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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00004
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: October 1954
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10-11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text
















October
%I-E 1954*


--4
















Official Journal
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS













I A


S








~i4


SE.RS ROEBUCK & CO.,
Coral Gables. A total of 12,600
square feet of wall slabs were used
with the largest of the panels
'7'"x 16'3" . making then
some of the largest ever cast in the
United States. Architect: "Weed,
Russell, Jolihnson associates l iami.
Contractor: Ed ward -1. Fleninming
Construction Co., Mliami. Engineer:
Normnan Dignum, Miami.


All Maule concrete and concrete products are tested
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laboratories: H. C. Nutting Co., Pittsburgh Testing
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kN A THUAN WORDS!


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ere an unknown quantity three years ago. These
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)nsider that 200 square feet of finished wall
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I] A [!]I
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SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 1913


)CTOBER, 1954








St. Charles has come to Florida





Now you can design a kitchen to fit each

client's special needs-a St. Charles Kitchen

of steel, with optional natural birch exteri-

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cording to your specifications.









THESE FIRMS DISPLAY Architects the country over have long
ST. CHARLES KITCHENS specified St. Charles Kitchens for quality, for beauty, for
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2 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT










Florida Architect

Official Journal of the
Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects

OCTOBER, 1954 VOL. 4, NO. 6


Officers of The F. A. A.
Igor B. Polevitzky .____ President
250 N. E. 18th St., Miami
G. Clinton Gamble _- Secy.-Treas.
1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Laud.

Directors
Florida North Central Chapter
James A. Stripling David W. Potter
Florida South Chapter
T. Trip Russell Herbert H. Johnson
Palm Beach Chapter
George J. Votaw Edgar S. Wortman
Broward County Chapter
Robert G. Jahelka
Morton T. Ironmonger
Florida North Chapter
Edward M. Fearney Franklin S. Bunch
Florida Central Chapter
John Bruce Smith Lawrance W. Hitt
Daytona Beach Chapter
Francis R. Walton David A. Leete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is published
monthly under the authority and direction
of the Florida Association of Architects'
Publication Committee: Igor B. Polevitzky,
G. Clinton Gamble, Edwin T. Reeder. Edi-
tor: Roger W. Sherman.
Correspondents Broward County Chap-
ter: Morton T. Ironmonger . Florida
North Chapter: Robert E. Crosland, Ocala;
F. A. Hollingsworth, St. Augustine; Lee
Hooper, Jacksonville; H. L. Lindsey, Gaines-
ville; J. H. Look, Pensacola; E. J. Moughton,
Sanford . Florida North Central Chap-
ter: Norman P. Gross, Panama City Area;
Henry T. Hey, Marianna Area; Charles W.
Saunders, Jr., Tallahassee Area . Florida
Central Chapter: Henry L. Roberts, Tampa;
W. Kenneth Miller, Orlando; John M. Cro-
well, Sarasota.
Editorial contributions, information on
Chapter and individual activities and cor-
respondence are welcomed; but publication
of any particular item cannot be guaran-
teed and all copy is subject to approval
of the Publication Committee. All or part
of the FLORIDA ARCHITECT'S editorial
material may be freely reprinted, provided
credit is accorded both the FLORIDA AR-
CHITECT and the author for prior publi-
cation.
Also welcomed are advertisements of
those materials, products and services
adaptable for use in Florida. Mention of
names, or illustrations of such materials
and products in editorial columns or ad-
vertising pages does not constitute en-
dorsement by either the Publication Com-
mittee or the Florida Assocaition of Archi-
tects.
Address all communications relative to
both editorial and advertising matters to
the Editor, 7225 S. W. 82nd Court, Miami
43, Florida.
McMURRAY ,g 26 MIAMI

OCTOBER, 1954


Atomic Design Is


Just Around the Corner

If we are to judge from news that apparently is beginning to leak
under the closed doors of industrial atomic energy research, the
entire building industry is due for some drastic changes. According
to the September issue of Architectural Forum, peace-time use of
atomic power can produce a whole new range of materials by exposing
ordinary products to massive doses of gamma radiation.

Not only can such radiation make an ordinary sheet of soft plastic
stronger than the same thickness of structural steel. It can, at the
same time, render the material so resistant to heat that it would
be completely fireproof when used in construction of buildings. Also,
says the magazine, the material can be made transluscent, transparent
or opaque at will.

Not only can these things be done. But the Forum story implied
that actual production of "irradiated specialties" was right around
the proverbial corner from a $60 million plant, the design of which
has already been completed. And with such products at hand, through
a technique of production which would certainly be progressively
refined, it could not be long before a complete revolution took place
in the art of construction.

It follows that architecture would undergo quite as radical a change.
As pointed out by Douglas Haskell, Forum editor, "A change as
profound as atomic creation of new materials must result in a new
world of architectural forms." From this atomic alchemy would
emerge, says Haskell, buildings that would be immensely decreased in
weight, vastly greater in clear spans and radically different in struc-
tural design-with a continuous "skin" enclosing space that would
contain, within a single envelope, both supports and finishes, color,
protection from elements, insulation from heat and cold. In short,
"all the characteristics we now impose separately" will, in the new
atomic building age, become available to designers in "a thin sand-
wich material" created through gamma radiation.

Of course it seems fantastic to us now. To anyone schooled in
terms of structural steel and 2-hour ratings and reinforced concrete
formulas, such glimpses of things-to-come appear to be in the same
category as flying saucers.

But it doesn't pay to scoff. Myriads of things we now live with as
necessities were thought of yesterday as the impossible dreams of some
impractical visionary. Progress is nothing but a succession of changes;
and in its course, the improbable has a startling way of developing
into the commonplace.
So let us keep our eye closely on the atomic ball. But, at least
for the next few years, there seems little reason to stop the fight to
get better and more generally workable local building codes!



Have you made reservations for Palm Beach yet? Better do
it soon, for accommodations are limited. Write Maurice E.
Holley, Plaza Circle, Palm Beach, Reservation Secretary.












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members span 32
feet.


,4aoter PRESTRESSED


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WEST COAST SHELL CORP . . . . . Sarasota
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HOLLOWAY CONCRETE PRODUCTS CO . . . Winter Park


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


4
4


-


-0









Does


Planning


Cost


Too


Much?


Not if it's good enough, decided a California panel.


But it's up to


the architect to make the public realize that the plans are worth it.


