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 Front Cover
 Advertising
 How good are your communicatio...
 New method for pre-stressing
 Guard that seal
 How would you answer these...
 Conventions slated for May,...
 Committee memberships
 Know your legislators
 Chapter news and notes
 Producer's council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00010
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    How good are your communications?
        Page 3
    New method for pre-stressing
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Guard that seal
        Page 6
    How would you answer these questions?
        Page 7
    Conventions slated for May, June
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Committee memberships
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Know your legislators
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Chapter news and notes
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Producer's council program
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text



Florid AlJhij
m^ Q


April 1955


Official Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS










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C. .' Alian
IS/IF iNL 1ILDI.I. Miami
Sla.;p, -,~ -i p.'i u nti..',.


iCon. Mliami 6 "j


SEARS ROEBUCK & CO.,
Coral Gables. A total of 12,600
square feet of wall slabs were used
with the largest of the panels
8'7/" x 16'3jy"... making then
some of the largest ever cast in the
United States. Architect: Weed,
Russell, Johnson Associates, Miami.
Contractor: Edward 11. Flemming
Construction Co., Miami. Engineer:
Norman Dignum, Miami.


All Maule concrete and concrete products are tested
constantly by the following independent testing
laboratories: H. C. Nutting Co., Pittsburgh Testing
Laboratory and Wingerter Laboratories, Inc.


- "' -- ---







0otgrah Tell. I Th0I S0-toI- o


UI
*TRO W AL ALB

AN A THOUAN WORDS


Light weight, story-high precast concrete
vall slabs developed and manufactured by Maule,
vere an unknown quantity three years ago. These
photographs show how they are being used today.
lot to mention the handsome appearance they
live a building ... the time that can be saved in
*s construction can be estimated when you
consider that 200 square feet of finished wall
irea can be installed in less that one hour!

Miami
2-7261 or 9-8653
)75 North Miami Avenue


The slabs are precast to specifications and
delivered to the job in the sequence required.
They can go on as the building goes up . .
without interrupting the erection of framework
above . or, they can be installed when the
framework is completed.
Call Maule at any of the telephone numbers listed
below for detailed information before planning
your next important building!

Ft. Lauderdale
LOgan 4-1211
1335 Northeast 26th Street


SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 1913
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 1913








Standard Prestressed
Concrete members
were used in the con-
struction of scores of
modern structures
like these:
Bank of Lakeland
Building
Dillard Elementary
School at Fort
Lauderdale
West Florida Tile &-
Terrazzo Corp.
Warehouse
Concrete Stadium at
Plant City
Singer Building,
Pompano Beach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Building at Orlando


40' span prestressed concrete Double tee garage roof deck
at Holloway Concrete Products Co., Winter Park, Florida.







rote acae e"
te es coCanre

t "L%" Prestressed concrete units offer new structural design possibill-
ties for any building in which low cost and high performance


are or special importance. Standard unit designs are made in
long casting beds by the pre-tensioning bonded system. Each
has been thoroughly field-tested; and a wide variety of units
is now being made under controlled conditions by members of
the Prestressed Concrete Institute. These prestressed concrete
units are now available. They can be specified in sizes and
shapes to meet a range of span, load and design conditions.
Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
sistance, high uniformity, low cost. Standard designs include
flat slabs, double-tee slabs, beams, columns and pilings.


E PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE
FLORIDA MEMBERS:
R. H. WRIGHT & SON, INC.------------Ft. Lauderdale WEST COAST SHELL CORP. ___._----- Sarasota
LAKELAND ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC. Lakeland DURACRETE, INC. _-- -------------_Leesburg
GORDON BROTHERS CONCRETE CO._-------_ Lakeland HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO Winter Park
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC._-__Tampa PERMACRETE, INC.-------------__Daytona Beach
CAPITAL CONCRETE COMPANY, INC._----__Jacksonville

A National Organization to establish and supervise Prestressed Concrete standards and procedures
. whose members are pledged to uphold the production control and specifications set up by the
Prestressed Concrete Institute.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


APRIL, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 4


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble ___.-__ President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman ____Secy.-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger-- Broward
Franklin Bunch- Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard -No. Central

Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell- Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick- Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph No. Central


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford . Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.
MO-7-0421.

MCMURRAY 26 MIAMI
APRIL, 1955


How Good Are


Your Communications ?

"The secret of good communications lies not in what is said, but
in what is understood."
That's a quotation from KETCHUM, INC., A.I.A. Public Relations
Counsel. The italics are ours, because those three words, we think,
sum up the whole problem of professional public relations through-
out the length and breadth of our State.
The language of any profession is a foreign one so far as the public
is concerned. The doctors have their own particular jargon, the very
sound of which seems frightening to the layman. Lawyers cloak their
thoughts in a phraseology that is anything but lucid and direct to
the average man. If anything, the language of architecture and build-
ing is even less intelligible to those unfamiliar with construction.
For, in addition to all the technical terms that building professionals
use, means for their communication are largely graphic drawings
of many types, crowded with symbols and signs and figures which
to Mr. and Mrs. Public usually mean nothing.
Within professional ranks communication and, more import-
ant, a common understanding of it presents no problem. But to
outsiders, the public with which the professional deals, the language
must be interpreted. The terms and symbols must be explained.
If that is true relative to the common, everyday work of the archi-
tectural profession, it's even truer relative to the aims of the archi-
tectural profession. You know the economic significance of the work
you do. Your place and it's an important one in the social fabric
of your community is clear to you. You know the value of your train-
ing, your experience and your services to the overall progress of your
town and to the safety and well-being of its citizens. Yes, you know
these things. Your brother architects know them. And, to a large
degree because you speak a common technical language with them,
most of the people in the construction industry with whom you work
will recognize the importance of your professional status and the
value of the services you render.
But how about others? How do you get across such things to
them?
You do it by creating understanding, by talking their language
to them instead of yours. You tell them what good design can mean
to them, not what the profession does or does not like. You show
what good construction means in terms of low maintenance costs,
better, long-term dollar values. You demonstrate the worth of good
schools and public buildings in terms of better training for youth
and a more efficient, less wasteful civic administration. You talk
hospitals in terms of community health needs, not costs per bed or
square foot areas. And you make them want improvement of build-
ing codes by showing the danger and the needless waste of money
and material in what now exists.
The public is really no different from any one of us- actually
it is us. You and I the public are instinctively against what we
don't understand. But once we understand an idea, or a product, or
a service, we're rather easily led to the point of wanting the benefits
that are offered. And we don't care how those benefits are generated
so long as they fit our needs and wants.
Seems to us that's what KETCHUM, INC. meant about the secret
of good communications.







New Method for


A recent successful test at the Uni-
versity of Miami concluded a year's
research on the development of what
is believed to be the first application
of curved wires in a pre-tensioned
pre-stressed concrete member.
"Curved wire" prestressing has been
common with post-tensioned systems,
where the steel wires are tensioned
after the beam is cast and the pre-
stressing force is applied by anchor-
age devices and bearing plates; how-
ever the use of curved wires in the
much more economical pre-tehsioning
systems, where the prestressing force
is applied merely by bond, is believed
unique.
Figure I shows a section and ele-
vation of the test joist constructed
on the prestressing bed at the Uni-


versity of Miami. The prestressing
wires were initially tensioned straight
at their proper location at the ends
of the beam. A fixture (see Figure
II) was placed at midspan, in which
slots engaged the wires. Through this
fixture was passed a tapered rod with
a shoulder at the fixture and threads
at the bottom. The threaded rod
was screwed into a nut plate which
bore on a pair of channels cast into
the stressing bed and anchored by
dead men into the earth. The ten-
sioned wires were thus pulled down
to the proper location at midspan to
compensate for the beam weight.
The total stress in the wires was de-
termined from their original exten-
sion plus the extension caused by the
wires being curved. More curving


)re-stressing



curving the wires in a pre-
nsioned, pre-stressed concrete
am, load capacities will soar.


