-----__________Lakeland
-------______ Lakeland
--------___-______ Tampa
__ -----------_- Sarasota
---_-----_ __-____Leesburg
-_____________Winter Park
--------- Daytona Beach
---____________Jacksonville
______________Pensacola


A National Organization to establish and supervise Prestressed Concrete standards and procedures whose members
are pledged to uphold the production control and specifications set up by the Prestressed Concrete Institute.



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


7~
.-. -T


.


,I~itir: ~illi~k(i Kirt

~s- s












Important Seminars Planned for June Meeting


Theme of the 87th Annual Con-
vention of the A. I. A. is "Designing
for the Community." To architects
where problems of community design
of a rapidly growing state like Florida,
are mushrooming as a result of
thoughtless development and quick
expansion, that theme should be an
especially significant one. In plan-
ning the Convention around it, the
Institute's staff took the subject seri-
ously and has arranged carefully or-
ganized seminars to bring before
delegates and visitors nationally recog-
nized authorities. Here are a few
highlights of the program.
"Urban Renewal" will be the sub-
ject of an address during the luncheon
meeting of the Convention's opening
day. The speaker will be Hon. JAMES
W. FOLLIN, Commissioner, Urban
Renewal Administration, U. S. Gov-
ernment; and his subject will relate
the architect to the task of civic re-
development.
"Rebuilding the City" is the sub-
ject of the Tuesday afternoon seminar
at which Mr. Follin will appear again
as a member of the panel. The Mod-
erator will be RICHARD W. E. PERRIN,
A. I. A., Executive Director of the
Housing Authority of Milwaukee.
Other panel members will include:
JOHN TASKER HOWARD, President,
American Institute of Planners; Miss
MARCIA ROGERS of the Pittsburgh
Regional Planning Association; CARL
FEISS, A.I.A., Washington, D. C.,
Planning Consultant; G. HOLMES
PERKINS, F.A.I.A., Dean, College of
Architecture, University of Pennsyl-
vania; ROBERT E. ALEXANDER, A.I.A.,
architect and planner, Los Angeles,
and WILLIAM F. R. BALLARD, A.I.A.,
Chairman, A. I. A. Committee on
Urban Design and Housing.
This seminar will be largely devoted
to discussing the correction of existing
planning faults and the extent to
which architects can work with city
planners and officials. It should offer
much to architects who are interested
in developing solutions to such prob-
JUNE, 1955


lems. as reclaiming obsolescent areas,
restoring land and tax values through
improved neighborhood design and
replacing sub-standard buildings with
creditable facilities in keeping with a
developed city plan.
A follow-up to this discussion will
take place during the Thursday after-
ternoon seminar on "The Architec-
ture of Community Expansion." The
Moderator will be NORMAN J.
SCHLOSSMAN, F.A.I.A. With him
on the panel will be PARK MARTIN,
Executive Secretary, Allegheny Con-
ference of Community Development;
ARCH R. WINTER, A. I. A., architect
and planner, Mobile, Alabama; L.
MORGAN YOST F. A. I. A., Chairman,
A. I. A. Committee on the Home
Building Industry; THOMAS P. Coo-
CAN, past president, National Associa-
tion of Home Builders; and VICTOR


Contingent liability is something
that gives any business man the justi-
fiable shudders. A liability in itself is
bad enough. But when it may be
imposed on him under conditions over
which the business man has no con-
trol, it's more than bad. It is annoy-
ing, it may be dangerous and it is
always costly beyond need.
Florida's construction industry has
been burdened with the headache of
contingent liability for years. It's con-
cerned with taxes sales taxes im-
posed by the State on sales of the
myriad products that go into the mak-
ing of any structure.
The burden has fallen largely on
the owner and contractor. Up to last
month they had no way of knowing
whether or not the state sales tax had
been paid on the products used in
what they owned or built. At any
time they might be open to a visit


D. GRUEN, A. I. A., New York.
This meeting will be devoted large-
ly to studying the avoidance of bad
planning in the development of new
suburban territories. It will attempt
to clarify ways in which architects can
work with planners and private de-
velopers to assure intelligent, coordi-
nated expansion and avoidance of ill-
considered, uneconomic building that
harbors the germ of future slums.
These meetings might be called the
meat of the Convention at least
so far as developing the theme is con-
corned. But there is to be plenty of
salad and dessert to round out the
meal. The three Minnesota Chapters
-Minneapolis, St. Paul and Duluth
-are sharing the responsibilities of
hosting the Convention. They have
planned for pleasure as well as profit.
The choice is wide in each category.


from a tax collector seeking payment
of sales taxes unpaid by material men
or sub-contractors but properly levied
on materials used in a building. With
material and sub-contract accounts
closed, neither owner nor prime con-
tractor had much recourse; and they
also had little choice but to pay the
tax collector for the sometimes lengthy
list of proven delinquencies.
The effect of this situation was to
make it next to impossible to close
out any job completely before the
statute of limitations on the unpaid
taxes had expired. One result has
been to freeze a part of what other-
wise would be the working capital of
a prudent contractor. Another has
been to cloud the title to the prop-
erties of building owners. Yet there
has been no recognized method of
avoiding these results.
(Continued on Page 9)


- .. -- -...... .. : --. f. ..i)4W .... .h ,.' ..,% t i' -,. A. >.-->- ,:


A.G.C. Cures Tax Liability Headache

Comptroller's Office Authorizes Release Certificate


`"DeW4Hipsa /M t6e eomWHait^- ...












