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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Now hear this!
 The way is easy if we make...
 Merchant building a $ 13 billion...
 Technical courses for building...
 Are retained percentages too...
 Third meeting shows joint F.A.A.-A.G.C....
 Chapter news and notes
 Producer's council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: May 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00011
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Now hear this!
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The way is easy if we make it so
        Page 5
    Merchant building a $ 13 billion opportunity!
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Technical courses for building officials was well attended at University of Florida
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Are retained percentages too high?
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Third meeting shows joint F.A.A.-A.G.C. committee ready for expansion
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Chapter news and notes
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Producer's council program
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text




I I
c^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^k^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


FlriaArhir


May -1955








Official Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS












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By incorporating both the high compression strength
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methods of reinforced concrete construction.


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2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






74e


Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


MAY, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 5


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble --- President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman-- __ Secy.-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger- Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard-No. Central

Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell- Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph No. Central

*0
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford . Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

MCMURRAY I26 MIAMI
MAY, 1955


TO ALL MEMBERS OF F.A.A., F.E.S., AND A.G.C.



Nou Hear This!

The hour of decision is almost here. Shortly after you read this,
the Legislature at Tallahassee will vote on appropriations to be
approved at this session. At that time it will be decided whether
or not a sorely-needed new building for the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts at the University of Florida can become an im-
mediate reality. Or, whether the fight to obtain adequate quarters
for training future leaders of Florida's huge construction industry
must be waged to another conclusion two years hence.

Dr. Wayne Reitz presented the need for the building at the
University budget hearing before the Senate Committee on Appro-
priations in mid-April. He indicated that he is fully aware of the
need for the new building.

But many of your Legislators who are not conversant with either
University affairs or construction industry requirements are not
fully aware of it. The reasons why they should vote affirmatively
for this building's appropriation must be made known to them.
You people in architecture, in engineering, in contracting are
the ones to do it. Here is the personal evaluation of the situation
by Sanford W. Goin, F.A.I.A.:

"The situation is not impossible by any means, providing we
can get the support of the profession in Florida. The support
received from a few architects has been enthusiastic and forceful.
But I regret to say that the majority has been apathetic."

Here is the estimate of Benmont Tench, Jr., F.A.A. legal
counsel, who has kept in close touch with legislative matters since
the current session at Tallahassee began:

"In order to get such a building, it is going to take real action
by every architect in Florida. And I think it will have to be a con-
sistently vigorous action extending over the entire time between
now and the time the appropriation is actually voted upon. It
should begin as soon as possible, because the Appropriations Com-
mittee will probably try to come out with its Appropriations Bill
at about the middle of this session."

The action that Tench was talking about means contact-
contact with Legislators in every part of the State by every architect
in the State-and also by their colleagues in construction, the
engineers and the general contractors.

In the April issue of this magazine there appeared a full list of
Senators and Representatives of our State. Look it up. Go down
the list. Then write or wire-or even better, do both-to those
representing your community. Tell them the need for the new
building. Tell them the importance of their understanding this
need. And tell them you want theIr support of the appropriation
to make the new building an immediate reality.

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m4er'de' tVdC'ALe ..A5W mo*'


The Way Is Easy



If We Make It So




By HARVEY F. PIERCE
President, Florida Engineering Society


The role which engineering, as
a profession, plays in our everyday
lives cannot logically be separated
from many other parallel, and
sometimes overlapping, lines of
endeavor. In truth, our complex
civilization does not permit man
or professional man to be an
"island unto himself." This is
indeed an abundant truth when
related to architects and engineers
in Florida.
Certainly it makes good sense.
for architects and engineers who
are mutually engaged on, or inter-
ested in, the construction industry
to "get along." But, in my opin-
ion, it makes much better sense to
cooperate actively, one with the
ether, to understand and overcome
those realms of conflict which have
hindered joint professional growth
and at the same time explore, dis-
cover and emphasize those ele-
ments of mutual strength which
will make the road together more
rewarding.
Much progress has been made
during the last few years through
the efforts of individual members
of both professions and the Joint
Committee on Architect-Engineer
Relations. But these efforts and
results achieved at Committee level
only point the way to a much more
universal effort which must be
made by all members of both pro-


fessions under the leadership of
Florida Association of Architects
and the Florida Engineering Soci-
ety.
In the coming year I am confi-
dent that means will be found to
move forward in this field. Some,
but not all, of the tools available
are:
1. Continuation of the Archi-
tect-Engineer Relations Commit-
tee.
2. The regular inclusion of
some item of architectural interest
in the Journal of the Florida Engi-
neering Society; and of engineering
interest in The Florida Architect.
3. Continuation of the current
joint legislative representation pol-
icy.
4. Individual, conscious efforts
to appreciate the problems and in-
terests of other professionals and
to meet the challenge of coopera-
tion more than halfway.
5. Active forum discussions at
local chapter level to explore the
common problems.
Other activities which will assist
in this program will undoubtedly
occur to members of both profes-
sional groups. And if they do, the
purpose of these paragraphs will
have been served, because it will
prove individual interest in doing
the job. After all, this is the level
where all lasting results must be
achieved.
The Florida Engineering Soci-
ety, now affiliated with the Na-


tional Society of Professional Engi-
neers, is, in my considered opinion,
a strong influence for good. Its
program will always be positive, as
I am sure will be the policy of the
Florida Association of Architects.
Within my personal experience,
some eighteen years of close associ-
ation with Architects have given
me a little better insight into the
problem under discussion than is
possessed by most of my fellow
engineers. Perhaps therein lies the
area of my maximum contribution
to the cause.
If during the coming year we
can help to define the obstacles
which stand between the two pro-
fessions and prove most of
them to be unworthy of both -
some further progress can be re-
ported this time next year.
If a positive and aggressive atti-
tude of professional conscience can
be engendered in the leaders of
both groups, I will be delighted
with our progress. But unless, and
until, the individual architect and
engineer can and will accept the
concept that the other profession
should be treated as he would him-
self be treated, we will still have a
long way to go.
I would like to take this oppor-
tuniy to thank The Florida Archi-
tect 'Tr this opportunity to pledge
the continued cooperation of the
Florida Engineering Society on all
probleibs of mutual concern.