By MERRIL E. CRISSEY and
MURRAY T. MANTELL
Civil Engineering Department
University of Miami


points could have been used if a
better approximation of the most
efficient shape of the curve was de-
sired.
After the pretensioned wires were
curved, forms were set and the con-
crete placed. When concrete strength
reached two-thirds of the design
strength of 5000 pounds per square
inch, the tapered bolt was removed
from the beani and the prestressing
wires released, leaving the curved, pre-
tensioned wires in place.
The beam was tested by loading
with 8"x8"x16" concrete block. De-
flection at midspan and slip of the
prestressing wires at the ends were


These drawings illustrate the method of reinforcing by pre-ten-
sioned, curved wires. Figure I, below, shows a section and
elevation of the test beam. Figure II, right, shows the fixture
at midspan through which the desired wire curve was produced.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





measured after each course of blocks
was placed. No noticeable slip of
wires was recorded by the 1/1000"
dial indicator even after the expected
ultimate load was exceeded.
Following tables show design and
comparative data for the test beam,
a conventional member, and a pre-
tensioned member with straight wires.
From the above tables it may be
noted that the conventional joist re-
quires five times more area of steel
and about 48% more concrete than
the test joint.
Advantages of pre-tensioned, pre-
stressed members with curved wires
over:
(A) Post-tensioned members with
curved wires: (1) Anchorage
devices eliminated (2) Bearing
plates eliminated (3) Form-
ing ducts eliminated (4) Pres-
sure-grouting eliminated (5)
Frictional resistance of wires
eliminated (6) More readily
adapted to quantity production
(7) Practical on multiple span
continuous structures.
(B) Pre-tensioned members with
straight wires: (1) Increased
load capacity because of com-
pensation for beam weight (2)
Reduced shear stresses (3) Can
be adapted to contin-ous
structures (4) Can be adapted
to combination cantilever
structures and other unusual
loading conditions.
It is believed that the development
of pre-tensioned curve wire prestress-
ing will be a major step opening the
path to economical and versatile use
of prestressing in an ever increasing
variety of structures. The equipment
and procedures used in the University
of Miami experiment were sufficient-
ly simple and inexpensive to indicate
that future development may find it
feasible for the average contractor
to use both precast and poured-in-
place prestressing in economic com-
petition with conventional reinforced
concrete, even on the smallest build-
ings.
The research staff, in addition to
the authors, included Mr. Edward
Heyer, Civil Engineering faculty and
Mr. Richard Reynolds, Senior Civil
Engineering student. The work was
made possible by a research grant
from the I. E. Schilling Company,
Inc. of Miami.


TABLE I
Comparison of Prestressed Test Joist with Conventional
Precast Joist of Similar Load Carrying Capacity:
Test Joist- Conventional
Curved Wires Concrete Joist
Depth of member _____________ 13" 16"
Concrete Area _________ 54 sq. in. 80 sq. in.
Steel Area _________________ 0.36 sq. in. 1.80 sq. in.
Weight per foot __ 56# 85#
Span _________________ 24' 24'
Working concrete stress ____ 2,000 psi 1,688 psi
Working steel stress _______ 120,000 psi 20,000 psi
Calc. Design Load _____ 320#/ft. 316#/ft.
Calc. Cracking Load ____ ___ 490#/ft.
Calc. Ultimate Load _____ 840#/ft.
Calc. Des. Load Deflect. __ 0.47" 0.58"


TABLE 2
Comparison of calculated performance of test joist with joist of similar
size and reinforcement having straight pre-tensioned wires:
Curved Wire Straight Wire
Joist Joist
Calculated Design Load __------- 320#/ft. 260#/ft.
Calculated Cracking Load ____ 490#/ft. 430#/ft.
Calculated Ultimate Load ______ 840#/ft. 725#/ft.







Both beam deflec-
tion under load and
wire slippage were
accurately measured
noticeable slippage
was recorded and de-
flection was less than
for a conventional
member of greater
size. Right, the slip-
age indicator; and
below, the deflection
recorder at midspan.


APRIL, 1955







NEW TILE DESIGNS BY 6%&.


S ***a "' a

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GUARD THAT SEAL!

Careless sealing of drawings
or slipshod accounting of
blueprints issued can cause
embarrassment.

The seal of a professional architect
is much more than a bit of decora-
tion on a finished drawing. It's ac-
tually a legal signature. And it can
also become a protection against im-
proper use of blueprinted drawings
by those who would like to use the
architect's brains, but don't care to
pay for doing so.
A case recently brought before the
State Board of Architecture illus-
trates the point. An architect was
commissioned by a builder to design
a house, for which he was duly paid
the fee asked. The commission did
not include supervision of the job by
the architect, however, and because
of that the builder asked for, and re-
ceived from the architect, several sets
of blueprints, all bearing the prints
of the architects seal that had been
impressed into the original drawings.
After the job had been completed,
the builder approached the building
department with duplicate blueprints
bearing the name of another client.
The inspector had no choice but to
issue the permit, since the blueprints
appeared to be in order with the
architects' seal showing. Thus, two
good sized jobs were built from one
set of drawings-with the architect
being on the short end of the deal.
In this case it appears that the
architect himself was at fault. First,
he issued blueprints of his design
without requiring a cash deposit to
guarantee their return. and without
keeping track of how many were is-
sued or who received them. Second,
and most important, he sealed the
original plans, so that upon printing
his official signature was reproduced,
thus stamping him as their legal
author.
To prevent such difficulties, the
State Board advises architects to seal
blueprints issued as instruments of
service rather than the original draw-
ings. Where originals must be sealed,
all blueprints should be accounted for
when issued and steps taken to assure
return of all sets except those for fil-
ing and specific job use.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







How Would YOU Answer These Questions?



No one questions the desirability of
developing a closer, contact between
architect, interior designer and land-
scape architect. The Convention Semi-
nar, last fall, brought out some
interesting sidelights on that subject.
Here is one side, from a past-presi-
dent of the Florida Chapter, A. I. D.




By JACK CAMERON, A. I. D.