Just a year ago seventeen men met
in California to discuss ways to pro-
duce better buildings. Overall results
were some remarkably clear-cut state-
ments of the building situation and
six recommendations framed as the
essence of their discussion. Though
expressed primarily as service tools for
California's building industry, these
results have significance far beyond
any single locality.
"Better planning," said the forum
collectively, "Can do more to assure
economy and efficiency of operation,
more to give protection against obso-
lescence and blight, than any other
move the building industry could
make. Better planning con do more
than any other factor to keep con-
struction booming long after present
shortages are met."
Of the seventeen men who com-
prised the forum, six were architects.
Six were more or less typical clients,
including two bankers, two develop-
ment, or "merchant" builders, two
management executives. The rest
were made up of an engineer, a con-
tractor, a landscape architect, an in-
terior designer and an editor who
acted as moderator throughout forum
discussions. Results of their delibera-
tions arc the more significant because
of this diversity of background, spe-
6ialized experience and viewpoint.
And what they had to say about Cal-
ifornia's building activities, applies
even more forcefully to conditions in
our own state of Florida.


As in California, building here has
become the State's largest industry.
But, unlike the Western area, rates
of growth in Florida are now exceed-
ing by wide margins not only na-
tional averages in almost every cate-
gory, but also increases in all but
two of the forty-eight states. Our
state is growing so fast in population,
in industrial development, in distribu-
tive activities-in addition to its basic
agriculture and tourism that most
service industries, including construc-
tion, appear to be lagging.
Thus, Florida's problem of build-
ing involves quantity as well as qual-
ity of construction. The need of the
industry in our state is not to needle
the continuation of a boom. It is
rather to keep pace, as best it can,
with expanding demands of the
state's development. The danger here
is not that there will not be enough
building, but that there may be too
much which is ill-conceived. We have
arrived at a point where expediency
is a poor substitute for a program.
In view of all this, the need for
better planning hits every factor of
Florida's building industry with par-
ticular force. As noted in the Cal-
ifornia forum, the building situation
has changed so rapidly that lack of
planning is one chief cause of rapid
building obsolescence. Building costs
have more than doubled, so every
error or oversight in planning costs
twice as much. Gradually, buildings
have become more complex, with the


need for mechanical equipment so
intensified that mechanical costs have
increased to represent one-third, or
even more, instead of one-tenth, of
the total building cost.
Standards of building performance
have been steadily rising, too. Schools,
hospitals, factories, even homes-all
must today provide for and integrate
types of equipment for heating, cool-
ing, lighting, power and sound that
were scarcely available ten years ago.
Personnel requirements likewise are
no longer the same. Meeting the
needs for shelter, food and sanitation
is no longer sufficient-cither in the
small house, where one generation
seeks friendly protection from the
other, or in a factory where employ-
ees expect working conditions that
embody cleanliness, decent comfort,
provision for safety, facilities for some
recreation and a convenient place to
park the car.
Only through the medium of bet-
ter planning, decided the California
forum, can all these various new re-
quirements of modern building be
met-with the assurance that costs
will be in line with good value and
that the building itself will deliver
the full measure of public service and
safety for which it was designed.
What is true of California-at least
in this respect-holds equally true
for Florida. Here, then, are the six
recommendations that hold so much
significance for building progress.
(Continued on Page 14)


OCTOBER, 1954 5








Everybody Benefits



The Social Security blanket now covers
the architect, too. G. C. I-Hosch, Lake Worth
accountant and tax consultant, highlights
the new rules and suggests how architects
can eat retirement cake and have it too.


G. C. Hosch


Starting next January architects
and engineers will be covered by So-
cial Security. When Congress voted,
for the third time in four years, to
re-design the country's mammoth
Social Security system, coverage was
extended to include those "self-em-
ployed professionals," who earn at
least $400 for themselves in a year.
At the same time Social Security
benefits were increased.
What does that mean to architects?
How does it affect the young archi-
tect who runs a one-man office? Will
it change existing situations in large,
or medium-sized offices? Will older
architects, now approaching what the
Government calls retirement age,
benefit by the new Social Security
law?
A blanket, general answer to those
questions can be put like this: The
new law will affect everybody in the
architectural and engineering profes-
sions. Not only individuals, from stu-
dent apprentice to principal will be
involved. New Social Security pro-
visions also touch the retirement in-
comes of wives; and if you should die,
your family is promised bigger bene-
fits than at present.
Specifically, the new law says this:
As a self-employed professional man,
an architect can now count on re-
ceiving a pension when he reaches the
retirement age of 65. If your income
has been $4,200 or more for at least
a year an a half before you reach that
age, you will be able to retire at the
maximum pension of $108.50 per
month. If your wife is also 65 or
more at that time, your total family
pension will be $162.50 per month
or $1,953.60 of tax-free income yearly.
If you wish to do some work after


retirement, the new law says you can
earn up to $100 per month, thus giv-
ing you and your wife a total yearly
retirement income of $3,153.60.
With a home paid for that could
mean carefree living for the rest of
your life.
Of course, this new set-up entails
some costs. If you're an employee
of a practising architect, your with-
holding tax will apply next year to
the first $4,200 of your income in-
stead of the first $3,600 as now. The
tax, however, will be the same, 2
percent. So, instead of paying $72
toward retirement income you'll be
paying $84. Your employer matches
this amount.
In 1960, unless Congress should
change the schedules now made into
law, the tax rate will rise to 2V2 per-
cent-$105 a year for both you and
your employer. And by 1975 it's
scheduled to rise to 4 percent or
payment of $168 for both employer
and employee.
To some that may seem high. But
it compares favorably with many
private pension plans, which, of
course, most architects' offices do not
have. Under Social Security, for ex-
ample, an employee covered since
1937, when the system was first
started, and reaching 65 in January,
1957, would be eligible for a month-
ly old-age pension check of $108.50.
In payroll taxes that cost him onlv
$837-matched, of course by his em-
ployer to bring the total tax pay-
ment to $1,674.
Under a private pension plan the
cost would be several times higher.
An annuity, bought in 1937, to start
paying off in Januaiy, 1947 at a
monthly rate of $108.50 would have


