Title: Pinellas news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073688/00138
 Material Information
Title: Pinellas news
Uniform Title: Pinellas news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Publisher: Potter Media
Publication Date: August 31, 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg
Coordinates: 27.782254 x -82.667619 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00073688
Volume ID: VID00138
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 28918446

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MR. WfLL CONOVA CURATOR **B010
SMATHERS DIGITAL LIBRARY CTR
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


250


Vol. 25 No. 35 1 Section 8 pages August 31, 2007


Ducks, Flooding and Cell



Towers Highlight



Candidate Discussion


i n .4 -. -. 4,ff "- ,. ..; *
Candidates for St. Petersburg city council district 3 met Wednesday at the Shore Acres Community Center to participate in a forum discussing
their plans and promises relating to current issues. The forum continued through the temporary power loss and ended with a question and answer
session from the citizens. Candidates seen left to right: Cathy Harrelson, Bill Dudley, Ed Montanari, and Cliff Gephart.


Photo and story by Melissa McCartney
Staff Writer ously no phones...except Ca!hy
Sthe storm, had service as her c
St. Petersburg- The candidate forum was for city council seat 3 answer. After answering her ques
got off to a thunderously ducky start after losing power in the first 5 was me."
minutes due to a passing thunderstorm and then intentlydiscussing If the meeting wasn't interest
the current duck problems of Shore Acres. be with the next question pertain
Starting off the forum was Cathy Harrelson followed by Bill The city has a policy for getting
"Coach" Dudley, Ed Montanari and finally Cliff Gephart. Questions Cliff Gephart: "I looked it up toc
focused on a variety of issues such as local flooding, cell phone you a trap. The city then comes a
tower referendum and current city policy regarding the removal of cates it to another area." Needl
pesky ducks. jokes and agreed not to "duck"
The cell tower discussion that ensued next was highly appropri- The power did return shortly
ate as the candidates and citizens sat there with no power and obvi- tinued without interruption.


Incoming USF and UT


freshman take Online


Alcohol Prevention Course


By:Melissa McCartney
Staff Writer
Tampa-As of this semester all incoming fresh-
man at the University of South Florida and the
University of Tampa will be required to participate
in an online alcohol awareness program. This 2-
part online course is designed to get students to
think about drinking situations. The test is for
everyone regardless of whether they drink, do not
drink or plan to drink.
For USF freshmen are required to complete
the first portion of the program before the start of
the semester and then complete the second part
about 45 days later. The first part takes about 2
hours and the second around 1-2. Altogether the
program will last about 3 to 4 hours. The comple-
tion time can vary depending on how long students
take to input personal information, how long they
take to answer and the connection speed also plays
a role.
Students who do not complete this mandatory
course will be reported to the Department of
Student Rights and Responsibility.
The idea behind the program, according to
USF's assistant director of student health services-
health promotion Holly Rayko, is to get them
thinking about situations involving drinking


whether they drink or not. The point being that all
people can be impacted by drinking situations.
Students can expect a variety of questions
including journal entries and personal accounts.
One example of a question is "You are at a party
and your' designated driver has been drinking.
What do you do?
At the end of each section the program asks its
own questions such as "Was this easy to under-
stand?" or "Do these questions make sense?"
Several schools are participating in this pro-
gram such as University of Tampa.and University
of Central Florida. One interesting difference
between the schools is that USF also purchased the
program dealing with sexual assault.
"Drinking and sexual assault have a definite
connection so students need to be thinking about
that too." said Rayko. "Questions about sexual
assault have been seamlessly integrated into the
course as well".
Rayko also says that this version of program is
one of the best, even though it is the longest,
because it is the most comprehensive and it is
based in theory and research.
Current freshman have completed part one and
should expect to take part two sometime in
October.


Harrelson who, even in the midst of
ell rang in the middle of her first
stion "Coach" Dudley said "Sorry, it

sting enough already it continued to
ing to duck policy. Yes, duck policy.
rid of ducks according to candidate
lay. You call the city and they bring
nd takes.the captured duck' and relo-
ess to say several candidates made
out on this question.
y after going out and the forum con-


Light, Progress



on 4th St.



1B-





.
~-


4 .-.,. iji~ic '- 1*"iE I.--.&


.M &.
Photo by Meljssa McCartney
St. Petersburg Along 4th Avenue North drivers and people passing by
may notice that Florida Power finally removing the street lights
-mourted on cement poles they originally put iit place and the city is
replacing them with more decorative light poles placed a little further
back from the curb.
The new streetlights add a certain level of attractiveness to the road
and provide a more contemporary look.
The remaining cement light poles located on the west side of 4th
Street will be removed in the near future.
The concrete high voltage electrical transmission lines located on the
west side of 4th street will take longer to relocate because the power
lines have yet to be to be moved. It is taking years but slowly progress
is being made.
Snnnk seson


of Labor Day Travelers
Labor Day Travelers
Start Your Engines and Wait
Tampa- The summer travel season close with record numbers of
travelers during Labor Day weekend, as 34.6 million Americans are
projected to travel at least 50 miles from home; a nominal increase of
0.2 percent over.last year. But, when adjusted for population growth,
this figure equates to no real change from Labor Day, 2006.
In the southeast, total travel over the holiday weekend will like-
ly be down slightly when compared to last year, based on a national
phone survey of 1,950 consumers contacted for AAA by the Travel
Industry Association of America. The number of people stating that
will drive at least 50 miles from home is down by 1.5 percent, while
the number of people who say they will travel my plane is up by 5
percent.
In Auto Club South territory, 1.9 million Floridians; nearly 1 mil-
lion Georgians; and 632,000 Tennesseans are projected to travel dur-
ing the Labor Day weekend. ,
State (POP.) DRIVE FLY TOTAL
FL 17,789,864 1,583,298. 302,428 1,885,726
GA 9,072,576 807,459 154,234 961,693
TN 5,962,959 530,703 101,370 632,073
The greatest number of Labor Day weekend auto travelers will
originate in the West with 109 million; followed by the southeast, 8.1
million; Midwest, 6.4 million; northeast, 4.8 million; and Great
Lakes, 4.5 million.
Cities and urban areas top the list of preferred destinations this
holiday with 30.4 percent of travel volume. Oceans and beaches rank
next with 19.8 percent; followed by small towns and rural areas with
16.5 percent. Theme and amusement parks expect to see 11.1 percent
of holiday travelers followed by mountain areas, 9.2 percent; lakes,
4.5 percent and state/national parks, 3.6 percent. Another 5 percent
responded with "other".
Research for Labor Day is based on a national telephone survey
of 1,950 adults by the Travel Industry Association of America, which
conducts special research for AAA.


with changes
The statewide harvest season
for snook reopens Sept. 1, and
anglers should note several new
snook regulations are in effect.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion recently changed snook bag
and size limits and harvest sea-
sons to help protect and preserve
snook stocks in Florida.
There is now a one-fish daily
bag limit per person statewide for
snook arid a slot limit of 28-32
inches total length in Atlantic
waters and a 28-33 inches total
length limit in Florida's Gulf,
Everglades National Park and
Monroe County waters.
In addition, the snook har-
vest season will close on Dec. 1
in the Gulf, Everglades and
Monroe County and will reopen
March 1. In the Atlantic, the sea-
son will close on Dec. 15 and
reopen Feb. 1.
New rules also allow anglers
to carry more than one cast net
aboard a vessel while fishing for
snook.
Licensed saltwater anglers
must purchase a $2 permit to har-
vest snook. Snatch-hooking and
spearing snook are prohibited,
and it is illegal to buy. or sell
snook. These snook regulations
also apply in federal waters.


SEvents Calendar Page 2
W HAT S Recipe Page 3

INSIE? Legal Notices Pages 4-5
INSIDE?