Tomorrow is our future, yesterday
our past. All creative arts are stronger
today by applying this philosophy.
A fusion of professional talents is
necessary. Criticism is not the most
desirable method of causing a fusion
of problems, even though it is a very
potent and often not too flattering
form.
At the F.A.A. State Convention
last fall, a plan was made to bring
together a group of the creative pro-
fessionals, namely, the architect, the
interior designer and the landscape
designer. By an open discussion, it
was anticipated that much good could
be brought out by the three members
of the panel simply by asking each
professional: "Why?".
All will agree that the interior dec-
orator was in the middle and certainly
had to put his spurs on to withstand
the counter attacks. The interior de-
signer has long been criticised by
architects for planning the interiors of
a project different from the original
conception of the architect. Naturally,
this could be eliminated by fusing the
ideas of both, each making use of his
technical knowledge, thereby prevent-
ing many errors in the completed
project.
To the architect, the following
questions are asked in a most respect-
ful manner, with no malice, but very
definitely, "Why?":
A-Why it is that the architect's
client, particularly the woman, goes
to the interior designer for a com-
plete explanation of the blue print?
B-Why does the architect plan
rooms in sizes that turn out to be
very costly for carpeting due to odd
room sizes-so special carpets must
APRIL, 1955


be made? Carpet widths are stand-
ard.
C-Why is it that wall spaces are
not sufficient to carry certain
favorite pieces of furniture the
client intends to use?
D-Why is it that the architect
does not consider that all windows
are likely to have some sort of
treatment from the interior angle
-and take this fact into considera-
tion?
E-Why must the four walls of a
room have varying door heights,
such as an outside door 6 inches
higher than a closet door? Cannot
all doors be uniform in height?
F-Does the architect ever consid-
er the interior of the room to the
extent that one window on a brick
wall, one window on a plaster
wall tends to create confusion?
G-Has the architect ever thought
how difficult it is, when doors are
placed at each side of a fire place,
to form any kind of workable fur-
niture arrangement directly in
front of the fireplace?
H-Large areas of glass are won-
derful, until the problem of con-
trol of glare is considered. Does
the architect acknowledge this
fact; if so, why doesn't he allow
some space for fabric to be pulled
away from the window when glare
control is not needed?
I-As a rule the architect makes
an inspection of the plot of land
to be developed. So, why does he
ignore this development by plac-
ing the house on the plot with not
too much thought as to views from
important rooms, how gardens
might be developed, where drying


yards might be placed in order
to not be on view, etc.?
J-Does not the creative architect
like to develop the plot as a unit
of pleasing design, rather than a
house on a plot of ground?
K-Why is it the architect has not
played a more important part in
the development of design per-
taining to items required on every
project-such as new ideas in door
hardware, more interesting light-
ing fixtures, a better understand-
ing between the bath fixture
manufacturers and the tile manu-
facturers?
L-Why doesn't the architect
consult with the interior designer,
as he does with his engineer, on
such problems as the above, as
well as with the landscape archi-
tect?
Mentioning the landscape archi-
tect, several questions can be asked
of him.
M-Why does the landscape de-
signer never consider his exterior
planting from an interior view-
point?
N-Why does he mass plants
around the house with no interest
other than color or scale of plants?
O-Where is the charm of plant-
ing in a more natural setting?
P-Perspective plays a part in the
three professions; why is it not
used to better advantage?
The foregoing is criticism only to
the extent that by fusion of our three
professions, we can do a better cre-
ative project, each to his own, with
consideration for the other. Certain-
ly this will create more complete and
livable projects.






This Letter Might Work Well for You, Too ...

A Simplified Practice Suggestion from JOHN STETSON, Palm Beach


No doubt you have experienced the sight of a
client "making like a scalded dog" when handed a
contract for architectural services. With due apologies
to The Institute, it has been my firm belief for quite
a few years that in most cases the members of our
profession could anesthetize this painful procedure
by the utilization of a simply worded letter, addressed
to Mr. Client, and worded somewhat like this:
Dear Mr. Client:
The following is my fee schedule and the serv-
ices the portions thereof represent, for professional
efforts to be incorporated in the design of, and
supervision of construction of, your residence (or
building) at 222 Wonderful Street, Utopia, Florida.
Sketch Fee_______ 1 V2% of construction cost
This includes all preliminary studies, sketches,
consultations, perspective renderings, etc., required
to bring the project up to the actual working draw-
ing stage.
Working Drawing Fee__3 /2% of construction cost
This includes working drawings, details and
specifications required to obtain the best possible
bid from qualified contractors, to be selected, the
taking of bids, and the preparation of the contract
between yourself and the successful bidder.
Supervision Fee ______- 3% of construction cost
This includes complete inspection by myself, or
a qualified member of my firm, of the actual con-
struction work as it progresses, checking of con-
tractor's requisitions and their approval for your
payment, obtaining a release of lien from con-
tractors and suppliers, and final inspection and
approval of the work. Also, during the progress
of the construction, this includes the necessary
assistance in your selection of materials, colors,
etc.
Payments toward the fee shall be: $250 upon
acceptance of this letter, the full amount of the


Sketch Fee less this amount upon the authorization
to start working drawings; two-thirds of the Work-
ing Drawing Fee upon completion of the plans and
specifications and their submittal for bid, the bal-
ance of this part of the fee shall be due upon
the signing of the contract with the successful
bidder (until a definite cost is determined, a cost
of $10.00 a square foot shall be used for the con-
struction cost). One-half of the Supervision Fee is
due two months after the actual start of the con-
struction, with the balance of the fee due within
ten days after completion of the project and its
acceptance by you.
In case of misunderstandings, arising during
our work on your project, the "Handbook for Arch-
itectural Practice" of The American Institute of
Architects shall be used for clarification.
Respectifully submitted,

Drawer Line, Architect
ACCEPTED:

John Q. Client

The sums used in this sample letter and the fee
and its breakdown are subject to individual cases.
These were used only to illustrate the point. Our
office has found a ready acceptance by the client of
this form of contract, and has only used the A.I.A.
Standard Form once since the war. The addition of
the last paragraph was made after the innocent query
by one client regarding a means of settling any argu-
ments that might develop. This hasn't proved neces-
sary, but as one client put it, "Say, you know I never
had any idea your profession was so thorough until
I looked over that Handbook last night. Still, I like
your proposal letter better, because it explains what
is expected of both of us in a simple manner."


CONVENTIONS SLATED FOR MAY, JUNE


In just about a month-May 5, 6
and 7, to be exact-the 1955 con-
vention season opens for the archi-
tectural profession in the shape of
the Fourth Regional Conference of
the South Atlantic District, A.I.A.
The place is Charleston, South Caro-
lina; and the three-day round of fes-
tivities is under the sponsorship of
the South Carolina Chapter, A.I.A.
Headquarters of the Conference
will be the beautiful Fort Sumter
Hotel located on Charleston's famed
Battery, overlooking the bay with
8


historic old Fort Sumter in the dis-
tanct. The Conference Committee
is headed by G. THOMAS HARMON,
Chairman; W. A. CARLISLE, Secre-
tary, and P. B. HARRISON, Jr., Treas-
urer. C. T. CUMMINGS heads the
sub committee on registration and
MILTON ABRAMS is in charge of
architectural exhibits. Regional Di-
rector HERBERT C. MILLKEY heads
the list of Committee chairmen on
the letterhead of the Conference.
Correspondence relative to registra-
tion, hotel reservations or exhibit en-


tries should be addressed to the A.I.A.
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE, 600 BELT
LINE, COLUMBIA, S. C.
Theme of the Conference is "The
Architect and His Community" and
an unusually interesting program of
meetings and seminars with speakers
and participants of prominence is
now being perfected to carry out the
theme. Among them, scheduled for
Saturday morning, May 7, is one of
WALTER M. MEGRONIGLE'S "Public
Relations Workshops" on public
speaking.
Taking a cue, perhaps, from the
1954 F.A.A. Convention, two huge
tents will be used to house both
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





architectural exhibits and that of
manufactured products. These will
be on the Fort Sumter's paved park-
ing lot and will also be the scene
for several cocktail parties.
On the entertainment side, there
will be several tours of outstanding
houses and gardens in Charleston and
a boat ride, cocktail party and buffet
on Friday afternoon that will include
a special tour of old Fort Sumter.
Registration starts at 6:00 p.m.
Thursday evening, with Conference
business starting in the evening with
an Executive Committee meeting and
a meeting of the Architectural Regis-
tration Boards of South Atlantic Dis-
trict states. The Conference will run
through Friday and all day Saturday,
winding up with the Conference
Banquet scheduled for 7 p.m.