cost the employee $8,200 in prem-
iums. Further, the private plan
would take no account of the em-
ployee's wife. Under Social Security
the wife would be entitled to $54 if
she, too, were 65 at the time of her
husband's retirement.
The self-employed architect now
pays no Social Security tax against
his own income. Beginning in Janu-
ary he'll be required to pay 3 percent
on his yearly earnings up to $4,200
-or a total of $126 per year. If Con-
gress doesn't change the law again,
by 1975 that tax will have risen to
6 per cent for an annual total of $252.
For a young architect, just starting
his own office, that could mean a
tax payment of several thousand dol-
lars before reaching retirement age.
But it still would be substantially less
than annuity payments under any
private pension plan.
But for the older architect, new
Social Security regulations could be
like economic manna from heaven.
Suppose, for example, you're pushing
65 and will reach that age during the
latter part of 1956. If your self-em-
ployment income from next January
to the time you reach 65 is $4,200
or more per year, you're in a perfect
spot to retire with payment of what
Social Security calls a "primary in-
surance amount" of $108.50 for the
rest of your life.
Already noted is the fact that this
amount may be increased by bene-
fits for your wife. In addition, you
can earn "wages" up to $1,200 per
year without jeopardizing receipt of
your pension payments. That is, you
can earn that much up to 72; after
you reach that age you'll be free to
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






enjoy unlimited earnings without loss
of any Social Security checks.
In addition, your pension checks
won't be affected by income of any
amount from annuities, other pen-
sions, dividends or other investments.
That means you could retire from
active practice, hire a manager for
your office, draw profits and still re-
ceive your old-age pension. The prof-
its will be considered investment in-
come.
That sketches a pretty attractive
picture to architects with established
offices who look forward toward the
time they can "take it easy." And it
not only furnishes a good basis for
planning ahead to a time that will
not only give you a pleasant period
of retirement. It suggests that or-
ganizing your office for a long-range
program could have several benefits-
personal ones for you, the self-em-
ployed principal, and incentive ones
for the promising youngsters who arc
now your employees.
Many other clauses in the new
Social Security set-up touch various
members of the architectural profes-
sion to some degree. From the em-
poyer's viewpoint, it will cost more
because withholding percentages arc
based on higher average monthly
wages-a monthly maximum of $350
instead of $300 as at present-as
well as increased percentages sched-
uled in years to come.
From the employee's standpoint
the pinch of larger withholding pay-
ments is more than offset by greater
benefits. Minimum monthly bene-
fits have been upped from $25 to
$30-and the new law authorizes a
study of the feasibility of raising this
minimum benefit to $55, $60 or $75.
Another of the new rules will work
to the advantage of many professional
employees whose earnings, now fairly
high, were meager minimums during
past lean years.
This is the "drop-out" rule. It
works like this: The size of your pen-
sion is based on "average month
earnings." In figuring this basis, you'll
be permitted to omit from your cal-
culations as much as five years past
in which you were earning low pay,
weren't covered by Social Security,
or weren't working at all. Exactly
how much "drop-out" is allowable
depends, of course, on each indivi-
OCTOBER, 1954


Bigger Retirement Pensions


AVERAGE MONTHLY
EARNINGS DURING
WORKING YEARS


Monthly Pension
of retired worker
65 or older
NOW FUTURE


Monthly pension
of retired worker and
wife, both 65 or older
NOW FUTURE


$200 $70.00 $ 78.50 $105.00 $117.80

$220 $73.00 $ 82.50 $109.50 $123.80

$240 $76.00 $ 86.50 $114.00 $129.80

$260 $79.00 $ 90.50 $118.50 $135.80

$280 $82.00 $ 94.50 $123.00 $141.80

$300 $85.00 $ 98.50 $127.50 $147.80

$320 $85.00 $102.50 $127.50 $153.80

$340 $85.00 $106.50 $127.50 $159.80

$350 or more $85.00 $108.50 $127.50 $162.80




Family Benefits If You Die

Worker's
Average Widow Widow, Any Widow, Any Widow, Any
Monthly Age 65 Age, One Age, Two Age, Three
Earnings or Older Child Children Children

$200 $58.90 $117.80 $157.00 $160.00

$250 $66.40 $132.80 $177.00 $200.00

$300 $73.90 $147.80 $197.00 $200.00


$350
S^aKi'sa:m


$81.40 $162.80 $200.00 $200.00


dual case history. But the point is
that this new rule serves generally
to raise earnings upon which pensions
are based and will be of particular
value to older personnel in any archi-
tect's or engineer's office.
The same general effect is pro-
duced by a new ruling on disability.
If, in past years, you couldn't work
because of disabling sickness or ac-
cident, these periods will be ignored
in figuring your retirement-age pen-
sion. Certain specific limitations ap-
ply to both these rules, of course. But


in certain instances both the "drop-
out" and the "disability freeze" can
be applied to qualify a worker for a
Social Security pension to which he
formerly would not have been en-
titled.
All the foregoing has been neces-
sarily briefed. But it adds up to a
system of social security that is really
new and is vastly broader than ever
before. To many a self-employed
architect, particularly, it offers a re-
markable chance to cat a piece of
professional cake and have it too!


I4:::
5:::::







A College Prepares for Progress


The growth of the College of Arch-
itecture and Allied arts at the Uni-
versity of Florida reflects the growth
of the building industry in this state.
Its mushroom expansion from a raw
beginning in 1929 to its present po-
sition as fourth largest in the nation
is no accident. It's the direct result
of the building industry's demand for
properly trained personnel.
That demand is still growing. Right
now the Department of Architecture
stands sixth in enrollment among the
70 or more University departments in
the upper division. And an A.I.A.
report on education and registration
recently estimated that expanding
needs for buildings would require,
by 1970-a mere 16 years-school en-
rollments 96 per cent greater than
those of 1953 to maintain the cur-
rent ratio of architects to urban pop-
ulation.
That's a national estimate, based,
presumably, on national averages.
Florida, however, is spurting way
above this yardstick with population
and industrial growth rates far ex-
ceeding-in some cases three and
four times-national averages.
Thus, bald statistics alone indicate


that the U. of F.'s College of Archi-
tecture and Allied Arts is bursting at
the seams-and that something must
be done about it. Plans and a pro-
gram have already been formulated
for a new building-the need for
which was outlined in these columns
in August. Need for the structure-
which at best cannot be made ready
until 1956-is further highlighted by
the current recommendations of the
College faculty.
These, in part, are prudently based
on the almost certain increases in
teaching loads that the College will
face in the immediate future. Right
now that teaching load is exceeded
by only six of the University twelve
upper division colleges. During the
past year only one school is the coun-
try awarded more degrees in archi-
tecture than did Florida.
Handling these increased educa-
tional demands is partly a matter of
organization. Now under considera-
tion is a plan to divide the existing
Department of Architecture-at pres-
ent composed of five related teaching
departments-into three departments.
Courses in Building Construction and
Community Planning would then be


handled separately as two additional
departments.
To make this feasible more equip-
ment is needed-to say nothing of
space. Staff additions will also be re-
quired, particularly personnel to head
the new departments of Building Con-
struction and Community Planning.
So far as equipment is concerned, one
forward step has already been taken.
The Department of Architecture now
is enjoying use of new drafting tables
designed by a staff member to replace
some 250 ancient-age makeshifts. Per-
sonnel additions must await decisions
on appropriations.