MAY, 1955













Merchant


- Building


...a $13 Billion Opportunity!




By JAMES K. ALBERT
President, Home Builders' Association of South Florida,
Member, Executive Committee, N.A.H.B.


The architectural profession in Flor-
ida is sitting on one of the most allur-
ing opportunities that could be imag-
ined. The opportunity exists in hous-
ing. And it is so big and so provocative
of accomplishment that some sound
and sober thinking is needed to bring
it into today's focus.
You can partially pin it down with
a few figures. Last year nearly 44,000
residential units were produced in
Florida, representing a dollar volume
just short of $470,000,000. The eco-
nomic experts, whose specific job it
is to keep on top of population trends,
sociological needs and business growth,


say and in deadly earnest, too -
that, barring an unforeseen dislocation
of Florida's future development, the
next 10 years should see the comple-
tion of more than a million new
housing units in our state. And what
does that mean in money? Over 13
billion dollars worth of residential
construction!
Just one percent of that huge sum
would be $130 million dollars. As-
suming that represented an aggregate
of architectural fees, the average yearly
amount would break down to $13 mil-
lion per year or about $13,000 for
every architect practicing his profes-
sion in the State.


This is housing-merchant building-without benefit of architect.
Unless builder and architect work together, this kind of development
will continue--and forecast community deterioration, future slums.
6


Those are staggering figures. But
they are as soberly realistic as care-
ful research and cautious projection
can make them. And few would
deny that they represent an attrac-
tive basis on which to build a future
security.
Those billions of dollars will be
largely channeled through the offices
of merchant builders. Even today,
merchant builders finance, construct
and sell more than 80 percent of all
housing units. It is probable that
the percentage will rise within the
indicated 10-year period, because the
merchant builder is a specialist in the
housing field. And, like all good spe-
cialists, he is taking advantage of
every new method and device to do a
better job at lower cost.
The responsibility for producing
housing has fallen on the merchant
builder largely because of the vast
demand for the commodity field in
which he has become expert. Mass
demands create methods of mass
production to fill them. The fact
is as true in the housing field as
in any other; and it is this one factor
of mass, or large-scale, production that
has thrust the merchant builder into
a special category in the construction
industry.
S He occupies a peculiar some-
,) times even an uncomfortable posi-
tion. He must know the needs and
desires of the public, or he cannot
fill their demands. He must risk large
counts of capital his and others

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


.la.. ' . :.. : ~




























. his work spells opportunity

-on his considered judgment of how
his community is developing and the
trend of the public's acceptance of
that development. He must be expert
in organizing all sorts of skills and ef-
forts into a program that is constantly
matching every penny of cost against
the hopeful possibility of profit. He
must keep constantly abreast of every
technical advance in building and
adapt it whenever possible to his pro-
jects. And he must be always on the
alert to improve his housing product
toward the end of giving his home-
seeking public a better housing value
and greater livability at a minimum
practical price.
Until a few years ago the merchant
builder was doing everything pretty
much by himself. Too many were
too concerned with construction costs
to pay much attention to the equally
important values of site planning and
architectural design. Today that is
not so true. Some five years ago, dur-
ing a conference of the National Asso-
ciation of Home Builders, architects
and merchant builders met to formu-
late methods of working together. The
result has been a growing harmony
between the two groups. And in more
and more residential developments
throughout the country this has shown
its practical worth in higher standards
of design and vastly better values for
the public.
Unfortunately, however, this team-
work has not been as prevalent in
(Continued on Page 8)


MAY, 1955


WHAT CAN BE DONE . .
This is a model home in a proj-
ected 1500-house development
north of Miami. Selling price is
about $14,000; and model is
one of three designed by the
architects. Builder of this house
was formerly dead set against
architectural services, learned
their value from poor sales re-
sponse and high, overall costs on
other, lower-priced projects.
Plan is standard for the project,
but involves several elevation
variations and was developed by
the California firm of Palmer &
Krisel. The well-organized design
could have been produced in
Florida as well as in California!


Living room is typical of carefully-considetd details that characterize
every room in the house. Job of coordinating finish materials, interior
and exterior colors and furnishings, was delegated to a local decorator.