Minneapolis is Headquarters for
87th Annual A.I.A. Convention

From June 20 to 24, Minneapolis,
and more particularly the Hotel Radi-
son, will be the setting for the A.I.A.'s
87th Annual Meeting. Convention
theme will be "Designing for the
Community"; and the Octagon staff
with officials of the Minneapolis, St.
Paul and Duluth Chapters who are
convention hosts, have arranged a
program full of professional interest
and entertainment in line with it.
Seminars on "Rebuilding the City"
and "Architecture of Community Ex-
pansion" will be highlights of the
technical side of the meeting and
will feature panel discussions and
speeches by leading architect-planners
and such experts as ALBERT M. COLE,
Administrator of Housing and Home
Financing Agency, and JAMES W.
FOLLIN, Commissioner of Urban Re-
newal Administration. Other con-
vention seminars are scheduled on
Chapter and Regional Affairs and
on Office Practice. The latter will
include discussions on cost estimating
and modular measure.
Entertainment will by no means
be missing from Convention programs.
The host chapter and the Cold Spring
Granite Company have arranged for a
special-train trip to the lake and stone
country highlighted by a tour through
quarries and plant of the Cold Spring
Granite Company. A heavy registra-
tion is expected and early reservations
are advised.
APRIL, 1955


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas
JOSEPH A. COLE





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MEMBERSHIPS




H-ere are the important working groups within the F.A.A. which have

been given responsibility for continuing the sound and decisive progress

made by your professional association in the past few years.


Membership of important F.A.A.
standing committees as well as person-
nel of a number of other operating
committees have finally been named
by committee chairmen who were ap-
pointed by F.A.A. President CLINTON
GAMBLE during the January meeting
of the F.A.A. Executive Board. Work
on each committee's program has
already been mapped and in many
instances is actively under way.
The Committee system of conduct-
ing the essential business of any pro-
fessioal association has proved to be
the most effective thus far devised.
But President Gamble and each Com-
mittee Chairman point to the need
for interest and active cooperation of
every F.A.A. member in every phase
of Association activity. Committees,
after all, are groups of men, not a
unit of machinery. Each has a certain
responsibility, an objective-and to
meet these, a more or less definite
program. But the ,more helpful co-
operation each committee receives
from the overall F.A.A. membership,
the better able it will be to accomplish
the task assigned to it. For this reason
each Chairman will welcome your
ideas relative to the work of his group
and your suggestions as to the most
effective way to get that work done
for the benefit of all concerned.

Legislative . As formerly noted in
these pages, legislative matters of par-


ticular importance concern the Com-
mittee this year. The F.A.A. is work-
ing closely with legislative groups of
the Florida State Council, Associated
General Contractors, and the Florida
Engineering Society toward action on
a number of matters touching all these
building professionals. In addition,
numerous changes in the Florida sta-
tutes are being sought at this legis-
lative session so that Florida's require-
ments for architectural registration
and practice will conform to those
recently established by the National
Council of Architectural Registration
Boards.
Membership includes: Chairman,
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, 33 South Hogan
St., Jacksonville; EDWARD G. GRAF-
TON, Miami; ELIOT FLETCHER,
Tampa; SANFORD GOIN, Gainesville;
RALPH F. SPICER, Daytona Beach;
JOHN BRUCE SMITH, St. Petersburg;
R. DANIEL HART, Pensacola; A.
)WYNN HOWELL, Lakeland; ERNEST
J. STIDOLPH, Tallahassee; RAYMOND
H. PLOCKELMAN, Palm Beach; JAMES
POWNALL, Ft. Lauderdale; JAMES
GAMBLE ROGERS, II, Winter Park;
WILLIAM STEWART, Vero Beach, and
WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN, Sarasota.
Uniform Building Codes . Clear
objective of this Committee is the
ultimate improvement of building
code situations throughout the State.
There is much to be done to accom-
plish even a semblance of a State


uniform building code; and it is pos-
sible that the final result miay be two
codes for Florida, one serving the
southern part of the State, the other
the Northern part, thus reflecting the
differences in technical problems and
requirements that exist.
Immediate work of the Committee
is assembly of all possible information
from all quarters on, first, the need
for code revisions; second, specific
means for improvement in every tech-
nical phase; third, action now under
way to accomplish such improve-
ments, and, fourth, situations that
now exist tending to prevent such
actions or to hinder local or regional
efforts toward code improvement and
ultimate unification.
The Committee earnestly invites
correspondence on any phase of the
foregoing. Chairman is JOSEPH M.
SHIFALO, Room 3, Postal Building,
Winter Park. Membership includes,
ROBERT HENRY LEVINSON (V.-Chair-
man), Clearwater; ROBERT E. HAN-
SEN, Ft. Lauderdale; CRAIG J. GEH-
LERT, Daytona Beach; MYRL J.
HANES, Gainesville; CHESTER L.
CRAFT, Bartow; EDWARD T. REMPE,
Jr., Coral Gables, and JEFFERSON N.
POWELL, West Palm Beach.

Public Information . Chairman of
this committee is ANDREW J. FEREN-
DINO, 927 41st Street, Miami Beach
40. Members will include the chair-


) THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT











men of the Public Relations Com-
mittee of each of the seven F.A.A.
chapters in the State. Unfortunately
they cannot be named in complete
detail here and now since full rosters
of chapter officers and committees
has not so far been forthcoming.
Study of a state-wide public rela-
tions program that will prove of both
practical and effective use for all
chapter areas is now under way. It is
hoped that it can shortly be put in
the form of a sort of "Public Rela-
tions Handbook" geared particularly
to our local interests and problems.
As soon as practicable, this will be
published in complete form in The
Florida Architect.

Relations With Construction Industry
Chairman is IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, 250
N. E. 18th Street, Miami 36; and the
two members are GEORGE J. VOTAW,
West Palm Beach, and Miss MARION
I. MANLEY, Coconut Grove. This
Committee will act in an advisory
and liaison capacity to further the
specific programs of two other im-
portant groups, the F.A.A.-A.G.C.
and the F.A.A. F.E.S. units, both
of which have developed particularly
constructive policies of intra-industry
cooperation during the past year.

Membership . Goal of this com-
mittee for the current year is the
possible establishment of two addi-
tional F.A.A. chapters, one in the
Pensacola area, the other in the
Naples area. Both of these were sug-
gested as being needed in the near
future as a result of the re-districting
plan adopted by the F.A.A. at the
November, 1954, Convention. The
Committee is also anxious to aid in
increasing overall F.A.A. membership
by working through appropriate .com-
mittees of already established chapters
in every section of the State.
Chairman is EDWARD G. GRAFTON,
927 41st Street, Miami Beach 40.
Members include' H. GEORGE FINK,
Coral Gables; WILLIAM F. BIGONEY,
Jr., Ft. Lauderdale; HILLIARD T.
SMITH, Jr., Lake Worth; J. A: MEE-
HAN, Jr., Jacksonville; ERNEST T. H.