AAA Predicts Record Number reopens Sept. 1


I _







:Page 2 Pinellas News Friday, August 31, 2007



St. Pete Events



.- i r -


Sep. 1 ALBERT WHITTED AIRPORT PRESERVATION
SOCIETY PANCAKE BREAKFAST. Albert Whitted Airport, 451
3th Ave. S.E. St. Petersburg. 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. All you can eat pan-
akes, eggs. bacon, hashbrowns, grits, coffee and juice. $10 adults, $2
childrenn under 12. www.awaps.org or 727-822-1532.
Sep. 1 SUNCOAST ANNUAL CORVETTE SHOW. The Pier,
- 00 2nd Ave. N.E. St. Petersburg. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Labor Day week-
:nd corvette show featuring entertainment, door prizes, awards and
- nore. Pre-register your 'vette by Aug. 5, plus receive a t-shirt, dash
plaque and goodies. $20 registration, www.stpetepier.com or 727-
321-6443.
Sep. 3 to 5 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. BALTIMORE
ORIOLES. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
ww.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Sep. 7 GET DOWNTOWN. Central Ave. from 2nd to 3rd St. St.
Petersburg. 5:30 to 10 p.m. Live music and festive street party. Free.
727-393-3597.
Sep. 7 to 9 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. TORONTO
BLUE JAYS. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
www.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Sep. 7 to 9 WEEKEND ART SALE. The Arts Center, 719
Central Ave. St. Petersburg.Fri. and Sat., 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sun. noon
.o 4 p.m. Purchase works of art from over 25 juried artists. Free.
www.theartscenter.org or (727) 822-7872.
Sep. 8 ST. GILES CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE. St. Giles
Church, 8271 52nd Street, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open to the public. Table
rental is $25. Call (727) 544-6856 for more information.
Sep. 8 CLUB FUNDRAISER FOR RESCUED ANIMALS.
Helen Howarth Park Horse Arena, 6301 94th Ave. N., 4p.m. to 7p.m.
5$ horseback rides, silent auction, face painting, food and drinks will
be available as well as a therapeutic riding demonstration. Call for
-more information (727) 520-3132.
Sep. 8 AUDITION NOTICE. The Francis Wilson Playhouse
ison 302 Seminole St., Clearwater, will hold auditions for A STAR IS
BORN (A Christmas Musical) from 9 a.m. to noon. Auditions will be
held at the theatre. Needed: A large cast of children singers ages 8-14
plus 1 adult man or woman for singing and acting. Dress for move-
ment NO open toed shoes. Show dates are December 1,8th and
15th(ll a.m.). Rehearsals will be held once weekly until mid-
SNovember. For more information call (727) 446-1360.
Sep. 9 BBQ BENEFIT FOR INJURED FIREFIGHTER.
,American Legion Post 104, 7550 60th St. N., 9, a.m. to noon. Local
Fire and Iron Group to host BBQ benefit for injured firefighter Mark
Woods. All money benefits Mark Woods. Tickets $8.
Sep. 9-15 WATER REUSE WEEK. The Southwest Florida
Water Management Distric's Governing Board joins the governor's
office and the Florida Department of Environment Protection in an
effort to promote water reuse and the need for water conservation.
For more information please visit the district's web site at
www.WaterMatters.org/conservation/reclaimed/.
Sep. 9-12 ANNUAL WATeReUSE SYMPOSIUM. The sympo-
sium coincides with Water Reuse Week. The WateReuse Association
will be hosting its annual event in the bay area for the first time. Their
-mission is to advance the beneficial and efficient use of water
resources through education, sound, science and technology using
reclamation, recycling, reuse and desalination. For more information
visit www.watereuse.org.
Sep. 14 LINKS TO NEXT GENERATION EXHIBIT. St
Petersburg Museum of History exhibit highlighting the history of
Links, Incorporated a volunteer service organization of women of
African ancestry. www.spmoh.org or (727) 894-1052 ext 205.
Sep. 15 AIDS WALK ST. PETERSBURG. North Shore Park,
901 North Shore Dr. N.E. St. Petersburg. 9 a.m. to noon. Fundraiser
benefiting clients of For AIDS Care Today. (727) 328-3268.
Sep. 15 CRIME PREVENTION RUN & FESTIVAL.
Campbell Park, 601 14th Street S, St. Petersburg. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Promotes positive interaction between community residents and law
enforcement. Free. For more information, call (727) 327-2081.
Sep. 15 PRESCHOOL VILLAGE RAMBLERS. Heritage
Village. 11909 125th Street N, Largo, FL. 10:00 a.m.-ll:30 a.m.
Preschoolers and their parents or grandparents can play at history!
Call (727) 582-2123 for more information.
Sep. 15 GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. Brooker Creek
Preserve. 3940 Keystone Rd. Tarpon Springs. 10 a.m.-ll:30 a.m.
SChoosing plants that create habitat for variouswildlife can be a
rewarding and educational experience for the entire family. An
instructor from Pinellas County Extension will be on hand to teach
this free workshop at Brooker Creek Preserve Environmental
Education Center in Tarpon Springs. Call (727)453-6800 for info and
pre-registration.
Sep. 15 AUDITIONS FOR THE NUTCRACKER Guifoil
-Ballet Theatre is holding auditions for the holiday performance of
THE NUTCRACKER. Dancers of all akes and skill levels are being
sought. Auditions will be held at 3 p.m. at the Guilfoil Ballet Studio
located in Clearwater at 1465 S. Ft. Harrison Ave #203 (Blue build-
ing, back entrance) There will be two performances at The Palladium
Theater in St. Petersburg on December 1, 2003 or www.guifoilbal-
lettheatre.com
Sep. 16 SICKLE CELL DINNER & JAZZ. Hilton St.
Petersburg, 333 1st St. S. St. Petersburg. 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Jazz extrava-
ganza featuring dinner, dancing, and entertainment by local musi-

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
9025 49th St. N., Pinellas Park 546-5741


Sunday School
9:00 am
Summer Reunion Worship
10:15 am


Transportation and Nursery Available
Frank K. Reynolds, Pastor


cians and vocalists. Call (727) 896-2355.
Sep. 16 FAMILY DAY. The Arts Center, 719 Central Ave. St.
Petersburg. 1 to 4 p.m. Family friendly day with hands-on.art projects
and other fun activities. Free. www.theartscenter.org or 727-822-
7872.
Sep. 17 GOP REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY
DEBATE. Mahaffey Theater, 400 1st St. S. St. Petersburg. 7 to 9 p.m.
Live broadcast on CNN moderated by Anderson Cooper.
www.mahaffeytheater.com or 727-892-5767.
Sep. 22 DOG SWIM DAY. Fossil Park Pool, 6739 Martin
Luther King Jr. St. N. St. Petersburg. Swim sessions: 10 a.m. to noon
and 1 to 3 p.m. Friendly canines get to splash and paddle in the pool.
Register at either start time with proof of vaccination. $5 per dog,
humans free. 727-893-7732.
Sep. 22 CLASSIC AUTO SHOW. The Pier, 800 2nd Ave. N.E.
St. Petersburg. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check out classic beauties from
1976 arid earlier. Call for car registration. Free. www.stpetepier.com
or 727-418-0628.
Sep. 24 ST. JUDE'S CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL FUNDRAIS-
ER AT CHILI'S BAR AND GRILL. 100% of profits from this
day will be donated directly to St. Judes Children's Hospital. All
Chili's locations will be participating. Restaurant hours are
11:00a.m.-11:00p.m. For more information contact your local Chili's
restaurant.
Sep. 25 TAMPA BAY JOB FAIR. The Coliseum. 535 4th Ave.
N. St. Petersburg. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Over 80 local employers on site per-
forming testing, interviews, and more. Free. Call (727) 898-5202 for
more information.
Sep. 28 4th ANNUAL CHAMBER CUP GOLF TOURNA-
MENT. Belleview Biltmore Golf Club, 1501 Indian Rocks Road.
Registration begins at 11 a.m. with the shotgun start at 12:30. Cost
per golfer is 125$. To register, become a sponsor or for more infor-
mation contact the chamber at (727) 584-2321 or events@largocham-
ber.com.
Sep. 29 1st ANNUAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS EXPO.
Park station, 5851 Park Blvd., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Explore health care
service options for businesses of all size or table at the event. Blood
pressure, cholesterol and sugar checks will be available. For more
information call (727) 544-4777
Sep. 29 CARIBBEAN MUSIC FEST 2007. England Brothers
Bandshell, 5121 80th Ave. N, 10.a.m. to 11.p.m. A family event fea-
turing reggae, salsa, soca, calypso and jazz. Tickets are $25 at the
gate, $20 pre-sold amd $15 early bird. Call (727) 504-8534 or (727)
898-8381.
Oct. 1-5 11TH ANNUAL COMMUTER CHOICES WEEK.
Bay Area Commuter Services (BACS) will be having a week long
series of events to help educate the general public, local government
amd media about commute options and the benefits of reducing traf-
fic congestion. For more information call (800) 998-RIDE or visit
www.TampaBayRideshare.org.
Oct 6 CHILDREN SAFETY FESTIVAL. Town Square
Plaza Park, 5010 81st Avenue N., 11.a.m. to 2.p.m. Events include a
bicycle rodeo, fire department open house and prize giveaways. For
more information call (727) 541-0721.
Oct. 8 ART SOCIETY OPEN HOUSE. Park Station 5851
Park Blvd., 7 p.m. Celebrating 43 years with local art to see and
working artists to watch. For more information call (727) 541-2697
Nov. 3 BASIC CPR CLASS FOE building, 3451 63rd Ave. N.,
9 a.m. to noon. Classes by the Pinellas Park Fire Department and
through the Fraternal order of Eagles Pinellas Park Chapter. Free and
open to the public. Register by Oct. 26. Call.(727), 527-2896.
Nov, 17 HISTORICAL SOCIETY PIONEER'S DAY OPEN
HOUSE. 1914 PCHS Community Cent6r 605 Collins St. Plant City,
Florida 33563., 9a.m. to 3.p.m. H.B. Plant Railroad Historical
Society and the E. Hillsborough Historical Society will hold an open
house.
r*----------- ------------------------