- -- -- -- -- -





































Windows and


Window Walls


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combined with insulated panels mean lighter loads,
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institutional buildings. They give the architect a greater
flexibility of design and can produce lower building
costs, better building performance, for his client.
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Florida Sales Representative:
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IGEORG IC. GRIFFIN Jacksonville, Fla.
Factory-BROWN & GRIST, INC., Warwick, Virginia


Merchant Building
(Continued from Page 7)
Florida as elsewhere in spite of the
fact that the state's tremendous
growth has mushroomed the volume
of house construction. It may be
that the very rapidity of thi" growth
has been a stumbling block in the
way of better housing values that
come from architect-builder team-
work. Whatever the reason and
I'm prepared to admit that the fault
may lie largely with the merchant
builder! the time has certainly
come to change the situation.
Bluntly, and in brief, the merchant
builder needs the architect. And, just
as bluntly, the architect is going to
need the merchant builder if he is
going to taste of the opportunities
that lie ahead in the Florida housing
field.
How can they work together? Well,
first, the merchant builder must make
it worth the architect's while finan-
cially. That has been done elsewhere;
it can be done here. But understand-
ing is needed on both sides. The
builder cannot expect stock plans for
$5, nor can the architect expect 10
percent on every house constructed.
Second, the builder must open his
mind to new and fresher design ideas,
or otherwise he defeats his own pur-
pose in asking an architect to work
with him. But the architect has no
less a responsibility to understand
the builder's problem of rigidly con-
trolling costs. Today and probably
for a long, long time to come-financ-
ing of housing is tied to MPR's, or
Minimum Property Requirements,
The architect who would work in
housing must know the MPR's like
the back of his hand.
Further he must match the builder's
ingenuity in doing the most with the
least. Broadly speaking, the best de-
tail is the least costly one to the
builder. And the architect's worth
and financial stature will grow
to the extent that he can cut cost
corners, improve the house in both
.structure and livability and clothe it
with an overall harmony of line, color
and proportion.
The merchant builder desperately
needs such help. And only you ar-
hitects can really give it to him.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








Can Architects Make Money in Merchant-Building?


In general the answer is "yes"
from those who have tried it.
How much money-or, more
exactly, how much profit above
office costs seems to depend
largely on the size of the build-
er's project. It could also depend
on the working arrangement
made, since it's possible for
builder and architect to team up
in a wide variety of ways. An
A.I.A. Bulletin on the subject
issued about two years ago listed
some 10 recognized variants in
both fee schedules and working
arrangements.
For the builder the crux of
the "fee question" is made up
of the cost and character of the
house and the overall size of the
project. On a project of 25
houses to sell for about $20,000
each, a fee of $100 to $125 has
been held reasonable. This im-


plies one basic, well-worked-out
plan, several variations in eleva-
tions and general advice on col-
ors, finishes, etc. In effect,
then, the fee would amount to
more than 10 percent on a single
house of that cost.
In general, the larger the pro-
ject, the greater return to the
architect even at a possibly
lower unit fee. In a 100-unit
project of $10,000, all to be
built from the same basic plan,
an architectural fee of $25 per
house would return the architect
two and one-half times a 10
percent fee on a single $10,000
house. And for a not-uncommon
200-unit project, the builder
would undoubtedly be satisfied
to pay the same royalty.
What merchant builders ap-
pear to be searching for is ar-
chitectural service plus. Build-


ers' organization officials say
that the plus factor includes such
services as site planning, color
coordination, detailing to speed
up and reduce costs of construc-
tion processes, advice on selec-
tion of finish materials and
equipment, and even assistance
in selling, as this involves adver-
tising and sales promotion mate-
rials such as sketches and ren-
derings.
For these services they will
pay and the architect can
make money. In one case the
fee was 4 percent of the cost
of the first unit, plus $100 for
each additional unit. There
were 32 houses in the project,
thus bringing the architect
$4,000. Houses were in the $20,-
000 bracket; and in this case
the "service plus" idea worked
out well for all concerned.


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MAY, 1955


I I


I





Technical Courses

for Building Officials

Was Well Attended

at University of Florida

Another first for Florida was
chalked up at Gainesville when the
third annual course for Building Offi-
cials opened in March. Sponsored
jointly by the University of Florida
and the Building Officials' Association
of Florida, the short but intensive
course of study was first begun in
1953, making this state the recognized
pioneer in specialized training for
men who have the responsibility for
administering planning and construc-
tion regulations in communities
throughout the State.
The 1955 course, formulated jointly
by the General Extension Division
and the Colleges of Architecture and
Engineering of the University of
Florida, was administered by a faculty
of 28 experts and covered almost every
phase of the building official's job,
from bookkeeping and public rela-
tions to the fine points of building
inspection. Among those taking active
part in the program were FREDERICK
H. BAIR, JR., Executive Secretary,
Florida Planning and Zoning Associa-
tion, H. N. CARAWAY, Assistant to
City Manager, Columbus, Ga., M. L.
CLEMENT, director, Southern Build-
ing Code Congress, WALTER J. RUBY,
President, Florida Building Officials'
Association, and Ross E. WINDOM,
City Manager of St. Petersburg.