BOWEN, II, Tampa; CRAIG J. GEH-
LERT, Daytona Beach, and DAVID W.
POTTER, Tallahassee.

By-Laws . This year's assignment
for this Committee is the overall
revision of the present by-laws in time
for ratification of all recommended
changes at the 41st F.A.A. Con-
vention to be held in Daytona Beach
next November. Particular items to
be included are changes incident to
redistricting; revisions to the auth-
orized roster of F.A.A. officers; pos-
sible realignment of standing commit-
tees and new operating committees;
and the need for establishing a con-
tinuity of certain committee member-
ships.
Chapter officers, past or present,
who have suggestions on any of these
important subjects are especially urged
to give the Committee the benefit
of their experience in by-law changes
that have proved successful at the
Chapter level.
Chairman is JEFFERSON N. POWELL,
Paramount Building, Palm Beach.
Membership includes: HAROLD A.
OBST (V.-Chairman), Palm Beach;
ROBERT V. MURPHY, Orlando; RAY-
MOND H. PLOCKELMAN, Palm Beach,
and A. COURTNEY STEWART, Ft. Laud-
erdale. BENMONT TENCH, Jr., Gaines-
ville, F.A.A. legal counsel, will act as
technical advisor to this group.

Education and Registration . Basic
purpose of this committee is to act
as liaison between F.A.A. member-
ship, the State Board of Architecture
and the educational institutions that
involve the construction industry
throughout the State. This year, how-
ever, its chief concern is "doing every-
thing possible to secure an appropri-
ation from the Legislature for the
construction of the first unit of a
permanent building to house the Col-
lege of Architecture and Allied Arts
at the University of Florida."
Chairman of the Committee. is
SANFORD W. GOING, 518 N.E. 4th
Avenue, Gainesville. He asks that
"every architect in Florida do what
he possibly can to inform the public


and particularly the members of the
Legislature concerning the need for
this important building to serve the
construction industry." Further, he
says that "the Committee will be
more than pleased to furnish all back-
ground information needed -and
quick!"
Membership includes: MARION
SIMS WYETH, Palm Beach; JAMES
GAMBLE ROGERS, II, Winter Park;
ALFRED B. PARKER, Miami, and R.
DANIEL HART, Pensacola.
Board of Trustees, F.A.A. Loan Fund
JOHN L. R. GRAND, University of
Florida, Gainesville, is chairman, with
THOMAS LARRICK and EDWARD M.
FEARNEY, both of Gainesville, as
members.
Architect-Engineer Relations . .
Chairman is JOHN STETSON, 217
Peruvian Avenue, Palm Beach. Mem-
bership includes: IGOR B. POLEVITZKY,
Miami; CLINTON GAMBLE, Ft. Laud-
erdale; WALTER B. SCHULTZ, Jackson-
ville; JACK MOORE, Gainesville; MOR-
TON T. IRONMONGER, Ft. Lauderdale;
ELLIOTT B. HADLEY, St. Petersburg,
and DAVID A. LEETE, Daytona Beach.
Joint Cooperative Committee, F.A.A.-
A.G.C. . Membership of the original
committee which met with the A.G.C.
group at the flying-start organizational
meeting in Orlando last August was
continued for the current year. Chair-
man is F.A.A. President CLINTON
GAMBLE, 1407 East Las Olas Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale. Reappointed were
JOHN L. R. GRAND, Gainesville;
HARRY C. POWELL, Jacksonville; WIL-
LIAM R. GOMON, Daytona Beach;
JOSEPH M. SHIFALO, Winter Park;
GEORGE J. VOTAW, West Palm Beach;
ROBERT G. JAHELKA, Ft. Lauderdale;
Miss MARION I. MANLEY, Coconut
Grove, and FRANKLIN S. BUNCH, Jack-
sonville.
Publication Committee . Members
of this Committee were also reap-
pointed to serve during the current
year. Chairman, EDWIN T. REEDER,
1777 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, Miami, and CLINTON
GAMBLE, Ft. Lauderdale.


APRIL, 1955


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Know Your Legislators

Architects and State Legislators have many common interests,
for each is concerned with the public's safety and the sound development
of the area in which he lives. Here, presented in the interest of better
mutual acquaintance, is the most recent roster of Florida's legislative bodies'

COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES


Alachua
RALPH D. TURLINGTON,
223 W. University Ave.,
Gainesville
J. EMORY CROSS,
Box 411, Gainesville
Baker
JOHN J. CREWS, JR.,
Box 246, Macclenny
Bay
FRANK M. ALLEN,
342 S. Palo Alto, Panama City
J. C. BODIFORD,
Box 1022, Panama City
Bradford
DOYLE E. CONNOR,
Starke
Brevard
A. MAX BREWER,
Titusville
O. L. BURTON,
Box 607, Eau Gallie
Broward
ANDREW J. MUSSELMAN, JR.,
412 N. E. 18th Ave., Pompano
THOMAS E. (TED) DAVID,
2206 Funston Rd., Hollywood
Calhoun
MARION B. KNIGHT,
Blountstown
Charlotte
JOHN M. HATHAWAY,
Punta Gorda
Citrus
HARRY H. GLEATON,
Inverness
Clay
S. D. (SAM) SAUNDERS,
Box 31, Middleburg
Collier
DAVID C. JONES, JR.,
Box 796, Naples
Columbia
W. E. BISHOP,
Lake City
Dade
GEORGE S. OKELL,
902 Biscayne Bldg., Miami
JOHN B. ORR, JR.,
3538 Crystal Court,
Coconut Grove
W. C. (CLIFF) HERRELL,
173 Navarre Drive, Miami Springs


Dixie
HAL CHAIRS,
Old Town
Desoto
S. C. SMITH,
Arcadia
Duval
LACY MAHON, JR.,
1517 Greenridge Rd., Jacksonville
HARRY WESTBERRY,
152 Tallulah Ave., Jacksonville
WILLIAM H. MANESS,
608 Consolidated Bldg.,
Jacksonville
Escambia
J. B. HOPKINS,
Kennedy Bldg., Pensacola
WEBB C. JERNIGAN,
Box 584, Pensacola
Flagler
H. T. COOK,
Bunnell
Franklin
MRS. BRYANT PATTON,
Apalachicola
Gadsden
W. M. INMAN,
Quincy
C. FRED ARRINGTON,
Havana
Gilchrist
HOWELL LANCASTER,
Trenton
Glades
J. H. PEEPLES, JR.,
Venus
Gulf
CECIL G. COSTIN, JR.,
Port St. Joe
Hamilton
J. W. MCALPIN,
White Springs
Hardee
G. W. (DICK) WILLIAMS,
Rt. 1, Wauchula
Hendry
ELBERT L. STEWART,
Clewiston
Hernando
JACOB V. VARN,
Brooksville
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Highlands
HOWARD LIVINGSTON,
Box 246, Sebring
Hillsborough
JAMES S. MOODY,
212 Gordon St., Plant City
TOM JOHNSON,
416 Tampa St., Tampa
SAM S. GIBBONS,
918 1st National Bank Bldg.,
Tampa
Holmes
HARVEY J. BELSER,
Bonifay
Indian River
SHERMAN N. SMITH, JR.,
1601 20th St., Vero Beach
Jackson
HUGH DUKES,
Cottondale
JOHN S. SHIPP, JR.,
525 N. Russ St., Marianna
Jefferson
PRENTICE P. PRUITT,
Monticello
Lafayette
HOMER T. PUTNAL,
Mayo
Lake
J. A. (TAR) BOYD,
Box 901, Leesburg
CARL E. DUNCAN,
Tavares
Lee
W. H. CARMINE, JR.,
Box 228, Ft. Myers
WALTER O. SHEPPARD,
1927 Cordova Ave., Ft. Myers
Leon
MALLORY E. HORNE,
Box 725, Tallahassee
KENNETH BALLINGER,
Center Bldg., Tallahassee
Levy
FRANK MARSHBURN,
Box 69, Bronson
Liberty
J. S. (RED) ALEXANDER,
Bristol
Madison
E. B. SHORTYY) JONES,
Greenville
Manatee
W. M. (BILL) GRIMES,
Prof. Bldg., Bradenton
J. E. PRATT,
717 21st St., West, Bradenton
(Continued on Page 14)
APRIL, 1955


