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 Front Cover
 And we'll live to see it happen,...
 In varied interests lies our...
 How to travel and have fun
 Know your state board
 Let's stop giving away good...
 Joint architect-engineer policy...
 A.G.C. awards citations
 News and notes
 Design award for St. Augustine...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00009
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: March 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00009
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    And we'll live to see it happen, too!
        Page 1
        Page 2
    In varied interests lies our strength
        Page 3
    How to travel and have fun
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Know your state board
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Let's stop giving away good advice!
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Joint architect-engineer policy code
        Page 14
        Page 15
    A.G.C. awards citations
        Page 16
    News and notes
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Design award for St. Augustine architect
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text






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March 1955


FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
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Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
-lorida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


MARCH, 1955 VOL. 5, NO. 3


Officers of the F. A. A.
G. Clinton Gamble ----. President
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale
Edgar S. Wortman __ Secy.-Treas.
1122 No. Dixie, Lake Worth

Vice-Presidents
Frank Watson Fla. South
John Stetson Palm Beach
Morton Ironmonger Broward
Franklin Bunch Fla. North
Ralph Lovelock- Fla. Central
Joel Sayers, Jr. Daytona Beach
Albert Woodard-No. Central

Directors
Edward Grafton Fla. South
Jefferson Powell Palm Beach
Robert Jahelka Broward County
Thomas Larrick-- Fla. North
L. Alex Hatton Fla. Central
William R. Gomon Daytona Beach
Ernest Stidolph No. Central

*
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford . Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
cannot be guaranteed and all copy is sub-
ject to approval of the Publication Com-
mittee. All or part of the FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S editorial material may be
freely reprinted, provided credit is accorded
the FLORIDA ARCHITECT and the author.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages doe es not constitute en-
dorsement by the Publication Committee
or the Florida Association of Architects.
Address all communications to the Editor,
7225 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami 43, Fla.

MCMURRAY ze26 MIAMI
MARCH, 1955


And We'll Live


To See It Happen, Too!


In the judgement of hard-headed, sober-thinking business men this
State of ours is just on the threshold of fantastic development. And, if
forecasts, cautiously-phrased statements and announced plans mean
anything, these gentlemen are backing their beliefs with plenty of action
and large amounts of capital.
Take a couple of items as examples. First, plans now being whipped
into shape for the near-future construction of the Inter-American Trade
and Cultural Center just north of Miami. This dream of a handful of
ultra-practical men would, almost by itself, justify all the new motels
and hotels and arterial highways now under construction. For the new
Center is regarded by its financial sponsors as one of the greatest of all
tourist attractions.
From the less spectacular viewpoint, however, it could well prove
'to be an even more important stimulus for Florida's already spurting
industrial activity, particularly from the standpoint of southern hemis-
phere export. This State, say those men who business it is to know,
is a natural for light manufacturing and for final assembly of parts of a
vast range of products that our Southern neighbors want and need and
cannot get within their own countries.
Here's another example: There's uranium in Florida, lots of it. It
now lies dormant as a possible and practical by-product of the phos-
phate mines in the center of the state. But once refined and processed
and put to use as atomic fuel for cheap and plentiful industrial power,
Florida could offer industry climate, domestic and.export markets and
low-cost operations that few other states could ever hope to match.
Of course, cheap atomic power is not as close to Floridians as is
the Inter-American Center. But it will come sooner, perhaps, than
most of us realize. The Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission
recently said, "Our children will enjoy electrical energy developed from
atomic power that will be too plentiful and too cheap to meter. And
I think I shall live to see it." Admiral Strauss is one of the hardest
of heads, formerly a partner in a great financial house. He is not given
to irresponsible public statements!
These are only two examples of many that could be cited to indi-
cate what future developments for Florida are even now in the prac-
tical planning stage. Experts say that tourism will expand, not dimin-
ish. They say Florida's industry will mushroom. They say that
population, on the heels of both trends, will soar beyond presently
possible estimates.
And what does all this mean for us? Growth and expansion?
Of course. More architects, more demands for architectural services,
more work for all architects? Certainly.
But it means much more than that. Opportunity, in anybody's
language, is directly coupled to responsibility for making the most of
it. If Florida's growh is to become even half of what responsible
opinion forecasts, the architectural profession must grow too. New
problems are in the making. Architects will be asked to solve them
only if they can continue to prove their ability to do so. More than
ever our profession requires understandings of the forces that are now
shaping the future and the vision to recognize what that future can
become. Required too, is the energy to learn and the patience to put
new knowledge to good use.











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STHE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









In Varied Interests Lies Our Strength






Is there a growing trend toward re-
gionalism in architectural affairs?

Is it a strong and healthy trend?

Or does it pose a threat to our
national professional solidarity?

Here are thoughtful answers to
those important questions from a
wise and seasoned observer who is
also a ranking officer of the A.I.A.





By GEORGE BAIN CUMMINGS
Secretary, The American Institute of Architects.


Occasionally, in the course of my
duties and pleasures as Secretary, I am
privileged to travel about the coun-
try, visiting groups of members in
their native habitat. Always the ex-
perience is tonic and enriching.
Wherever I go I meet good men,
trying honestly, earnestly and with
measurable effectiveness to do the
job society expects of an architect.
Perhaps it is in Pennsylvania; and
the panel discusses research and new
building products in the experimental
stage. Perhaps it is in Ohio; and a
speaker thrills a group by opening
their eyes to the rich architectural
heritage left by pioneers in this region.
Again it may be in New Mexico; and
I observe one of the finest workshops
in public relations I have ever at-
tended.
Or it may be within view of Mt.
Rainier that I am permitted the honor
of presenting the charter to a newly
formed chapter, and gaze into the
earnest faces of the founding mem-
bers, as a federal judge reminds them
of the excellence of their calling and