3RD ANNUAL SCHOOL FOR BUILDING OFFICIALS, University of
Florida. Front Row: (left to right) H. N. Caraway, Building Official,
Columbus, Georgia; M. L. Clement, Director, Southern Building Code
Congress, Birmingham, Alabama; Gilbert Barnhart, Housing and Home
Finance Agency, Washnigton, D. C.; Carl Wetherell, Daytona Beach;
Walter Ruby, retiring President, Building Officials' Association of Flor-
ida, Lakeland; J. A. Mortland, Sarasota; Harry L. Lindsey, College of
Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida; W. T. Arnett, Dean,
College of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida; John E.
Miklos, Coordinator for the course and Assistant Professor, General Exten-
sion Division of Florida, Gainesville. Second Row: (left to right) Thomas
L. Watts, Waycross, Georgia; Ralph W. Jones, Jr., Orlando; L. M. Addison,
Panama City; J. H. Worrell, Marion, South Carolina. Third Row: (left to
right) W. H. La Grave, Gainesville; Edwin Blanton, Clearwater; Robert A.
Alexander, Albany, Georgia; Joseph A. Wilkes, College of Architecture and
Allied Arts, University of Florida; R. E. Yonge, Ocala; Russell Jacobsen,
Winter Park; Edgar H. Gregory, Lake Worth; R. Jerome Lozito, West
Palm Beach; Ray Knopp, Key West. Fourth Row: (left to right) John M.
Gillon, Sanford; John J. Trippe, La Grange, Georgia; William C. Havard,
Acting Director, Public Administration Clearing Service, University of
Florida; Richard H. Owen, South Miami; E. F. McCray, Ocala; Joseph V.
Thomas, Jr., Coral Gables; Ward S. Ireland, Cocoa; Joseph H. Corino,
Vero Beach. Fifth Row: (left to right) W. C. Phillips, Dade City; Arnold
F. Butt, College of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida;
0. M. Pushkin, Miami Beach; R. A. Hughson, Delray Beach; C. M. Jones,
Jacksonville Beach; Floyd Lawson, New Port Richey; Grady Duncan,
Sanford; John Blanyer, Daytona Beach; Hoyt W. Ireland, Cocoa; J. C.
Amis, Jr., Naples; George A. Pippin, Rockledge; Frank P. Wolf, Ft. Pierce;
Sixth Row: (left to right) Herman H. Block, College of Architecture and
Allied Arts, University of Florida; John L. R. Grand, College of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts, University of Florida; Donald A. Halperin, College
of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida; Carl Brandelein,
Indialantic; Robert M. Dillon, College of Architecture and Allied Arts,
University of Florida; T. F. Thompson, Pahokee; W. L. Cunningham, Sr.,
Belle Glade; Frank W. Smith, Haines City.


They Do Things Right in Mexico City!


When you write your State Senator
and Representatives about the need
for a new building for the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts at the
University of Florida, you've plenty
to tell them! You can say that many
other colleges in these United States
have erected modern facilities for
training the young men and women
who will some day be architects and
engineers. You can tell them about
the disgraceful, crowded, ramshackle,
insanitary, makeshift buildings that


now necessarily house students of the
second largest architectural school in
the United States.
You can tell them all these things
with confidence that you are telling
the exact truth, without one single bit
of exaggeration for effect! You can
put across the point, as forcefully as
you wish, that as one of the three
fastest-growing states in the entire 48,
Florida should be utterly ashamed to
permit continuance of a scholastic
housing condition that has been 25


years in the making. And, as a
clincher you can quote from the fol-
lowing letter from HARRY M. GRIF-
FIN, A.I.A., of Daytona Beach:
"I was in Mexico City last week,
looking at their new Uinversity Build-
ings, and found that the only building
which is now occupied and being used
is the Architectural Building.
S "They have spent many millions
- and will eventually have a wonderful
institution. This is merely a sidelight
showing that, while we are asking for
Sur Architectural Building last, the
university of Mexico gets its Archi-
tectural Building first!"
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Ik~l.i::*:.uok~ ~ cjsPb8a 8 ~ ..: ~ -PVQ~~~rpi f~ .. '. .,r %.~ xr .. : .- 4 ..., I ., '.t: 1i . Ir










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Singer Building,
Pompano Brach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Buddi"n at Orlando
























another I


Is:


C: ,


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. . Mistik & Lester, General Contractor . "Double Tee" Prestressed
Concrete Roof for building and open show room supplied by R. H. Wright &
Son, Inc., Fort Lauderdale.


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is now being made under controlled conditions by 'menimbeSf
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MAY, 1955


-- --







Are Retained Percentages Too High?


Many building professionals believe they are. Results of a recent con-

ference study support the belief and offer a way to better the situation.


Results of a conference of con-
struction industry executives held in
New York the latter part of March
may prove to be an incentive to lower
building costs. Called by the Pro-
ducers' Council and the National As-
sociation of Credit Men, the meeting
was the second to be held this year
with the object of studying the prob-
lem of frozen credit resulting from
the building industry practice of re-
taining part of the payments due
contractors for completed work on
construction projects.
Out of the conference came a rec-
ommended procedure which it is
hoped may eventually become stand-
ard practice for the industry. The
procedure is largely the work of
WILLIAM STANLEY PARKER, F.A.I.A.,
of Boston, and FANEUIL ADAMS,
L.L.B., who were consultants to the
conference. It is the result of a de-
tailed study of the retained percentage
question and was adopted by the
conference as a practical way of free-
ing hitherto frozen construction funds.
Recommendations are essentially
these: Ten percent of payments to
contractors should be retained until
the work is 75% complete; and there-
after the retained amount should be
five percent.
The Parker-Adams report pointed
out that the procedure applies pri-
marily to lump sum contracts for
private work, whether bonded or not,
and is designed to conform to the
requirements of the A.I.A. Standard
General Conditions. Also, it recog-
nizes that the interests of owners,
contractors, subcontractors and sup-
pliers are all involved in provisions
governing applications and certificates
for progress payments under a gen-
eral contract.
The report says, in part:
"Under average normal conditions,
a retention of 10% on payments is
reasonable during the early stages of
the work, but when the work ap-
proaches substantial completion, such
retention becomes unnecessarily bur-
12