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Know Your Legislaors . .
(Continued from Page 13)
Marion
FARRIS BRYANT,
Box 563, Ocala
WILLIAM V. CHAPPELL, JR.,
4 S. Magnolia St., Ocala
Martin
MARVIN H. ROWELL,
Stuart
Monroe
BERNIE C. PAPY,
1021 Washington St., Key West
Nassau
JAMES P. PAGE, JR.,
Fernandina Beach
Okaloosa
CHARLES D. STEWART,
Box 643, Walton Beach
Okeechobee
NATHAN ZELMENOVITZ,
Box 98, Okeechobee
Orange
HENRY W. LAND,
Apopka
WILLIAM C. COLEMAN, JR.,
Orlando
Osceola
J. J. GRIFFIN, JR.,
435 Florida Ave., St. Cloud
Palm Beach
FRED O. DICKINSON, JR.,
321 Palmetto Rd.,
West Palm Beach
EMETT S. RORERTS,
Box 488, Belle Glade
Pasco
J. B. A. WILLIAMS,
Box 911, Dade City
Pinel!as
FRED C. PETERSON,
'201 4th Ave., S., St. Petersburg
CHARLES R. JOHNSON, JR.,
1450 Coral Way, S., St. Petersburg
B. E. SHAFFER,
Rt. 2, Box 568, Clearwater
Polk
ROY SURLES,
Box 1375, Lakeland
BOONE D. TILLETT, JR.,
Lake Wales
PERRY E. MURRAY,
SFrostproof
Putnam
JAMES N. (GATOR) BECK,
Palatka
St. Johns
F. C. USINA,
St. Augustine
NATHAN I. (SONNY) WEINSTEIN,
161/2 St. George St.,
St. Augustine


St. Lucie
LAWRENCE L. KING,
28 Florida Bank Bldg., Ft. Pierce
Santa Rosa
JOHN S. PITTMAN,
Jay
Sarasota
GEORGE E. YOUNGBERG, SR.,
Castile Road, Venice
HENRY S. BARTHOLOMEW,
Box 646, Sarasota
Seminole
MACK N. CLEVELAND, JR.,
Box 134, Sanford
VOLIE A. WILLIAMS, JR.,
Atl. Bank Bldg., Sanford
Sumter
EVAN A. (BILLY) MERRITTE, JR.,
Box 41, Sumterville
Suwannee
HOUSTON W. ROBERTS,
Live Oak
Taylor
O. W. JONES,
Perry
Union
G. FRED ANDREWS,
Lake Butler
Volusia
THOMAS T. COBB,
219 Magnolia Ave., Daytona Beach
JAMES R. SWEENY, JR.,
302 S. Spring Garden Ave., Deland
Wakulla
Z. WALLENSTEIN REVELLE,
Panacea
Walton
THOMAS D. (TOM) BEASLEY,
DeFuniak Springs
Washington
JEFF WEBB,
Chipley

Following are members of
Florida's upper house the State
Senate representing the 38
senatorial districts into which the
State is divided.

District
1 . WOODROW M. MELVIN,
Milton
2 . PHILIP D. BEALL, Fla.
Bank Bldg., Pensacola
3 . H. B. DOUGLAS, Bonifay
4 . JOHN RAWLS, Citizens
Bank Bldg., Marianna
5 . C. H. BOURKE FLOYD,
Apalachicola
6 . DEWEY M. JOHNSON,
Quincy
7 . HARRY E. KING, Beymer
Bldg., Winter Haven
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






8 . WILSON CARRAWAY, State
Bank and Trust Co.,
Tallahassee
9 .. JAMES E. (NICK) CONNOR,
Inverness
10 . W. T. (TURNER) DAVIS,
Madison
11 . J. FRANK HOUGHTON, 355
Burlington Ave., N.,
St. Petersburg
12 . MERRILL P. BARBER, Box
936, Vero Beach
13 . R. B. (BUNN) GAUTIER,
1539 DuPont Bldg.,
Miami
14 . .. 0. (JACK) PHILLIPS,
Lake City
15 . CHARLEY E. JOHNS, Starke
16 . HARRY 0. STRATTON,
Rt. 1, Callahan
17 . J. GRAHAM BLACK, Jasper
18 . FLETCHER MORGAN, 45 W.
Bay St., Jacksonville
19 . J. B. RODGERS, JR.,
P.O. Box 417,
Winter Garden
20. . L. K. EDWARDS, JR., Irvine
21 . W. RANDOLPH HODGES,
Cedar Key
22. . S. D. CLARKE, Monticello
23 . K. ED BAKER, Umatilla
24 . WILLIAM R. NEBLETT,
415 Francis St.,
Key West
25. . GEORGE G. TAPPER,
Port St. Joe
26 .. B. C. PEARCE, East Palatka
27. . DOYLE E. CARLTON, JR.,
Wauchula
28 . E. WILLIAM GAUTIER,
1200 Magnolia St.,
New Smyrna Beach
29 . EDWIN C. FRASER,
Macclenny
30 . TED CABOT,
309 First Federal Bldg.,
Ft. Lauderdale
31 . VERLE A. POPE, Box 519,
St. Augustine
32 . W. A. SHANDS, Gainesville
33 . ORLO BRONSON, Kissimmee
34 . PAUL KICKLITER,
501V2 Franklin St.,
Tampa
35 . RUSSELL O. MORROW,
1102 N. "0" St.,
Lake Worth
36 . JOE BILL ROOD, 2322 7th
Ave., W.; Bradenton
37 . DOUGLAS STENSTROM,
1019 Magnolia Ave.,
Sanford
38 . J. C. GETZEN, JR., Bushnell
APRIL, 1955


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Chapter News & Notes


What



Makes



A Good



Job?




FIRST
Good Design, Functional
Layout; with drawings
and specifications by
qualified Architects and
and Engineers.

SECOND -
Qualified and Experienced
General Contractors.