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HERITAGE


NEWS


FORUM

Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D.
http://www.heritage.org
214 Massachusetts Ave. N.E. Washington, D.C. 20002 *
(202) 546-4400


Fueling the Push for a

Better Car

Today's modern technology would doubtless awe the people
whose pioneering work made it possible. If Alexander Graham Bell
flipped open a cell phone or Philo T. Farnsworth watched a high-def
television, they'd be dumbfounded. Technology has taken their rela-
tively crude inventions and made them immeasurably better.
But suppose Henry Ford took a spin in a 2007 Lincoln Town Car.
He'd undoubtedly be impressed with the leather seats, the thunderous
sound system and the power windows. But when he looked under the
hood, he'd feel right at home.
Sure, the internal combustion engine's been improved since the
Model T days. For example, fuel injection has replaced the carbure-
tor, and electronic ignition eliminated the crank. But Mr. Ford would
certainly recognize the basic system: An 8-cylinder engine burns
gasoline to turn the wheels and drive the passengers.
It's long past time to improve this design, and it's critical that we
do so.
Think of it this way: Policymakers stress the importance of
reducing our dependence on foreign oil. To do this, they've subsi-
dized ethanol and passed automotive fuel economy standards, among
other things. But none of these measures have worked and they
won't. To use less foreign oil, we need to make the internal combus-
tion engine obsolete, by creating the next generation automobile a
car that doesn't run on gas.
That may sound impossible, but it isn't. Somewhere there's an
inventor who can design an affordable car that runs on clean fuel.
This person simply needs the right incentive, and here's where private
groups and foundations can help.
They could use the Ansari X Prize as a model. That competition
promised $10 million to the first team that could put a man into low-
earth orbit. Eventually, 26 teams from all around the world vied for
the prize. To fund their efforts, these inventors lined up $100 million
worth of private research and development R & D worth far more
than the prize that was eventually handed out in 2004.
For a similarly small investment, foundations could encourage
private citizens, academics and auto industry experts to develop the
next generation car.
It's time to set up a fund to reward the first person who develops
a commercially viable alternative-fuel car. Such a fund could offer to
pay, say, $25 million to this lucky inventor. It's a lot of money, but a
mere drop in the bucket compared to the billions our government has
spent in recent years to subsidize the ethanol industry subsidies
we 'e all paying for and few are benefiting from.
Everyone knows that incentives work. Employers offer bonuses
to workers who exceed expectations on a project. Even the govern-
ment frequently pays contractors a bonus to finish projects ahead of
schedule. Why not use rewards to speed the production of a better
automobile?
It may seem as if the internal combustion engine will remain
around forever. But it won't. Eventually, something will replace it.
Recall that just 100 years ago, many worried about whether cities
could continue to grow. After all, more people meant more horses,
and what would a city do with all the resulting manure? Cars changed
all that. Tomorrow's vehicles will do something similar, because once
they're invented, they'll allow us to travel without burning any for-
eign oil or generating any exhaust.
But they won't invent themselves.
Lawmakers have failed to solve our oil problems because they've
tried to pick winners. Only the market can do that successfully. We
need to set up a reward and then get out of the way. That will drive
inventers to finally create something that'll eliminate our dependence
on foreign oil, and in doing so improve the environment. The next
Henry Ford awaits.
Ed Feulner is president of The Heritage Foundation








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Award Winning Newspaper



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Professor's book

examines the rise of

marketing God,

megachurches

By: Steve Orlando
GAINESVILLE, Fla. Time was when a religion was some-
thing people were born into, grew old with in comfort and died with
in glory. How quaint. Move over, pastor. Make room for "pastorpre-
neur." The Old School church of days gone by has given way to mar-
keting magic. In his latest book, "Shopping for God: How
Christianity Went from In Your Heart to In Your Face," University of
Florida English professor James B. Twitchell explains not only how
and why it happened but also what it means for America's churchgo-
ers.
In his book, scheduled for publication Sept. 18, Twitchell exam-
ines today's megachurch movement as well as how today's religious
leaders have used media from books and movies to radio and
blogs to build a competitive marketplace that rivals the cream of
corporate America.
The book, Twitchell says, "has nothing to do with belief. It has
to do with the people who deliver the service structure of religion. It's
not surprising that these churches seek ways to differentiate them-
selves, because what they're selling are very similar products."
Church, Twitchell writes, has become something people simply
try on for size and it fits only as long as the pastor keeps them
happy.
The most visible manifestation of religious marketing phenome-
non is the megachurch.
"Inside church proper there are all the technologies men appre-
ciate: the sound system, the JumboTron screens and the comfy seats,"
he writes. "Best yet, there are none of those grayhairs of Route 21
threatening to pray for this and that, including you."
Leading people in worship, he says, has taken a back seat to giv-
ing people a reason to come and, in turn, grow church membership.
Today, he writes, "Successful churches have one thing in com-
mon: They are entertaining. Fun! ... Not only is God alive, He rocks."
While churches recruiting new members is hardly new, Twitchell
writes, the concept of religious marketing is a relatively recent event
that can be traced back to the mid-1950s. He recounts the story of
Pennsylvania entrepreneur Mel Stewart, who built a business out of
making and selling the now-familiar lighted signs with changeable
plastic letters and pithy sayings so common in front of houses of wor-
ship.
From those humble roots, Twitchell writes, come religious blogs
and other modern forms of religious marketing. But rather than pro-
moting ways to address pressing problems such as poverty and world
hunger, church blogs have become vehicles to advance political agen-
das with "hot-button" issues such as abortion and homosexuality.
So what does the future hold? For the megachurches, Twitchell
predicts an implosion that already shows signs of being under way.
For one thing, megachurches, by virtue of their expansion, are
becoming part of the very thing they started out trying to avoid: the
mainstream.
For another, he says, they have become too involved in politics,
which can backfire when politics go awry. Then there's the matter of
celebrity pastors falling by the wayside either by scandal or retire-
ment.
Finally, he writes, the biggest threat is market saturation. When
a church ties its value to growth, sooner or later it will hit a brick wall.
"In old-time denominations, growth was not proof of value; stability
was," he writes. "But the megachurch has no cushion to absorb that
inevitable day when they have reached the last available seeker, and
the balloon deflates."
Incidentally, Twitchell considers himself a "cold Christian" or an
"apathiest," a term he borrowed from Atlantic Monthly. It means, in
Twitchell's words, someone who thinks religion has an important
place in every culture but if its members believe they should prosely-
tize, they should do so "very quietly and politely. Knock first."