their potential usefulness to their state.
Perhaps it is in Texas where things
are on a big scale, including their
state association meetings. And I am
edified and challenged by the opin-
ions expressed of our profession by a
panel of intelligent and able laymen.
On another occasion it is in Con-
necticut that I hear reports rendered
to the annual meeting indicating sub-
stantial co-operation between factors
of local government and the archi-
tects of the state. A new chapter is
to be chartered in Illinois; and I am
given the privilege of presenting the
scroll and of noting the eager and
understanding reception given to my
simple recital of what goes on at the
Octagon. Presentation of the charter
to a new chapter in Tennessee affords
another view of architects hard at
work in the service of their commun-
ity, against the backdrop of the lovely
Smokies.
Always at national conventions local
architects lead us, with becoming
pride, to see the things that are beau-
tiful and inspiring and worthy of
emulation in their section of the


country. And when we hold our ses-
sions there is rich variety of nourish-
ment for both mind and spirit.
It is good to go about. One re-
turns home and resumes his own task
with refreshed spirit, stimulated
imagination, and a warm sense of pro-
fessional solidarity. And in his heart
he is grateful for friends, for sharing,
for the assurance that he is not alone.
He is all the more resolved in high
purpose.
There are great differences among
the regional groups; and their variety
makes for richness of pattern in the
tapestry of our national professional
life. Yet two factors are found in all
groups. They constitute the strong
common denominator of our profes-
sion-the goodwill in, and among, de-
cent men; and our dedication to the
highest service of our society. This
I believe. On this I rely.
It has taken a long time to achieve
the degree of organizational unity
The Institute now enjoys. We are a
small profession-not over 20,000
registered architects among 160,000,-
(Continued on Page 12)


MARCH, 1955 3





.. .-


and












Fan











By

T. TRIP RUSSELL


Hwo a


There are all sorts of ways to travel
in Europe. Some American tourists
of last summer brought back the
saddest stories I've ever heard. I am
continually amazed that they contrive
to be so miserable and get themselves
into such fantastic situations. Ex-
hausted and broke at the end of their
trip, they often resolve never to do it
again. It's a worthy resolve! Since
they're obviously not good travellers
it should be followed. But it seldom
is!
In reality, travel in Europe is fun.
There are three cardinal rules to
follow: first, Don't try to live up to
an absolute schedule; second, Don't
try to see everything; and, third, Go
to enjoy yourself. These are certainly
simple rules you'd expect anyone to
know. The trouble with many people
is that their common sense becomes
affected by the fearful thought that a
chance for European travel may never
come again. Rules go out the window;
and what should be fun becomes a
miserable disappointment.
This past summer I went to France.
Any other countries I may have
touched upon were only incidental.
My only serious purpose was to see as


At Avignon is Priory, one of the most sublime hotels in all my
experience and the home of wonderful food in a romantic setting.
This snapshot can only vaguely suggest the charm of the place.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


much of France as I possibly could in
a month. I saw about half of what I
would like someday to see-maybe
not even half.
To do that, I flew to Paris and
rented a French car. Arrangements
for that must be made in advance, a
good way being through your A.A.A.
There is a large deposit (which you
get back), but prices are moderate
and service is frequent, good, and no
more expensive in France than in
Georgia. Beware of taking an Am-
erican car. They're not only expensive
to operate, but their size is a definite
handicap in many foreign cities.
It's well to reserve a hotel room
for several nights in Paris if you arc
arriving by air, because you won't
know where to go. A. A. A. will
arrange that, too. The same applies
to Rome, London, Madrid, or any
national capital. Beyond that, reserva-
tions are a mistake. They tie you down
and stifle all your erratic impulses.
In France the exception to this rule
is Dijon, where the main route from
Paris to Cannes makes a convenient
one-night stop and at Nice and
Cannes in the months of July and
August.









Otherwise, hotel reservations, un-
less tourist traffic quadruples, are a
waste of valuable stamps. -The same
goes for restaurants. True, you might
not get in the Pyramide at Vienne
unless you have booked, but I assure
you there are a half dozen others
almost as good within a stone's throw.
Which brings me to another point.
Insisting on the most famous, the
most fashionable, or the most any-
thing, hotel or restaurant, is an ex-
cellent way to waste a lot of money.
Everything is much cheaper and often
much better in the fine old establish-
ments used by the French, and not as
well known. Don't use American
Guide Books. As soon as you get to
Paris, buy a Michelin Guide-put
out by the Michelin Tire Company-
and use it. It knows everything and
is absolutely honest.
Trying to cover too much ground
is torture. Most tours give one day to
motoring from Paris to Cannes. To
do that, one can glance at the stately
towers of Sens, see Fountainbleau
from a distance. At Dijon, one of the
world's great museums must be
passed up and one of the world's great


restaurants can be looked at, since it
is not time for dinner. A glimpse
through an archway is all one has of
the noble Abbey of Tournus; and as
Lyon, Balence and the great walls of
Avignon whiz by, the only sensation
is one of extreme frustration.
French roads are excellent except
through the villages, where cobble-
stones are more effective in reducing
speed than any number of signs. You
can travel comfortably at about as
many kilometers per hour as you
would miles in the States. Plan doing
not more than 200 kilometers a day.
Travelling between twelve and two
o'clock is pleasant, because traffic is
less and most places are closed.
It's really tough to get a light lunch
in France. The best restaurants are
not open and the cheaper ones insist
on serving you dinner, which only
puts you to sleep. Do as the French
do. Buy some cheese, (each area has
its own, and all are wonderful) a loaf
of delicious French bread and a half
bottle of local wine, and eat it miles
from anywhere in some forest glade.
When evening comes you then have
both the capacity and the money to


enjoy Les Trois Faisans or the Maison
des Tetes.
It may be fun to dazzle your
friends later with photographs; but
standing around waiting for the sun
to be right or the traffic to move can
be a pain in the neck. Just be sure
that the camera isn't having a better
time than you are. When it comes to
taking pictures, I shoot from the hip
and some surprising results come
about.
Some of the most rewarding sights
are seen on the spur of the moment.
Conversely, some of the much ad-
vertised spots are not worth a second
look. Some people, (though with
remarkably dreary minds) reported
last summer that Paris was sad, dull
and decadent. Their politics must
have gotten mixed up with their
judgement! "Yes, it was a rainy sum-
mer in Paris. But it is impossible
to find Paris dull; and it still re-
mains a city of irresistable charm.
If travellers would forget the Eif-
fel Tower, the Invalides and the
Folies Bergere and visit instead the
towers of Notre Dame, the Cluny
(Continued on Page 6)


The South-of-France country is beautiful, varied and
steeped in history. At Tarascon, Philip Le Bel's castle,
above, looks as formidable as the day it was built.
MARCH, 1955


If it's Roman ruins you want, France has plenty of
them. And many are much better preserved than in
Italy-like these I found and photographed at Aries.