During the past two years many
and varied honors to mark overall
accomplishment have come to the
College. In architecture, students have
taken prizes in several design compe-
titions. A graduate student won a Ful-
bright grant for study in England.
And more recently, CORA LEE WELLS
received one of the seven scholarship
awards by the National Board of Fire
Underwriters through the American
Architectural Foundation.
Thus the quality of the College's
activities are being recognized out of
its locality as well as in the State.
That's another encouraging sign of a
firm educational foundation and a
sound, healthy growth.


IC


V, %
. o '* -'. -' ,.


/
/
/
/
/
-I


The article headed "Let's Build Our Future Now" that
appeared in the August issue of The Florida Architect has
been reprinted for distribution to every element of Flor-
ida's building industry. It also has been brought to the
8


personal attention of all State Legislators. Additional
copies can be secured by addressing Dean William T.
Arnett, College of Architecture and Allied Arts, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







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II


LEGEND


Proposal On A Problem

The matter of possible redistricting may emerge as
one of the chief pieces of business at the 40th Annual
convention. It is not so much a question as to whether
or not some reorganization of Chapter areas and rela-
tionships is desirable. It is more pointedly a problem
of how such reorganization can best be accomplished.
Thus it is a subject that touches every F.A.A. member
and calls for careful thought, wise action.
The problem is not a new one. Since the Redistrict-
ing Committee was appointed at the 1952 annual
meeting, the whole subject has been under study. The
Committee's report at the St .Petersburg meeting last
year presented two general plans, requested member-
ship reaction to each and asked for a continuance of
its work during 1954.
Plan "A" was designated as being generally the more
preferable of the two submitted last year. On the basis
of that plan the Committee has developed a graphic
proposal for an adjustment of Chapter boundaries
and a realignment of chapter representation on the
F.A.A. Executive Board. This proposal is, of course,
tentative and is shown on the large-scale map here.
As a helpful comparison with current conditions the
small-scale map (originally published in the F.A.A.
Bulletin for June, 1952) indicates present chapter boun-
daries and the approximate distribution of registered
architects in the State.
As outlined by the Committee, Plan "A" called for:
a) an Executive Secretary and a General Counsel;
b) a President and Secretary-Treasurer selected from
the State at large; c) three Vice-Presidents each repre-
senting a particular area of the State; and d) directors
representing the chapters, the small chapter having one
director, the medium-size chapter having two directors
(or one director with two votes), and the large chapter
having three directors (or one director with three
votes).
Note that the graphic proposal divides the State into
three geographical sections, suggests some immediate
changes in chapter boundaries and indicates the even-
tual formation of some additional chapters.


Suggested Re


Section Boundaries


-Chapter Boundaries
_'-___ Chapter Boundaries (Future)


lresi- Direct-
dent.s ors
FLORIDA NORTH SECTION I (3) -
Florida North Chapter 1
Florida North Central Chapter 1
FLORIDA CENTRAL SECTION 1 (3)
Daytona Beach Chapter 1 -
Florida Central Chapter 2 Fo
FLORIDA SOUTH SECTION 1 (7) ,
Broward County Chapter 2
Florida South Chapter 3
Palm Beach Chapter 2
STUDENT SECTION
University of Florida Y.
Student Chapter"" .B
:Example shown is based upon number of Insti- FS
tute members as shown in 1953-54 Membership
Directory of The AIA.
::It is proposed that the Student Chapter be
represented on the Board by a Student Repre-
sentative whose duty it would be to maintain
liaison between the FAA and the Chapter.
Membership of the Redistricting Committee is: '-
William T. Arnett (Florida North), Chairman;
George Votaw (Palm Beach); Lawrence Hitt
(Florida Central); Willis Stevens (Florida North);
and John Stetson (Palm Beach).







Districting Plan "A"


,-101lS0E CO','


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT OCTOBER, 1954


ION


SCALE IN MILES
0 5 0 20 30 '0







chapter News & Notes


INVENTION PLANS
ARLY COMPLETE
Vith the 40th Annual Convention
the F.A.A. barely six weeks away,
Convention Committee, chair-
aned by RAYMOND H. PLOCKEL-
vr, is whipping plans into final
pe for what an enthusiastic group
Palm Beachers hope will be one
the best F.A.A. get-togethers on
)rd.
'inal announcements regarding the
ous side of the Convention-
ikers, seminars and the like-will
made on these pages next month.
exhibit of architects' work, with
FORD SHOUMATE in charge, bids
to become a major attraction of
meeting as well as an excellent
ortunity for bettering professional
)lic relations. And GEORGE J.
rAW, in charge of the Building
ducts Exhibit, reports that interest
tigh and space commitments are


now coming in. Among firms that
have already signed for exhibits are:
St. Charles Manufacturing Co., (kit-
chens); John H. Couse (York air con-
ditioning); Gate City Sash & Door
Co. (windows); U.S. Mengel Ply-
wood; Hunter-Douglas Corp.
Entertainment, for both delegates
and their ladies, is being handled by
HILLIARD T. SMITH and JOHN STET-
SON. A combined report suggests that
from this angle the Convention will
offer one grand time for everyone!
Entertainment for the ladies will
include a motor tour of Palm Beach,
then visits to several of the larger
of the old estates that in the plush
past gave Palm Beach its reputation
for being the playground of the rich.
That will be on Friday. Luncheon at
the Sailfish Club will include a fash-
ion show of resort styling.
Both Thursday and Friday evenings
there will be cocktail parties for all
visitors and guests and that of


Thursday may include a swimming
and diving exhibition. Saturday after-
noon all registered members and their
wives will be welcome on a deep-
sea fishing expedition. Saturday eve-
ning there will be a number of
informal parties.
Throughout the Convention trans-
portation will be available-for ladies
who may wish to go shopping, or see
Palm Beach sights in more detail, and
also to take groups to the Norton Art
Gallery to see both the permanent
exhibition and the display of archi-
tects' work that will be shown there.
Of course, there will always be golf
on several of Palm Beach's famed
courses, and swimming in the fabu-
lous pool of La Coquille Hotel, the
Convention's three-day home.
Does that sound like a good time
ahead? It should, for JOHN STETSON
says: . We hope to make this
a fall vacation period for architects
and their wives, a three-day round of