dcnsome. It can properly be reduced
to 5% after the entire work is 75%
complete, on those divisions of the
work which are themselves 75% com-
plete. This adds an element of compli-
cation in the Application Form for
subsequent payments in order to show
the retentions on the different divi-
sions of the work, some being 5% and
some 10%. No such complications,
however, are present during the first
three quarters of the work, or after all
divisions of the work are at least
75% complete."
So far as is known, this is the first
comprehensive study that has been
attempted on a subject that has long
been a source of annoyance and often
substantial financial hardship on the
part of contractors and material sup-
pliers. Conference discussions indi-
cated that all segments of the con-
struction industry recognized the de-
sirability of retaining some propor-
tion of due payments on behalf of
the owner. But the Parker-Adams
study showed that custom on the
percentages of retained payments va-
ried.
"Fifty years ago 15% was custom-
ary. Since then it has gradually be-
come customary to reduce the per-
centage in different ways. Many
contracts now customarily use 10%.
Much government work is now based
on retaining 10% until the work is
half done, accumulating a retention
of 5% of the total contract price,
thereafter paying 100% of the value
of subsequent work. Many contracts
still retain 15%."
Conference recommendations, in-
cluding the Parker-Adams report, do
not propose the setting-up of rigid
procedures. The object was to arrive
at a reasonable method for protecting
the owner's interests and at the same
time afford as much financial relief
as possible to contractors, subcon-
tractors and suppliers. And it should
be emphasized that percentages rec-
ommended may be even lower in
instances where other procedures pro-


vide adequate protection for the
owner.
Following is a suggested amend-
ment to Article 4 of A.I.A. Form A-i
as proposed in the Parker-Adams re-
port to the conference.
Article 4. Progress Payments. The Owner
shall make payments on account of the
Contract as provided therein, as follows:
On or about the . . day of each
month . 90 . per cent of the value
based on the contract prices, of labor and
materials incorporated in the work and
of materials suitably stored at the site
thereof up to the . . . day of that
month, as estimated by the Architect, less
the aggregate of previous payments, until
such value amounts to 75% of the con-
tract price; thereafter the retained per-
centage shall be reduced to 5% on
portions of the work more than 75%
complete, retaining 10% on portions not
75% complete.
All payments are on account of the
contract price and do not constitute ac-
ceptance of any specific portions of the
work. Full payment of the retained per-
centage on a portion of the work satis-
factorily completed prior to the comple-
tion of the entire work may be made
subject to the approval of the Architect
upon submission of evidence that all pay-
rolls, material bills, and other indebted-
ness connected with the work have been
paid, and, if required, the submission of
a written guarantee or bond covering
correction of defects that may later be
discovered in the materials or labor or
operating requirements as required by
the contract.
Note: The bold face portion is quoted
from the Standard Agreement
Form. The remainder of the print-
ed clause may be crossed out
and the balance of this provision
typed in the blank space provided.
The Retained Percentage Confer-
ence was presided over by WILLIAM
GILLETT, national president of the
'Producers' Council, and was mod-
elated by TYLER STEWART ROGERS.
Participants were invited on the basis
of: their intimate knowledge of the
subjects under discussion. Among
them were H. R. DOWSWELL, Shreve,
Lamb & Harmon; DAVID Q. COHEN,
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





Association of Casualty and Surety
Companies; GEORGE B. ROSCOE, Na-
tional Electrical Contractors Associ-
ation; E. VERNON ROTH, The Surety
Association of America; WELTON A.
SNOW, Associated General Contrac-
tors, and CLARENCE B. LITCHFIELD,
LaPierre, Litchfield & Partners.


U. of F. Architectural School
Has Record-Breaking Growth
Information recently released by
the secretary of the Association of
Collegiate Schools of Architecture
indicates that the University of Flor-
ida's College of Architecture and
Allied Arts has moved from fourth
place to second place in enrollment.
As of now, its volume of professional
degree students enrolled is exceeded
only by the University of Illinois,
which is by far the largest in the
country.
The A. C. S. A. statistical report is
issued annually. For several years
Florida has occupied fourth place -
which in itself is a remarkable posi-
tion for a school that has just passed
its 25th year. The jump to second
place seems nothing short of phenom-
enal particularly in view of the
handicap of physical facilities that has
plagued the College for many years.
The A. C. S. A. figures furnish still
another justification if any such
were needed for the current Flor-
ida Legislature to approve the im-
mediate construction of a building
adequate to cope with the growing
volume of architectural and construc-
tion students.

That 1953 Convention Design
Exhibit is Still Traveling

For well over a year and a half the
"Florida Architecture by Florida
Architects" exhibit, first shown to an
interested public at the 1953 F. A. A.
Convention at St. Petersburg, has
been on tour. After several showings
in Florida cities, the exhibit was
turned over to the U. S. Information
Agency at Washington and has been
visiting various cities of Central and
South America.
Latest report received by JOHN L.
R. GRAND, who headed a committee
on the exhibit, indicated an enthusi-
astic "reception of material at the Uni-
versity of Panama. Its next showing
was scheduled for Bogota, Colombia.
MAY, 1955


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK .D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
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Third Meeting Shows Joint
F.A.A.-A.G.C. Committee
Ready For Expansion