THIRD -
Qualified and Experienced
Sub-Contractors and
Specialists-like Miller
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PHONE ELGIN 4-4461


PALM BEACH
The monthly meeting of the Palm
Beach Chapter was held on Thurs-
day, March 10th at the El-Bo Room,
West Palm Beach. Under old busi-
ness, a report was made on the prog-
ress of the drive locally to provide a
standard building code for all of the
municipalities in Palm Beach County
and to incorporate this same code in
the presently planned County Zoning.
The Joint Cooperative Committee
of the A.G.C., Architects and Real-
tors held an open meeting at the
Palm Beach Town Hall, at which
time building inspectors and town
officials of the incorporated areas
within the County were given an
opportunity to hear the advantages
of adopting the recommended code,
the Southern States building code
with appendices. This code has been
unanimously accepted by all commun-
ities contacted to date; and we feel
it will be brought to a successful con-
clusion within six months, or possibly
sooner, if the Palm Beach County
Zoning Enabling Act is passed by
the current legislature and zoning
adopted by the County Commission
right away as promised.
Through efforts of the Public In-
formation Committee of the Chapter
and with full cooperation of the local
papers, the architects really came into
their own in the March 20 issue of
the Palm Beach Post-Times. One sec-
tion of the paper was devoted entire-
ly to construction, with almost every
ad and article mentioning the archi-
tect.
Continuing under new business,
much discussion has been brought
about at recent Chapter meetings
regarding the illegal practices on the
part of certain architects and drafts-


men. It is the intent of the Chapter
to put a stop to this and prevent its
occurence in the future. It has been
brought out that there is a promiscu-
ous use of the seal by architects in
Florida in approving plans not pre-
pared under their supervision. Al-
most every conscientious practicing
professional has encountered this situ-
ation; and all have been asked to co-
operate in obtaining the necessary in-
formation to prosecute those guilty.
Routine business was conducted
and later an investment company
showed movies on diversified invest-
ment groups. Colored slides were
shown also by the Chapter president
of his European trip. These were
mainly pictures of recent develop-
ments in architectural design and de-
velopment throughout the Continent.

FLORIDA SOUTH
Many laudatory comments have
been received concerning the pro-
gram at the March 1st meeting held
at the Colony Club. MR. ARTURO Di
FILIPPI amusingly described the de-
velopment of Opera in Miami; MR.
ALLAN MCNAB outlined the progress
made by the University of Miami's
Lowe Gallery; and MRS. PAT BROM-
BERG told us about the ups and downs
of the legitimate theatre in Miami.
TOM ROWLAND and his Committee
is to be complimented for a very
interesting meeting.
There were 62 present at the meet-
ing. Good! TRIP RUSSELL served as
Secretary for GEORGE FINK. The Uni-
fied Codes Committee, IGOR POLE-
VITZKY, Chairman, and EDWIN T.
REEDER, was selected to serve as our
representative on the Technical Ad-
visor Committee for the writing of
the new code.
Upon recommendation of the


OBJ ECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





School Buildings Committee, FRANK
WATSON, Chairman, the Chapter
went on record favoring the single
lump sum contract for school work
and left the announcement of this
opinion to the discretion of the
School Buildings Committee in their
work with the School Board.
The Executive Committee is
studying the ways and means of
providing scholarships for students of
architecture at the University of Flor-
ida. It has approved six applications
for membership from associate to
corporate, one reinstatement and one
new. ED GRAFTON was chosen to
assist the Membership Committee
in preparing a campaign for new
members in line with the recom-
mendations outlined in FAA, Palm
Beach Convention.
The President, SAM KRUSE, repre-
sented the Chapter at the Miami
Manufacturers Association luncheon
at Dinner Key; Dade County Re-
search Foundation annual meeting at
the Biscayne Terrace and at the din-
ner for F.H.A. Commissioner MASON
at the Riviera Country Club. He was
the principle speaker at the Profes-
sional Engineers of South Florida
regular meeting after proper lubrica-
tion at JOE FARRINGTON'S show of
new Southern Blind Products.
The Public Relations Committee,
Vice President TRIP RUSSELL Chair-
man, is active, not only on regular
TV programs, but also Farrey's Hard-
ware ads, Florida Building Journal
articles, to mention a few.

Florida North
In line with the idea of simplifying
committee setups as recommended by
the National Headquarters of the A.I.
A., this year's activities are being
organized in three general divisions-
Administrative, Professional Affairs
and Governmental Relations. In
charge of each division of chapter
activity is an appointed director whose
job it is to coordinate the programs
and work on committees in his di-
vision.
Presumably each division director
will sit with each of his committees
as a kind of advisory member. This
should prove to be both a practical
and efficient arrangement, since all
committees that compose each di-
vision of Chapter operation fall with-
in a general category of interest and
(Continued on Page 18)
APRIL, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)

activity. Under the Professional Af-
fairs division, for example, the com-
mittees are: Practice of Architecture,
Recommended Fee Schedule, Educa-
tion and Registration and Relations
with the Construction Industry.
The first meeting of the year was
held in the Roosevelt Hotel at Jack-
sonville March 17. Attendance was
good and the first couple of hours
were given over to committee meet-
ings and programming. FORREST M.
KELLEY, Jr., State School Architect,
presented some excellent information
on school building construction and


ASSOCIATE WANTED
An architect in the Miami area
with a well-established practice
that includes fine residences, gen-
eral commercial work, institutional
buildings and schools, needs an
associate fully qualified to take
charge of all details of office op-
eration. Applicants must be reg-
istered in Florida with at least
five years' experience in independ-
ent practice or as a responsible
member of a large or medium-
sized architectural office. The
position carries an excellent start-
ing salary, is permanent and will
lead to a profit-participation or
possible future partnership on the
basis of interest and performance.
This is an unusually fine opo-
portunity for an able and ambi-
tious young man. To apply, send
your educational background and
experience outline, with a recent
snapshot, to The Editor, 7225
S. W. 82nd Ct., Miami 43. Infor-
mation will be treated confiden-
tially and turned over to the archi-
tect himself for further action.


spoke on several important legal
aspects of architectural practice.
The Chapter discussed by-law
changes needed as a basis for incor-
poration, both matters being held over
for definite action at the next meet-
ing. This will be on April 23 and
will be held in Gainesville in conjunc-
tion with the Student Chapter's
Home Show gathering at the U. of
F. Approval was also voted on the
matter of redistricting which had been
tentatively approved by Convention
action.
Four new applications for Corpo-
rate Memberships were received, and
the Chapter accepted JOHN A. BuR-
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





News & Notes
TON, Jr., of Sanford, as a Junior
Associate.
March 15th was a double-barreled
red-letter day for MYRL HANES of
Gainesville. On that day he was
elected to the Gainesville City Com-
mission, receiving the greatest number
of votes of all three candidates. His
running mate was also a professional
man, a physician.
On the same day bids were opened
for a new high school designed by
the newly-elected commissioner. He
and city and school officials were
pleased to discover that the accepted
low bid differed by less than one-half
of one percent from a construction
cost total estimated by the architect.

New Scholarship Voted for
College of Architecture,
University of Florida
At its January meeting the Ex-
ecutive Board of the F.A.A. voted
unanimously to establish a new schol-
arship grant for an architectural stu-
dent at the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts at Gainesville. The
sum of $250 was placed in the F.A.A.
1955 budget for this purpose. This
brings to nine the number of $250
scholarships now available to archi-
tectural students. Six other scholar-
ships of similar size are available to
students in building construction; and
one, in the amount of $150, has been
set up for use by a student in costume
design.
Two loan funds are also available to
architectural students at the Uni-
versity of Florida. One was established
by the will of Rudolph Weaver, first
director of the School of Architecture
and Allied Arts; the other by the
Executive Board of the F.A.A. Both
loan funds are in the amount of $500.
In commenting on the new F.A.A.
scholarship, Dean William T. Arnett
said, "The move of the F.A.A. is an-
other instance of the fine cooperation
which exists between the elements of
the Architectural profession in this
State".

