Group Title: Research report - North Florida Experiment Station, University of Florida - NFS 67-4
Title: Winter pasture versus sorghum-sudan haylage for wintering cattle and corn silage in the finishing ration
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073734/00001
 Material Information
Title: Winter pasture versus sorghum-sudan haylage for wintering cattle and corn silage in the finishing ration
Series Title: North Florida Station mimeo report
Physical Description: 4 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Baker, F. S ( Frank Sloan ), 1921-
North Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: North Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1967
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sorghum as feed -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Corn as feed -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by F.S. Baker, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "May 5, 1967."
Funding: NFES mimeo rpt. ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073734
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 83790514

Full Text

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North Florida Station Mimeo Report NFS 67-4

WINTER PASTURE VERSUS SORGHUM-SUDAN HAYLAGE FOR WINTERING CATTLE AND
CORN SILAGE IN THE FINISHING RATION

F. S. Baker, Jr.l/


WINTER FEEDING TRIAL

Sorghum-sudan haylage, fed in dry lot and on frosted grass-clover pasture, with
different amounts of grain supplement was compared with oats pasture for wintering stocker
steers. During the first half of the winter a negligible amount of clover was present in
the frosted grass pasture (Lots 3 and 4), but during the last half, an increasing amount
was available, with abundant clover forage at the end of the winter period. Six groups
were fed as follows:


First Half Winter
Lot
Haylage
Gr. snap. corn
41% c, seed meal
Pasture


Second Half Winter
Haylage
Gr. snap. corn
41% c. seed meal
Pasture


1
Full-fed
None
None
Dry lot


Full-fed
2.50 lbs.
1.25 Ibs.
Dry lot


2
Full-fed
6.25 Ibs.
1.25 lbs.
Dry lot


Full-fed
6.25 lbs.
1.25 lbs.
Dry lot


3
Full-fed
None
None
Frosted
grass


Full-fed
3.75 lbs.
None
Frosted
grass-
clover


4
Full-fed
6.25 Ibs.
1.25 lbs.
Frosted
grass


Full-fed
6.25 Ibs.
1.25 lbs.
Frosted
grass-
clover


5
None
None
None
Oats


None
None
None
Oats


6
None
None
None
Oats


None
None
None
Oats


Amounts of feed shown were pounds per head daily.


Minerals were self-fed to all groups;


some grass hay was fed to Lots 5 and 6 when pasture was short during cold weather.
was sorghum-sudan (Lindsey 77F) with 50-55 percent moisture and 4 percent protein.


Haylage


Initial weights were purchase weights, and final weights were on market weight basis
(trucked 3 miles to Quincy in early morning, weighed, and weights shrunk 3 percent).
Carcass weights were hot weights less 2 1/2 percent shrink.


Animal Husbandman


I


-- --


NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
Quincy, Florida
May 5, 1967










Winter Performance (126 days)


Lot
First Half Winter
Haylage daily
Cone. daily
Av. daily gain
Cost gain*

Second Half Winter
Haylage daily
Cone. daily
Av. daily gain
Cost gain*

Entire Winter
Haylage daily
Cone. daily
Initial wt.
Final wt.
Av. daily gain
Cost gain*
Initial cost (cwt.)
Final cost (cwt.)


*Haylage, $12.53 ton; ground snapped corn, $45.00 ton; 41%
oats pasture, $35 acre; frosted grass-clover pasture, $10


cottonseed
acre.


meal, $86.00 ton;


Following wintering the cattle were finished in feedlot.

Feedlot Performance (113 days) and Carcass Data


Lot 1 2 3 4 5 6
Av. daily feed intake 25.80 24.40 24.26 24.15 24.04 25.29
Av. final wt. 913 1037 1000 1029 1054 1060
Av. daily gain 2.04 2.39 2.26 2.02 2.36 2.21
Feed 100 lbs. gain 1286 1020 1075 1193 1017 1143
Cost gain* $29.86 $24.09 $25.56 $28.34 $24.16 $26.41
Carcass weight 546 620 598 615 630 634
Carcass yield 59.78 59.78 59.78 59.78 59.78 59.78
Carcass grade** 10.3 11.4 10.6 11.7 11.6 11.5
Sale price cwt. 24.03 24.33 24.08 24,37 24.55 24.36
Cost cwt. feeders 24.89 23.83 21.68 22.62 21.73 21.14
Return above cattle
and feed -19.41 +4.54 +14.06 +5.43 +23.25 +21.10
*Ground snapped corn, $45 ton; citrus molasses, $25 ton; 41% cottonseed meal, $95 ton;
grass hay, $22.50 ton; corn silage, $12 ton.

