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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Come on along and join the...
 A new beginning at forty
 Tile
 Three days' round of fun
 Convention (continued from page...
 New J.C.C. meeting slated
 Convention (continued from page...
 Convention will have public...
 Important meetings planned prior...
 Chapter news and notes
 Producers' council program
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00005
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1954
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Come on along and join the clique!
        Page 1
        Page 2
    A new beginning at forty
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Tile
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Three days' round of fun
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Convention (continued from page 8)
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    New J.C.C. meeting slated
        Page 14
    Convention (continued from page 13)
        Page 15
    Convention will have public headquarters
        Page 16
    Important meetings planned prior to convention
        Page 17
    Chapter news and notes
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Producers' council program
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text












9v*e06t,


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FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN INSTITUTE


OF
OF


ARCHITECTS
ARCHITECTS


c7A


FI


November
*1954


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Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Hlorida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects


NOVEMBER, 1954 VOL 4, NO. 7


Officers of The F. A. A.
Igor B. Polevitzky ------- resident
250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
G. Clinton Gamble ----_Secy.-Treas.
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.

Directors
Florida North Central Chapter
James A. Stripling David W. Potter
Florida South Chapter
T. Trip Russell Herbert H. Johnson
Palm Beach Chapter
George J. Votaw Edgar S. Wortman
Broward County Chapter
Robert G. Jahelka
Morton T. Ironmonger
Florida North Chapter
Edward M. Fearney Franklin S. Bunch
Florida Central Chapter
John Bruce Smith Lawrance W. Hitt
Daytona Beach Chapter
Francis R. Walton David A. Leete
*0
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonvlle; H. L. Lindye/, (Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford Florida North Central Chap-
-ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
of any particular item cannot be guaran-
teed and all copy is subject to approval
of the Publication Committee. All or part
of the FLORIDA ARCHITECT'S editorial
material may be freely reprinted, provided
credit is accorded both the FLORIDA AR-
CHITECT and the author for prior publi-
cation.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by either the Publication Com-
mittee or the Florida Assocaition of Archi-
tects.
Address all communications relative to
both editorial and advertising matters to
the Editor, 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida.
MCMURRAY a 26 MIAMI

NOVEMBER, 1954


Come On Along


And Join The Clique!

You may have already heard it. The story about the man who
was complaining that his lodge was run by a handful of men.
"Sure," he said, "They do everything. They set up a lot of com-
mittees; but that doesn't mean much. Some of the committee chair-
men are part of the same gang and they have everything sewed up.
Me? Yes, I was a committee chairman too once. But I knew it
wasn't any use trying to do anything. They wouldn't have looked at
the report even if I'd made one. Besides, I was pretty busy then."
Chief trouble with that story is that it's not fiction. It's unfortun-
ately true to life- so true, in fact, that it can cause a twinge of
conscience to almost anybody.
The extent of the twinge depends on the man. It's mighty small
in the narrow minds of those who can't see the use for any kind of
organization and who won't join even a professional association
because "it can't do anything for me." It's somewhat bigger in the
fellow who's naturally of a retiring disposition and set in the routine
ways of his business.
But it is great indeed to any member of "the gang" that has
"everything sewed up." If he has failed to do anything less than his
best for the advancement of a cause or organization of which he is
a part, he feels it keenly. For he belongs to the handful of men who
have vision, a broad outlook beyond their own circle of activity, an
urge for creative thinking and the initiative needed to put constructive
ideas into action.
Such men run things in organizations and out. They run a better
business, live a smoother life at home, are respected as people who
think straight and get things done. When asked for an opinion they
give it. When given a job, they do the best they can. They get them-
selves a reputation for that; and pretty soon they're part of that same
gang which always runs things.
Ask any one of them how he got there and he'll answer something
like this: "Oh, I got interested in figuring out how our situation could
be improved. It was work at first; but after a while it didn't seem so."
It's a funny thing about most cliques in an organization like the
F.A.A. The members always want company. All that's needed to
join them is to get interested and do a little something that at first
seems like work. That's all it takes and a Convention is the best
of all times to start.
Why not come along and join the clique!



-. --- -


ROADMAP TO A GOOD TIME-It shows the location of La Coquille,
headquarters of the F.A.A. 40th Annual Convention.



















wKr I




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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







T7h P t f l Cw^A p e ..--... .. -. .-. '...-.... ..5 L... -




A New Beginning



At Forty


By Igor B. Polevitzky, A. I. A.


When anybody reaches forty a
certain amount of self-analysis is in
order. And certainly the process is
as appropriate to a professional group
like the F.A.A. as it is to any one
of that group's individual members.
With the F.A.A.'s 40th Annual
Meeting just around the corner, it's
obvious that behind it lies a record
of substantial growth and undeniable
progress. But if you believe with
Walter Pitkin-and who in the two-
score bracket doesn't? that "Life
begins at forty", it's equally obvious
that our professional association has
barely scratched the surface of its
potentialities.
Where do we stand right now?
And, in the light of that position,
what should we strive for in the im-
mediate future?
First, I suppose, is the present
strength of our organization. It's
statewide. It's representative of every
section of architectural activity, pro-
fessionally as well as geographically.
With its power flowing from the
grass roots of local chapter interests,
the concept of the F.A.A. as a pro-
fessional association is as healthily
American as apple pie.
And because that is so, our Asso-
ciation is more and more being rec-
ognized by the public as well as
other segments of the building indus-
try, as a well-knit professional group
that, both politically and socially,
has a great potential power for good.
The F.A.A. is now operating as ex-
actly that.
We have established a basic profes-
sional standard in our registration
laws. We have joined hands with the
engineering profession and with the

NO'.V ': EM': BE :- .1 '. '95 -
NOVEMBER, 1954


contractors to initiate cooperative
statewide organization of general
programs bent on not only maintain-
ing those professional standards, but
also on assuring a more understand-
ing and more mutually productive
association with those groups.
We have finally .recognized, col-
lectively and, for the most part, indi-
vidually that the true measure of
our professional progress is the extent
of our service to the people of our
communities and our state. And we
have begun to take an ever more
active part in matters of public inter-
est that touch on questions involving
our technical knowledge and profes-
sional experience.
In short, we have at last begun to
assume the mature responsibilities of
leadership within the tremendous in-
dustry of which we are a part. So the
F.A.A. is at the present. Toward
what future goals should we now
move?
One. of course, is the strengthening
of that leadership and its wise expan-
sion-a generality, perhaps, but a
vital one. The way of reaching that
goal must come from within our
membership; and it must be devel-
oped from a frank recognition among
ourselves of what the F.A.A. can do
within its own ranks to strengthen
its capacity for leadership and gen-
erate the driving force necessary to
make that Jeadership felt. Here are
some things that can help bring that
about.
Membership in the FAA should be
increased. Ideally, our association
should not stop growing until it has
enrolled every architect registered in
our state who can meet the profes-