F.A.A. LEGISLATIVE E

The Florida Ar'i'itir of Ar-
chitects' Legislativc Committee has
been advised by -the Florida State
Board- of Archit.ecture that certain
desirable amendments to the laws
regulating the practice of'architec-
ture will be submitted to the
F.A.A. in the near futile. These
suggested amendments will be
placed in the hands of the mem-
bers of the F.A.A. Legislative
Committee as soon as they are re-
ceived by the Committee Chair-
man. The members of the Com-
mittee will be requested to review
the proposed changes with the ar-
chitects in their particular area and
be prepared to discuss them dur-
ing the 1954 F.A.A. Convention.
All F.A.A. members are re-
quested to contact members of
the Legislative Committee in their
area to review the amendments as
proposed by the State Board of
Architecture, and also to advise the
members of the Legislative Com-
mittee as to any suggestions for


COMMITTEE NOTES ITEMS FOR CONVENTION ACTION


other legislative activities by the
F.A.A. at the 1955 session of the
Forida Legislature.
The Joint F.A.A.-A.G.C. Coop-
erative Committee, which was or-
ganized in Orlando on July 14, is
making a proposal of the two par-
ent bodies as follows: "The leg-
islative interests of the two spon-
soring organizations should be co-
ordinated." It is proposed that the
legislative program of each of the
sponsoring organizations be for-
warded to the other for review, and
it is expected that the A.G.C. pro-
gram will be available for review
at the time of the F.A.A. Conven-
tion in November.
Reference is made to the article
appearing on pages 6 through 9 of
the August 1954 issue of The Flor-
ida Architect entitled, "Let's Build
Our Future Now." It is expected
that a decision will be reached at
the November Convention as to
endorsement and active support in
the Legislature by the F.A.A. of


the effort by the University of
Florida College of Architecture
and Allied Arts, to secure "new
facilities desperately needed to re-
place temporarily overcrowded
makeshifts."
A meeting of the F.A.A. Legis-
lative Committee will be held at
12:30 for lunch, on November 18,
at the La Coquille Hotel, Palm
Beach, Florida.
Members of the F.A.A. Legis-
lative Committee are as follows:
FRANKLIN S. BUNCH -Jacksonville
A. J. FERENDINO .....-- Miami Beach
ELIOT FLETCHER ---.-.- Tampa
SANFORD GoIN Gainesville
HARRY GRIFFIN -. Daytona Beach
ELLIOTT HADLEY --St. Petersburg
R. DANIEL HART ---- Pensacola
A. WYNN HOWELL .-._.___ Lakeland
PRENTISS HUDDLESTON Tallahassee
RAY PLOCKELMAN ....Palm Beach
JAMES POWNALL __Ft. Lauderdale
JAMES ROGERS, II ---Winter Park
WILLIAM STEWART --Vero Beach
WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN --Sarasota


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







fun. We're trying hard to fix things
so everybody can keep amused, what-
ever individual likes may be."
The November issue of The Florida
Architect will carry a fully detailed
program of the Palm Beach Con-
vention.

SARASOTA-BRADENTON
GROUP MEETS
In the Florida Central Chapter
formal chapter meetings are scheduled
only every quarter, due to the fact
that long distances separate key areas
of professional activity. In the Orlando
area the Orange County Architects'
Association carry through the F.A.A.
program between Chapter meetings.
In St. Petersburg a group of archi-
tects meet, usually each Thursday, at
the Yacht Club for a professional
luncheon. And in Sarasota last Au-
gust 24, thirteen F.A.A. members
who form the Sarasota-Bradenton As-
sociation of Architects met at Mar-
tine's Coach House for a scheduled
monthly meeting.
The meeting was marked by enthu-
siasm for future cooperation between
local architects. Principal piece of
business was a decision to invite the
Florida Central Chapter to hold its
first quarterly meeting of 1955 in
Sarasota. The date will be January
8; and it's hoped that about 100
architects and guests will attend.
Though no program details are yet
ready, JOHN M. CROWELL and Ro-
LAND W. SELLEW, who were named
by President RALPH S. TWITCHELL
as a committee on arrangements, have
cocked an eye on professional public
relations and are considering a pro-
gram that will be of interest to the
Sarasota-Bradenton public as well as
to architects. PAUL RUDOLPH and
WILLIAM ZIMMERMAN were named
to secure a speaker of wide recogni-
tion for the evening.
Another meeting, prior to the
Chapter meeting to be held in Or-
lando October 9, will include election
of new officers for the Sarasota-Brad-
enton group. Present officers are:
RALPH S. TWITCHELL, president;
WVILLIAM ZIMMIERMAN, secretary;
WERNER KANNENBERG, treasurer.
(Continued on Page 16)


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Does Planning,

Cost too Much?
(Continued from Page 5)
FIRST: Correct three public mis-
conceptions about planning.
The public frequently misconstrues
the architect's job by considering him
too often an embellisher of buildings
which might be built without him.
Second is the public's misunder-
standing regarding the architect's re-
lationship to costs. Few of the build-
ing public realize that "The architect
sells no products and therefore can-
not be an architect and give a cost
guarantee, though he must furnish
the best possible cost guidance."
Third misconception concerns the
way architects are paid. The public
apparently thinks that the architect's
"fee" is a charge against the building
over and above the building cost.
Possibly because the fee is usually
stated as a percentage of construction
cost, it frequently appears to the pub-
lic as an extra, perhaps a luxury;
while the fact is that the architect's
work is as necessary to a building as
a foundation and that the architect-
ural staff that prepares plans and
specifications is a payroll expense
which must be met as a first, rather
than last, charge against any build-
ing.
SECOND: Keep the public more
closely advised on costs.
Because of his position in the
building industry, the brunt of that
will fall on the architect. Reputation
of the building industry has been
impaired through the public's im-
pression that "buildings can cost
more than you think"; and the moral
obligation of the industry is to keep
the public advised on costs, to ex-
plain them, even anticipate them and
to do all possible to control them.
THIRD: Teach the public how to
help keep costs down.
Most architects' clients do not
know how, because 60 to 90 per
cent of them are beginners in build-
ing. They do not realize that chang-
es cost money; and they are wont to
blame the architect for added costs
resulting from their own decisions
relative to changes or additions once
the job has begun.