At its first meeting of 1955, held
April 22 at the Columbus Hotel in
Miami, the Joint Cooperative Com-
mittee, F.A.A.-A.G.C., piled up
plenty of evidence that it was living
up to its name and was well-started
toward fulfilling the hopes of its spon-
soring organizations. This was the
Committee's third session since it was
first organized at mid-August last year
in Orlando. Attendance numbered
20 12 of which were members of
the A.G.G. and the remainder repre-
sented the F.A.A.
JOHN L. R. GRAND, chairman of the
Scholastic Awards sub-committee, re-
ported that the U. of F. award pro-
gram for students of both architec-
tural and construction courses had
now become an accomplished fact.
He presented copies of award certifi-
cates that will be presented twice a
year by the Joint Cooperative Com-
mittee to outstanding students.
The report of the Sub-Committee
on Expansion, chairmanned by Miss
MARION MANLEY, signalled a general
discussion of J.C.C. aims and objec-
tives, with particular reference to the
character and scope of Committee
membership in the future. There
emerged a unanimous agreement that
all interests would best be served by
confining Committee membership to
the "designing and constructing ele-
ments of the building industry." And
it was also agreed that Committee
expansion as needed along such lines
would develop sufficient industry
representation to permit action on
many fronts. Chief among the Com-
mittee's purposes, it was pointed out,
is the exercise of positive leadership
in the improvement of construction
policies and practices, in the fields of
technical research and education, as
well as improvement of relationships
between membership groups.
On such a note the Committee
voted to invite participation of the
t'Florida Engineering Society.- Accept-
-,ince by the F.E.S. would undoubt-
edly require overall consideration by
F,.E.S. membership and presumably
could not become an established fact
until action by that organization at
its next year's annual meeting.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





JAMES K. ALBERT was continued as
chairman of an enlarged sub-commit-
tee that will undertake to write a
program of technical research required
by the construction industry in this
state. This will include a listing of
tests needed and the kind of result
data that will be most useful to build-
ing professionals.
J. HILBERT SAPP called on the
Committee, individually and collec-
tively, to keep in close touch with
civic, county and state affairs and
developments.
"Our industry," he said, "is one of
the main keys, if not the very basis;
for the future progress of Florida.
This Committee owes it to our com-
munities to concern itself with long
range planning for improvement. Too
many actions are taken by civic and
county bodies quickly and without
adequate professional knowledge and
advice. This Committee's objective is
the overall improvement of the con-
struction industry. But it can serve
its purpose best by raising its sights
to include the communities which the
construction industry has had an im-
portant hand in developing."
Present at the meeting were, for the
architects, Chairman CLINTON GAM-
BLE, MIss MARION I. MANLEY, IGOR'
B. POLEVITZKY, JOHN L. R. -GRAND,
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, JOSEPH SHIFALO
and GEORGE J. VOTAW. ROGER W.
SHERMAN represented The Florida
Architect. Contractor members .in-
cluded W. H. ARNOLD, Co-Chairman,
WILLIAM P. BOBBY, JR., Secretary, IRA
McK. KOGER, President of the Florida
A.G.C. Council, PAUL HINDS, J. HIL-
BERT SAPP, JAMES K. ALBERT, T.
EDWARD CHASEN, G. P. MCCONNELL,
E. R. BROWN, THEODORE DIETSCH,
WILLIAM SOULE, and HENRY TOBY.


Make A.I.A. Reservations Early
If you're planning on attending the
87th Annual A.I.A. Convention in
June you'd better act fast on.the mat-
ter of hotel reservations. Accommo-
dations in Minneapolis the week of
June 20 will be scarce, for the Con-
vention program promises to attract a
record crowd. Also, the A.I.A. man-
agement has made it clear that they'll
be strictly on a first-come-first-served
basis. So better write now. You
can always cancel if the cards don't
fall right for you.
MAY, 1955


eette SAFE t4a SORRY ^td


JONES STORM SHUTTERS
Sooner or later all industrial and commercial buildings in
this area require the protection of storm shutters. Plan now
to install the best-JONES STORM SHUTTERS-tested and ap-
proved by the University of Miami.
The best way to preserve the beauty of architectural de-
sign is to make provision for storm shutters at the time the
building plans are drawn. While construction is taking place
it is simple to conceal the hardware, such as headers, and thus
preserve the clean architectural lines of the structure. Later, as
the need arises, the full shutter installation can be made.
Our engineering group is available for consultation at any
time regarding details of header design or complete shutter
installation.


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Chapter News & Notes
Information from all F.A.A. Chapters is welcomed. Deadline for June issue is May 20


DAYTONA BEACH
Recently the Chapter approved a
move to add two new project com-
Smittees as subdivisions of the four
main committees through which busi-
ness of the Chapter is conducted.
Under Practice, will be an award proj-
ect, run by committee members, by
which recognition of technical per-
formance and business ethics will be
given a builder, contractor, subcon-
tractor, etc., judged most deserving.
Under Design, the six-person com-
mittee will conduct a chapter-wide
competition for an award for the best
design as judged by committee mem-
bers with approval of the Chapter
executive group. The Practice Com-
mittee is headed by FRANCIS W.
CRAIG. JOEL W. SAYERS is chairman
of the Design Committee.

Convention Chairmen Named
With the undeniable success of two
past Conventions breathing down
their necks, Chapter members who
will be hosts to the 41st Annual
F.A.A. Convention are already girding
themselves for the task of making it
the "biggest and best" on record.
They are reaching for an F.A.A. mem-
bership attendance of at least 300.
They have already mapped tenta-
tive plans that suggest a Convention
of fun and frolic as well as accom-
plishment. And as an early start, they
hve plotted an exhibit program tied
in closely with the entertainment part
of the meeting that might well break
a record.
G e n e r a Convention Chairman
FRANCIS R. WALTON has appointed
working committees as follows:
Registration: JOEL W. SAYERS,
chairman; Treasurer: HARRY M.