sional and ethical standards of our
association.
We need more individual partici-
pation in F.A.A. affairs and pro-
grams. No body can grow either in
size or influence if the many ride on
the activity-coattails of the few. We
must find ways first of stimulating
interests in local, professional affairs.
Each chapter should be the breeding
ground for state-wide policies and
programs. Each can be if individual
members will put forth the effort
needed to make it so.
We need a more constant contact
between our chapters and ourselves
as building professionals. We should
exchange our technical experiences,
air our considered opinions for the
good of our profession and the in-
terests of those other segments of
the building industry with whom
we work. And we should keep our-
selves constantly informed as to what
is happening in our Association-
and what each of us can do to help.
The means for such contacts and
exchanges of ideas and experiences
are already available to every archi-
tect in the state in The Florida
Architect, the F.A.A.'s own official
journal. Let us use it. Let us read
it regularly, contribute to it as often
as possible, encourage those firms
whose advertisements make it pos-
sible for the magazine to serve our
professional organization's needs.
On such foundations as these the
building of our future progress de-
pends. I am confident that the next
year can see them immeasurably
strengthened as a fitting start to the
new life that the 40 years of our
Association has made possible.


. I .:. 4 r '. -. q r- .- 1 .


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT




























TILE


By

KAY PANCOAST


Architectural history has a way of
repeating itself. Thoughtful designers
realize this. But proof of the fact is
still like a bright spotlight turned on.
From it comes a glimpse of new possi-
bilities for gaining fresh, and better,
results.
The place of ceramics in architec-
tural design, for example, is nothing
new. Research' has laid bare, under
eighty feet of Egyptian soil, the fact
that ceramics and architecture
marched hand-in-hand through civili-
zations some 18,000 years old. Ruins
of these show that tile, used as a
natural complement to structure, con-
tributed form and surface and texture
and color and beauty to buildings.
We talk about such things today. In
the Egyptian world of 18,000 years
ago, people were living with them.
It was the same in ancient China,
in Greece, in many parts of the
Roman Empire. In all these countries,
ceramics flourished to contribute their
touch of finality to buildings and to
preserve the color and the life and
the talent of their crafters' time. But
in America there was none of it. No
architectural ceramic heritage has been


uncovered here. Pottery, yes; but that
or Indian origin only, comparatively
recent, and completely divorced from
architectural association. Indeed, ar-
chitectural ceramics used in this coun-
try were entirely imported at first,
for the country did not have even a
single tile company until after the
Civil War.
So, the modern ceramist's job in
the field of architecture is vast-and
vastly difficult. Against the overall
background of ceramic usage, he has
nothing of a local tradition from
which to work. Nor has he had, until
recently, any adequate technical basis
on which to advance. He cannot ana-
lyze his work against the accomplish-
ments of a native past, for there is
nothing at hand to serve as subject
.or comparison.
Architectural ceramics is far more
virgin a field of design than is com-
monly realized. Progress in it is slow,
too, for the range of technical knowl-
edge needed is wide, the breadth of
design possibilities virtually unlimited.
With each new fact learned, a new
avenue of design is opened up. Thus,
progress may be constant. But it is


Photos by Rudi Ruda


progress wrung from seemingly end-
less failures, unceasing experimenta-
tion. Rules are few, seldom hard and
fast; and variations from them are
almost literally beyond the number-
ing.
Perhaps because all this is so, re-
sults are sometimes incredibly reward-
ing. In the fields of industrial and
chemical ceramics an amazing pin-
nacle of technical perfection has been
reached. Products have known qual-
ities, rigidly controlled, exactly bal-
anced for particular purposes, manu-
factured with mechanical exactitude.
But they are not products that can
be used in architectural design.
Nor should they. Modern design
faces the danger of becoming sterile
in the human quality of emotion.
The machine products may give pre-
cision in form and dimension; but
they cannot provide the emotional
quality that we need. This comes
(Continued on Page 6)


NOVEMBER, 1954 5


































DESIGNER-CERAMIST Kay Pancoast graduated from the
Architectural School at Cornell and since 1924 has been active
in design circles in Miami. For some time she did stage
designing for local theater groups, later became adept at
fabric and wallpaper design. Her interest in tile stems from
her search for a design field primarily adaptable to architec-
ture and susceptible to a full range of color and graphic
expression. The tiled architrave, right, is a recent installation
of sgraffitto units in which the design is cut from a white clay
again a background of terra-cotta.


vnOTOS Dy KODerr blanaer


from color, from texture, from the
individuality of craftsmanship that
gives variety and vibrant depth to the
overall result.
Such things are part and parcel of
architectural ceramics. They become
most evident and most satisfactory
in tile tile used in modern build-
ings as it was used in ancient Assyria
or Babylonia. Tile is a permanent
thing, a part of the building itself. Its
use today, as in the past, must reflect
that fact. So, in color, it must be
apt. In design it must be conservative
to the extent that it is in complete
harmony with the architectural theme
and detail of the structure which
holds it.
Out of that has come a few ob-
servations that seem like good rules
to follow. Tile designs should prob-
ably not be pictorial at least in the
Victorian sense--lest they detract
from a sense of structure. Use of tile
should justify itself as a special type


of modern material, ideal for a facing,
indoors or out, where the structure
of the building demands an envelope
and the. surface- with its character-
istic of color and texture- becomes
a design element of dominant impor-
tance.
Here, of course, tile can serve with
glory. Its color, burned in, will never
fade. Each individual marking is there
to stay. Surface textures will with-
stand temperature, wind and weather.
Maintenance is child's play, easy and
quick. And for trim, for practical
wainscots, or for decorative panels on
walls or floors-even on some ceil-
ings-tile might well be called one of
the perfect architectural materials.
That fact is the more impressive
in view of the very wide range of
tiles that the modern ceramist can
make available. It is possible to obtain
tiles that are completely handmade,
individually glazed and fired. They are
apt to be varied in size and shape as


well as color, for control of clays and
firing to assure a strict physical con-
formity is hardly possible. But in cer-
tain applications, these natural vari-
ations produce a surface texture and
interest that is desirable and espe-
cially appropriate.
But most modern ceramists are con-
tent to work with glazes and surface
design to get the results they seek
in terms of color and texture. They
use a bisque as a basic form a reli-
ably stable unglazed tile, mechanically
formed and fired under controlled
conditions to produce fairly uniform
characteristics. Their finishing ma-
terials include various types of slips -
thin, free-flowing mixtures of fine clay
and water a wide range of glazes
most of which are metalic compounds,
and even such natural metals as cop-
per, aluminum, silver, pewter and
German silver. They use each with
imagination, with deep respect for the
vagaries of each when touched with