5;00 to 7Wuuect ad 01ac*e 0ue


This is a Le Corbusier building at Marseilles; but crudity of
execution has effectively spoiled a magnificent design conception.


Museum and the Opera Comique,
they would have something different
to talk about. They no doubt found
the George V expensive and noisy.
But if, as I did, they had stayed at the
Royal Conde on the left bank, they
would have found a charming place,
quiet and reasonable.
There's a lot of building in France.
But, compared with this country, it
doesn't seem like much, though the
percentage of really outstanding work
is, I would say, about the same. The
influence of Corbusier is very strong;
and his own apartment house in Mar-
saille is perhaps the best example. It
displays a crudity of workmanship
and a harsh use of color that, to an
extent, distracts from its splendid
conception.
Certainly next most important is
the work of August Perret at Le
Havre. It has much greater refinement
and, since it comprises a large num-
ber of buildings, displays the French
genius for large scale planning. The
broad terraces, beautiful gardens and
exciting use of sculpture can be
enjoyed even among the unfinished
buildings and barricaded streets.
As I had a modest part in the
destruction of a lot of bridges across
the Loire and Rhone, I was interested
in what the French had done to
replace them. The new ones are clean,

















Typical of many old
French cities is this
street is Strasbourg
where red geraniums
lining the window
boxes contrast pleas-
andy with the black-
and-white of old
houses.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







simple and surprisingly light. It
would be nice if we had one over the
Miami River that was as aesthetically
satisfying!
All through Paris, especially around
the University, new apartment houses
are springing up, following closely the
Corbusier influence. There is relatively
little single family residence construc-
tion. Commercial building is oc-
casionally quite fine; and I put my car
into a couple of slick new ramp
garages.
Reconstruction of war-damaged
monuments proceeds slowly. More
damage was done by ten years of
neglect than by bombs; and the major
reconstruction is often necessary. The
magnificent cathedrals at Ronen and
St. Quenton are being slowly put back
together, but some lovely buildings
are simply beyond help.
Much is done for the tourist in
France today. But it is often a toss-up
whether the crowds won't spoil one's
enjoyment of the show. The fountains
at Versailles are superb, but it's rather
heavy going to arrange to see them.
Some of the world's finest music can
be found at Nimes, Perpignan and
Aix en Provence, but it's hard to get
seats and the hotels in little towns
are taxed to capacity during the festi-
vals. I saw Aida in the old Roman
Arena at Nimes-a spectacular show,
but musically somewhat overpowered
by the setting and props.
The real reward of travelling in
France comes from the quiet cafes
and in the old streets illuminated at
night with such sublety and dramatic
fitness. You find it in old Roman
buildings, better preserved than those
in Italy; and in quiet corners of
ancient churches, turned irridescent
by the sun through jewelled windows.
And it comes too, from the noisy
markets, just as they were centuries
ago, and from the gardens of the
Luxembourg, where children sail toy
boats in the enormous fountain and
ice cream is less than a nickle.
And the French-"Didn't you find
them mercenary, unfriendly, sus-
picious?" ask my American friends.
The answer is simply-No! I found
them reserved, hospitable, patient on
the whole. True there were a few
whose Gallic necks I would like to
have wrung! But then, who doesn't
feel the same way about a couple of
characters in one's own home town?
MARCH, 1955


Now


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IlliltfL :Ib~ ilh


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Know Your State Board



Five busy men are dedicated to the job of pro-

tecting the public by seeing that legal stand-

ards for professional practice are maintained.


This year will mark the 40th An-
niversary of the Florida State Board
of Architecture. Since the first Board
members were appointed and the
body organized on July 15, 1915, the
scope of its detailed activities and
responsibilities have broadened.
Today the State Board is not only
the guardian of technical competency
for the practice of architecture in
Florida. It is also quite as jealous a
guardian of professional rights, for
each individual architect. Today the
State Board has two basic functions:
One is to act as an examining agency
and a registration bureau. The other
is to act as a regulatory body to assure
the legal practice of architecture un-
der the Florida State law. As such
it can become, when necessary, a dis-
ciplinary body also.
Architects in this State are for-
tunate because, in the vast majority of


instances, appointments to the State
Board have been well considered, re-
markably free from politics. Men who
are now serving to maintain profes-
sional standards of good architectural
practice are of the highest possible
professional and personal caliber.
The job they have sworn to do
throughout each 4-year appointment
goes largely unrewarded. Compensa-
tion of $10 per day-even with travel-
ing expenses and out-of-town living
allowances-hardly pays for the gruel-
ling 12-hour 5-day sessions that are
held twice a year. And it pays not
at all for the substantial amount of
"home-work" incident to Board ac-
tivities-such as development of ex-
amination questions, a steady flow
of correspondence on legal as well as
technical phases of State Board work
and an almost incessant series of in-
terviews relative to various points of


S. RALPH FETNER,A.I.A. President..
Born in Laurinburg, N. Carolina, and
a resident of Jacksonville since 1925.
A gradaute of Georgia Tech's archi-
tectural school and associated with
Mellen C. Greeley prior to establishing
his own office. Member of the State
Board since 1949 and now serving his
second term as its president.