Important Seminars Planned for June Meeting


Theme of the 87th Annual Con-
vention of the A. I. A. is "Designing
for the Community." To architects
where problems of community design
of a rapidly growing state like Florida,
are mushrooming as a result of
thoughtless development and quick
expansion, that theme should be an
especially significant one. In plan-
ning the Convention around it, the
Institute's staff took the subject seri-
ously and has arranged carefully or-
ganized seminars to bring before
delegates and visitors nationally recog-
nized authorities. Here are a few
highlights of the program.
"Urban Renewal" will be the sub-
ject of an address during the luncheon
meeting of the Convention's opening
day. The speaker will be Hon. JAMES
W. FOLLIN, Commissioner, Urban
Renewal Administration, U. S. Gov-
ernment; and his subject will relate
the architect to the task of civic re-
development.
"Rebuilding the City" is the sub-
ject of the Tuesday afternoon seminar
at which Mr. Follin will appear again
as a member of the panel. The Mod-
erator will be RICHARD W. E. PERRIN,
A. I. A., Executive Director of the
Housing Authority of Milwaukee.
Other panel members will include:
JOHN TASKER HOWARD, President,
American Institute of Planners; Miss
MARCIA ROGERS of the Pittsburgh
Regional Planning Association; CARL
FEISS, A.I.A., Washington, D. C.,
Planning Consultant; G. HOLMES
PERKINS, F.A.I.A., Dean, College of
Architecture, University of Pennsyl-
vania; ROBERT E. ALEXANDER, A.I.A.,
architect and planner, Los Angeles,
and WILLIAM F. R. BALLARD, A.I.A.,
Chairman, A. I. A. Committee on
Urban Design and Housing.
This seminar will be largely devoted
to discussing the correction of existing
planning faults and the extent to
which architects can work with city
planners and officials. It should offer
much to architects who are interested
in developing solutions to such prob-
JUNE, 1955


lems. as reclaiming obsolescent areas,
restoring land and tax values through
improved neighborhood design and
replacing sub-standard buildings with
creditable facilities in keeping with a
developed city plan.
A follow-up to this discussion will
take place during the Thursday after-
ternoon seminar on "The Architec-
ture of Community Expansion." The
Moderator will be NORMAN J.
SCHLOSSMAN, F.A.I.A. With him
on the panel will be PARK MARTIN,
Executive Secretary, Allegheny Con-
ference of Community Development;
ARCH R. WINTER, A. I. A., architect
and planner, Mobile, Alabama; L.
MORGAN YOST F. A. I. A., Chairman,
A. I. A. Committee on the Home
Building Industry; THOMAS P. Coo-
CAN, past president, National Associa-
tion of Home Builders; and VICTOR


Contingent liability is something
that gives any business man the justi-
fiable shudders. A liability in itself is
bad enough. But when it may be
imposed on him under conditions over
which the business man has no con-
trol, it's more than bad. It is annoy-
ing, it may be dangerous and it is
always costly beyond need.
Florida's construction industry has
been burdened with the headache of
contingent liability for years. It's con-
cerned with taxes sales taxes im-
posed by the State on sales of the
myriad products that go into the mak-
ing of any structure.
The burden has fallen largely on
the owner and contractor. Up to last
month they had no way of knowing
whether or not the state sales tax had
been paid on the products used in
what they owned or built. At any
time they might be open to a visit


D. GRUEN, A. I. A., New York.
This meeting will be devoted large-
ly to studying the avoidance of bad
planning in the development of new
suburban territories. It will attempt
to clarify ways in which architects can
work with planners and private de-
velopers to assure intelligent, coordi-
nated expansion and avoidance of ill-
considered, uneconomic building that
harbors the germ of future slums.
These meetings might be called the
meat of the Convention at least
so far as developing the theme is con-
corned. But there is to be plenty of
salad and dessert to round out the
meal. The three Minnesota Chapters
-Minneapolis, St. Paul and Duluth
-are sharing the responsibilities of
hosting the Convention. They have
planned for pleasure as well as profit.
The choice is wide in each category.


from a tax collector seeking payment
of sales taxes unpaid by material men
or sub-contractors but properly levied
on materials used in a building. With
material and sub-contract accounts
closed, neither owner nor prime con-
tractor had much recourse; and they
also had little choice but to pay the
tax collector for the sometimes lengthy
list of proven delinquencies.
The effect of this situation was to
make it next to impossible to close
out any job completely before the
statute of limitations on the unpaid
taxes had expired. One result has
been to freeze a part of what other-
wise would be the working capital of
a prudent contractor. Another has
been to cloud the title to the prop-
erties of building owners. Yet there
has been no recognized method of
avoiding these results.
(Continued on Page 9)


- .. -- -...... .. : --. f. ..i)4W .... .h ,.' ..,% t i' -,. A. >.-->- ,:


A.G.C. Cures Tax Liability Headache

Comptroller's Office Authorizes Release Certificate


`"DeW4Hipsa /M t6e eomWHait^- ...






lew Pa4ze Recamtaa 7?6d ...

"Architecture U.S.A."