FWC Distributes

millionn in Emergency

Response Equipment

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's
(FWC) Division of Law Enforcement distributed nearly $1 million
worth of emergency response equipment today to 24 local law
enforcement agency marine units throughout the state. Funding came
from a Dept. of Homeland Security grant.
The equipment will bolster the capabilities of Florida's Regional
Domestic Security Task Force Waterborne Response Teams, manned
by FWC and local sheriff and police departments from Pensacola to
Key West.
The teams carry out security missions for various large-scale
waterside events and serve as first responders to critical incidents and
natural disasters.
"This statewide response strategy is ideal because we are not cre-
ating anything new; we are simply strengthening the existing
response capabilities of agencies who are already recognized as well-
practiced experts in water rescue and response," FWC's Special
Operations Coordinator, Maj. Calvin Adams, said.
Since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack, Florida has stepped up
security for residents and visitors, many of whom are near coastal
areas and waterways. Col. Julie Jones, FWC's director of law
enforcement, agreed to coordinate state and local law enforcement
efforts to sharpen Florida's preparedness and response along the
coastline and inland waterways.
"This equipment will help these agencies in their daily law
enforcement missions and improve their technical and tactical
response to natural and manmade disasters," Jones said.
Eight of the 37 teams are provided by the FWC. Although the
FWC provides planning and management for the teams, its primary
role is to offer support when local law enforcement agencies need
transportation on the water, vessel escorts, security, search-and-
rescue and scene protection. The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement deploys the groups when needed.
The collective enforcement area for FWC includes Florida's
inland waterways, 8,400 miles of tidal coastline and up to 200 miles
offshore.
The new equipment includes night-vision goggles, thermal
imaging devices and high-powered searchlights.

Cat and Kitten Overload at

St. Pete Humane Society

Global Warming may be to blame
By: Melissa McCartney
Staff Writer
St. Petersburg-The Humane Society of Pinellas currently has
,over '100 cats awaiting adoption to new homes. Cats of all ages;
shapes and sizes are currently available for adoption. An article from
Live Science, written by Andrea Thompson, blames global warming
for the increases in nationwide cant populations. Cats usually breed
during the spring and summer but with global warming they have
become year round breeders say Kathy Warnick, President of Pets
Across America, a national adoption organization.
Today animal shelters across the United States are reporting sky-
rocketing influxes of cats and kittens being brought into their agen-
cies. A large variety of cats are available for adoption immediately at
the Pinellas County Humane Society. The cats are described as per-
sonable, well behaved and healthy.
The adoption rate has been reduced to $20.00 which includes a
health exam, all shots, license, spay or neuter and a microchip.
Adopters will also receive an adoption kit containing a video on cat
care in training from Pets Incredible.
The Humane Society of Pinellas is open for adoption six days a
week and closed Wednesday. They are located at State road 590 close
to McMullen Booth Road. For more information call (727) 797-7722
or E-mail twila@humanesocietyofpinellas.org.


College Football Season to Kick Off


r--------------

Candy


2 cups Gold Medal
all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking
soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup butter or mar-
garine, softened
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
4 ounces unsweet-
ened baking choco-
late, melted and
cooled
1 cup buttermilk
1 can (14 ounces)
sweetened con-
densed milk
1/2 cup caramel top-
ping
1 bag (13.3 ounces)
fun-sized choco-
late-coated nougat
and peanut candy
bars, chopped
(about 3 cups)
1/2 cup Betty Crocker@
Rich & Creamy
chocolate frosting


Prep Time:20 min
Start to Finish:2 hr 30 min
Makes:16 servings

Recipe Courtesy of Betty
Crocker


Pinellas News Friday, August 31, 2007 Page 3

SBar Cake


I I
L-..-----.....-----------

North Shore Beach Heath

Advisory Still Active

St. Pete-The Environmental Protection Agency recommended an
advisory be issued based on the quality of water last week. Since then
the Pinellas County Health Department has continued to conduct salt-
water testing through the Healthy Beaches Monitoring program.
According to the sampling results on August 21st and 23rd the
status is changing. The water continues to be analyzed for enteric c
bacteria which is an indicator of fecal pollution. This type of pollu-
tion is a result of fecal matter meaning pet waste, sewage, wildlife
and storm water runoff.
In the event that the result is poor re-sampling may take place to
confirm the quality and then an advisory will be issued as seen on
August 20.
According to Jearinine Mallory at the Pinellas County'Health
Department the beach has not been officially closed. The advisory
been issued as a precautionary measure for beachgoers.
Some dangers of entering water with such poor quality include
disease, infection and rash. Ingesting this water can cause various
effects that vary from person to person. Some may develop throat
conditions, skin rash or infection but the most commonly seen effect
is a diarrheal illness. Although it is reliant on the specific person as
the bacterium does not affect everyone.
Back in 2005 the Pinellas County Health Department issued an
advisory for the beach area along the Gandy Causeway for the same
type of bacteria. That particular advisory was lifted after 8 days.
According to the Pinellas, County Health Department, water test-
ing and sampling will take place this week and a water quality update
should be available by Friday.
For more information visit http://www. pinellas health.com/
index.asp.


With 25 Games Over Labor Day Weekend FSU's 'buckypaper' research recognized

Wuitkh n'annfiknn nninnu uawrrd


The 2007 college football season will kick off Thursday, Aug. 30 and feature 25 games over five days
on ESPN on ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, ESPN360.com, ESPN Classic, ESPN Radio and ESPN
Mobile TV. From August 30 to September 3, the networks will offer coverage of 10 of the top 25 teams
from the pre-season AP poll: #2 LSU, #7 Wisconsin, #9 Virginia Tech, #10 Louisville, #12 California,
#13 Georgia, #15 Tennessee, #18 Auburn, #19 Florida State and #20 Nebraska.
The first weekend will be highlighted by #15 Tennessee at #12 California on the second season debut
of Saturday Night Football on ABC at 8 p.m. ET, the first weekly primetime college football series on
broadcast television; the ninth Bowden Bowl pitting Bobby's #19 Florida State against his son Tommy's
Clemson squad in a special Labor Day telecast Monday, Sept. 3 at 8 p.m. on ESPN; #2 LSU at
Mississippi State on the Thursday ESPN College Football Primetime at 8 p.m. (also on ESPN Mobile
TV); East Carolina at #9 Virginia Tech at noon on ESPN; Marshall at Miami at noon on ESPNU; and a
Sprimetime game each on ESPN2 (Oklahoma State at #13 Georgia at 6:45 p.m.) and ESPN (Kansas State
at #18 Auburn at 7:45 p.m. also on ESPN Radio).
S Schedule through September 3 (All times eastern):


Date Time
Thur., Aug. 30 7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 31 7:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 1 noon
noon
noon
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
6:00,p.m.
6:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:45 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
10:00 p.m.
Mon. Sept. 3 4:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.


Network
ESPN2
ESPN360.com
ESPNU
ESPN
ESPNU
ESPN
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPNU
ESPN Classic
ABC
ABC
ABC
ESPN2
ESPNU
ESPN360.com
ESPN360.com
ESPN360.com
ESPN2
ESPNU
ESPN
ABC
ESPNU
ESPN
ESPN


Game / Commentators
Tulsa at Louisiana-Monroe
Southeast Missouri State at Cincinnati
Murray State at #10 Louisville
#2 LSU at Mississippi State
Navy at Temple
Washington at Syracuse
East Carolina at #9 Virginia Tech
UAB at Michigan State
Marshall at Miami
Southern vs. Florida A&M
Washington State at #7 Wisconsin
Wake Forest at Boston College *
Nevada at #20 Nebraska
Missouri at Illinois
Iowa vs. Northern Illinois (from Soldier Field)
James Madison at North Carolina
Central Florida at N.C. State
Villanova at Maryland
Oklahoma State at #13 Georgia
Purdue at Toledo
Kansas State at #18 Auburn
#15 Tennessee at #12 California
Texas Southern at Prairie View A&M
Texas Tech at SMU
#19 Florida State at Clemson