technical qualifications for registra-
tion, matters of Board procedure, or
investigations into alleged violations
of architectural practice regulations.
Little publicity has been given to
all this. The result is more of a wide-
spread misunderstanding of just how
the State Board functions that should
exist. Among candidates for architec-
tural registration-particularly those
who are struggling to pass the Junior
Examinations-the impression seems


MELLEN C. GREELEY, F.A.I.A., See- RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, F.A.I.A ....
retary . .Born in Jacksonville, Flor- Born in Merchantville, N. J., and a
ida, and a life-long resident of the resident of Miami Beach since 1914.
state. Opened his own office in Jack- After architectural training at Univ.
sonville in 1909 after technical train- of Pennsylvania and Cornell, began
ing in various other offices. Is the practice as partner of Pancoast & Sib-
author of numerous articles on archi- bert in 1926, then operated his own
texture and allied subjects and is listed office until formation of current part-
in Who's Who In America. Appointed nership with associates. A member
to the State Board in 1923 and has of the State Board since 1946, a past
served continuously as its Secretary- president of the Board and currently
Treasurer since then. its Examination Committee chairman.


ARCHIE G. PARISH, A.I.A.... Born
in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and a resi-
dent of St. Petersburg since 1924.
After extensive office and academic
training, formed partnership, Brown
and Parish, in 1926, then independent
practice until establishing association
with Robert B. Crowe, A.I.A., in 1950.
Appointed to the State Board in 1941;
also has served as Chairman, Building
Code Committee of St. Petersburg
since 1945.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






to prevail that the State Board is a
kind of an impersonal ogre with five
heads and a penchant for bending
itself completely backward over a
hurdle bristling with technicalities
and arbitrary negatives. Even to some
of those who apply for registration in
Florida with a background of practice
in other states, Board actions may
sometimes seem quite as arbitrarily
perverse.
Actually, the exact reverse is true.
An observer of any of the Board's
business sessions could not help being
deeply impressed with the thoughtful
and detailed consideration accorded
every matter brought before it. He
would be struck, first, by the fact that
the Board's standards of technical
competence for the practice or archi-
tecture are high. But he would find
them in accord with technical stan-
dards of the National Council of
Architectural Registration Boards.
And he would discover that every
question of individual qualification is
thoroughly explored and discussed un-
til a unanimous decision can be
passed upon it.
This observer-yourself, for in-
stance-would come quickly to real-
ize that every decision of the State
Board must be made in the light of
a number of factors. First, there
must be strict observance of statutes
(Continued on Page 10)


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pre.. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
JOSEPH A. COLE


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RICHARD BOONE ROGERS .. Born
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his life. Educated in Orlando schools,
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and the architectural school of Colum-
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MARCH, 1955


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"Or Equal" - are they?


Sometimes architects and engineers
are asked to approve a residential-weight aluminum window as
"equal" to the type of rugged window that Brown & Grist make
for commercial and institutional jobs . Only facts can guide
you in deciding what is, or is not, "equal" to the quality of
construction and the long operating life you wish to specify.
Here is a check-list of awning window facts. Compare them,
appoint by point, with whatever substi-
tute may be offered for your approval.


IAluminumo


Awning Windows


1 FRAME . .Depth, 21/2 inches; thickness, full Vs inch.
Sections are heavier; joints are mortised and tenoned
and riveted.
2 STRENGTH ... Nearly twice the standard test requirement.
Deflection, 20-lb. load, .164" (requirement: .313");
Uniform load, 15-lb., .083" (requirement: .267").
Aluminum alloy (63-ST6) yield strength, 32,000 Ibs.
per square inch.
3 TIGHTNESS . Nearly ten times standard requirement.
Type W infiltration, 25 mph., .056 cfm per foot (require-
ment: .500).
4 OPERATION . Manual control, gadget-free, smooth.
No mechanism to wear out. No cranks, gears, springs
or pulleys.
5 LOCKING . Automatic, built-in snap-lock and release.
Tight closure can be released instantly with slightest
pressure.
6- VENTILATOR BALANCE . Unified action, any position.
Patented design of B & G windows assures balanced
smoothness and opening to any position without depend-
ance on friction.

Be sure the "Equal" meets these specifications
SWEET'S CATALOG 16a-Br

IN YOUR LOCALITY CALL:
Pensacola HE 8-1444 Daytona Beach 3-1421 Tampa . . 33-9231
Tallahassee 2-0399 Orlando . 4-9601 W. Palm Beach 8517
Jacksonville EX 8-6767 Ocala . . MA 2-3755 Miami . . 48-4486
Hollywood . 2-5443 Ft. Lauderdale JA 2-5235
Florida Sales Representative:
IP. O. Box 5151,
GEORGE GRIFFIN r Jacksonville, Fla.
Factory-BROWN & GRIST, INC., Warwick, Virginia


Your State Board...
(Continued from Page 9)
relating to the practice of architecture
in this state. Second, there must
be equally strict observance of the
Board's own rules and regulations,
developed from provisions of the
Statutes.
Third, there is the State Board's
basic responsibility to protect the
public from possibly disastrous re-
sults of technical incompetence or
improper professional behavior. And
finally there is an added responsibility
to the architectural profession itself.
Incompetence or malpractice hurts
the profession as a whole even more
than it harms an individual architect's
client. And, being seasoned profes-
sionals themselves, each Board mem-
ber is actively aware of that fact.
In view of all these backgrounds,
against which every decision of the
Board, however minor, must be made,
it is safe to say that the Board's ac-
tions arc ahnost judicially fair and
impartial. In judging examinations,
for example, a system of numbering
and a scrupulous check of all papers
preserves the anonymity of each ap-
plicant. Grades are made on the basis
of performance, not people; and not
until after all grades have been totaled
does any Board member know who
passed, or who failed what.
The same judicial attitude is held
relative to the Board's work-now
greatly on the increase-of enforcing
the statutes and its own rules. As a
regulatory body the Board has had,
since 1953, the power of forcing com-
pliance through the medium of legal
action on its own right. But it can-
not take that action unless it has
proof that a; violation actually exists
as alleged. Then action is swift and
so far has been remarkably conclusive.
However, much of the Board's en-
forcement success has come from
warnings. It has found that ignorance
of the law is, sometimes, a valid ex-
cuse. And in such cases, the gloved
hand serves better than the bare fist.
If ever there were a body profound-
ly dedicated to the cause of better-
ing the public and profession it serves,
that body is the Florida State Board
of Architecture. It deserves the un-
derstanding and intelligent support of
every architect who has received the
stamp of professional approval from
its hands.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