Further, accurate cost data can
help hold costs down. But that takes
time and skill to obtain and the cli-
ent should pay what is needed to
get it.
FOURTH: Recognize that building
is a team operation; and organize the
team better.
Because he has the final executive
responsibility for all decisions includ-
ing those on costs, the owner is the
head of the team. A complete team
includes the architect as the owner's
agent and his representative, the en-
gineers, builders, real estate men and
whatever technical consultants the
job requires. Each member has dual
responsibility-for his own part of
the work and the way it must fit
with all the other parts. Except where
the owner is his own builder, the
architect must be the sole coordin-
ator; and to be most effective in
that role he must be in on the proj-
ect from the very first.
FIFTH: Make the nature of archi-
tectural services better known.-
Barring outright advertising, the
best apparent method for an indi-
vidual architect to establish his name
is "by favorable mention of his per-
formance in the papers." Collectively,
however, there is much more to be
done to clarify the work of the archi-
tectural profession in the public's
mind.
(The California forum disclosed
the fact that more adherance to a
public relations policy of "doing good
work and taking the credit for it" is
not a sufficiently incisive' program for
educating the public on many details
of architectural activity. In the mat-
ter of payment for architectural ser-
vices, for example, the percentage fee
system is not only confusing to the
public. It may even be regarded as
an excuse for architects to let build-
ing costs soar; and with considerable
logic has been scored as at least a
psychological barrier to the archi-
tect's developing efficiencies and
technical advances to lower building
costs.)
SIXTH: Set adequate totals for
budgeting a building's plans.
If quality of planning is not to
suffer through inadequate perform-
ance, the budget for plans and spe-


I llul iIlll IIIIIlll llllll lll lll lllllll IIIIl lllllllll llIIIII lllinl ll llII lll iiI llll~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~lllIIITH E FLO RIDA A RCHITECTl
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







cifications and necessary supervision
to carry them through should be ade-
quate in all respects. Today's build-
ing team is more complex than for-
merly simply because today's build-
ings are complex. Most owners would
agree that inadequate planning bud-
gets must result in reduced perform-
ance in architecture, engineering or
supervision. And most owners should
recognize the fact that failure to ac-
cept today's higher planning costs
can only result in reducing a build-
ing's performance in favor of higher
operating and maintenance costs.
Another facet of this situation is
reflected in the fact that as buildings
become more complicated mechan-
ically, engineering costs rise; and the
architect's own job becomes more
costly due to the complications of
coordinating engineering details with
architectural plans. It is obvious that
no member of the planning team can
be paid at the expense of another
without risking the quality of the
whole. Thus, expenses of the entire
planning operation should be budg-
eted. And, as the captain of the
building team under the owner's di-
rection, it behooves the architect to
first make clear (how and why) cur-
rent building complexities have raised
planning costs.
These six recommendations, con-
sidered individually, might appear to
be so obvious as to merit scarcely
more than an approving nod. Let's
not be misled by their simplicity. A
panel of some of the keenest and
most experienced brains in the busi-
ness have selected these six points as
the foundation upon which to build
a better construction industry. That
they were selected with particular re-
lation to California doesn't in any
way reduce the force of their direct
application to our own Florida situa-
tion.
Taken together the six points in
bold-face outline the sort of overall
educational program that is particu-
larly needed in Florida. A small start
along some of these lines has ad-
mittedly been made. But much, much
more remains to be done. And the
time for doing it can never be bet-
ter than now.


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16


Chapter News & Notes


GREATER MIAMI HOME SHOW, held during mid-September at the Dade
County Auditorium, included this exhibit of residential design. Sponsored
and prepared by members of the Florida South Chapter, the exhibit con-
tained photographs of completed work and presentation sketches of pro-
posed jobs.


FLORIDA NORTH
There's not an architect who has
ever planned an outing or a Chapter
officer or committee member who has
worked hard to make an outing a
success who will fail to read between
the lines of this month's report from
Jacksonville. Sad thing is, nothing
can be done about it!
It's probably happened to every-
one. So, the following falls into our
"No Comment" department.


"The Florida North Chapter meet-
ing held at Gold Head State Park
on August 28 will long be remem-
bered as the most 'all wet' meeting
ever held by this Chapter. It was a
picnic meeting. And, true to. form
of all picnics, everyone got thoroughly
soaked by the rain and showed signs
of nervous strain due to too much
close lightning.
"The storm lasted all afternoon so
the picnic was restricted to a shelter
of moderate size. Food was placed on


GROUND-BREAKING--J. H. Buchanan, president of Maule Industries,
wields the traditional spade at ground breaking ceremonies for his com-
pany's new headquarters building in Miami. To his right above is R. G.
Witters, contractor for the building. The architects are represented by
Russell T. Pancoast, second from right, and Andrew J. Ferendino, extreme
right, of Pancoast, Ferendino, Skeels & Burnham.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT







one table for all to help themselves.
This was promptly done by all. After
every one had had two or three turns
at the table, little groups gathered
together and discussed-the storm!
"Darkness fell about seven o'clock
and the members all started for their
homes and dry clothes. Thus ended
the First Annual Picnic of the Florida
North Chapter!"

PALM BEACH
At last month's meeting speaker
of the evening was G. C. HoseH,
Lake Worth accountant and tax con-
cultant, who discussed the most
recent Federal tax and Social Security
laws and the ways in which these
would affect professional architects.
Following his talk members asked a
number of questions on the subject.
(The substance of Mr. Hosch's dis-
cussion on the application of new So-
cial Security laws to the architectural
profession, appears on pages 6 and 7
on this issue.-Ed.)

Newest architectural public rela-
tions project in the Palm Beach-Fort
Worth area is a television program
over WJNO-TV. It's the architect's
own program and will start on a
regular basis in the near future. AMES
BENNETT, chairman of the committee
handling it, is now perfecting plans
and is interested in hearing from any
architects in the Palm Beach area
who would be winning to participate.



LOCAL EXHIBITIONS URGED
AS GOOD PR PROJECT
Last month's announcement storv
on the Architectural Exhibit to be
held at Palm Beach during the Con-
vention next month was hardly in
the mails when a call reached the
editor of The Florida Architect from
BILL HARVARD Of St. Petersburg.
Bill was last year's Convention Ex-
hibit Chairman. His call was about
the Exhibit planned for this year. It
also concerned an idea of his for
stimulating public interest in archi-
tect's work-in line with Bill's job
as Chairman of the F.A.A. Commit-
tee on Public Information.
(Continued on Page 18)