6 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111








the heat of the kiln. And they work
with infinite patience, borne up by
the painstaking zeal and deep-seated
optimism of the researcher who seeks
a goal, strives toward it, but can never
be quite sure how his best efforts will
turn out.
Uncertain? Yes, the art of ceramics
is all of that. Even the most careful
of tile-makers can never say just why
one tile, or batch of them, will come
from the kiln very close to the per-
fection sought-or why another batch,
made with identical materials and
methods, will produce a failure of a
design but possibly a brilliant suc-
cess of another sort.
Ancient Japanese tilemakers had
one answer for it, and as good a one
as any other. In each kiln, they said,
lives a goddess of the clay. When the
kiln is cold, she sleeps. When it is
fired she comes alive and watches the
heat transform the clay and make the
glazes take on color and depth. When
the firing is over she looks at each
object in the kiln. Those she likes,
she blesses. The others she wrecks.
To a large degree modern glazes
and methods of applying them and
firing have earned fairly consistent
blessings from the goddess of the clay.
And experimentation has accom-
plished a number of unusual successes,
some of them truly brilliant ones. For
example, tremendously effective-
though sometimes unpredictable-re-
sults have been obtained by combin-
ing glazing techniques and by com-
bining various glaze colors with metals
and slips.
Three main methods of decorating
tile are used today: underglaze, over-
glaze and polychrome. In underglaz-
ing, a design, or single color, is applied
to the unglazed bisque. The tile is
then coated with a transparent glaze
and fired. Overglazing involves first
coating the bisque with a color glaze
and firing. Then a design is painted
over the glaze and the tile re-fired
at a heat sufficient to fuse and set the
design, but not high enough to dis-
turb the original glaze.
Colors obtained through overglaz-
ing are more brilliant than those
resulting from underglazing. But with
underglazing, both color and design
(Continued on Page 22)


Robert Glander
This tile-faced barbecue suggests an ideal use for tile in which factors of
easy maintenance and permanence of material and design are of chief
importance. The design here is worked out in polychrome, adapting the
Spanish "dry-cord" method to modern usage and techniques.


Rudi Rada
A vividly colorful installation developed by combining polychrome with
inglazing to achieve both depth and range of color with smool and permanent
surface treatment. These tile required several processes with underglaze
pigments painted on unfired glaze to obtain the effect.


I1III 11III 1111111111 IIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIII IIIIIII IIu IIIIII II IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINOVEM BER, 1954 7IIIIII I I IIIIIII I IIIIIIIIIII
NOVEMBER, 1954 7


1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111








Three


Day's












Round


of Fun


In just about two weeks from the
time you read this, the 40th Annual
Convention of the F.A.A. will get off
to a rousing start. The place, Palm
Beach; the headquarters, the fabulous
La Coquille Hotel; the time, No-
vember 18, 19 and 20.
The program in the adjacent col-
umns gives you the official time-table
of the Convention. But no such sche-
dule can suggest the fun and good
fellowship that awaits everyone who
attends. For the past four months a
hard-driving committee of twelve-
headed by General Convention Chair-
man RAY PLOCKELMAN, and not
counting Chapter President EDGAR
S. WORTMAN-has been perfecting
plans for what is visioned as "a fall
vacation period and a three-day round
of fun for everyone."
That can be taken literally. Though
business meetings will hold an im-
portant place on the Convention's
agenda, all efforts will be made to
keep them short and effective, thus
giving the greatest possible opportun-
ity for sight-seeing, relaxation and
good-time activities. Here are some
of the plans that don't show on the
official program.
For the ladies of the Convention
Friday, the 19th, will be virtually an
all-day whirl. Starting at 10 a.m.,
they'll be treated to a tour of several
(Continued on Page 10)


PROGRAM: 40th ANNUAL CONVENTION, F. A. A.


THURSDAY AFTERNOON
3:00 Executive Board Meeting
Registration begins
Architectural Exhibit
opens
Manufacturer's Exhibit
opens
Committee meetings
THURSDAY EVENING
6:00 Cocktail party by Palm
Beach Chapter Presi-
dent. All convention
registrants invited.
FRIDAY MORNING
8:00 Dutch treat breakfast
meeting for F.A.A. offi-
cers, Convention Chair-
men, and convention
committee chairmen.
8:30 Registration continues
Exhibits open
9:30 Opening business session.
President Igor Polevitzy
presiding.
Reports by officers and
standing committees.
12:30 Stag Luncheon
Welcome and introduction
of dignitaries.
Awards for architectural
and student exhibits.


Address by Nicholas Arro-
yo, Architect of Havana,
Cuba.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
2:00 Business Session
President Igor Polevitzky
presiding.
Old business
3:30 Panel Discussion -
"Architecture Under The
Sun," John Stetson,
Moderator.
FRIDAY EVENING
7:00 Cocktail Party
8:00 Buffet Dinner (Informal)
9:00 Introduction of guests and
A.I.A. Representatives
9:15 Ceremony honoring new
Fellows of the A.I.A.
Sanford W. Goin and
Marion Sims Wyeth.
9:30 Dancing & Entertainment
SATURDAY MORNING
8:30 Exhibits open
9:30 Closing Business Session,
President Igor Polevitzy
presiding
Reports of committees
Resolutions
New business
Election of Officers
Adjournment


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Introducing


JALD 1RETi





The JALOCRETE is a reinforced pre-cast concrete frame glass
jalousie-a revolutionary new development in the building
field combining the durability of concrete, modular con-
formity, and amazingly low installation cost.
The result of years of research and development utilizing
the combined skills and experience of architects, engineers,
and manufacturers, the JALOCRETE will be presented to
the Architectural fraternity for the first time at the FAA
Convention in Palm Beach, Nov. 18, 19, 20.
We sincerely believe you will find a visit to the JALOCRETE
exhibit, Booth 12, an interesting and worthwhile experience.
SEE IT IN BOOTH 12










ENGINEERED
PRODUCTS, INC.
1064 E. 29th STREET HIALEAH, FLORIDA


NOVEMBER, 1954










Beyond

The

Specifications


The kind of Quality that ar-
chitects demand for Mill-
work can't be completely
specified or covered by de-
tail drawings it goes
beyond these. It comes from
the background of a firm
with long experience. It
means fine plant equipment,
skilled craftsmen with a
"feel" for woods as well as
technical knowledge of
them. It means, too, the
kind of management that
insists on the kind of fine
and accurate work he, the
architect and the client can
all be proud of For 25
years we've been doing that
kind of work in the custom
manufacture of Sash and
Doors, Cabinets, Screens and
Screen Doors, Mouldings
and Trim. We have done all
types of jobs, large ones,
small ones .. On every one
we've produced and installed
Millwork that has been qual-
ity "beyond the specifica-
tions."


coraon M. rotrer
PALM BEACH CHAPTER PRESI- CONVENTION CHAIRMAN-Ray-
DENT-Edgar S. Wortman, of mond H. Plockelman, of Palm
Lake Worth. Beach.