LET'S STOP GIVING AWAY GOOD ADVICE!
Our profession in Florida is daily losing themselves in a dilemma. Should we re-hang
thousands of dollars of personal income because this door? How about a wall versus a fence
of either a reluctance to accept the $5 or $10 around our patio? Can that large bedroom be
office consultant fee, or by our failure to let successfully divided into two smaller ones?
the public know we are interested therein. Many Doctors still treat hangnails, blisters and
old timers and quite a few of the larger offices hangovers. But we? We are thumbing our
frown on this source of income. So we con- noses at a 100% increase in personal income.
tinually give away advice or squabble over fee Our holier-than-thou attitude also just
schedules, might be scaring away a lot of good job pros-
Ever since the first witch doctor concocted pects. Most people are a lot more afraid of
a brew of roots, or drove off evil spirits by visiting an architect than going to a doctor or
beating on drums, the medical profession (ad- lawyer. Convince a man you don't bite by
mittedly the best paid) has found no indignity giving him some such needed advice about
in sending a bill for $5.00 for an office visit, eliminating a drip over his kitchen door-for the
Beating the tom-toms won't help us. But cer- grandiose fee of $7.50-and he will be much
tainly a little well-organized interest in this more willing to pay an 8 per cent fee on the
direction would produce an added source of fuel new house he builds next year.
for maintaining a safe distance between the This thing can mushroom. Let's stop sniff-
"wolf" and our door. ing the blossoms and start tapping some of the
For the newly-registered the consultant life producing sap. There are hundreds of thou-
Sservice is a natural. Hardly a month passes sands flowing by us each year, while we make
when Mr. and Mrs. Householder do not find like Ferdinand!- JOHN STETSON, Palm Beach.





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MARCH, 1955










What



Makes



A Good



Job?




FIRST-
Good Design, Functional
Layout; with drawings
and specifications by
qualified Architects and
and Engineers.


SECOND -
Qualified and Experienced
General Contractors.


THIRD-
Qualified and Experienced
Sub-Contractors and
Specialists-like Miller
Electric Company who
have stood the acid-test
for over twenty-five years.


MILLER

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Electrical Contractors,
serving the southeastern
states, and all of Florida.

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PHONE ELGIN 4-4461


In Varied Interests ...
(Continued from Page 3)
000 people. And our job is to coun-
sel this great nation so that its build-
ings and aggregations of buildings
shall be not only safe to use, but well-
suited to its needs and interests, and
withal in harmony with the natural
setting. And, somehow, fraught with
a sense of goodness that is indeed
beauty. There is no higher demand
made upon any professional group;
and we may well unite deep pride
with a sober sense of our responsi-
bility. It is well-it is necessary-
that we be strongly organized.
Fifteen years ago there were few
more than 2000 members of The
Institute-the only national organi-
zation of the profession. A campaign
of unification was conducted which,
in the next decade, raised our mem-
bership many fold and brought into
our framework of organization the
many state and local groups which
had existed outside the fold. And
when at last unification could be re-
garded as accomplished, applications
for membership continued to pour in.
And now, in these recent two years
of my Secretaryship, applications have
been received at the steady rate of
some sixty a month, and are continu-
ing without sign of dimunition. Now
we have well over 10,000 members.
And so we are growing strong in
numbers.
Along with the extension of our
membership, new chapters have been


The next twenty-five years
should witness developments just
as startling as a review of the past
half century permits us to see in
retrospect. Industrial research will
most assuredly be in the vanguard.
Its allies in the construction in-
dustry will build, alter, tear down
and rebuild to serve its needs. And
Architects and Engineers will be
on the teams.
We think of Architecture as one
profession and Engineering as an-
other-two separate and distinct
professions. They are, in theory.
But actually, they are one in serv-
ice. Architecture cannot be com-
plete without intimate and in-
separable union with Engineering.
This is more true today than it
has ever been in history. It will
become more potently essential in
the future. As our structures-be
.they commercial, industrial or in-
stitutional become more and


formed and will continue to be
formed in the good old way of nature,
by the division of "cells." I believe
there were some sixty chapters fifteen
years ago; now there are 117. Every
state now has at least one chapter,
and in all the state capitals the voice
of the profession may make itself
heard.
And as this proliferation has taken
place, it has become more than ever
necessary as well as wise to select
members of The Board of Directors
of The Institute upon a geographical
basis, so that all parts of the country
will be represented in determining
national professional policy. Thus the
domain of The Institute has been
divided into districts and re-divided
-and may be re-divided again, if
greater professional advantage and or-
ganizational effectiveness are to be
gained thereby.
Because of this division into ic-
gions, local consciousness of common
interests-at least in the choice of
regional directors-has led to tenta-
tive degrees of regional organization.
\here districts are conterminous
with states-as in New York and
Texas-regional organization has been
a very natural development and has
evolved to a high degree of integrated
effort and procedure. Offices have
been set up and executives have been
installed. Where regions are wide-
flung, organization has been slower.
But at last we have a regional coun-
cil, by one name or another, in each
of the twelve districts.


more integrated in their machine-
like precision of design, it becomes
increasingly apparent that Archi-
tecture must assimilate and co-
ordinate unto itself the specialized
fields of Engineering and utilize
for the benefit of the Architectural
Profession the talent and experi-
ence of the Engineer.
The designation "Architect-En-
gineer" was coined during the
preparedness era before World
War II to express the close rela-
tionship between the Architectural
and Engineering Professions. I like
that designation, because it recog-
nizes an essential cooperative
union designed for integrated
service. In the organization which
I am privileged to represent, it is
we Architects and Engineers -
who serve; and in our experience,
we find that "we" can serve more
fully than can "I." Service is our
sole commodity.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ONE PROFESSION IN SERVICE From an address given by George
M. Miehls, Albert Kahn Associated Architects and Engineers, Inc.