Is Now Available to Chapters


What should prove to be one of
the most practical public relations
tools ever devised for the general pro-
motion of architecture was recently
announced by the A.I.A. at Wash-
ington. It is a film report on con-
temporary U. S. architecture and is
the work of RALPH E. MYERS, of the
Kansas City, Missouri, firm of KIVETT
AND MYERS.
Titled Architecture-U. S. A., the
film report is a sound presentation of
140 full color slides showing "current
architectural trends in homes, schools,
offices, factories, churches and other
building types." It was made possible
by a grant from the Arnold W. Brun-
ner Scholarship fund. Before it was
completed, Ralph Myers had travelled
more than 50,000 miles and had
pored over more than 10,000 color
photographs.


The slides have been matched with
a sound strip and processed as a movie
for use with standard 16 mm. sound
equipment. The film's running time
is 26 minutes; and it has been planned
for presentation before service clubs,
school assemblies, women's groups
and similar organizations. It was also
planned to be suitable for TV presen-
tation and all material has been
cleared for television use.
Distribution of Architecture -
U.S.A. will be made through na-
tional A. I. A. headquarters at THE
OCTACON, Washington, D. C. It will
be available to local Chapters for gen-
eral use this month.
The film's sponsors believe it can
do much toward raising the general
public's appreciation of architecture
- and, incidentally, the value of the
architectural experience and services


Ralph E. Myers He traveled 50,000
miles, looked at 10,000 photographs.

necessary to bring contemporary build-
ings into being. Sixty-two individual
architects and firms are represented
in the film which includes work in
all sections of the country. Those in-
cluded from Florida are: ALFRED B.
PARKER, PAUL RUDOLPH, CARLOS B.
SCHOEPPL and WEED, RUSSELL, JOHN-
SON & ASSOCIATES.


Aduraec II~


Illustrated above: The Aluminum
Maid Mr. & Mrs. sliding mirror
door cabinet.

Illustrated at right: The Alumi-
num Maid Venus Vanity cabinet
featuring adjustable vanity end
mirrors.


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Aluminum Maid bathroom cabinets offer the utmost in
design, quality, and ease of installation. Both the Venus
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Outstanding features include: Copper-backed mirrors--
Baked white enamel interiors heavy anodized satin finish
aluminum frames Polished aluminum handles -
Adjustable shelves.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY




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you complete specifications and
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






A. G. C. Cures Headache
(Continued from Page 7)

Now there is such a method. And
it has been developed through the
simple expedient of an administration
ruling from the State Comptroller's
office, thus making unnecessary the
costly and uncertain procedure of
introducing a bill to amend a law.
After an exchange of letters, based
on a conference between RAY E.
GREEN, State Comptroller, and PAUL
H. HINDS, Executive Manager of the
South Florida Chapter of the Associ-
ated General Contractors of America,
Inc., a simple procedure involving an
affidavit has turned the trick. An
administrative ruling from the Comp-
troller's office now permits owner or
general contractor to remove any con-
tingent tax liability by requiring sub-
contractors and suppliers to sign an
affidavit or written certification to the
effect that all sales and use taxes due
the State of Florida have been paid.
The Comptroller's office has said,
"The following phraseology of such
certificate will satisfy our require-
ments 'The undersigned certifies
that all taxes imposed by Chapter 212,
Florida Statutes (Sales and Use Tax
Act), as amended, have been paid and
discharged.' "
This ruling will have an immediate
an4 healthy effect on the operations
of prime contractors and building
owners. It also gives the architect one
more thing to keep in mind in per-
forming services for an owner.
In practice the certification set
forth by the Comptroller could most
easily be made a part of the release of
lien secured when final payments are
due. Or it could be made a condition
of payment for all purchases from
building suppliers as made. The
method is flexible. The important
point is that the certification be re-
quired before accounts can be closed.
The A. G. C.'s South Florida
Chapter has carried the ball of this
matter to the benefit of the building
industry throughout the State. Credit
for making the touchdown goes to
PAUL H. HINDS, Executive Manager,
and the Legislative Committee of the
Chapter with which he worked. Mem-
bers of this committee are: C. C.
BLAKE and W. J. TROUP, Co-Chair-
men; and, JAMEs M. ALBERT, ANGUS
GRAHAM, JOSEPH J. ORR, HARRY
TOUBY, and RANDOLPH YOUNG.
JUNE, 1955


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE





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"Operation Dreamhouse" Attracts 20,000 Visitors



University of Florida students designed it, built it, showed

it... and thereby unlocked the door to a huge public interest



What students of the University
of Florida did during their "Home
Show" week the latter part of April i :
could serve as an intensive demonstra-
tion course in good public relations
to many a more mature professional
group. Some 20,000 people visited I
an exhibition home designed by stu-
dent LEE OGDEN and built, equipped t
and furnished by 75 of his fellow-





the University's stadium around one
of the supporting pillars that was
transformed into a courtyard tree.
The students did it all themselves,
from planning to painting. And the Entrance to "Operation Dreamhouse" is from a court containing
t wa s a tree" that was actually an ingeniously camouflaged pillar of the
result was a modem home complete University Stadium in which the exhibition was housed. Above is at
with lighting, plumbing, interior dec- view of the court leading to the living room and dining area at the left.
oration and furniture, that wowed Kitchen faces court and bedrooms open from a corridor at the right.