WILE. mIaIIU IFImIUIUUjy aWalUU


By Barry Ray
FSU
A remarkable new material that has shown
promise in a variety of applications, ranging from
lightning strike protection and electromagnetic-
interference shielding to the design of next-gener-
ation aircraft and computer displays, is bringing
international attention to its Florida State
University developers.
Researchers with FSU's High-Performance
Materials Institute recently were recognized for
their work with engineered carbon nanotube and
nanofiber buckypapers, which were named one of
the most innovative nanotechnologies of 2007 by
the editors of R&D Magazine and the Micro/Nano
Newsletter.
"We present the 25 best micro- and nanotech-
nologies of the year," the publications stated in
introducing the award recipients. "These products,
processes and innovations are groundbreaking
technologies that are likely to have a large impact
on their specific industries and society."
"Many organizations are doing some outstand-
ing work in nanotechnology," said Ben Wang.
research director of the High-Performance
Materials Institute and a professor of industrial and
manufacturing engineering at the Florida A&M
University-Florida State University College of
Engineering. "We are honored to have our research
recognized among the top 25 in this revolutionary
field."
Already, the technology is being evaluated for
existing and new products. Leading companies
such as Lockheed Martin and Boeing are consider-
ing using buckypapers in aircraft structures.
Wang envisions other commercial applications
for the technology in the near future.
"Carbon nanotube and nanofiber buckypapers


soon will provide lightweight thermal conductivity
to dissipate heat in laptop computers," he said.
"They also will provide electromagnetic-interfer-
ence shielding in computers and aircraft; offer
lightning-strike protection in composite structures
such as aircraft or large windmill blades; enhance
the strength of composite structures; and be used
for embedding sensors in composite materials."
Farther down the road, Wang foresees applica-
tions such as using buckypaper in producing mor-
phing structures and in providing backlight sources
for laptops.
Buckypaper is made from carbon nanotubes-
amazingly strong fibers about 1/50;000th the diam-
eter of a human hair that were first developed in the
early 1990s. It owes its name to
Buckminsterfullerene, or Carbon 60'-a type of
carbon molecule whose powerful atomic bonds
make it twice as hard as a diamond. Sir Harold
Kroto, now the Francis Eppes Professor of
Chemistry at FSU, and two colleagues shared the
1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their discovery
of Buckminsterfullerene, whose molecules were
nicknamed "buckyballs" for their spherical shape.
Their discovery has led to a revolution in the fields
of chemistry and materials science-and directly
contributed to the development of buckypaper.
In describing FSU's entry, the Micro/Nano
awards stated that "these materials are macroscop-
ic or continuous thin films or membranes com-
prised of randomly oriented and magnetically
aligned CNTs (carbon nanotubes) and nanofibers.
These buckypapers combine the advantages of
large dimensions, superior electronic conductivity,
nanotube alignment, and continuous production."
To learn more about FSU's High-Performance
Materials Institute, visit www.hpmi net.


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


1. Heat oven to 350F.
Grease bottom and
sides of rectangular
pan, 13x9x2 inches,
with shortening; light-
ly flour. In medium
bowl, mix flour, bak-
ing soda and salt; set
aside.
2. In large bowl, beat
sugar and butter with
electric mixer on
medium speed, scrap-
ing bowl occasionally,
until fluffy. Beat in
eggs, one at a time,
until smooth and
blended. Add vanilla.
Stir in melted choco-
late. Gradually beat in
flour mixture alter-
nately with buttermilk,
beating after each
addition until smooth.
Pour into pan.
3. Bake 35 to 40 minutes
or until toothpick
inserted in center of
cake comes out clean.
Immediately poke top
of cake all over with
toothpick or fork. Mix
condensed milk and
caramel topping;
spoon over warm
cake, allowing it to
soak in. Sprinkle
chopped candy over
cake. Place frosting in
small microwavable
bowl. Microwave
uncovered on High 20
to 30 seconds or until
pourable; drizzle over
cake. Cool cake about
1 1/2 hours before
serving.


v









'Page 4 Pinellas News Friday, August 31, 2007
NOTICE OF SALE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
PINELLAS COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 07-2622-CI-7

IOHN MENNA
Plaintiff.
."s.

VERNON MAXIE and
Defendants.

Notice is hereby given that. pursuant to the Summary Final
judgment of Foreclosure entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court
>f Pinellas County, Florida, I will sell the following property situ:
' ted in Pinellas County, Florida. described as:

Lot 122. WATERFORD CROSSING PHASE II. according
to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 103, Pages 33
through 38, of the Public Records of Pinellas County,
Florida.

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in the
obby of the Pinellas County Courthouse. 315 Court Street,
:learwater, Florida, 33756, at 11:00 a.m. on September 18. 2007.


)ATED: AUGUST 17, 20107


AU I


5A 55


CLE

"; 9.A


NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SIXTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-9566 FDI2

fNES C. SIMON,
Petitioner,
nmd

,AMON ALVAREZ ACOSTA,
Respondent.

fo: RAMON ALVAREZ
\COSTA
UNKNOWN ADDRESS

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
in action has been filed against
,'ou and that you are required to
;erve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on YNES
SIMON, whose address is
2243 AUBURN STREET
SOUTH, ST. .PETERSBURG,
=L 33712, on or before
September 21,2007 and file the
originall with the Clerk of this
2ourt at 315 Court Street,
laearwater, FL 33756, before
servicee on the Petitioner or
shortlyy thereafter. If you fail to
lo so, default may be entered
against you for the relief
Jemanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
af the Circuit Court's office.
SYou may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
,Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
'titdntaiic disclosure of d6cu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
- striking of pleadings.
Dated: August 17, 2007

SKen Burke
Clerk of the Circuit Court
315 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165
By: /s/ LINDA PREIATO
As Deputy Clerk
DM082403 AUG24.31.SEP7,14,2007
01R2403



NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 07-5082-ES-003

IN RE: ESTATE OF
NEIL C. ANDERSON
Deceased.
The administration of the
estate of- Neil C. Anderson,
deceased, whose date of death
was May 20, 2007, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 312 Court Street, Clearwater,
Florida 33756. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER

BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING,
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is August 24,
2007.
Personal Representative:
Myron N. Anderson
7257 118th Circle
Largo, Filorida 33773
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
G. Michael Mackenzie
Attorney for Myron N.
Anderson
Florida Bar No. 151881
1027 Broadway
Dunedin, Florida 34698
Telephone: (727) 733-1722
Fax: (727)733-1717
14670 AUG 24. 31. 2007 082413


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
UPON ORDINANCE
Notice is here) given that the City Council of Pinellas Park.
Florida. w ill hold a FIRST PUBLIC HEARING upon the follow-
ing ORDINANCE NO. 3573 in City Hall. 5141 78th Avenue.
Pinellas Park. Florida on the 13th day of September 2007 at 7:30
P.M., the title of said ORDINANCE being as follows:

ORDINANCE NO. 3573
CITY OF PINELLAS PARK. FLORIDA
APPROPRIATIONS AND TAX LEVY ORDINANCE

AN APPROPRIATIONS AND TAX LEVY
ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PINELLAS
PARK. FLORIDA. COVERING THE FISCAL
YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER I. 2007, AND
ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2008: BEING AN
ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING FUNDS
REQUIRED FOR THE PURPOSE OF MEETING
THE GENERAL OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE
CITY FOR SALARIES, WAGES. FEES
NECESSARY OR PROPER, DISBURSEMENTS
AND OTHER EXPENDITURES NECESSARY OR
PROPER FOR THE OPERATION OF THE CITY
GOVERNMENT. THE WATER AND SEWERAGE
UTILITY SYSTEM, AND FOR THE PURPOSE OF
MEETING DEBT RETIREMENT
REQUIREMENTS AND CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS DURING SAID FISCAL YEAR.