I think this is all to the good,
especially when I read of the extra-
ordinarily effective regional confer-
ence recently held in the Gulf States
District. A -meeting of the A.I.A.
Committee on School Buildings was
held concurrently and the program
of the conference was derived from
that committee's agenda. Noted na-
tional figures in education attended
and addressed the conference, at-
tracting news attention from all over
the country. Nothing succeeds like
success; and this district's conferences
will be eagerly awaited and attended
in the future. Many other districts,
each in their own way, are develop-
ing regional meetings to a high de-
gree of usefulness in professional de-
velopment and in public service.
Now, a question arises in my mind.
We have striven for years to gain
unity as professionals, to gain strength
through numbers, to gain an effective
voice with government-at national,
state and local levels-and to develop
a national forum and an effective
medium of communication for the
profession. \ill the continued de-
velopment of strong regional coun-
cils and attention to their programs
dilute our national solidarity and di-
minish effectiveness? Will it lead
to fission rather than fusion? Con-
ceivably it might.
But I do not believe that it will.
Because, as I have said, I rely upon
the goodwill of the members of our
profession, and upon our dedication
to the highest service of our society.
Because I believe that The Board of
Directors, as it may be constituted
year after year, will not only repre-
sent, but will lead the membership.
Because I believe in a fully-integrated
program of professional development
that will require and use the best
effort of every member-in his per-
sonal practice and service to his com-
munity, in his work in, and for, his
chapter, in his participation in the
council of his region, in his service
upon the different levels of the "ver-
tical" and other national commit-
tees, and in his attendance at na-
tional conventions.
We need to perfect ourselves indi-
vidually and as a profession in the
full and fine discipline we profess.
By cultivating and conserving the
richness of individual differences of
talent and performance, and by cor-
dially and constantly interchanging ex-
perience and acquired wisdom, we
may enjoy all the advantages of re-
gional characteristics within a frame-
work of unified endeavor and dedica-
tion in the service of our day and
generation. This is a realizable goal.
We are planning to attain it.
MARCH, 1955


SIGNS OF GOOD DESIGN



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OUR ENGINEERING, ART AND DESIGN DEPARTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE
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Joint Architect-Engineer Policy Code


The Architect-Engineer Policy Proposal, first drafted by a Joint FAA-FEC
Committee, has been subject to further study and revisions. Here is its final form as
approved and accepted as a code of good practice by both professional organizations.


PREAMBLE:
By its very nature the rendering of professional
services by the design professions must be on a
high ethical and professional basis. It is pre-
supposed that the collaborators will perform their
services in a cooperative manner with competence
and efficiency and in full compliance with the "Code
of Ethics" of the various professions.
Professional service, performed singly or in
collaboration, entails exhaustive study and research
in preparation for the solution of the problem, and
careful application of talent to sound planning and
design and the highest integrity in guarding the
client's interest.
1-BASIS
The functions and the responsibilities properly
inherent to the practice of architecture and en-
gineering frequently overlap. For that reason it is
difficult to establish an arbitrary and precise
measure by which to determine whether a particular
project should be regarded by the professions as
an architectural or as an engineering project.
Increasingly, present day projects require the serv-
ices of both professions. However, the interests of
the public and of both of the professions will be
advanced if certain policies can be established and
adhered to in the relations between the two pro-
fessions. Suggestions for such policies follow.
2-ARCHITECTS
Architects should be engaged as the prime pro-
fessionals for projects such as residences, apart-
ments, hotels, stores, office buildings, churches,
schools, hospitals, courthouses, and all other simi-
lar private, commercial and public buildings. The
engineer should not seek the position of prime
professional on such projects.
3-ENGINEERS
Engineers should be engaged as the prime pro-
fessional for projects such as roads, bridges, docks,
power plants, electrical generation, transmission
and distribution, water control, water supply and
distribution, sewage collection and disposal, heating
and air conditioning when not a part of a major
building project, factories with mechanical or elec-
trical equipment an important feature and all


other similar projects. The architect should not
seek the position of prime professional on such
projects.
4-EITHER PROFESSIONAL
There exists a third classification of projects
for which the prime professional may properly be
either an architect or an engineer. On such
projects the construction cost of the portion of
the work designed by either the architect or the
engineer may represent from 40% to 60% of
the construction cost of the entire project. Stadia,
industrial buildings, warehouses, cold storage, and
refrigerated buildings commonly fall within this
classification. Either of the two professions may
properly be designated prime professional on such
projects.
5-USE BY EACH
The prime professional for any project shall
call in members of the other profession to furnish
the services in the field of that profession required
by the project. Only registered members of either
profession shall be called in, and their work shall
bear their signature and their professional seal,
subordinated to that of the prime professional.
6-FEE SCHEDULES
Each profession shall prepare a special schedule
of fees that should be for the sole use of, and
that should be used by, the prime professional in
paying for services furnished by the member of
the other profession called in.
7-ADHERENCE
Adherence by the two professions to these con-
siderations will assure the public the service to
which it is entitled; it will promote good will
between the professions; it will enhance the stand-
ing of both professions in public opinion, and it
will promote the selection of professionals on the
basis of ability to give proper service rather than
on the basis of lowest price.
8-GENERAL
Nothing in the above would mitigate against
an architect or an engineer from joining forces
for the purpose of designing a building of any type
in a manner and under conditions satisfactory to
each of them.