the visitors and was an important part
of an eye-opening exhibit of building
materials and products available to
the home-building public.
The house was a full-sized one
containing, in 1200 square feet, liv-
ing-dining areas, two bedrooms with
connecting bath, a kitchen, utility
room and a broad terrace, landscaped
and furnished for outdoor living.
Students in various departments of
the College of Architecture and Allied
Arts teamed up with their specialties
to produce the house that had all the
marks of top professional abilities.
The exhibit was excellently pro-
moted by the students. Feature
stories in local papers, spot radio an-
The model home was decorated and furnished by students with ine TV coverages,
announcements, threeious covertgeso
cooperation of local merchants who furnished everything needed to com-
plete the project. As suggested by this view of the living room, all even sound truck advertising were
elements were selected in view of their practical application to the kind used to stimulate public interest. Re-
of informal living the home-buying public associates with Florida. sults were all anyone could ask.
10 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





July 1st Is Deadline For _iiiiiiilii IIII iiiiiiiliiiiiii
Submitting Designs For Fall r
Munich Exhibit R Tile for Everg Purpose

By acting promptly, architects in
Florida can submit examples of their
work for showing in the International
Exhibition of Munich, Germany, to
be held this fall.


The Exhibit is one of the most
important of the year and will be
held during the last two weeks of
September in all halls and annexes
of the Exhibition Park in Munich. It
is being planned as an architectural
show representing work from all
countries. Architects whose work is
selected for showing will benefit from
the extensive publicity which will at-
tend the exhibition; and examples of
outstanding exhibits are scheduled
for publication in leading German
architectural magazines.
Theme of the Exhibit is "Healthy
Living." It will be carried out in ex-
hibits of homes, places of work (fac-
tories, hotels, offices, etc.), places
of recreation and culture (churches,
theatres, etc.), and gardens. Material
can be in the form of both photo-
graphs and sketches. It should be
sent to GEORGE FARKAS, Designer,
FARKAS AND GRIFFIN, INC., 1245
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
On Mr. Farkas has been placed re-
sponsibility for coordinating display
material in Florida. He has stated
that no cost to exhibitors is involved
beyond expense of mailing and insur-
ance of exhibition material. But all
submissions must be in his office by
July 1st.
The designer is most anxious that
Florida be well-represented at the
exhibit.
"The International Exhibition of
Munich offers Florida architects an
excellent opportunity to gain inter-
national recognition," he said. "The
work they submit will be part of ar-
chitectural displays from every sec-
tion of the world. Much of what
Florida architects are doing compares
favorably with anything being pro-
duced in other localities. For this
resort, if for no other, Florida
achievements in architecture should
be particularly well-represented this
fall at Munich."
JUNE, 1955


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Construction for Blast Resistance


EDITOR'S NOTE:-This article has
been abstracted from technical dis-
cussions held at the 1st Annual Con-
vention of the Prestressed Concrete
Institute, held at Ft. Lauderdale in
April. Statements made in it are on
the authority of Mr. Harry G. Ed-
wards, of Lakeland, Secretary of the
Prestressed Concrete Institute.

Whether we like it or not, we are
entering an atomic age. There are
many encouraging signs that the
years ahead will see the development
of tremendous progress for good. But
the immediate future holds the threat
of terrific destruction. And squarely
upon the shoulders of the building
industry has fallen the responsibility
for devising structural methods that
will minimize the extent of possible
catastrophe.
The object of such methods is
primarily to protect life within build-
ings that may lie in the range of
atomic attack. The most logical ap-
proach to that lies in development
of structures that can withstand blast
damage to the greatest practical de-
gree. Toward that end much prog-
ress has already been made, notably
in the field of reinforced concrete.
Ordinary construction suffers ter-
rific destruction from an atomic
blast. But through observation and
controlled tests, we are beginning to
see that concrete is the one generally
available material that will resist the
sudden and immense destructive
force of atomic blasts and thus pro-
tect lives as well as property.
The degree of blast resistance must,
of necessity, be a compromise. Con-
ceivably, it might be possible to de-
sign protection at ground zero. But
it would certainly not be feasible
economically, even though it might
be possible technically. What is
practical, however, both economically
and structurally, is to design and build
so that 90 per cent of our structures
and people can survive within a given
radius as opposed to a possibly 30
per cent survival in terms of our
present construction practices.
But our thinking must be differ-


ent than that of the past. For all but
the most extraordinary types of build-
ings, we can no longer think in terms
of "bomb-proofing." The best we
can do is to think in terms of "bomb-
resistance." No one can say that
any type of construction will ride
through an atomic blast undamaged.
But, with various types of reinforced
concrete units, we can design for a
high degree of protection to life and
property and do so with a con-
siderable certainty of the degree of
protection such construction can
offer.
For example, blast resistance in
homes can be developed rather easily
through use of prestressed channels
and double-tees. Where cellars, or
basements are involved, they should
be made of reinforced concrete,
roofed with prestressed channels and
topped with 4-inches of concrete.
Such a slab of 24-foot clear span will


resist a force of 1000 pounds per
square foot. And that is high enough
a resistance to justify construction
without windows if desired.
Windows, however, act as a pres-
sure relief valve in a blast. If win-
dow areas are sufficient, pressure on
the underside of a roof or the in-
side of a wall will quickly build up
to equal the outside blast pressure.
Thus no need exists to develop the
great wall and floor strengths that
are required for an entirely enclosed
area like a cellar.
In spite of damage to parts of the
building such as shattered windows
and ruined equipment and furniture
- the structure of a prestressed house
will remain intact and will offer a
considerable degree of protection to
occupants, even on the first floor.
The upper part of the house can be
built of block walls, well reinforced
with a poured-in-place tie beam. The