This Ordinance is available for review, in the City Clerks
KEN BURKE Department. Interested parties are invited to attend this meeting
ERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT and be heard.
By: /s/ANNE THERIAULT Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the City
Deputy Clerk Council, City Board, or City Commission, with respect to any mat-
31. 2007 082406 ter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS ings. and for such purpose, may need to ensure that a verbatim
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testi-
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY, mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
FLORIDA The city maintains a tape recording of all public hearings, in
PROBATE DIVISION the event that you wish to appeal a decision, the tape may or may
UCN: not adequately insure a verbatim record of the proceedings, there-
522007CP005234XXESXX lore, you may wish to provide a court reporter at your expense.
REF: 07-5234-ES-4 FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED An interpreter for indi-
viduals with hearing impainnent will be made available upon
IN RE: ESTATE OF requests made at least 72 hours in advance. Also, an Assistive
LEAH JANE LEE, Hearing Device (magnifier) is available from the City Clerk for use
Deceased. in Council Chambers and all meetings rooms throughout the City.
The administration of the This document is available in the following accessible formats:
Estate of Leah Jane Lee, Braille, Large Print. Audio Tape and Electronic File on Computer
.deceased, is pending in the Disks.
Circuit Court for Pinellas DIANE M. CORNA, MMC
County. Florida, Probate CITY CLERK
Division, the address of which CITY OF PINELLAS PARK
is 545 First Avenue North. St. 10005- AUG 31, 2007 083114
Petersburg, FL 33701.
The name and address of
the Personal Rresen ve NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS
and the Personal IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
Representative's attorney are set FOR PINELLAS COUNTY, SIXTI I JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
forth below'. FLORIDA PINELLAS COUNTY,
All creditors of the dece- PROBATE DIVISION FLORIDA
dent and other persons having File No. 07-5278-ES-3 PROBATE DIVISION
claims or demands against hUCN:
decedent's estateincludin IN RE: ESTATE OF 522007CP002648XXESXX
unmatured, contingent, oi GLADYS E. DURLAND, CASE NO. 07-2648-ES
unliquidated claims, on whom a Deceased.
copy of this notice has been The administration of the IN RE:ESTATE OF
served must file their claims estate of GLADYS E. DUR- MARILYN J. ROTBERG.
with this court WITHIN THE LAND. deceased, whose date DECEASED.
LATER OFTHREE MONTHS of death was JULY 3, 2007; and
AFTER THE DATE OF THE whose social security number is The administration of the
FIRST PUBLICATION OF 486-32-4138, is pending in the estate of MARILYN J. ROT-
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY Circuit Court fo Pinellas BERG, deceased, File Number
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF County, Florida, Probate 07-2648-ES, is pending in the
SERVICE OF A COPY OF Division, the address of which Circuit Court for Pinellas
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. is 315 Court Street. Clearwater, County, Florida, Probate
All other creditors of the FL, 33756. The names and Division, the address of which
decedent and other persons addresses of the personal repre- is 315 Court Street, Clearwvater,
having claims or demands tentative and the personal rep- Florida 33756. The name and
against the decedent's estate resentative's attorney are set address of the Personal
including unmatured, contin- forth below. Representative and the Personal
gent, or unliquidated claims All creditors of the dece- Representative's attorneys are
must file their claims with this dent and other persons having set forth below.
Court WITHIN THREE claims or demands against All creditors of the dece-
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE decedent's estate, on whom a dent and other persons having
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- copy of this notice is required claims or demands against
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to be served must file their Decedent's estate, including
ALL CLAIMS, claims with this court WITHIN unmatured, contingent or unliq-
DEMANDS, OR OBJEC- THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS uidated claims, on.whom a copy
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL AFTER THE TIME OF THE of this Notice is served must file
BE FOREVER BARRED. FIRST PUBLICATION OF their claims with tAis Court
NOTWITHSTANDING THE THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH AFTER THE DATE OF SERV- MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED ICE OF A COPY OF THIS OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TWO YEARS OR MORE NOTICE ON THEM. TION OF THIS NOTICE OR
AFTER" THE DECEDENT'S All other creditors of the 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
DATE 'OF DEATH 'IS decedent and other persons OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
BARRED. having claims or demands THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
The date of first publica- against decedent's estate, must All other creditors of the
tion of this notice is August 24. file their claims with this court decedent and persons having
2007. WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER claims or demands against the
Personal Representative: THE DATE OF THE FIRST decedent's estate, including
James Todd Murrian PUBLICATION OF THIS unmatured, contingent or unliq-
Attorney for Personal NOTICE. uitlated claims, must tile their
Representative: ALL CLAIMS SO NOT claims with this court WITHIN
Walter E. Smith Esuire FILED WITHIN THE TIME 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
Meros, Smith, an Oley, PA. PERIODS SET FORTH IN DATE OFTIHE FIRST PUBLI-
757 Arlint Avenu SECTION 733.702 OF THE CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701 FLORIDA PROBATE CODE ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
P.O. Box 27 WILL BE FOREVER FILED WILL BE FOREVER
St. Petersburg, Florida 33731 BARRED. BARRED.
Telephonie: (727) 822-4929 NOTWITHSTANDING NOTWITHSTANDING
Facsimile: (727) 898-5246 THE TIME PERIODS SET THE TIME PERIODS SET
SPN No. 00174414 FORTH ABOVE, ANY FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
Fla. Bar No.139209 CLAIM FILED TWO (2) FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
18170 AUG24.31 2007 082401 YEARS OR MORE AFTER MORE AFTER THE DECE-
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
NOTICE OF ACTION DEATH IS BARRED. BARRED.
FOR DISSOLUTION OF The date of first publica- The date of the first publi-
MARRIAGE tion of this notice is AUGUST cation of this Notice is August
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 24,2007. 24, 2007.
OF THE SIXTH Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JOSEPH F. PIPPEN, JR. JOHN A. WILLIAMS
IN AND FOR 1920 East Bay Drive Post Office Box 1102
PINELLAS COUNTY. LARGO, FL 33771 Tampa. Florida 33601-1102
FLORIDA Attorney for Personal
CASE NO.: 07-9482 FD Representative: Attorneys for Personal
Division 014 Cynthia J. McMillen Representative:
Attorney for JOHN A WILLIAMS, ESQ.
AVIS E. WALCOTT, JOSEPH F. PIPPEN, JR. Florida Bar No. 0486728
Petitioner, FBN 351581 TRENAM, KEMKER,
and SPN 01769503 SCHARF, BARKIN. FRYE,
Law Offices of Joseph F. O'NEILL & MULLIS, P.A.
KEVIN L. FORD. Pippen, Jr. & Assoc. 2700 Bank of America Plaza
Respondent. 1920 East Bay Drive Post Office Box 1102
Largo. Florida 33771 Tampa, Florida 33601-1102.
To: KEVIN L. FORD Telephone:, (727) 586-3306 (813) 223-7474
UNKNOWN ADDRESS 13105 AUG 24.31. 2007'082416 13210 AUG24.31.2007 082412

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to AVIS E. NOTICE OF SALE
WALCOTT. whose address is IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
11549 69th Avenue North, FOR PINELLAS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Seminolc, Florida 33772, on or CIVIL DIVISION
before September 21, 2007, and UCN: 522006CA008954XXCICI
file the original with the Clerk REF: 06-008954-CI-013
of this Court at 315 Court
Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, CITY OF ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
before service on Petitioner or Plaintiff,
immediately thereafter. If you vs.
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief CERTAIN LANDS UPQN WHICH
demanded in the. pet e. SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS ARE
demanded in the petition. DELINQUENT,
Copies of all court docu- Delendant.
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the
of the 'Circuit Court's office. SUMMARY FINAL JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE entered
You may review these docu- in this cause in the Circuit Court of Pinellas County, Florida I will
ments upon request. sell the property situated in Pinellas County, Florida. described as:
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti- THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOTS 41 AND 42, C.E.
lied of your current address. SPEAR'S SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE
(You may lile Notice of Current MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
Address, Florida Supreme PLAT BOOK I, PAGE 30. OF THE PUBLIC
Court Approved Family Law RECORDS OF PINELLAS COUNTY. FLORIDA
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the
address on record at the clerk's west door of the Pinellas County Judicial Building. 545 First
fflice. Avenue North, St. Petersburg, Florida, at I 1:00 a.m. on September
WARNING: Rule 12.285, 19, 2007.
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SUR-
automatic disclosure of docu- PLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROP-
ments and information. Failure ERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS
to comply can result in sanc- MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING REA-
Dated: August 17, 2007 SONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS SHOULD CALL (727) 464-
Ken Burke 40162 (V/TDD) NO LATER THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO
Clerk of the Circuit Court ANY PROCEEDING.
315 Court Street DATED: AUGUST 15, 2007
Clearwater. FL 33756-5165 KEN BURKE
By: /s/ LINDA PREIATO CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Deputy Clerk By: /s/ OLANDA E. HAUCK
DM082403 AUG24,31.SEP7. 14.A107 Deputy Clerk
ns74o4 13630-1 AUG 24.31,2007 082405