14 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Standard Prestressed
Concrete members
were used in the con-
struction of scores of
modern structures
like these:
Bank of Lakeland
Building
Dillard Elementary
School at Fort
Lauderdale ne e
West Florida TilRoe 'e' by the oi
Terrazzo Corp.
warehouse
Concrete Stadioncum ati rt

Singer Building,
Pompano Beach
T. G. Lee Dairy
Bnildine at Orlando








The new WFLA-TV Transmission Building in Tampahy cn "Double Tee"
Prestressed Concrete Roof supplied and erected by the Florida Preressed Concrete
Co., Inc., Tampa . G. A. Miller, Inc., General Contractor.






pt ete'ent """
d' ner



ties for any building in which low cost and high performance.









Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
re of special importance. Standard unit designs are made in
long casting beds by the pre-tensioning bonded system. Each
has been thoroughly field-tested; and a wide variety of units
is now being made under controlled conditions by members of
the Prestressed Concrete Institute. These prestressed concrete
units are now available. They can be specified in sizes and
shapes to meet a range of span, load and design conditions.
Prestressed concrete units have low maintenance, high fire re-
sistance, high uniformity, low cost. Standard designs include
flat slabs, double-tee slabs, beams, columns and pilings.


FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE INSTITUTE MEMBERS

R. H. W RIGHT & SO N INC .. ............................................................. ................Ft. Lauderdale
LAKELAND ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC.......... .............................................. Lakeland
GORDON BROTHERS CONCRETE CO. ........................................... ........................Lakeland
FLORIDA PRESTRESSED CONCRETE CO., INC. ................................. ..................... Tampa
W EST CO A ST SHELL CO RP. ...... ................................................ ........................ .................Sarasota
DURA CRETE, IN C. ......... . ................................................................................................... ......... Leesburg
HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO. .................................................. Winter Park
PERM A CRETE, IN C. .................................................................................................................Daytona Beach
A National Organization to establish and supervise Prestressed Concrete standards and procedures
. . whose members are pledged to uphold the production control and specifications set up by the
Prestressed Concrete Institute.


MARCH, 1955








Specifications

for

Your Planning


Today, our way of life is
the best in our history .
in the world's history. And
one of the BIG reasons is
electric power!

We're proud to be one of
the companies who have
spent billions developing
this power without tax sub-
sidies of any sort . proud
to be supplying this area
with dependable, economi-
cal, electric power.

Yes, thanks to the methods
of efficient, mass-produc-
tion economy and sound
business management devel-
oped under our American
systme of free enterprise . .
electric power is the means
to better and better living.

Here in Florida . we
pledge to continue to sup-
ply dependable, economical,
Sunshine Service Electricity
S. for Happier Florida
Living.


FLORIDA POWER &
LIGHT COMPANY


V. R. Gorham, Treasurer of the Florida State A.G.C. Council, pinch-
hitting for President Ira Koger, presents a citation to F.A.A. Chapter
president John Stetson, while George J. Votaw and F.A.A. Secretary-
Treasurer Edgar S. Wortman beam appreciation for their own awards.



A.G.C. Awards Citations


Relations between architects and
general contractors of the Palm Beach
area are better than ever because of
what happened during the evening of
February 9th. At that time the Flor-
ida East Coast Chapter of the A.G.C.
held its annual meeting; and the high
point of the evening was the pre-
sentation, to three architects of the
Palm Beach F.A.A. Chapter, of cita-
tions "For outstanding achievement
during 1954." Recipients were: JOHN
STETSON, EDGAR S. NWORTMAN and
GEORGE J. VOTAW.
Award of the citations was made by
secret vote of the membership of the
A.G.C. Chapter; and when the poll
was made, over 60 per cent of the
architects in the area received votes.
This speaks well for the overall con-
duct of architectural business in Palm
Beach, for qualifications of the citation
covered three points of distinction:
First, preparation of clear and concise
drawings and specifications; second,
cooperation with general contractors
in adhering to recommended bidding
procedures; and, third, protection of
the interests of clients and equitable
consideration of general contractors


and sub-contractors. The three win-
ners received the greatest number of
votes from the contractors.
This is the first of what the A.G.C.
chapter hopes will be a continuing
yearly award that will eventually
become a custom in other chapters
throughout the State. It follows the
trend, started last year in the Florida
South Chapter, F.A.A., of recognizing
outstanding performance in various
groups of the construction industry;
and without question it is an excellent
means for promoting better inter-
industry relations.
In view of that, it is interesting to
learn that the F.A.A. Palm Beach
Chapter is contemplating a similar
award program for this year in recog-
nition of outstanding performance on
the part of general and sub-con-
tractors.
The meeting was attended by
F.A.A. President CLINTON GAMBLE
who presented A.G.C. awards to con-
tractors V. R. GORHAM, VINCENr L.
BURKHARDT, HAROLD L. HAWKINS and
P. C. LISSENDEN for outstanding
efforts in the interests of improving
conditions in the construction in-
dustry of the area.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






News -

--& Notes

Electrical Contractors,
State Board, Endorse
College Building Program
Virtually every phase of Florida's
construction industry has signified, to
various legislative committees and
government officials at Tallahassee,
complete approval of the proposal to
build a new home for the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts at Gaines-
ville. The State Board of Architecture
has written to Governor Collins on
the subject.
And so has the Florida Association
of Electrical Contractors. JAMES
DANDELAKE, chairman of that body's
legislative committee, signed a reso-
lution endorsing the proposed build-
ing . so this College can keep
pace with the growth of the State and
provide the training of men so
urgently needed in the construction
industry." The resolution was passed
unanimously at the meeting of the
Association's Board of Directors in
Jacksonville, January 23.
(Continued on Page 18)


ALBERT P. WOODARD, A.I.A.,
served as a member of the State
Board of Architecture from Janu-
ary, 1952, to November, 1954. Born
in Fayetteville, Tenn., he graduated
in architecture from Georgia Tech
and opened his own office in At-
lanta, Ga., in 1936. After a 4-year
service with the Corps of Engineers,
USA, he established his present of-
fice in Tallahassee in 1946.
MARCH, 1955


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News & Notes
(Continued from Page 17)
FES & FAA Boards Planning
Joint Luncheon Meeting
The Florida Engineering Society
will hold its annual Convention at
the Princess Iscena Hotel in Daytona
Beach, April 21, 22 and 23, winding
up the session with a luncheon meet-
ing of the new Board of Directors on
Saturday, April 23. HARVEY PIERCE,
recently-elected FES president, has
suggested to FAA President CLINTON
GAMBLE that a joint luncheon meet-
ing of both Boards of Directors be
held on that date. The April meeting
of the FAA Board had previously
set for April 16 at Daytona.