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MORTAR 4 ALIGNING STEEL TO DOWELS.
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OPENINGS $ MAX. 32' O.C. BETWEEN OPENINGS.
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BOND BEAM UNITS FORM POURED CONCRETE LINTEL
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CONCRETE FOOTINGS SHALL BE CARRIED DOWN TO
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3 COVERAGE OF CONCRETE
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






roof can be of prestressed double-tee
roof slabs with a 2-inch concrete
topping poured in the field. Such
construction could resist a 500-pound
per square foot ultimate load.
As to schools, we may have to
return to the old-fashioned, double-
loaded interior corridor to produce a
really effective bomb shelter. Such a
corridor should have reinforced con-
crete walls at least 8-inches thick
and a roof of prestressed concrete
channels with a poured-in-place top-
ping. Construction of this kind
could easily resist momentary forces
of 2000 pounds per square foot. Class
room roofs could be made of pre-
stressed double-tees, designed for a
500-pound per square foot ultimate
load. To incorporate such bomb-
resistance in a school would increase
construction costs from 50 to 75 cents
per square foot of floor area.
Today's trend in industrial build-
ing design is, fortunately, toward the
one-story structure. But very large
roof areas present a problem of pres-
sure relief, even though windows are
used in the walls. Also, the long
clear spans and heavy column load-
ings that are often necessary serve to
complicate the design problem.
A solution to it, however, is still
relatively simple. To provide pres-
sure relief valves for roofs, plastic
skylights, or "bubble-domes," can be
used. And for a roof deck, a poured-
in-place reinforced concrete slab over
inverted, prestressed tee-beams will
give excellent blast protection on
spans up to 40 feet. Prestressed gird-
ers should be used and especially
prestressed columns, because of the
very special abilities of these units
to resist buckling even with large
overloads.
Use of the prestressing and pre-
casting principles in reinforced con-
crete construction is primarily what
makes the kind of blast-resistant con-
struction outlined here economically
practical. Application of these prin-
ciples under controlled conditions is
now making available reinforced con-
crete units with amazingly improved
qualities. Techniques of manufactur-
ing and using prestressed and pre-
cast concrete units have grown with
startling rapidity during the past few
years, and competent engineering
opinion holds that the potential field
of application has hardly been recog-
nized.
JUNE, 1955


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Chapter News & Notes
Information from all F.A.A. Chapters is welcomed. Deadline for July issue is June 20


DAYTONA BEACH
As might be expected, there is now
little in the way of Chapter activity
that's not concerned with the formu-
lation of plans for the 41st Annual
F. A. A. Convention in November.
Few of those plans are complete or
even definite enough as yet to justify
any kind of final announcement. But
progress is real and healthy along at
least two lines.
One is the general programming of
the Convention. The Chapter voted
to hold a dinner and social gathering
Thursday evening (November 17)
honoring the exhibitors. As Conven-
tion Chairman FRANCIs WALTON ob-
served.
"This will be something of an in-
novation in having a social event prior
to the formal opening of the Conven-
tion Friday morning. We hope to
attract many early comers and those
who would attend the Thursday after-
noon Board meeting."
Progress is also being made in
developing the manufacturers' exhibit
part of the Convention. BILL GOMoN,
who is in charge of this department
(as well as Student Exhibits) reports a
very substantial acceptance of booth
space by building product firms; and
HARRY GRIFFIN, Convention Treas-
urer, reports that money is even now
rolling in from advance sales of
booths. But neither gentleman is yet
satisfied. They, and the entire Chap-
ter membership, would like the active
support of other Chapters. Their goal
is a state-wide representation of build-
ing and design products; and they
urge your cooperation in interesting
suppliers in your locality to sign up
for an exhibit.
The Chapter also hopes that a
state-wide architectural exhibit can


also be developed. Convention head-
quarters the Princess Issena Hotel
- has excellent;facilities for such an
exhibit. It also has complete facilities
for showing slides either of the
automatic variety, or the manually-
operated kind. Types and classifica-
tions of architectural exhibits have
not yet been definitely set. But
FRANK CRAIG, Architectural Exhibit
Chairman, asks that all F. A. A. mem-
bers begin now to plan on showing
their work in the shape of photo-
graphs of completed structures, plans-
and-sketches or models. His address is
15 North Wild Olive St., Daytona
Beach. Write him about what you'd
like to show and give him the benefit
of your ideas as to kind of overall
architectural show you think is best.
As things stand now, the consensus
of Chapter opinion is against "formal
lecture seminar activity." It looks as
if business sessions would be held to
Friday and Saturday mornings, with
Friday afternoon's session still open to
suggestions.
Though the Daytona Beach Chap-
ter has willingly accepted the respon-
sibility for putting on the show, they
want it to be acceptable to everyone.
Chairman Walton says his committee
members will welcome ideas and sug-
gestions from any quarter.