GRIFFIN, chairman; Program and
Entertainment: DAVID A. LEETE,
chairman; Hospitality: RALPH F.
SPICER, chairman; Transportation:
CRAIG J. GEHLERT, chairman; and
Publicity: ALFRED G. KEMMERER,
chairman.
The manufacturer's exhibit pro-
gram is in charge of WILLIAM R.
GOMON.
Date of the F.A.A.'s 41st annual
meeting will be November 17, 18 and
19. Convention headquarters will be
the Princess Isena Hotel at Daytona
Beach, which, according to Conven-
tion Chairman Walton, "will be
almost completely ours while we're
there."
The Committee promises more spe-
cific information as soon as present
plans mature to justify its release. As
soon as details are pinned down, full
reports of the Convention program
will be printed in these pages.

FLORIDA NORTH
The Student Service Center of the
University of Florida was the scene
of the April 23rd meeting of the
Chapter, and climaxed a four-day pro-
gram sponsored by the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts and the
Student Chapter, F.A.A. Chapter
members,. students and the College
faculty attended a luncheon prior to
the business meeting. They heard
CARL FEISS, A.I.A., of Washington,
D. C., talk to the students about their
role as future architects in the growth
and progress of the nation.
At the business meeting Chapter
members adopted a charter; and the
Executive Committee was directed to
file papers for incorporation. As a
basis for this a number of by-law
changes were adopted. The changes


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Inrtitute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and'public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





also authorized realignment of Chap-
ter committee organization in order
to conform with that recommended
by A.I.A. national headquarters.
In line with action in other chap-
ters, approval was given for a pro-
gram of craftsmanship awards; and
responsibility for initiating a definite
plan was placed on the Relations with
the Construction Industry Commit-
tee, of which LEE HOOPER is chair-
man.
Those accepted for membership in
the Chapter included: WALTER MAY-
BERRY LEE, Jacksonville; ALBERT R.
BROADFOOT, JR., Tallahassee; and
JAMES CLYDE EARLIER, Gainesville.

STUDENT CHAPTER
It was a crowded four days for
members of the College of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts in Gainesville.
The Student's Field Day Program
started April 21 in the afternoon
when doors opened to a double-bar-
reled exhibition that included the
Student Art Show and the Architec-
tural Home Show both designed to
show the visiting public concrete re-
sults of native ability coupled with
technical training.
The two shows carried through un-
til Sunday, April 24. And in the
meantime there was the Field Day
picnic on Friday and a full day of
activities on Saturday, culminating in
the Beaux Arts Ball in the evening.
The entire program was characterized
by clever showmanship as well as evi-
dent ability. JACK MOORE, President
of the Florida North Chapter, un-
doubtedly spoke for most of those
attending the Field Day Program.
"The students have really done a
wonderful job." he said. "The whole
program has, I feel, done much to
make the public more conscious of
architecture. The only real disappoint-
ing thing about the program is the
apparent lack of support from prac-
ticing architects themselves. Student
projects like this justify such support;
and the profession should do some-
thing about it."
Scholastic honors were awarded at
Saturday's luncheon meeting. Miss
CLAIRE DEMPSEY, Hollywood coed,
won the A.I.A. Medal for outstanding
work. JACK WOHLBERG, Chapter presi-
dent, was winner of the F.A.A. Medal
"for meritorious contributions in
(Continued on Page 18)
MAY, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)
leadership and service". He also was
awarded the Alpha Rho Chi profes-
sional architectural fraternity medal
for leadership, service and professional
promise.
Winners of $250 scholarship awards
from the Steward-Mellon Companies
of Jacksonville, Orlando and Tampa
were: LAWRENCE B. EVANS, JR., ALAN
COLBY GREEN, JAMES B. SPENER, and
GEOFFERY E. SMITH.
ROBERT A. DENYSE was the recipi-
ent of a $250 scholarship presented
by the Florida North Chapter. STAN-
LEY H. GREENE received the George
Doro Fixture Company scholarship
for the study of design.

Executive Board Previews
Convention in Daytona
The April 23rd meeting of the
F.A.A. Executive Board seemed like a
preview of the 41st Annual Conven-
tion scheduled for next November. It
was held at the Princess Isena Hotel
in Daytona which will be the head-
quarters of the Convention; and re-
ports and discussions touched matters
that will unquestionably become im-
portant convention business.
Committee reports were informal
and for the most part were notes on
progress. In the important question
of By-law changes to streamline the
F.A.A.'s operating rules and to per-
mit the matter of Re-districting to be
put into final effect, Committee
Chairman JEFFERSON N. POWELL re-
ported that his group's work would be
completed well before the convention
deadline date. All by-law changes will
be ready for publication in the Sep-
tember issue of The Florida Architect
so that due legal notice is assured as
a basis for action in November.
President CLINTON GAMBLE re-
ported that the National A.I.A.
Board does not feel Florida is as yet
ready for regional status. But the
F.A.A. Board's reaction was against
letting the subject die; and the mat-
ter will undoubtedly be broached to
,-A.I.A. headquarters again.
,I Preliminary Convention plans, re-
ported elsewhere in this issue, were
presented by General Convention
Chairman FRANCIS R. WALTON. As
rt of them The Florida Architect is
to become the Official Convention
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





News & Notes
(Continued from Page 18)
Program. The November issue of the
magazine will be devoted to a fully
detailed schedule, a roster of all Con-
vention officials and a listing of all
events as they will be finally decided
by the Convention Committee.
In line with this plan, President
Gamble asked that all committee
chairmen prepare their reports for
pre-publication in the November issue
of the magazine. To make that pos-
sible material will need to reach the
publication's office by October first.