Student Chapter Home Show
Slated for April 21 to 24
With the chief aim of bringing
students'and practicing architects to-
gether at an exhibit of common in-
terest, the Student Chapter annual
Home Show at Gainesville will be
more ambitious than any yet at-
tempted. Feature attraction of the
affair will be an exhibition Florida
house, completely equipped and fur-
nished. Design of the house will be
chosen by completion among the
students.
A week-end of fun has been
planned-a picnic and swim party
Friday night; a luncheon Saturday
(Continued on Page 20)


State Board Announces
New Registrations
At the January meeting of the
Florida State Board of Architecture,
held at Jacksonville January 18-23,
S. RALPH FETNER of Jacksonville was
re-elected President, and MELLEN C.
GREELEY was continued in the po-
sition of Secretary-Treasurer.
During the session, 93 applicants
took one or more of the examinations
for architectural registrations, 23 of
these being new applicants taking
State Board exams for the first time.
After results had been tabulated,
RUSSELL T. PANCOAST, Chairman of
the Examining Committee, an-
nounced that 26 individuals had suc-
cessfully met the technical require-
ments for registration. This was 28
per cent of the number taking the
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





tests and was the best showing made
at any examination period since
World War II.
Registrations issued by the Board
in the period from July 12, 1954, to
January 22, 1955, total 60. Of these,
32 were to residents of Florida and 29
were to architects already practicing
in other states. Out-of-state registra-
tions included 7 from New York, 5
from Illinois, 3 each from Missouri
and Alabama, 2 from Minnesota, and
one each from California, Connecti-
cut, Georgia, Louisiana, South Caro-
lina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and
Washington.
Following is the list of Florida
registrants:
Ft. Lauderdale
LAWRENCE BROWNING
ARTHUR D. INWOOD
CHARLES F. McALPINE, JR.
Gainesville
WILLIAM B. EATON
WAYNE D. HEASLEY
JOHN D. PARRISH
FRANK B. REEVES
Gulfport
JAMES Y. BRUCE
Jacksonville
CECIL B. BURNS
HERBERT COONS, JR.
ROY M. POOLEY, JR.
Miami
RALPH A. ANDERSON
JAMES H. CHURCH
EDWARD E. CRAIN
WILLIAM M. FRIEDMAN
JOHN O. GRIMSHAW
JOSEPH G. RENTSCHER
JOSEPH N. SMITH, III
RoY W. SPENCE, JR.
FREEMAN L. WALKER
WILLIAM P. WHIDDON
Miami Beach
HOWARD M. DUNN
Panama City
THOMAS H. DANIELS
St. Petersburg
CHARLES L. COLWELL
THOMAS W. Moss
Sarasota
EDWARD J. SEIBERT
Starke
FRANK G. GEORGE
Stuart
DONALD E. ARMSTRONG
Tallahassee
FORREST R. COXEN
GEORGE M. MEGGINSON
Tampa
DONALD E. CLARK
West Palm Beach
CHARLES E. TOTH


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MARCH, 1955







Design Award for St. Augustine Architect


F. A. HOLLINGSWORTH, A.I.A., St.
Augustine, member, Florida North
Chapter, F.A.A.
A citation for architectural design
was awarded F. A. HOLLINGSWORTH,
veteran St. Augustine architect, on
behalf of the St. Augustine Historical
Society by Judge DAVID R. DUNHAM,
the Society's president, at a meeting
February 8. The citation, handsomely
embossed in color and done on parch-
ment, was presented for Mr. Hollings-
worth's work in restoring the Florida
State Arsenal, for his work with the
Society in restoring the Triay and
Fornelle houses, for his study of
Spanish architecture and its use in
St. Augustine structures and for his
work on the Webb Memorial Building
of the Society.



News & Notes
(Continued from Page 18)
for visiting architects; and the annual
Beaux Arts Ball Saturday night.
The Student Chapter, through its
Secretary, WALTER J. STANTON, ex-
tends a special invitation to visit the
Home Show to every architect in the
state.


Industrial Zoning Urged
For Palm Beach County
Architects have taken leadership in
putting the spotlight on the growing
need for the orderly control of in-
dustrial developments in Palm Beach
County. At the Chapter meeting on
February 10, a resolution was adopted
calling on county commissioners to
set up a county zoning and building
code in the shortest possible time.
20


The resolution urged immediate
action "to insure public health and
safety and to prevent lowering of
property values."
The resolution was sent, with a
covering letter signed by JOHN
STETSON, Palm Beach Chapter presi-
dent, to the Board of County Com-
missioners, to public officials of all
communities in Palm Beach County


and to various civic clubs, as well as
newspapers.
-Palm Beach County is not alone in
the need for better overall planning
and regulatory controls for industrial
construction. Industry is expanding
at a rapid rate in every section of the
state. Action of Palm Beach archi-
tects could well serve as inspiration
to those in other localities.


OBJ ECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
-public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the
advancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Top, Webb Memorial Building, headquarters of the St. Augustine Histori-
cal Society; and, above, the Florida State Arsenal, both of which were
the basis for the Society's architectural design award.


-' f'. _6 .



















































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