BROWARD COUNTY
At a well-attended meeting May 13
at the Seahorse Restaurant in Fort
Lauderdale, this Chapter became the
third F. A. A. group to adopt the prac-
tice of adding the expense of dinner
or luncheon meetings to annual dues.
It was voted to assess each member in
advance for the meals involved in the
coming six meetings of this year as a


OBJ ECTI VES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





trial. Presumably, if the plan works
out it will be adopted as a regular
Chapter policy next year. Both Palm
Beach and Florida South Chapters
have been operating under this kind
of pre-paid meeting program for some
time. Better meals, more interesting
meetings and higher attendance have
resulted.
The small house program proposed
ty the Ft. Lauderdale Daily News,
whereby Chapter members were to
provide plans and sketches for weekly
publication, was squashed when Presi-
dent ROBERT JAHELKA read to the
meeting letters from A. I.A. head-
quarters regarding it. Since the Daily
News scheme involved selection of a
"winning house" at the end of its
publishing program, the Institute
deemed it to be in fact an architec-
tural competition. But it was not an
anonymous competition, since the
News planned to include the name of
the architect with each house pub-
lished. And since the public was to
be asked to vote for the house it
thought "best" and thus act as
competition "judges" there was
little possibility that an architectural
advisor would be involved as is re-
quired in all authorized professional
competitions.
Thus the scheme had more value as
a circulation and promotion stunt for
the paper than as a public relations
activity for Ft. Lauderdale architects.
JAMES POWNALL reported that, as a
result, the program was dead unless
the Daily News was disposed to open
it with the Chaptei again on a pro-
fessional basis that could be approved
by the Institute.
The Chapter delegated to the
Executive Board the task of approving
applications for delegates to the
A. I. A. Convention in Minneapolis,
but authorized an appropriation of
$100 to help defray expenses of those
who may be selected.
At a prior meeting of the Executive
Board it was decided that the Board
would henceforth meet a week in ad-
vance of regular Chapter meeting
dates. The chief purpose of this de-
cision is to form a definite agenda
for each meeting. The agenda will be
sent to each member prior to meet-
ings; and any matters that require
Chapter consideration must now be
brought to the Board for inclusion on
the agenda at its pre-meeting session.
(Continued on Page 16)
JUNE, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 15)
Highlights of the Chapter meeting
were informal reports by MORTON
IRONMONGER, of the F. A.A. Execu-
tive Board Meeting at Daytona Beach
and by JAMES POWNALL of the 4th
Regional Conference at Charleston.

PALM BEACH
Members of this Chapter are taking
seriously the A. I. A.'s public relations
counsellor's advice that architects get
into community affairs. MAURICE
HOLLEY has been newly elected as a
member of the West Palm Beach
City Commission. J. RAYMOND LA
THOMUS has become the new Mayor
of Juno Beach. AMES BENNETT in



Legislation Is Lagging
As we go to press, the F.A.A.
legislative program is still in a
state of flux. At least one of the
most important measures-the ap-
propriation for a new building for
the College of Architecture and
Allied Arts at Gainesville-is still
in committee. It remains to be
seen whether legislators will finally
recognize the need for this building
and authorize an appropriation.
As soon as the Legislature has
adjourned a full report on all
measures of interest to architects
will be published. In the mean-
time there is little more that can
be done at this writing except -
wait and hope.



addition to serving the Chapter as
head man of its TV program, is a
member of the West Palm Beach
Electric Board.
At its April meeting the Chapter
took steps to increase the list. It
recommended RAYMOND PLOCKEL-
MAN as a member of the West Palm
Beach Planning Board; and GEORGE
J. VOTAW as an alternate member of
the West Palm Beach Zoning Board
of Appeals.
The Chapter's regular May meeting
was largely concerned with the reports
of Delegates to the Regional Confer-
ence STETSON, HOLLEY and JACOBSEN.
EMILY OBST, reporting for AMES
BENNETT as TV program chairman,
said that the program had been de-
layed in starting due to station diffi-
culties. It had been planned formerly
as a 30-minute, once-a-month pro-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ORE COMFORTABLE

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gram sponsored by local stores.
No specific delegates were named
to the A. I. A. Convention in June,
but JOHN STETSON and MAURICE
HOLLEY signified their intention of
going and each urged attendance
by other members. Members voted
unanimously to pay for delegates air
transportation to Minneapolis and re-
turn.
If you've had difficulty in ordering
forms from the A. I. A., a letter from
Executive Director EDMUND PURVES,
read to the meeting by JEFFERSON
POWELL, may explain why. Following
a recent ruling by the Florida State
Comptroller, the A. I. A., must now
qualify as a dealer in the State. So,
hereafter, when it sells forms to indi-
viduals they, and the A. I. A. will be
involved with the Florida sales tax!

FLORIDA NORTH
From JAMES A. MEEHAN, JR.,
Chapter Secretary, came the an-
nouncement that the Chapter was to
hold a general meeting following an
Executive Committee meeting at the
Seminole Hotel, Jacksonville, May 20.
Results of the meeting could not be
reported here because of production
deadlines.
The Chapter was also scheduled to
attend a Producers' Council informa-
tional meeting sponsored by the Pitts-
burgh Plate Glass Company who was
to act as host to the architects. After
dinner a talk and discussion was
scheduled on paints and color selec-
tions.
WILLIAM STANLEY GORDON of
Jacksonville, has applied for Corpor-
ate Membership. JAMES C. PARLIER
was approved for Associate Member-
ship at the last Executive Meeting in
Gainesville.


Hospital Exhibit Slated
All registered architects who have
done hospitals or related structures
have the opportunity to submit three
of their designs for showing in an
architectural exhibition to be held in
connection with the 57th Annual
Convention of the American Hospital
Association. The event will take
place in the Convention Hall at
Atlantic City, N. J., September 19-22,
1955. Applications for entries must
reach the Association's headquarters
(Continued on Page 18)
JUNE, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)
on or before August 1. The address is
Architectural Exhibit, American Hos-
pital Association, 18 East Division
Street, Chicago 10, Illinois.
Fees of $15 for'each single mount
(approximately 40 by 40 inches), $30
for each double mount (40 by 80
inches) and $25 for each model must
accompany entry applications. Ex-
hibits must be shipped in time to
arrive in Atlantic City not later than
midnight, September 14.
The annual exhibit is conducted by
the American Hospital Association in
cooperation with the American Insti-
tute of Architects. Entry blanks and
full data relative to conditions of the
exhibit may be obtained from A.I.A.
headquarters.