Convention
(Continued from page 8)
famed Palm Beach estates, including
those of JOSEPH DAVIES and HORACE
DODGE, and including the buildings
as well as the grounds. At 1 p.m.
there'll be luncheon at the Sailfish
Club. It will be held on the pool
terrace and will feature a fashion
show of sunshine and sport styles by
one of Palm Beach's finest shops.
After luncheon there'll be another
tour, this one to the famous gardens
of the Bethesda Church. From there
the feminine caravan will visit the
Norton Gallery to view the Con-,
vention's architectural exhibit as well
as one of the most prized permanent
exhibits of fine arts in the South.
The ladies are also invited to Chap-


ter President Wortman's cocktail
party on Thursday evening and the
cocktail party and informal F.A.A.
Annual Dinner on Friday evening.
Throughout the Convention period
transportation will be provided. And
no Convention lady need worry about
the tab! All the Committee asks is
that those who wish to, sign up early
so details can be smoothly coordi-
nated.
You and your wife may want to
sign up for more than one thing, too.
On Saturday afternoon, starting about
2 p.m., there'll be an afternoon of
deep-sea fishing to which all Con-
vention registrants are invited. The
trip will be through the courtesy of
several local contractors lucky enough
to have boats. You'll be back on the
dock at about 5 p.m.
Another trip has also been planned


Trotter


Manufacturing


Company




,. .o <25 years


636 East Twenty-first Street
Jacksonville 6, Florida


DURING EVENING CONVENTION festivities Thursday and Friday nights
of the Convention, the pool terrace of La Coquille will look much as it did
during the opening party of that famed hotel.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
























CONVENTION CO-CHAIRMAN-
Gustav A. Maass, of Palm Beach.

- an overnight one to Nassau via a
specially chartered plane of the Mac-
key Air Line that operates on a
regular schedule between Palm Beach
and the Bahamas. It's an all-expense
tour leaving Palm Beach Sunday
morning, November 21, and returning
late Monday afternoon. Included in
the $42 per person rate are accom-
modations at one of Nassau's finest
hotels, all meals and three sight-see-
ing tours, including the inevitable
night club stops. Trip leader will be
PAUL E. KOHLER. Registrations are
necessarily limited and should be
made early.
As to other generalities in the en-
tertainment line, the Committee sug-
gests you bring your golf clubs and
tennis rackets if you're still that fast
on your feet. And, of course, swim-
ming things, for the magnificent pool
of La Coquille will be entirely at the
disposal of Conventioneers. Fun? If
(Continued on Page 12)


"B & G"- Brown & Grist



WINDOWS & WINDOW WALLS

COMPLETE UNIT SPEEDY INSTALLATION


OUTER SKIN
Pattern Aluminum
Porcelain
Asbestos
Stainless Steel
Plastic Sheet
Etc.


CORE
Insulite
Celotex
Styrofoam
Fiberglass
Rubbertex
Etc.


INNER SKIN
Aluminum
Plastic
Plywood
Hardboard
Sheetroek
Etc.


IN YOUR LOCALITY CALL:


Rabe's Studio
CONVENTION CO-CHAIRMAN-
Frederick G. Seelman, of West
Palm Beach.
NOVEMBER, 1954


Hollywood -_____ 5443
Tampa ___-- 33-9231
Daytona Beach _3-1421


Miami ______48-4486
Ocala __--_MA-2-3755
Jacksonville ___98-6767
Pensacola__Hemlock 8-1444


W. Palm Beach___8517
Orlando _____ 4-9601
Tallahassee ---2-0399


FLORIDA SALES REPRESENTATIVE:

George C. G riffin P. Box 5151, Jacksonville
.111111111111t 11111111111111









Convention will be Host to V. 1. P. s


EDMUND R. PURVES, F.A.I.A.

High-ranking professional guests of
the Convention will'include EDMUND
R. PURVES, Executive Director of the
A.I.A., and HERBERT C. MILLKEY,
A.I.A. Director for the South At-
lantic Region. Purves, who has been
associated with A.I.A. headquarters
since 1941, was named to his present
post in 1949, following the retirement


Keynote speaker at the Convention
will be NICHOLAS ARROYO, prominent
architect of Havana, Cuba, whose
subject, tagged as "Architecture Un-
der the Sun", will be the design of
modern buildings for sub-tropical cli-
mates. A graduate of the Havana
University College of Architecture, he
has been a member of the architect-


HERBERT C. MILLKEY, A.I.A.

of EDWARD C. KEMPER. Millkey was
elected Regional director at the na-
tional A.I.A. convention last June to
succeed G THOMAS HARMON. He is
a member of the Atlanta firm of
Willner and Millkey and associated
with the teaching staff of Georgia
Tech. He has had a long record of
service to the Institute.



S NICHOLAS ARROYO,
honor guest of the Con-
vention, is one of the
busiest architects in Cuba.
Work now in progress in-
cludes the Cuban National
Theater and Sports Palace,
four major hospitals and
30 health centers for child
welfare. He has just com-
pleted plans for the Inter-
national Airport Terminal
in Havana and is now en-
gaged in developing the
master plan for a huge
tourist center at Varadero,
near Havana.



ural firm of Menandez and Arroyo
since 1942. He is also a member of
the Cuban Architects' Association and
the Cingress of International Modern
Architects. He was recently appoint-
ed, in association with WELTON
BECKET, of Los Angeles, as architect
for Cuba's most up-to-date hotel, the
new Havana-Hilton.


REGISTRATION SECRETARY -
Maurice E. Holley, of Palm Beach.

Convention
(Continued from Page 11)
anyone doesn't have it, the fault will
certainly be theirs!
Costs The Convention registra-
tion fee will include the cost of the
Friday evening cocktail party and din-
ner. It has been set as follows: For
Corporate and Associate members,
$10; Junior Associates, $3; Student
Associates, $1; Non-members of the
F.A.A., $10; and Ladies, $5. No reg-
istration fee will be required of prod-
uct exhibitors.
Hotel accommodations have been
set at a flat $7.50 per day per person.
This, of course, does not include meals
or any incidental expenses. All checks
should be made out to "F.A.A. 40th
Annual Convention." They should be
marked to indicate exactly what the
amount is to cover, so proper credit
for fees can be given. And they should
be sent in as soon as possible.


TREASURER-David S. Shriver,
of Palm Beach.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Ill 1111111 LI 1m nm11 I [H]mI [I I I I] I In I InII Fr




















J. Sam Johnson
PROGRAM AND ENTERTAIN-
MENT-Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.,
Lake Worth.

Transportation- Don't worry
about it! If you're driving, La Co-
quille Hotel, Convention Head-
quarters, is on U.S. A1A eight miles
south of Palm Beach at Manalapan,
seven miles north of Del Ray Beach.
You can't miss it! If you're arriving
by plane or train, transportation to
La Coquille will be furnished by the
Committee and the same fleet of
twelve station wagons, with drivers,
will be available for trips to Palm
Beach and the Norton Gallery during
the Convention.

Architectural Exhibits- Work of
any size and type is being welcomed,
whether represented in sketches, ren-
derings, working drawings, models or
photographs. An exhibit of student
work from the U. of M. is assured.
All material must arrive in Palm
Beach by November 16. It should be
sent prepaid to: The Norton Gallery
(Continued on Page 15)










41..