**10, average good; 11, high good; 12, low choice.
-------------------------------------------------------------------- --


35.51
0
0.18
$123.56


29.11
3.75
1.26
$23.73


32.36
1.85
580
670
0.71
$36.80
22.72
24.89


25.36
7.50
1.52
$23.56


23.38
7.50
1.10
$31.58


24.39
7.50
581
743
1.31
$26.85
22.72
23.83


30.77
0
0.20
$115.50


7.76
3.75
2.14
$8.22


19.45
1.85
580
726
1.16
$17.87
22.72
21.68


33.81
7.50
1.47
$30.26


10.23
7.50
1.76
$17.11


22.20
7.50
580
783
1.62
$23.23
22.72
22.62


0
0
1.45
$19.85


0
0
1.79
$15.82


0
0
581
785
1.62
$17.57
22.72
21.73


0
0
1.64
$17.40


0
0
1.95
$14.58


0
0
581
807
1.79
$15.89
22.72
21.14










CONVENTIONAL GRAIN RATION VERSUS CORN SILAGE-LIMITED GRAIN RATION

Each wintering lot was divided into two sub groups, one of which was fed a conventional
high grain finishing ration and the other was fed a high corn silage and limited grain ration.

Conventional Ration
Feed Per head daily Per ton
Ground snapped corn 21.46 1575
Citrus molasses 2.79 205
41% cottonseed meal 2.45 180
Grass hay (at start of trial) 0.57 40
Salt and steamed bonemeal Free choice
Totals 27.27 2000

Silage-Limited Grain Ration
Corn silage 31.14 1440
Ground snapped corn 9.61* 445*
41% cottonseed meal 2.47 115
Salt and steamed bonemeal Free choice
Totals 43.22 2000

*5 lbs. daily first month, 7 lbs. daily second month, 11 lbs.
daily third month, and 15 lbs. daily fourth month.

25,000 I. U. vitamin A per head daily with both rations.

24 mg. stilbestrol implants to all steers when placed in feedlot.

Feedlot Performance (113 days) and Carcass Data (six sub groups combined,with 48 steers
each group).

Conventional ration High silage ration
Av. daily feed intake 27.27 43.22
Initial weight 767 766
Final weight 1041 991
Av. daily gain 2.45 1.99
Feed 100 pounds gain (gross) 1113 2172
Feed 100 pounds gain (D. M. adjusted) 1094 1143
Feed cost 100 pounds gain* $26.09 $26.37
Carcass weight 622 592
Carcass yield 59.78 59.78
Carcass grade** 11.6 10.8
.Estimated cutout (percent)*** 49.16 49.97
Estimated cutout (pounds) 306 296
Sale price cwt. on foot**** $24.36 $24.20
Cost cwt. feeders 22.59 22.58
Return above costs cattle and feed 8.82 7.55
*Corn silage, $12 ton; ground snapped corn, $45 ton; 41% cottonseed meal, $95 ton;
grass hay, $22.50 ton; citrus molasses, $25 ton.
**10, average good; 11, high good; 12, low choice.
***Closely trimmed, boneless chuck, rib, loin, rump, and round.
****U. S. Choice carcass, $41.50 cwt.; U. S. Good carcass $40.00 cwt.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------







-4-


SUMMARY

Sorghum-sudan haylage (50 percent dry matter and 4 percent protein) with no grain
supplement maintained weight of stocker cattle with negligible gain.

Sorghum-sudan haylage supplemented with 7.5 pounds concentrates daily (6.25 pounds
ground snapped corn and 1.25 pounds 41% cottonseed meal) produced 1.47 pounds daily gain,
with a cost of $25.04 per 100 pounds gain; while oats pasture produced 1.71 pounds daily
gain,with a cost of $16.73 per 100 pounds gain. Except with the groups on clover during
the second half of the winter, it is possible that the 7.5-pound concentrate level was not
adequate to supplement the haylage; approximately 1.6 pounds of the ground ear corn was cob
and shuck, which resulted in actual concentrates (ground shelled corn and cottonseed meal)
of only 5.9 pounds per head daily or somewhat less than a concentrate level of 1 percent of
body weight. Perhaps a concentrate level of 1.5 percent of body weight (approximately 10
pounds daily with these cattle -- 8.75 pounds ground shelled corn, or 11.75 pounds ground
snapped corn, and 1.25 pounds cottonseed meal) would have produced faster, less costly
gains. Work at Purdue and the University of Illinois supports this supposition (Purdue
Univ. Res. Prog. Rept. April 1966 and Ill. AS-593a, 1963.).

Cattle finished with a conventional high concentrate ration gained faster and had
heavier carcasses than those fed a corn silage-limited grain ration, but difference in
carcass grade was small. It is interesting to note that although the high concentrate
cattle had 30-pound heavier carcasses, there was a difference of only 10 pounds per head
between the two groups in estimated cutout of closely trimmed boneless cuts, indicating
that the silage-fed cattle had less excess fat. With corn silage priced at $12 and ground
snapped corn at $45 per ton, cost of gain and net returns were similar with two rations.



















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3/15/67
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