Our Apologies, Gentlemen!
The following paragraphs from a
fine letter from ELLIOTT B. HADLEY,
of St. Petersburg, is not only justified
but self-explanatory:
"In the December 1954 issue, my
last name was misspelled MADLEY!
This did not bother me too much.
But your May issue failed to mention,
under those attending Architects-
Engineers Relations Committee meet-
ing in Daytona (page 20), the names
of MORTON T. IRONMONGER, myself,
and our F. A. A. President, G. CLIN-
TON GAMBLE.
"I do think that the recording of
only three of the seven-man commit-
tee,. while all but one were present,
might give the membership at large
the impression that there was a lack
of interest in attendance which,
of course, is not true."
To Mr. Hadley is due our thanks
for his letter, our appreciation of his
tolerance and our promise for better
proofing. And to him and the others
named our apologies for an uninten-
tional but nonetheless inexcusable
- omission.

F.A.A. Please Note. .. .!
In last month's Florida Architect
there appeared an article entitled,
"Are Retained Percentages Too
High?" It was a condensed report of
the conference held under Producers'
Council auspices during March of
this year in New York on a subject of
important interest to all construction
industry people. There must certainly
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






have been many reports of the
Conference printed in publications
throughout the country. Thus it
should be gratifying to Floridians to
learn that Producers Council Head-
quarters in Washington reprinted the
article in its entirety and is sending
it to editors of A. I. A. State and
Chapter publications throughout the
country.

Recent Awards .
To the A. I. A. "for the high merit
of its public relations program," came
a national Certificate of Public Rela-
tions Achievement by the American
Association of Public Relations, in
Philadelphia, on April 22. The award,
an "Oscar" in the public relations
profession, was made in the profes-
sional association category and is a
reflection of the high caliber of work
performed in the interests of the
A. I. A. by WALTER M. MEGONIGLE
and ANSON B. CAMPBELL of Ket-
chum, Inc., PR counsel for the A.I.A.
To WILLIAM B. HARVARD, St.
Petersburg, went an Award of Merit
from the National Honor Awards
Committee of the A. I. A., for his
Bandstand and Park Pavilion in St.
Petersburg. His was the only design
from Florida so honored.
To ALFRED BROWNING PARKER,
Mianli, went Honorable Mention at
the 4th Regional Conference in
Charleston, May 6, for his design of
the Bal Harbour Club in Miami.

American Architects' Directory
Now in preparation is a biograph-
ical directory of architects practicing
in this country and its territories.
Purpose of the volume is to provide
biographical information on all A.I.A.
members and a few non-members. As
the only reasonably complete compila-
tion of this kind ever attempted, the
Directory will be issued this fall as a
hard-bound volume of approximately
800 pages.
Publisher of the book is the R. R.
Bowker Company of 62 West 45th
Street, New York 36, N. Y. Its editor
is entirely dependent on cooperation
of each architect for both the com-
pleteness and the accuracy of bio-
graphical information. To assist in
compiling this reference work, ques-
tionnaires have been going out to all
A. I. A. members.


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JUNE, 1955






Regional Conference
(Continued from Page 5)
tion in June, will involve an average
yearly expenditure of about $50,000.
But, as Secretary Cummings ex-
plained, it involves a more ambitious
program built on the foundation of
the past three year's experience and
accomplishments. It can be financed,
said the Secretary, by a charge of $10
against all A. I. A. members' dues.
Those in any way experienced with
the size of expenditures for public
relations campaigns in other associa-
tions or in any commercial field, will
recognize that the proposed yearly PR
budget is anything but exorbitant.
And those same people will also real-
ize that much time and a great deal
of seemingly repetitive effort are
necessary to bend public conscious-
ness to understanding approval of any
group, any program, any product.
That's particularly true when the
group is a non-vocal minority, the
program almost indefinable, the prod-
uct intangible. Thus the job that
Ketchum, Inc., in the persons of
WALTER MEGRONIGLE and ANSON
CAMPBELL, undertook three years ago
was one that could easily have
swamped any other PR firm. That
they have made excellent, even bril-
liant, progress with it must certainly
be evident to any architect that calls
himself progressive and open-minded.
But they have just started. Their
work of the past three years has been
primarily a foundation upon which
they can now safely build along more
vigorous lines. Much of it has of
necessity had to be of the internal PR
character they have had to educate
their own clients as to what consti-
tutes good public relations for archi-
tects. That education is still incom-
plete. But it is sufficiently advanced,
the A. I. A. Public Relations Com-
mittee evidently thinks, to justify giv-
ing Ketchum, Inc., the tools needed
for another term of building good will
toward a profession that cannot pro-
mote its value through its own vocal
expression and cannot advertise its
abilities or services through any but
institutional channels.
Any business man who could buy
a share in a campaign to accomplish
that for his business and for himself
would jump at the chance. Particu-
larly if it were to cost him only $10
per year!
20