SPECIAL HEARING MASTER MEETING
NOTICE OF PROCEEDING
BEFORE THE CITY OF
PINELLAS PARK. FLORIDA

1. CASE NO.: 07-07-4224
FILING DATE: August 20. 2007
VIOLATION DATE: June 29. 2007
RE: VIOLATION OF PINELLAS PARK CITY CODE
SECTION(S): 18-1507.4
PARCEL NO: 20/30/16/91665/000/0660: Trade Winds
Estates Sub Lot 66;
10075 62ND STREET
TO: NAME OF RESPONDENTSS: Khanhtam Nguycen

2. CASE NO.: 06-07-3425
FILING DATE: August 20. 2007
VIOLATION DATE: May 31. 2007
RE: VIOLATION OF PINELLAS PARK CITY CODE
SECTION(S): 18-912: 18-1507.10
PARCEL NO: 29/30/16/01908/023/0310: Avon Dale BIk
23. Lot 31 Less S 10 Ft for Alley:
6454 81ST Avenue
TO: NAME OF RESPONDENT(S): Christopher & Jennifer
Co, llins


3. CASE NO.: 06-07-3396
FILING DATE: AuEust 20, 20
VIOLATION DATE: June I,
RE: VIOLATION OF PINEL
SECTIONS
PARCEL NO: 28/30/16/93438/
Corp Replat
TO: NAME OF RESPONDENT
Fred Selmo

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFII
Park, a Florida municipal corpo
September 26, 2007, at 6:00 PM. or
hold a public hearing a: City Ha
Pinellas Park, Florida, concerning
above-listed Section(s) by the at
found in violation of the above-
Hearing Master has the power by I;
of up to $250 per day against you, o
lation, for every day that any violate
set in the order of the Special Heal
you desire further information ab
immediately contact the Special H
(727) 541-0700, extension 4216. Fa
may result in the Special Hearing
absence.
Please note that if a person dt
made by the Special Hearing Mas
considered at the above-cited hear
the proceedings for such purpose na
tim record ofthe proceedings is ma
timony and evidence which the app
The City maintains a tape reco
the event that you wish to appeal a
not adequately insure a verbatim rec
fore, you may wish to provide
expense.
FOR THE HEARING IMPA
hearing impaired will be made av;
least 72 hours in advance.
10001 AUG 24, 31, SEP


AIM T
and int
7658 U
713.78
reserve

IGI

AIM T
and int
7658
713.78
reserve

IFA
1Ft
1J4
JH


NOTICE OF PUI
AIM TOWING AND
7658 Ulmerti
Largo, FL 3
Office (727)7
Fax (727) 72

owing and Recovery gives N
ent to sell these vehicles on (
Jlmerton Road Largo, FL 337
of the Florida Statutes. AIM
es the right to accept or rejec

NER16K1KF187878

owing and Recovery gives N
ent to sell these vehicles on (
Jlmerton Road Largo, FL 337
of the Florida Statutes. AIM
;s the right to accept or rejec

,SPIOJOSW263663 19
)NF70H8GVA25160 19
FY19POSP322215 19
MAG4312GS004141 19


NOTICE OF AUCTION

TO: ALL INTERESTED PARTIES

NOTICE IS hereby given that the Pinellas County Sherrif will
sell at auction approximately eleven (11) vehicles. The auction
will be held at the Tampa Machinery Auction, Highway 301. live
miles North of Interstate 4. Tampa, Florida on September 8. 2007
beginning at 9:00 A.M. If you have any questions, please contact
the Purchasing Agent at t727) 464-6308

PINELLAS COUNTY SHERRIF'S OFFICE
Karen M. Main, Purchasing Agent


In003


AUG 31. 2007


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN:
522006CP005409XXESXX
File #: 06-5409-ES-003


IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE M. SANDERS a/k/a
ROSE BELFIORE SANDERS,
07 Deceased.
2007LAS PARK CITY CODE The administration of the
LLAS PARK CITY CODE estate of ROSE M. SANDERS
): 12-104 A/K/A ROSE BELFIORE
000/0190; United Cottage SANDERS, deceased. who
Lot 19: 5780 75TH Terrace died March 19, 2006, and
'(S): Rosemary Harrison & whose Social Security Number
is 467-10-9714, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Pinellas
ED THAT theCity of Pinellas Count, Florida, Probate
ration, shall on Wednesday. cut
rDivision, the address of which
r as soon thereafter as possible, is: 315 Court Street
all, 5141 78th Avenue North learwater, FL 33756. Th
Clearwater, FL 33756. The
the alleged violations) of thenames and address of the per-
bove-named respondentss. 11 sonal representative and the
listed Section(s) the Special sonal representative's attor-
aw to levy administrative lines personal presenative's ator-
ney are set fonrth below.
r $500 per day for a repeat vio- All creditors of the dece-
tion continues beyond the date dent and other persons having
ring Master for compliance. If claims or demands against
bout the hearing, you should decedent's estate on whom a
hearing Master Coordinator at copy of this notie is required
ailre to appear at thishearig to be served must file their
g Master proceeding in your claims with this court WITHIN
an TIlE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
decides to appeal any-decision THE AER F M OFNTH
ler with respect to any matter FIRST PUBLICATION OF
ng,-they will need a record of T NOTICEAOR 30
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
tay need to ensure that a verba- AFTR THE DATE OF SERV-
ide, which record includes tes-
eal is to be based. ICE OFF THIS
riding of all public hearings. In All oter creditors of theON TEM.
decision, the tape may or may decedent and other persons
cord of the proceedings; there-lais or demands
a court reporter at your own agvingt cedeit's ete must
against decedent's estate must
RED. An interpreter forth file their claims with this court
HIRED. An interpreter for the WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
ailable upon requests made at THE DATE OF THE FIRST

07, 14. 2007 082409 PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
BLIC SALE PERIODS SET FORTH IN
D RECOVERY SECTION 733.702 OF THE
on Road FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
33771 WILL BE FOREVER
725-3544 BARRED.
25-2589 NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET

otice of Foreclosure of Lien FORTH ABOVE, ANY
09/12/2007, 09:00 a.m. at CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
771, pursuant to subsection YEARS OR MORE AFTER
Towing and Recovery THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
n any and/or all bids. DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
1989 CHEVROLET tion of this notice is August 31.
2007.


notice of Foreclosure o
09/14/2007, 09:00 a.m
7 I, pursuant to subsi
Towing and Recover
t any and/or all bids.

195
186
195
986 H


AIM Towing and Recovery gives Notice of Foreclosure
and intent to sell these vehicles on 09/15/2007, 09:00 a.n
7658 Ulmcrton Road Largo, FL 33771, pursuant to subse
713.78 of the Florida Statutes. AIM Towing and Recover
reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids.

WAUBC5446LN040629 1990

AIM Towing and Recovery gives Notice of Foreclosure
and intent to sell these vehicles on 09/18/2007, 09:00 a.m
7658 Ulmerton Road Largo, FL 33771, pursuant to subse
713.78 of the Florida Statutes. AIM Towing and Recover
reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids.


1J4

18185


FX58S8VC543430


1997


Aug.31.2007


NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SIXTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR .
PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07004629FD-012

CECILIA ROCHA.
Petitioner,
and

ABRAHAM L. ORELLANA,
Respondent.

To: ABRAHAM L.
ORELLANA
ADDRESS: Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on C.
ROCHA. c/o Wayne D. Knight.
Esq. whose address is 1277
Cedar Center Dr., Tallahassee,
Fl 32301 on or before June 1,
2007 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court at 315
Court Street, Clearwater, FL
33756, before service on the
Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so,
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office.
You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Current
Address. Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: April 27, 2007

Ken Burke
Clerk of the Circuit Court
315 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165
By: /s/ LINDA PREIATO
As Deputy Clerk
Mi I tUAiM Ai Si 7 S 14 'i 7 1' 7()7 1h


NOTICE OF ACT
FOR DISSOLUTIC
MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT C
OF THE SIXT
JUDICIAL CIRC
IN AND FOR
PINELLAS COUt
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-00954

MONICA ALVAREZ
Petitioner,
and

MICHAEL O'DONNI
Respondent.