Architect and Engineers
Celebrate Good Relations
Saturday, the 23rd of April, marked
a significant new high in inter-pro-
fessional relationships in Florida. At
Daytona Beach, the Florida Engineer-
ing Society was winding up the four-
day sessions of its 39th Annual Con-
vention. In the morning the Archi-
tect-Engineer Relations Committee of
both the F.E.S. and the F.A.A. held
its first meeting of 1955. And at
12:30 the directors of both profes-
sional bodies gathered at the tradi-
tional horseshoe table for a joint
luncheon.
It was the first such occasion in the
history of professional activity in
Florida and was marked by a com-
plete absence of anything except the
most jovial good fellowship. Every-
body introduced himself around the
long tables; and speaking for their
respective groups, F.E.S. President
HARVEY F. PIERCE and F.A.A. Presi-
dent CLINTON GAMBLE, who sat side-
by-side at the center of the head table,
tossed expressions of thanks and
esteem at one another and hoped -
as undoubtedly did everyone present
- that the future would see the oc-
casion become a yearly tradition.
Judging by the tone of the Archi-
tect-Engineer committee m e e t i n g
which preceded the joint luncheon,
that hope could well become both
father and grandfather to the deed.
That meeting was conducted by
THEODORE B. JENSON, F.E.S., in an
atmosphere of complete goodwill; and
in every discussion there was evident
a sincere wish on the part of com-
mittee members to cooperate fully
(Continued on Page 20)
MAY, 1955


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News & Notes-
(Continued from Page 19)
with their opposite numbers.
Chief among pieces of business was
a discussion of inter-professional fee
schedules. Engineers have docu-
mented their fees in a pamphlet that
was presented to architects for study
and future comment. Architects were
requested to study their own fee prob-
lem so that by the committee's next
meeting in November, fee schedules
could be stated for projects on which
engineers might employ architects'
services.
The Committee heard BENMONT
TENCH, JR., who is acting as joint legal
representative for both professional
groups during current legislative ses-
sions, deliver an interim report of the
architect-engineer legislative program.
Co-Chairman JOHN STETSON, F.A.
A., reported progress of cooperative
efforts between the two groups. The
engineers have not yet officially rati-
fied the Architect-Engineer joint pol-
icy declaration as amended by the
architects at the 40th Annual Conven-
tion and as published in finally ap-
proved form in the March, 1955, issue
of The Florida Architect. Chairman
Jenson expressed his opinion that
engineer approval would be voiced
probably as a result of the current
F.E.S. convention.
Members of the joint committee
attending, in addition to the two
chairmen, were for the engineers,
MOREAU BOSTWICK, A. E. O'NEALL,
JOSEPH SHIVLER, HERBERT MENDEN-
HALL, and Miss ANN CLOVER, Execu-
tive Secretary of the Florida State
Board of Engineer Examiners. Present
for the architects were WALTER B.
SCHULTZ, IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, and
DAVID A. LEETE.

Fashionably Speaking!
A lady telephoned an architect to
discuss her ideas for her new house.
"I want one of those long, graceful
houses." she said. "One with interest-
ing and sweeping and flowing lines.
Somewhat like those beautiful models
in a style show. Do you understand.
the style I have in mind the 'mode'
I mean?"
"Yes," replied the architect. "I
think I do. At least, you've given me
a vogue idea!"
-HENRY P. WHITWORTH, A.I.A.
Winter Park.


Producer's Council Program


Unique among exhibits of building
products and materials is the type that
the Miami Chapter of the Producers'
Council now one of the largest
groups of its kind in the country -
calls the "Table-Top". The Table-
Top has become a kind of tradition in
the Miami Chapter's contact with
architects, engineers and general con-
tractors in the area. With some 50
manufacturing firms represented, it
actually has become a sort of capsule
cross-section of what's new in the
building products field.
That's one reason for the invariably
good attendance at Table-Top meet-
ings. Another, of course, is that Pro-
ducers' Council members act as gen-
erous hosts to those who view the
exhibit; and the round of examination
and discussion with representatives
attending each exhibit is always pre-
ceded by a cocktail hour and an
excellent dinner.
That kind of program went off with
flying colors on the evening of April
19th. The Coral Gables Country
Club was again the scene of the gath-
ering; and Chapter officials estimated
that some 200 members of the Miami
area building industry were on hand.
Next meeting will be an informa-
tional presentation by the Armstrong


Cork Company. It is scheduled for
May 24 at the Coral Gables Country
Club and will mark the end of this
year's meetings under the present
roster of officers.

Plans have finally crystallized for
the 1955-56 Caravan of Quality Build-
ing Products which will reach Florida
'in mid-January, 1956. WILLIAM
GILLETT, Producers' Council presi-
dent, has signed a contract with a
Chicago firm, General Exhibits and
Displays, Inc., to build and manage
the $180,000 travelling show.
This year's version of the Caravan
will be completely different from last
year's show which was the first of what
Producers' Council officials hope will
become a regular annual event. This
year the travelling exhibits will visit
36 of the country's major marketing
areas where the sponsoring organiza-
tion operates local chapters.
These local groups will be hosts to
invited audiences of architects, engi-
neers, contractors. The Caravan will
this year include some 50 exhibits
covering all types of building ma-
terials and equipment. It will reach
Jacksonville January 17 for a two-day
stop and will arrive in Miami January
24.


WILLIAM GILLETT, national president of Producers' Council, recently
signed a contract with a Chicago display firm for the construction of the
organization's second Caravan of Quality Building Products. On the left
is the Council's Managing Director, John L. Haynes. To the right, Exhibit
Chairman Elmer A. Lundberg.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




















































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