OCTOBER, 1954


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS, President FRANK D. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres.
JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR., Exec. Vice-Pres. JACK K. WERK, Vice-Pres.
MARK P. J. WILLIAMS, Vice-Pres. JAMES H. BARRON, JR., Secy-Treas.
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(Continued from Page 17)
"Why not," said Bill Harvard over
the telephone, "Use material that will
be made ready for the exhibit at Palm
Beach as a series of local exhibits
throughout the state. Each Chapter,
or local group of architects, could pre-
pare material prior to sending it to
Palm Beach and could show it locally.
Local department stores would un-
doubtedly cooperate. And newspaper
editors should find plenty of interest
in what buildings were being planned
locally. What do you think of the
idea?"
We thought it an excellent one,
urged Bill to carry it through and
told him to count on all possible
assistance from this quarter.
Here, received well before we went
to press, is a letter on the subject. It
was sent to Chapter Presidents as a
communication from the Public In-
formation Committee. It is repro-
duced here because of its specific in-
terest to all F.A.A. members who
plan to submit one or more of their
projects to the Palm Beach Conven-
tion Exhibit.
"The St. Petersburg and Clear-


water members of the F.A.A. are
planning to have an architectural ex-
hibit and reception prior to the Con-
vention. This exhibit will contain
entries to be sent down to Palm
Beach. By showing our work twice, it
will in a measure repay us for our
trouble in preparing panels. And, of
course, it will help show the public
the results of our work in the com-
munity.
"Mr. Al Schelm, manager of Maas
Brothers, our local department store,
enthusiastically offered display space,
as well as possible space in their ad-
vertising. He will also assist in the
hanging of the exhibit.
"Mr. Douglas Doubleday, building
editor of the St. Petersburg Times,
says, 'The exhibit is a good spring-
board for news stories and publicity
of the architect's work'. He earnestly
encouraged the idea and thinks it is
a positive way to show the value of
an architect. -
"Mrs. Winfield Lott, chairwoman
of the public reception held at last
year's exhibit here in St. Petersburg,
thinks the event last year was so
successful that the reception, open-
house, idea should be repeated.


Florida Sales Representative


GEORGE C. GRIFFIN
P. O. Box 5151, Jacksonville


OBJECTIVES
The objectives of the Florida Association of Architects shall be to unite
the architectural profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward
the objectives of the The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession; to cooperate with
the other professions; to promote and participate in the matters of general
public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural profession in the
State; and to promote educational and public relations programs for the ad-
vancement of the profession.

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT






"Here's a sample invitation::
Pinellas County Members
Of The American Institute of Architects
Cordially Invite You and Your Friends
To Attend
An Architectural Exhibit
At Maas Brothers
November 2 through 6 3 to 5 P.M.
"It is good news that the Palm
Beach Exhibit will allow drawings,
because this will help the newer mem-
bers of the profession to display their
work-and will help liven up the
show.
"The purpose of this letter is to
seek out volunteers to head up this
project in each community where
such an exhibit is possible. It will be
appreciated if you will contact by
phone anyone you know interested
in pushing this project.
"Even if the exhibit is small and
select, it will serve a good purpose. It
will provide a means for reaching
the public and afford an excuse for
architects to be hosts at a reception,
or open house."

Proof that architectural exhibits are
of keen interest to the public-and
a potent means for furthering a bet-
ter understanding of good archi-
tectural design-is the history of
last year's exhibit. It was shown in
five Florida cities, one in Georgia,
two in Virginia and one in Alabama.
Currently it is at Washington, D. C.,
where it is being readied for a
Latin-American tour under the offi-
cial sponsorship of the U. S. Inform-
ation Agency.
The pointed success of this exhibit
was due partly to the excellence of
its subject matter. But partly also it
was because of the well-organized
fashion in which the exhibit tour
was handled by the Center of The
Arts at the University of Florida un-
der direction of JOHN L. R. GRAND.
Accompanying the two cases of
material that comprised the exhibit
were packing instructions, a report
form with shipping instructions and
a suggested news release for local use.
Itinerary of the tour had been ar-
ranged via a preliminary letter from
Tom Grand. This letter created ex-
cellent reaction from most quarters.
Curiously enough, however, the ex-
hibit appeared to hold no interest for
three of the F.A.A.'s seven Chapters.


.,4.4. Gr oa 4iablt fInwsuigce Pays4 U 7



$400 a month

WHEN SICK OR HURT



When you're sick or hurt and can't work, you need money
to live on and you may need extra money for medical,
hospital or nursing expenses. Here's the security the
F.A.A. Group Health-Accident Program gives you . .


* SICKNESS . Up to $400 per month for as long as
5 years should illness prevent you from working.

* ACCIDENT . Monthly income up to $400 for as long
as disability stops your earning power even for life!
And up to $20,000 for your family in case of accidental
death.
o HOSPITAL EXPENSES ... An extra payment up to $200
monthly for as long as three months should sickness or
accident put you in a hospital.

* NURSES, DOCTORS FEES . Up to $200 per month
extra for nursing services up to three months and up
to $100 extra to help pay doctor's bills.


LOW-COST GROUP

INSURANCE WILL

GUARANTEE YOU

MONEY WHEN YOU

NEED IT MOST
....


You can choose from 8
different monthly income
plans offered by the
F.A.A Group Health-Acci-
dent Insurance Program-
virtually write your own
policy to fit your needs
and budget. This guaran-
teed protection is spon-
sored by the Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects and
is underwritten by the In-
ter-Ocean Insurance Coin-
pany, Cincinnati, Ohio.


Apply now to:

BEN W. BALAY, Manager, STATE OFFICE

1202 Florida Title Bldg., Jacksonville, Florida


OCTOBER, 1954







Producers' Council Program



II~~~~llIIIIIII~~~~~~~illiIIIi llii llIIIIIIIIIi llIII lIii 1111111111111111 11111111iiii il IIi ll lllli l IIII IIIIIll lii Ii ll llIIIIIIIIIillll





IsCoin !._i


In mid-October architects in the
Miami and Jacksonville areas will
have an opportunity to visit and study
one of the most unique exhibits ever
dreamed up. Again this year the Pro-
ducers' Council, through what it calls
the "Caravan of Quality Building
Products," is bringing to the door-
steps of the nation's designers and
builders a collection of top-flight dis-
plays of the newest and most signifi-
can product developments in the
building field.
As in the past this ingenious trav-
eling display is freely open to all
architects-including their staff mem-
bers. In Jacksonville, Caravan exhibits
will be shown in the Ballroom of the
Roosevelt Hotel, 33 West Adams
Street, on Friday, October 15, from
10:00 in the morning till 10:00 at
night. The Maimi exhibit will be
open on Tuesday, October 12, from
11:30 in the morning to 10:00 at
night. The place will be the Miami
Beach Auditorium, 1700 Washington
Avenue.
In Jacksonville the Florida North
Chapter, F.A.A., has scheduled a
meeting in conjunction with the Car-
avan exhibit. In Miami, the local Pro-
ducers' Council Chapter will be hosts
to registered and practicing architects
in the Greater Miami area at a cock-
tail party to be held at the Miami
Beach Auditorium from 5 to 7 p.m.
on Monday, October 11, prior to the
opening of the Caravan exhibit.
To those who view the Caravan
show for the first time, it will seem