I !
HOSPITALITY, ENTERTAINMENT
-John Stetson, Palm Beach.
NOVEMBER, 1954


7. 4.A. rop Viaideity Insaaurance Pays It, 7T


$400 a month

WHEN SICK OR HURT



When you're sick or hurt and can't work, you need money
to live on and you may need extra money for medical,
hospital or nursing expenses. Here's the security the
F.A.A. Group Health-Accident Program gives you...


* SICKNESS Up to $400 per month for as long as
5 years should illness prevent you from working.
* ACCIDENT Monthly income up to $400 for as long
as disability stops your earning power even for life!
And up to $20,000 for your family in case of accidental
death.
HOSPITAL EXPENSES... An extra payment up to $200
monthly for as long as three months should sickness or
accident put you in a hospital.
NURSES, DOCTORS FEES Up to $200 per month
extra for nursing services up to three months and up
to $100 extra to help pay doctor's bills.


LOW-COST GROUP
INSURANCE WILL
GUARANTEE YOU
MONEY WHEN YOU
NEED IT MOST
. .
..l....................l......l......"l


You can choose from 8
different monthly income
plans offered by the
F.A.A Group Health-Acci-
dent Insurance Program-
virtually write your own
policy to fit your needs
and budget. This guaran-
teed protection is spon-
sored by the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects and
is underwritten by the In-
ter-Ocean Insurance Com-
pany, Cincinnati, Ohio.


Apply now to:

BEN W. BALAY, Manager, STATE OFFICE

1202 Florida Title Bldg., Jacksonville, Florida








New J.C.C. Meeting Slated


State-wide Joint Cooperative Committe, FAA-AGC,

will Report on Progress, plan next year's program


Better understanding and im-
proved relationships between archi-
tects and general contractors is well
on the way to becoming a formally
established fact. Last August, in Or-
lando, committees representing both
the Florida Association of Architects
and the Florida State Council of As-
sociated General Contractors met to
form a Joint Cooperative Committee
on a State-wide basis. As reported in
these columns in the September is-
sue, the meeting forged an organiza-
tion and established sub-committees
toward the end of developing a pro-
gram that would meet approval of
both architects' and contractors' or-
ganizations and thus establish a basis
for the same sort of cooperative ac-
tion state-wide as has proven so valu-
able on both national and local chap-
ter levels.
The second meeting of the Joint
Cooperative Committee is slated for
Wednesday evening, November 17,
just prior to the opening of the F.A.A.
Convention. Purpose of this meeting
is to consider reports of sub-commit-
tees, to clarify further the aims and
policies of the new organization and
to draft a program of practical action
for the coming year.


All indications point to the proba-
bility that the meeting in November
will produce positive and specific re-
sults. All sub-committees have met,
have considered the subjects with
which they were charged at the Au-
gust organizational meeting and have
indicated to Chairman CLINTON
GAMBLE their readiness to present
reports embodying definite recom-
mendations for future action.
Particularly important among them
is the sub-committee on Bidding
Procedures. Headed by J. HILBERT
SAPP as the contractor-chairman, and
including contractors JAMES M. AL-
BERTS and JACK O'BRIEN and archi-
tects GEORGE J. VOTAW, JOSEPH SHIF-
ALO and ROBERT C. JAHELKA, this
committee met in mid-September at
Fort Lauderdale and evolved a set of
standards on bidding procedures de-
signed for state-wide application.
These standards will be the basis of
the committee's report at the Novem-
ber JCC meeting.
Meanwhile, these bidding stand-
ards were submitted as the commit-
tee's tentative recommendations to
the Florida State AGG Council's
mid-year Board of Directors' Meet-


F -K



G. CLINTON GAMBLE, A.I.A., Per- W. H. ARNOLD, Vice-Chairman of
manent Chairman of the Florida the State-wide J.C.C., is Vice-Presi-
State J.C.C., is a principal in the dent of the Arnold Construction
firm of Gamble, Pownall & Gilroy, Co., Palm Beach, and a Past-presi-
Architects. He is also Treasurer of dent of the Florida East Coast
the F.A.A. Chapter of the A.G.C.
14


ing on October 8 at Ponte Vedra
Beach. The AGC Board ratified a
number of the JCC's actions at its
initial Orlando meeting and went on
record as also approving the bidding
standards, subject, of course, to final
acceptance by the Joint Cooperative
Committee as a whole and subse-
quent approval by the architect's or-
ganization during its Palm Beach
Convention.
Equally concrete results are expect-
ed from sub-committees on Budget,
U. of F. Scholastic Awards, and Tech-
nical Reference Libraries. As work
of Joint Cooperative Committee
groups develops into a definite and
well-integrated program, salient ac-
tions will be reported here.
No thoughtful member of the
building industry-architect or gen-
eral contractor-would minimize the
present need for a smoother mutual
understanding between every factor
of that industry, or the desirability of
a cooperative program that would
serve the practical ends of meeting
that need. JOHN McLEOD, nation-
al AGC president, suggested the
long-range aspects of such a program
by stating, "I think that perhaps the
greatest value of the joint committee
lies in its basic concept of industry-
wide cooperation." And IGOR B.
POLEVITZKY, FAA president, voiced
the idea, before a gathering of more
than 200 leaders of Florida's con-
struction industry last spring, that
ultimately the joint cooperative idea
could embrace every major factor in
the building field.
That long-range objective also was
designated as the ultimate goal of
current cooperative efforts by IRA
KOGER, president of the Florida
AGC Council at the initial JCC
meeting in Orlando. But as most
practical building professionals real-
ize, the future must be solidly built
on the successes of the present. If
the current work of its sub-commit-
tees and the recommendations they
have developed can be wholeheartedly
accepted by both architects and gen-
eral contractors, the Joint Cooperative
Committee will have taken a long
step toward the bright future visioned
by industry leaders. From that point
of view, if from no other, the full
report of the JCC and the announce-
ment of its program for the coming
year is a matter of first importance
to every AGC and FAA member.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT





















TRANSPORTATION-Ames Ben-
nett, of Palm Beach, chairman.

Convention
(Continued from Page 18)
and School of Art, Pioneer Park,
West Palm Beach. Mark it for the
attention of Architectural Exhibition
Committee, Belford Shoumate, Chair-
man.
Two special exhibit galleries have
been made available for this showing
by the Norton Gallery; and additional
space is ready if needed. They will be
opened for viewing Thursday after-
noon, November 18, and will remain
open to the public through Sunday,
November 21. All material will be
packed and returned to the sender
collect as soon as possible after that
date.
The Award Jury, as now planned,
will comprise five architects. Invited
to review the exhibit and present
awards are: MARION SIMMS WYETH,
F.A.I.A., Palm Beach; ALFRED
(Continued on Page 16)


ARCHITECTURAL EXHIBITS-
Belford Shoumate, Palm Beach.
NOVEMBER, 1954


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PUBLICITY-Harold Obst, of Palm PUBLICITY-Emily Obst, distaff
Beach is half of this team. side of Obst & Obst is other half.