Producer's Council Program


From Frank R. Goulding, Presi-
dent of the Miami Chapter, comes
this memorandum relative to the Uni-
fied Building Code of South Florida,
a project that certainly should be of
important interest to every material
supplier as well as to architects, engi-
neers and contractors:
Your president recently attended a
meeting of the Technical Sub-Com-
mittee for the Unified Building Code
of South Florida. This Committee is
composed of Mr. Igor B. Polevitzky,
chairman; Mr. M. W. Deutschman,
vice-chairman, and Messrs. Ellis C.
Knox, John McKie, Robert F. Cook,
William M. Porter, Edwin T. Reeder
and L. B. Taylor. Mr. Frank D.
O'Neal is secretary; Mr. V. W. Sills
is code consultant; and Mr. W. G.
Stephan is code compiler. The pur-
pose of this committee is to prepare
a uniform Building Code for South
Florida.
At this meeting, it was pointed out
that this committee is anxious to re-
ceive any information which would
assist them in preparing this Building
Code. It was learned that many of
the Trade Organizations were pre-
paring this information' for submission
to the Committee.
I am sure that most of the Pro-
ducers' Council members are con-
cerned with having such a Code here
in the South Florida area, and prob-
ably most Producers' Council mem-
bers can best work through the Trade
Organizations. If, on the other hand,
any members wish to submit reports
to the Technical Sub-Committee,
this should be done to Mr. Frank D.
O'Neal who is located in the Miami
Builders Exchange Building.

Twelve Producers' Council mem-
bers were among the 44 firms which
offered exhibits of building materials
and equipment to visitors and dele-
gates to the 4th Annual South Atlan-
tic A. I. A. Regional Conference in
Charleston last month. They were:
Zonolite Company, U. S. Mengel Ply-
wood, Levelor-Lorentzen, Mosaic Tile
Company, Aluminum Company of


America, Hunter-Douglas Corp., Gate
City Sash & Door Co., Detroit Steel
Products Co., Crane Company, LCN
Closers, Inc., The Celotex Corpora-
tion.
Most of the firms representing
these companies were local to the site
of the convention, though some firms
exhibiting were from North Carolina
and Georgia.
Like the product exhibit at La
Coquille, near Palm Beach last
November when the F. A. A. held it's
40th Annual Meeting, this latest one
at Charleston was housed in a large
tent, pitched on the parking lot of
the Fort Sumter Hotel. But unlike
the F. A. A. show, architectural ex-
hibits were hung under the same roof;
and the business part of the two cock-
tail parties held in the tent was at
one end.
Exhibitors expressed themselves
generally as pleased with the interest
visitors showed, but somewhat dis-
appointed by the fact that space
seemed crowded and the brown can-
vas covering made the interior very
warm indeed during the day.
Word from the Daytona Beach
Chapter Architects' committee now
planning a building product exhibit
at Daytona Beach for the F. A. A.'s
41st Convention next November 17,
18 and 19, indicates no such difficul-
ties will be encountered there. Con-
vention activities and product exhibit
will be quartered in the Princess
Issena Hotel; and William R. Gomon,
Daytona architect in charge of the
exhibit plans says there will be plenty
of cool space for every firm that
wants to take advantage of the chance
to get his products shown.


The last information meeting of
the Miami Chapter's 1954-55 season
was held at the Coral Gables Country
Club May 24th. It featured a pres-
s' entation of products of the Armstrong
-*Cork Company, represented in Miami
by M. E. Pipkin, Jr., Ralph Lambert,
Alternate, of the Huttig Sash & Door
Company.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










UI N


BRICK


Specialists In

DECORATIVE MASONRY MATERIALS

FOR WALLS, WALKS AND FLOORS

MATERIALS OF CLAY, SHALE

CONCRETE AND NATURAL STONE




Manufacturers Of




(A Concrete Product)

In The Following Color Ranges

OYSTER WHITE .. CHARCOAL CHALK WHITE

RAINBOW RANGE TAN RANGE RED RANGE .. PINK RANGE

GRAY RANGE TAUPE RANGE .. GREEN RANGE
*T.M. REG.

St~aUe ed ~c t sold in Florida by:


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ----- Avon Park, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ...-....- Bartow, Fla
Fort Myers Ready-Mix Concrete, Inc ..... -....--- Fort Myers, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company -..... Frostproof, Fla.
Baird Hardware Company .... ..----------- Gainesville, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company -.- Haines City, Fla.
Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company......... Jacksonville, Fla.
Sfrunk Lumber Yard ---------- ...-- Key West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company .-.. Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company ........ Marathon, Fla.
Gandy Block & Supply Company ......- Melbourne, Fla.
C. J. Jones Lumber Company ----- Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company -........---.. ---.- .. Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lurber Company ----.... Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply -........ ----- ..... Tallahassee, Fla.
Burnup & Sims, Inc......---......... .. West Palm Beach, Fla.


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, PHONE)880-1525, MIAMI, FLORIDA
INCORPORATED








Tcwce /




JUNE 20th to 24th
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

The 87th Annual Convention of the A.I.A. will offer
much to every architect. Theme, "Designing for the
Community", will cover seminars with top-level ex-
perts. And plenty of fun and fellowship goes with it.

NOVEMBER 17th, 18th, 19th
AAYTONA BEACH

That's the time and place of the Forty-First
Annual Convention of the F. A. A. It's your own
Convention. By attending you can help make it
the biggest and best one ever,.held.


PLAN NOW TO MAKE BOTH TRIPS I