incredible that the displays of 43
nationally known building product
firms can be packed into a single van,
however large, and rolled throughout
the country to cover its 33 major
marketing areas. For each display
booth is a unit by itself, carefully
and expertly designed to provide as
wide as possible a range of technical
information for the quick compre-
hension of busy professional men.
Each unit is free-standing. Each is
colorful, well-lighted, and provides the
sort of background that will most ef-
fectively show the product involved.
And each is packed full of an amaz-


ingly complete fund of vital, quick-
reading facts geared to the interests
and technical needs of designers, engi-
neers, specification writers, field sup-
ervisors, construction superintendents,
builders and even students.
Though each individual display is
different from any other, all of the
43 have been designed to present a
well-coordinated exhibit. Thus, the
Caravan show becomes an easy and
pleasurable way to absorb the latest
data on the materials and equipment
with which architects' designs are
built. For any building professional
it's too good a show to miss.


Typical of Caravan exhibits is this display in which detailed information
and working models keep architects informed of new developments in
door hardware. This particular display is one of several new products
being exhibited for the first time.
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT








F. A.A. Operating Committees-1953 -1954

In the work of any organization's operating committees lies the ability of
that organization to make progress. Listed here are the Committees of your
professional Association whose reports will be presented and considered at
the Palm Beach Convention next month. Right now most of these reports
are still incomplete. So, if you have a suggestion to offer on the work of
any committee, write the chairman at once. His address is listed below.

ALLIED ARTS Joel V. Savers, Jr. (Daytona) Robert II. Maybin (North
Norman F. Six (Central) Central)
Fredericck Scclman William T. Vaughn (Broward) Harold D. Steward (South)
(Palm Beach) Chairman
Paramount Building LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING
Palmhn Beach, Fla.
P B a Franklin S. Bunch (North) William T. Arnett (North)
= illiam F. Bigoncv, Jr. Ci
Chairman Chairman
(Broward) 33 South Hogan St. College of Architecture and
Francis NV. Craig (Daytona) Jacksonil, Fla. Allied Arts
DaeT 13 (Centra ; Jacksonville, la. Allied Arts
= C. Dale Dykema (Central)
- ykea cnAndrew J. Fcrcndmo (South) Gainesvillc, Fla.
S Willam F. Kittle (South) Eliot C. Fletcher (Central) Laurance W. Hitt (Central)
SDonald J Reiff (South) Sanford NV. Going (North) Willis L. Stephens (North)
Pasquale M. Torraca (North) arrv M. Griffin (Daytona) John Stetson (Palm Beach)
Albert P. Woodard .
A P. Elliott B. Hadley (Central) George J. Votaw (Palmhn Beach)
(North Central) R. Daniel Hart (North)
BOARD OF TRUSTEES, A. NWynn Howell (Central) RELATIONS WITH
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Prentiss Huddleston CONSTRUCTION
FUND (North Central) INDUSTRY
John L. R. Grnd (North) Raymond H. Plockemhnan George J. Votaw (Palm Beach)
Chairman (Palm Beach) Chairman
College of Architecture and Jamecs J. Pownall (Broward) 210 Okeechobee Rd.
Allied Arts James Gamble Rogers, II West Palm Beach, Fla.
University of Florida (Central) Myrl J. Hancs (North)
Gainesville, Fla. N\111. A. Stewart (Palm Beach) M. Winfield Lott, Jr.(Ccntral)
Andrew J. Ferendino (South) w~lliam WN Zimmerman Bayard C. Lukens (Broward)
George H. Spohn (Central) MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE Nilliam II. Merriam (South)
Bclford Shoumnate(Palmn B'ch)
BY-LAW REVISIONS Sanford W. Goin (North) E in Snead B ta)
E-dwin M. Snead (Daytona) =
Francis R. Walton (Daytona) Chairman u
Chairman 518 N. F. 4th Avenue James A. Stripling (North)
142 Bav Street Gainesvillc, Fla. UNIFORM BUILDING
Daytona Beach, Fla. Mvrl J. Lanes (North) CODES BUILDING
Sanford WNV. Goin (North) 1I. Samucl Kruse (South)
NWilliam D. Kemp (North) Ralph P. Loveclock (Central) Edward T'. Rcmpc, Jr.(South)
Chairman
EDUCATION AND PUBLIC INFORMATION 153 Sevilla Avenue
REGISTRATION AND GOVERNMENTAL Coral Gables, Fla.
John L. R. Grand (North) RELATIONS William Kemp Caler
Chairman William B. Harvard (Central) (Palm Beach)
College of Architecture and Chairman George A. Coffin (South)
| Allied Arts 2714 9th Street No. WVilliam G. Crawford -
= University of Florida St. Petersburg, Fla. (Broward)
Gainesville, Fla. Thos. H. Chilton (Palm B'ch) Donovan Dean (Central)
Donovan Dean (Central) =
= illiam T. Arnett (North William R. Gomon (Daytona) =
Gustav A. Maass (Palm Beach) Lee Hooper (North) Thomas Larrck (North)
T. Trip Russell (South) Horace H. Hamlin, Jr. IH. D. Mendenhall
Charles VW. Saunders (Central) (North Central)
(North Central) Cedric Start (Broward) Ralph F. Spiccr (Daytona)
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W AT I -I _LI hlI.
H N I C- BE, r I i 4



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A SITE FOR THE
J EYES OF TEXAS!


,Towering high in downloWri Da3llas is this latest
v .Corig n oilire tuildinf w'Ih thousands of
J lit ''Arlte windc.wS arnd Therm.Artey aluminum
t4 S I sp ndrEl: anotherr arrli a ledur3l ,riumph in
.. t .*; ,f i l l ,urrluminum bi" ,:,-rlulin 0 Closer to
,I-.._'," homrr,-rihlt here in meiroipoliIan M3imi-are
S r IheLr oulitandirin Arlv ePitmple. r. this new-
'I Ito " erl ,.:.n,cept which limrin3le. lar13 rious masonry
1 1.1ll .1 et.-rin 3nri se.s ec.:,n,:m, records-
SI i FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
-A
71 AINSLEY BUILDING
y; f BOWMAN F. ASHE
MEMORIAL BLDG. OF U. M.


ii iu, We nvile conS ulta3liorn or
lip -1.313 S und ioit.

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