Convention
(Continued from Page 18)

BROWNING PARKER, Miami; ELLIOTT
B. HADLEY, St. Petersburg; ROBERT
LAW WEED, Miami, and HARRY MIL-
TON GRIFFIN, Daytona Beach.
Product Exhibits Up to the
deadline for publication of this issue,
GEORGE J. VOTAW, in charge of this
important phase of the Convention,
reported that 30 firms had made
commitments for space and were
already hard at work getting their
exhibits in readiness for the open-


ing. Tight space prevents listing them
here; but the character of the firms
and the types of materials and equip-
ment involved make it certain that
the show will be not only of wide
and varied interest, but also valuable
as a source of up-to-date information.
Products range from an adhesive,
through paints and sound insulation
to structural and finish masonry ma-
terials. Equipment includes windows,
doors, air-conditioning units, electric-
al heating elements and accessories,
full-scale kitchens, sound systems and
building hardware. All will be housed
in a huge 60'x100' flame-and-water-
proof tent on the grounds of La Co-
quille Hotel and will be but a step


CONVENTION WILL HAVE PUBLICITY HEADQUARTERS


Publicity Co-Chairmen HAROLD
and EMILY OBST are planning to
maintain a centrally-located publicity
headquarters in La Coquille through-
out the Convention. From it will be
issued stories dealing with significant
Convention news; and it will serve,
with the Registration Center of the
Convention, as a focal point for all
F.A.A. members and their guests.
The publicity committee is espe-
cially anxious to learn about the reg-
istration of all those attending from
distant parts of the State. The Chair-
men ask that they be contacted so
that personal news notes may be sent
out from the Convention to local,
home-town papers. They stress the
fact that "personal" publicity of this
kind is also excellent publicity for
the architectural profession through-
out the State; but it will be possible


to obtain only through the coopera-
tion of individual architects attend-
ing the Convention.
As part of the publicity set-up, a
capable photographer from one of
the local newspapers will be present
during most of Thursday and Friday.
He will cover the special events of
the Convention; and it is hoped that
he will also be able to record candid
shots of many F.A.A. members -
and their wives who will attend.
As now planned, all significant
sessions of the Convention will be
recorded on tape for later transcrip-
tion and as complete as possible re-
porting in the December issue of
The Florida Architect. Represent-
atives of the F.A.A. official journal
will attend all sessions of the Conven-
tion and will also be on hand to as-
sist the Publicity Committee.


PRODUCT EXHIBITS-George J.
Votaw, of West Palm Beach.

from Convention headquarters.
As it is now shaping up, the show
will be an outstanding one that de-
serves viewing by the general public
as well as every architect who attends
the Convention. To let the public
know what's happening inside the
big tent, Chairman Votaw has plan-
ned an intensive publicity program
for the Saturday afternoon and Sun-
day following the close of formal
Convention sessions.
Now scheduled are "at least twen-
ty" radio spot announcements run-
ning through these two days. Adver-
tisements in Palm Beach and West
Palm Beach papers will also cover the
public aspect of the exhibit; and lo-
cal correspondents of out-of-town pa-
pers have already been primed to
cover the show.

One unique feature of this year's
Convention will be the comparative
absence of speeches. Aside from busi-
ness sessions, speech-making has been
confined to two general periods-one
during the Stag Luncheon on Friday
noon, the other during the Panel on
Friday afternoon.
Visiting dignitaries including
National A.I.A. Executive Director
EDMUND R. PURVES and A.I.A. Re-
gional Director HERBERT C. MILLKEY
--will be introduced at Friday's
luncheon. At that time, too, NICHO-
LAS ARROYO, famed Havana, Cuba,
architect will address Conventioneers.
The Panel Discussion will be mod-
erated by JOHN STETSON and will in-
clude, FREDERIC STRESAU, landscape
architect; JACK CONNELL, engineer;
JACK CAMERON, interior decorator,
and J. A. MEACHAM, color consultant.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






IMPORTANT MEETINGS
PLANNED PRIOR
TO CONVENTION
Three meetings of particular im-
portance have been scheduled before
the official start of the 40th F.A.A.
Convention on Thursday, November
18. If they concern you as a commit-
tee member, mark them on your cal-
endar now.
Joint Luncheon, Architects-
Engineers This is planned as a
discussion session to be held Thurs-
day noon at La Coquille Hotel for
all members of Architect-Engineers
Relations Committees of both pro-
fessional organizations. F.A.A. Presi-
dent POLEVITZKY and CARL JENSEN,
Chairman for the committee of the
engineers' group, are both anxious for
a full attendance.
Discussion will center about possi-
bilities for joint legislative activity,
toward the promotion of which the
engineers have already authorized a
fund of $3,000.
Dinner Meeting Joint Cooper-
ative Committee, FAA AGC -
Detailed notice of this gathering has
been reported elsewhere in this is-
sue (see page 14). It will be a din-
ner meeting to start promptly at 7
PM, Wednesday, November 17, at
the Terrace Room, Colony Hotel,
Palm Beach. Co-Chairmen CLINTON
GAMBLE and W. H. ARNOLD and
JCC Secretary WILLIAM P. BOBB, JR.,
have prepared an agenda that includes
reports and recommendations of all
sub-committees and the consideration
of a program for the coming year.
Florida State Board of Archi-
tecture This body will meet at
La Coquille Hotel, FAA Convention
headquarters, at 9 AM, Thursday,
November 18. As reported in these
columns last month, under the head-
ing "F.A.A. Legislative Committee
Notes .", the State Board has
been considering important changes
in the laws regulating the practice
of architecture. As now planned the
Board's recommendations for amend-
ments to the law will be submitted
to the F.A.A. at the Convention.
Each of these meetings center on
a subject vital to progress of profes-
sional activity not only for the
F.A.A. as a body, but for every reg-
istered architect in the State.
NOVEMBER, 1954


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Chapter News & Notes


FLORIDA NORTH

The Roosevelt Hotel at Jacksonville
was headquarters for the Chapter's
fall quarterly meeting. That was both
a smart and fortunate agreement, for
the meeting date coincided with the
all-day exhibit of the Producers'
Council Caravan show.
Members started to gather in earn-
est about that stimulating exhibit as
cocktail time approached, for they
were to be guests of the Jacksonville
Producers' Council Chapter, prior to
their own dinner meeting at 7 PM.
Attendance from most Chapter areas
was excellent, though it was not pos-
sible for most members in the Pen-
sacola area to be present.
After an excellent dinner President
LOGAN CHAPPELL introduced Miss
CORA LEE WELLS of the University
of Florida, who then received from
a spokesman of the National Board
of Fire Underwriters her scholarship
award. Mr. W. J. BALDWIN, president
of the Jacksonville Producers' Coun-
cil Chapter then spoke briefly on the
plans now underway for constructing
a new building to house a permanent
exhibit of building materials and
products. The project, admittedly an
ambitious one and still more of an
idea than an actuality, would be of
unique value to every element of the
building industry in the area.
The Chapter elected new officers
for the coming year as follows: JACK
MOORE, of Gainesville, president, to
succeed LOGAN S. CHAPPELL; MYRL
HANES, also of Gainesville, vice-presi-
dent to succeed himself; JAMES A.
MEEHAN, JR., of Jacksonville, secre-
tary; and HARRY L. LINDSEY, of
Gainesville, treasurer. Both Meehan
and Lindsey were re-elected.
The Chapter also designated three
representatives to the Convention.
They were, FRANKLIN S. BUNCH,
THOMAS LARRICK and LEE HOOPER,
all of Jacksonville.
The meeting was also attended by
Roger W. Sherman, editor of The
Florida Architect, who spoke at the
dinner meeting. He touched briefly
on the goal of the F.A.A.'s official
Journal.
"This publication," said its editor,
"Is developing for its readers a rather
unusual niche in the professional pub-
18