April Meetings
The Joint Cooperative Committee,
F.A.A. A.G.C. will hold an import-
ant meeting at 10:00 a.m., Friday,
April 22nd, in the Pan American
Room of the Columbus Hotel at
(Continued on Page 20)
APRIL, 1955


REINFORCED PRE-CAST CONCRETE FRAME GLASS JALOUSIE


One of Several Duplexes Built by


FRANK VALLANI

545 N. E. 141st Street



USING JALOCRETE WINDOWS

JALOCRETE pre-cast concrete frame glass jalousies are
winning greater and greater acceptance among architects
and builders in the South Florida area. Like other leading
builders, Frank Vallani selected JALOCRETE in prefer-
ence to other types of windows because of their low cost
of installation, and because they require no costly main-
tenance, no caulking, no stool, no job-poured concrete
sill. To find out how JALOCRETE will fit into specifi-
cations on jobs you are now projecting, call 88-6433,
or write for complete information.


ENGINEERE PRDCS INC.






News & Notes
(Continued from Page 19)
Miami. The meeting will include
luncheon.
The 1955 Convention of the Flor-
ida State A.G.C. Council will be in
the form of a cruise to Nassau and
Havana aboard the S.S. Tradewind,
starting on April 22 and returning
April 27.
Members of the Florida Engineer-
ing Society will hold their Annual
State Convention at Daytona Beach,
April 21 to 23, inclusive. On Satur-
day, April 23, the Executive Board
of the F.A.A. and the F.E.S. will hold
a cooperative, informal luncheon meet-
ing on that date.

Prestressed Concrete
Institute to Hold
First Annual Meeting
The first annual convention of the
Prestressed Concrete Institute will
be held April 21 and 22 at Ft. Lau-
derdale. Marking the first anniver-
sary of the Institute, the meeting
promises to be of outstanding inter-
est not only to Institute members,
but also to architects and engineers
concerned with the wide range of
building types for which pre-tensioned
concrete units are adapted.
Attendance is open to all architects
and engineers and to all interested
members of the concrete and allied
industries. The convention program
will cover a number of technical
field demonstrations, including fire-
testing of a roof slab, pile driving and
various strength tests. Also planned
are inspection trips to several large
installations and a tour of the pre-
tensioning plant of the R. H. WRIGHT
AND SON CORP. Scheduled also are
a number of panel discussions and
presentation of technical papers by
outstanding authorities in the pre-
tensioning field.
Headquarters of the Convention
will be the Lago Mar Hotel, Ft.
Lauderdale, where reservations at
special rates of $7 to $10 per day
should be made as early as possible.
Registration fee for the Convention
is $20 which includes a barbecue
luncheon party. Applications and
further detailed information may be
obtained by writing the Prestressed
Concrete Institute Convention Com-
mittee, Box 781, Ft. Lauderdale.


Producer's Council Program


Mark the evening of April 19th
on your office calendar. That's the
date for the next get-together of the
Miami Chapter of the Producers'
Council. The place will be the Coral
Gables Country Club; the time, the
usual pre-dinner cocktail hour; and
the occasion, the Council's annual
"Table-Top" exhibit of outstanding
products manufactured by member
companies.
President FRANK GOULDING prom-
ises no speeches. After cocktails
there'll be the kind of a fine buffet
dinner that the Council's informa-
tional gatherings have become fa-
mous for. Then, after dinner,
architects will have the opportunity
of seeing capsule exhibits and of
talking about them with factory rep-
resentatives that make up the Coun-
cil's local membership.
Incidentally that membership has
grown by two important companies
since publication of its latest roster.
The newcomers are the Cambridge
Tile Company, represented in Miami
by WALTER EARNEST, and the
Schlage Lock Co., with representa-
tion in the person of GILBERT VIOLA.
This makes the Miami Chapter one
of the largest in the country with
members representing some 56 com-
panies that are listed in the national
Producers' Council roster.
A number of other changes have
lately occurred in the Miami Chapters
ranks. FREDERICK H. SMITH, formerly
the Chapter's secretary, and for some
time past the genial local manager
for the Roddis Company, was recent-
ly transferred. His place in the Rod-
dis office has been taken by GEORGE
REMPT. And his post as Chapter
Secretary is now being ably filled by
ALLEN KERN, local head man for the
Mosaic Tile Company.
The change was, of course, not
expected by the Chapter's executive
group and it caught the Chapter with
the quick need to change its by-laws
to take care of the contingency of
electing a new ranking officer be-
tween annual meeting when elections
are customarily held. A series of by-


law changes were quickly drawn up,
submitted to the National Chapter
for approval and subsequently adopt-
ed at the March 22 business meeting
held in the Seven Seas Restaurant.
Most of that meeting time was
taken up planning details of the
Table-Top Meeting scheduled for
April 19. But the subject of action
now under way by the League of
Municipalities and various commit-
tees from building professional or-
ganizations to develop a revised and
uniform building code for South
Florida areas was also discussed.
Though membership privately appears
to be much interested in the subject,
no official action of the Chapter was
taken during the meeting. President
FRANK GOULDING is now investigat-
ing the whole subject and will un-
doubtedly report on it at the next
business meeting with some recom-
mendation on what action would be
appropriate for the Chapter to take
regarding the project.
The Miami Chapter's February 22
meeting was unreported in the March
issue due to the pressure of a short-
month press date. It was the first
"Informational Meeting" of the year
and, as usual, was held at the Coral
Gables Country Club. It was a cock-
tail and dinner affair, excellently at-
tended by architects and engineers,
and was made possible through the
sponsorship of the Ludman Corpora-
tion. Among guests of honor was
HENRY W. TAVS, Vice-President in
Charge of Sales of the Ludman Cor-
pdration, Miami manufacturers of
the aluminum doors and windows
that were on display and expertly
demonstrated at the meeting.
Plans are now being made by many
home offices of local Producers'
Council members for the 34th An-
nual Convention of the Producers'
Council which, according to long-
established custom, will be held dur-
ing the week of the 87th Annual
A.I.A. Convention at Minneapolis.
Judging by past records, the product
exhibit alone will be worth the price
of the trip to any architect.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









IlU i


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Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company o. Haines City, Fla.
Florida-Georgia Brick & Tile Company ..--. Jacksonville, Fla.
Strunk Lumber Yard ..-- ----..... -......... Key West, Fla.


Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ..- Lake Wales, Fla.
Grassy Key Builders' Supply Company --........ Marathon, Fla.
Gandy Block & Supply Company .-~.. Melbourne, Fla.
Alderman Lumber Company ------...-.-.... .------- Naples, Fla.
Marion Hardware Company ...------.. -----.--.. Ocala, Fla.
Townsend Sash, Door & Lumber Company ..-...- Sebring, Fla.
Tallahassee Builders' Supply .....--------.. Tallahassee, Fla.
Burnup & Sims, Inc. ----- West Palm Beach, Fla.


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Ma ^(Wt Ca jndar






MAY 5th, 6th, 7th
CHARLESTON, S. C.
That's the time and the place of the Fourth Annual
Conference of the South Atlantic District, A.I.A.
Headquarters is the Fort Sumter Hotel. Conference
Theme is "The Architect and His Community".

JUNE 20th to 24th
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

The 87th Annual Convention of the A.I.A. will offer
much to every architect. Theme, "Designing for the
Community", will cover seminars with top-level ex-
perts. And plenty of fun and fellowship goes with it.



PLAN NOW TO MAKE BOTH TRIPS