lishing field. The F.A.A. Publica-
tions Committee, under whose au-
thority and general supervision the
magazine is issued, believes it can
provide every F.A.A. member with
the news vehicle on professional or-
ganization matters that the Associa-
tion has always needed. In addition
it can prove to be a valuable forum
for the exchange of professional opin-
ion and technical information rela-
tive to solutions of design problems
peculiar to our special locality."
The speaker also discussed pro-
cedures of the State Board of Archi-
tects in enforcing provisions of Flor-
ida's registration law.
"The State Board," he said, "Now
has the power to take direct action


against those who are willfully vio-
lating provisions of the Florida law.
The Board and its legal counsel are
anxious to learn of violations wher-
ever they may occur."
In this connection the speaker em-
phasized the point that proof must
be made available to the Board be-
fore any decisive legal action could be
instituted. Once the proof is ob-
tained, the Board will not hesitate
to seek an injunction against any vio-
lator. But he pointed out that ob-
taining proof was largely up to local
architects, since the Board had no
funds for the type of detailed investi-
gation that is sometimes necessary to
establish it.
(Continued on Page 21)


ALL ARCHITECTS AREN'T SUBJECT
TO OCCUPATIONAL TAX


"Are all architects registered in
Florida subject to assessment of an
occupational tax-even though some
of them may be employed as salaried
members of another architect's
staff?"
That question has been asked
many times, probably in every section
of the State. Until recently the as-
sumption was positive-that is, most
architects have assumed that registra-
tion to practice architecture in Flor-
ida automatically obligated them to
pay whatever occupational tax might
be levied on them by state, county
or city agencies. Others, however,
have raised eyebrows over the legal-
ity of such occupational assessments.
Recently the question was raised
as an issue by some members of the
Florida South Chapter. An opinion
was sought by the Legal Affairs and
Parliamentary Rules Committee from
a legal firm. The letter stating the
opinion said, in part:
"You have requested our opinion
as to whether or not draftsmen em-
ployed by an architect are required
to pay a license fee. It is our con-
sidered opinion that they are not re-
quired to pay such fee; and we base
that conclusion on the case of Lee
vs. Caddy, (Fla.) 183 So.4."
That case involved an attempt, by
the Tax Collector of Leon County,
to collect a tax from every pharma-


cist in the county. One rebelled,
brought suit and was granted an in-
junction, freeing him from the ob-
ligation of paying the tax. On appeal,
the Supreme Court of Florida upheld
the lower court's decision. Justice
Brown's concurring opinion stated
that the practice of a profession
within the meaning of the statute
was intended to apply only to per-
sons "who serve the public and
charged members of the public direct
for their expert services". He further
stated that to give the statute the
meaning contended for by the Tax
Collector would impose the tax upon
many types of workers whom the
Legislature never intended to tax.
Shorn of legal language, the facts
as clarified by the State Supreme
Court are these: Registered architects
are subject to occupational taxes if
they are principals in an office, deal
directly with clients and receive re-
muneration from their clients as pay-
ment for services. But-No occupa-
tional tax need be paid by architects
who, though duly registered in the
State, do not act as a principal of
an office. This would apply to a
registered architect serving as drafts-
man in a practicing architect's office
who, though he might be called upon
to have some contacts with clients,
received his compensation in the
form of a salary.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






Chapter News & Notes


(Continued from Page 18)

SARASOTA- BRADENTON
From JOHN M. CROWELL of Sara-
sota, comes the report that the Flor-
ida Central Chapter has accepted the
invitation of the Sarasota-Bradenton
Architects Association to hold its first
quarterly meeting of 1955 in Sarasota.
The date will be January 8. PIETRO
BELLUSCHI, Dean of Architecture of
M.I.T., will be the featured speaker.
The meeting promises to be an out-
standing one on which full details
will be announced later.
The following were elected as of-
ficers of the local Association: Presi-
dent, ROLAND W. SELLEW, Sarasota;
Secretary, EDWARD DEAN WYKE,
Bradenton; Treasurer, WERNER KAN-
NENBURG, Sarasota.

FLORIDA CENTRAL
The regular quarterly meeting of
the Chapter was held October 9 in
Orlando. Though not scheduled to
start until 2:30, so far as Chapter
business was concerned, a number of
members met informally for lunch-
eon; and there were group meetings
including committees and directors
before President RICHARD JESSEN
called the meeting to order at the
Coliseum.
The business session was a long
one. A number of committee reports
involved a considerable amount of
discussion; there were presentations
of applications for new members;
there was election of officers. By the
-time business had been concluded,
the session had run overtime (a
healthy sign of interest noted by
more than one present) and the
group dispersed to pick up wives and
friends for the dinner scheduled to
follow the cocktail party in the eve-
ning.


Arrangements were in charge of
the inimitable W. KENNETH MILLER,
who also served as master of cere-
monies during dinner and introduced
the two speakers of the evening. In
attendance, in business accomplish-
ments and in fellowship the meeting
could be counted a firm success.
Election of officers brought these
results: president, RICHARD E. JESSEN,
Tampa; vice-president, RALPH P.
LOVELOCK, Winter Park; secretary,
ERNEST T. H. BOWEN, II, Tampa;
treasurer, ANTHONY J. PULLARA, Tam-
pa. The first three officers were elect-
ed to succeed themselves. The treas-
urer's office is a new one, having been
separated from the formerly com-
bined office of secretary-treasurer.
Directors named were: ROLAND W.
SELLEW, Sarasota, for three years as
Chapter director; L. ALEX HATTON,
Orlando, F.A.A. director for one
year; and JOSEPH M. SHIFFALO, Win-
ter Park, alternate F.A.A. director.
Newly elected members included
the following: Corporate, BLANCHARD
E. JOLLY, St. Petersburg, WILLIAM
H. GUERIN, formerly of Miami, and
HILL STIGGINS, Orlando; Associate,
PAUL M. RUDOLPH, Sarasota, ROLAND
W. SELLEW, Sarasota, and ELDRIDGE
F. McLANE, JR., Tampa; Junior As-
sociate, RICHARD G. SMITH. The
Chapter also approved membership of
CHARLES L. HENDRICKS, of Orlando,
who had transferred his A.I.A. mem-
bership from the Alabama Chapter.
Guests at the Chapter dinner in-
cluded friends and wives of members
and the editor of The Florida Archi-
tect, who spoke briefly on the part
the publication is now playing in the
development of the F.A.A. Guest of
honor was the dean of Orlando in-
terior decorators, MRS. EDITH TAY
LITTLE, who delivered an account of
(Continued on Page 24)


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the ad-
vancement of the profession.

NOVEMBER, 1954


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This intricate design is executed in
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


T IL E IlliiIlliileIII lli liII iIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII inIIIIIIII
(Continued from Page 7)
are permanently protected by the
glaze fired over them, whereas the
colors on the surface of an overglazed
tile may eventually wear thin over a
long period of exposure.
In polychrome, a number of dif-
ferently colored glazes are applied di-
rectly to the bisque and the tile is
then fired but once to produce the
desired design. In old Spanish tiles,
polychrome designs were outlined on
the tile by slight ridges, called "dry
cords," and the spaces between filled
with glaze. The same trick is used
today, but it has been variously
adapted to produce a greater freedom
of glazing so that colors will "flow"
but still retain the sense of design.
An almost infinite range of treat-
ment exists by variously combining
these three basic methods. Further
variety results from combining differ-
ent types of clays. In sgrafitto work,
for example, a "slip" of a colored clay
is flowed on to a different colored
bisque. A design is then cut through
the slip after it has dried. Then the
tile is fired to set the slip. After that
the design can be underglazed or over-
glazed, according to the whim of the
designer.
Possibilities do not end there, by
any means. Tiles, with all the archi-
tectural qualities their name implies.
can be made to take on a sort of three-
dimensional surface character through
surface modeling. The original type of
faience mosaic tiles furnish a historical
precedent for this. And today some of























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It is fair to say that we have now
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as materials and methods and qualities
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art they produced enriched their every-
day living by becoming a part of build-
ings their people used. They left their
beauty behind. But they lived with it
first.
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IllIIl IIIIII IINO11111111111111111111954
NOVEMBER, 1954


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Chapter News
(Continued from Page 21)

her recent travels that was a fascinat-
ing mixture of good humored com-
mentary, shrewd observation and
welcome information.

FLORIDA SOUTH
The high attendance record of this
Chapter is largely due, according to
members, to three things-for which
officers and directors of the Chapter
must take full responsibility. One is
the good food and pleasant atmos-
phere that is offered on monthly
meeting nights. Another is the plan
whereby members pre-pay a definite
amount for dinner-meeting expenses
in advance with their dues. The third
is the generally high calibre of enter-
tainment provided after dinner.
More often than not the entertain-
ment is quite as informative as en-
tertaining. It was all of that on the
October meeting night. Arranged by
EDWARD GRAFTON, the Chapter was
treated to an exhibition of ceramics
hand-made tiles by KAY PANCOAST
and photographs and examples of
three-dimensional ceramics by Fort
Lauderdale potter and ceramist
MISCA PETERSHAM.
Both artists spoke of their craft,
Kay Pancoast on the design and ap-
plication of tile to architectural use;
and Petersham on the creation of
ceramic objects via a potter's wheel.
He actually demonstrated his art for
a fascinated audience on a wheel
brought into the dining room.
The craft-products of artists such
as these could add much to archi-
tectural design in Florida. Work of
Kay Pancoast and the major part
of her talk before the Chapter is
reproduced elsewhere in this issue.
Illustrations of Petersham's work will
appear in a future issue.


READ IT IN DECEMBER!
For those who couldn't make it
to Palm Beach, there'll be a full
report of Convention happenings
in the December issue of your
official F.A.A. Journal. Don't
miss it!


Producers' Council Program


The two showings of the Caravan
exhibit, the nation-hopping show of
43 quality products manufactured by
Producers' Council members, were
undeniably successful. Numerically,
the Jacksonville show nosed out that
held in the Miami area, at least so
far as architect's visits were con-
cerned.
But Miami Chapter President
FRANK GOULDING has announced that
overall results of the Caravan's 1954
tour were held to be so gratifying by
Producers' Council top administrators
and individual manufacturers who
had supplied exhibits for it, that next
year the Caravan exhibit would be
twice as large. That means, two, in-
stead of one huge van; and it could
involve 86 individual exhibits, pro-
vided each were held to the approxi-
mate size and type in this year's
show.
Plans for the 1955 trek are now
under way and will be announced
as soon as all the inevitable wrinkles
have been ironed out. The itinerary
will undoubtedly be the same as this
year-which means that Florida's
two major marketing centers will once
more be privileged to review the
unique traveling show.
One reason given for the smaller
Miami attendance as compared to
that in Jacksonville was the location
of the exhibit. A number of view-
ers expressed the opinion that a more
central spot in downtown Miami
would possibly have attracted sub-
stantially more visitors. The com-
ment might be valid in view of the
fact that the Jacksonville show was
excellently attended all day long, ac-
cording to Chapter officials. One
reason given for that was the central
location of the Roosevelt Hotel Ball-
room in which the exhibit was held.
Another was undoubtedly the fact
that the exhibit was timed to take
place on the day the Florida North
Chapter of the F.A.A. held its
quarterly meeting.
Speaking before F.A.A. members
near the close of their chapter meet-


ing, W. J. BALDWIN, JR., president
of the Jacksonville Producers' Council
Chapter, outlined a plan for devel-
opment of a permanent, local exhibit
of materials and products used in the
building industry. Though still in
the tentative planning stage, the idea
involves the cooperative design, fi-
nancing, construction and operation
of a Products Display Center-a cen-
trally located building that would not
only house exhibits of building prod-
ucts, but would be so designed and
constructed as to constitute a display
of materials and construction tech-
niques in itself.
The idea is unique and, if carried
through to a successful conclusion,
may prove to be the first of its kind
in the country. As now planned,
Baldwin said, it would be largely fi-
nanced by cooperative "donations".
Land, he said, had already been
offered for a site. Manufacturers and
dealers of basic materials for con-
struction and finishes and of a wide
range of equipment products have
already signified their willingness to
participate. Even labor unions have
expressed interest in the project and,
according to Baldwin, have tenta-
tively offered to provide skilled labor
to construct the building on similarly
cooperative terms.
In Miami, plans for the new Con-
struction Industries Center in down-
town Miami's DuPont Plaza are com-
ing quickly to a head, according to
CLINTON WETZEL, present man-
ager of Miami's Architects' Samples
Bureau, and a leading figure in the
promotion of the new project. Sub-
stantial commitments for space in
the new structure are coming in from
building material and equipment
firms throughout the country, Wet-
zel said.
Next big event on the calendar of
the Producers' Council Miami Chap-
ter is the Annual Christmas Party at
which Council members play hosts to
local architects and their wives. The
party will be held December 14, at
the Coral Gables Country Club.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT









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