To: MICHAEL O'DO0
William R. Sharp Jr. H
936 Sharp Hospital Rd
Weston, VA 26452

YOU ARE NOTII
an action has been file
you and that you are re
serve a copy of you
defenses, if any, to it o
CA ALVAREZ, whose
is 1903 Sheffield Ct.
Florida 34677 on o
9/30/07 and file tihe
with the Clerk of this
315 Court Street, Cl
FL 33756, before serve
Petitioner or shortly t
If you fail to do so, de
be entered against yo
relief demanded in tihe
Copies of all cou
ments in this case,
orders, are available at
of the Circuit Court
You may review the
ments upon request.
You must keep the
the Circuit Court's ol
fied of your current
(You may file Notice o
Address, Florida
Court Approved Fan
Form 12.915.) Future
this lawsuit will be mai
address on record at tl
office.
WARNING: Rule
Florida Family Law
Procedure, requires
automatic disclosure
ments and inlormatiol
to comply can result
tions, including disr
striking of pleadings.
Dated: August 28,

K
Clerk of the Circ
315 Co
Clearwater. FL 33
By: /s/ LINDA P
As Dep
DIMiitOi Aii iT] SIi'7 14 '1


of Lien Personal Representative:
n. at JOSEPH R. SANDERS
action 2550 Stag Run Blvd., #921
y Clearwater, Florida 33765
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
FORD PILKA & ASSOCIATES
FORD By: 0. Reginald Osenton,
JEEP Esquire
ONDA Florida Bar No.: 693251
P.O. Box 3470
of Lien Brandon, Florida 33509-3470
n. at (813) 653-3800 (telephone)
action (813) 651-0710 (facsimile)
.y Attorney for Petitioner
S 13680-1 AUG 31, SEP7.2007081719C


AUDI 'NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
of Lien FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
1. at FLORIDA
action PROBATE DIVISION
y FILE NUMBER 07-5615-ES4

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEEP JULIA VALERIA HOLLAND,
083106 Deceased.
The administration of the
estate of JULIA VALERIA
HOLLAND, deceased, whose
'ION date of death was June 24,
)N OF 2007. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Piniellas County,
:OURT Florida. Probate Division. File
H Number 07-5615-ES4, the
'UIT address of which is 315 Court
Street. Clearwater. Florida.
NTY. 33756. The names and address-
es of the personal representative
1-FD-24 and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons who
have claims or demands against
ELL, decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, and who
NNELL have been served a copy of this
hospital notice, must file their claims
1. .with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
FIED that OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
:d against TION OF THIS NOTICE OR
required to THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
r written THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
n MONI- A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
e address ON THEM.
Oldsmar, All other creditors of the
r before decedent and other persons
original who have claims or demands
Court at against the decedent's estate,'
learwater, including unmatured, contin-
ice on the gent, or unliquidated claims
hereafter. must file their claims with this
fault may court WITHIN THREE
u for the MONTHS (3) AFTER THE
petition. DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
urt docu- CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
including ALL CLAIMS, NOT SO
the Clerk FILED WILL BE FOREVER
's office. BARRED.
se docu- NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
eClerk.of FORTH ABOVE. ANY
fice noti- CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS
address. OR MORE AFTER THE
ifCurrent DECEDENT'S DATE OF
Supreme DEATH IS BARRED.
lily Law The date of first publica-
papers in tion of this notice is August 31.
iled to the 2007.
he clerk's Personal Representative:
Hazel Pryor
S 12.285, Petitioner
Rules of 1847 Shore Drive South
certain Apt # 306
of docu- South Pasadena. Fl. 33707
n. Failure
in sanc- Attorney lor Personal
nissal or Representative:
Alan M. Gross
2007 POWELL, CARNEY. GROSS.
SMALLER & RAMSAY PA.
:en Burke One Progress Plaza, Suite 1210
:uit Court St. Petersburg. Fl, 33701
court Street Telephone: (727) 898-9011
756-5165 Facsimile: 1727) 898-9014
'REIATO Fla. Bar No. 510602

uty Clerk SPN: 815601
1117 I1 iit 13340 AUG 31. SEP 7. 2007 083102


083108


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN:
522007CP001410XXES004
REF: 07-001410-ES04

IN RE: ESTATE OF
LYNDA CAVE, also known as
LYNDA B. CAVE,
Deceased.
The administration of the
Estate of LYNDA CAVE, also
known as LYNDA B. CAVE,
deceased, whose date of death
was February 18, 2007, File
Number 07-001410, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Pinellas
County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is Pinellas County Courthouse
315 Court Street, Clearwater,
Florida, 33756. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, on whom a
copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contin-
gent, or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE .TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS
OR. MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is August 31,
2007.
Personal Representative:
Julian A. Cave
15815 Gulf Boulevard
Redington Beach, Florida
33708
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John L. Green, Jr. of
THE LAW OFFICE OF
JOHN L. GREEN JR.
3637 Fourth Street North,
Suite 410
St. Petersburg, FL 33704
(727) 821-6550
Florida Bar No.0031195
SPN No. 00041568
18385 AUG 31.SEP07.2007083103c




NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 07-5606-ES
Division 003
UCN:
522007CP005606XXESXX

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEAN K. McNICHOLAS,
Deceased.

The administration of the
estate of JEAN K.
MeNICHOLAS. deceased,
whose date of death was May 8,
2007, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Pinellas County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 315 Court
Street, Clearwater. FL 33756:
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney arc set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR. 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE. ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR1
MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
Thile date of first publication
of this notice is August 31.
2007.
Personal Representative:
Ronald McNicholas
21722 West Empress Lane
Plainfield. Illinois 60544
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
ROBERT 1. KELLY. ESQ.
KELLY & KELLY, LLP
605 Palm Blvd.
PO Box 1056
Duncdin, FL 34697


Telephone: (727) 733-0468
Fax: (727) 733-0469
Florida Bar No. 238414
SPN 60372
10250 AUG 31. SEP 7. 2007 083117


_ ___


FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of Ithe first publi-
cation of this Notice is August
24, 2007.
Personal Representative:
PAUL E. DRISCOLL. JR.
5842 PETUNIA LANE
ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32821
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Alan Kay. Esq.
Florida Bar No. 104755
8668 Park Blvd. North
Suite F
Seminole, FL 33777
(727) 3t3-5700
o1i(26 AUL: 24. 31. 2X)7 082.115c


NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SIXTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-9949 FD

IONAH M. RIVERA.
Petitioner.
and

SAUL RIVERA,
Respondent.

To: SAUL RIVERA
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on IONAH
M. RIVERA, whosi address is
3665 EAST BAY DR. 204 #
434 LARGO FL 33771. on or
before September 28. 2007 and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court at 315 Court
Street. Clearwater, FL 33756,
before service on the Petitioner
or shortly thereafter. If you fail
to do so, default may be'entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office.
You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the'
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
'Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure. requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: August 27. 2007

Ken Burke
Clerk of the Circuit Court
315 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165
By: I/s/ LINDA PREIATO
As Deputy Clerk
aM~131S) AUG31,SEP7,14,21.2107
W0im
















Tiny Prices

for Legal

Advertising
















NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 06-4538-ES-004
UCN:
522006CP004538XXESXX
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
PAUL E. DRISCOLL, SR.
Deceased.
The administration of the
estate of PAUL E. DRISCOLL,
SR., deceased, whose date of
death was JUNE 12. 2006, File
Number 06-4538-ES-004, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Pinellas County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 315 Court St.
Clearwater, Florida 33756. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and the
personal representatives' attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, on whom a copy
of this notice is served must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate including
unmatured, contingent or unliq--
uidated claims, must file their
claims with the court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER .THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable







Page 6 Pinellas News Friday, August 31, 2007 f I r

Jatropha tree could be a biodiesel boon for Intrepid FSU


Florida farmers, UF researcher says


By: Mickie Anderson
UF
GAINESVILLE Growing plants for fuel might be an engine-
-evving idea for some South Florida farmers who feel their crops
iave stalled, a University of Florida researcher says.
Jatropha curcas, a plant native to Mexico that is being widely
grown for fuel and medicine in some parts of the world, is a tree that
producess golf ball-sized fruit. Inside each fruit are three seeds full of
)il that can be pressed to make biodiesel.
"For maybe a year and a half now, I have been working on an
dea that here in deep South Florida we can grow a biodiesel crop that
loes not conflict with food and that we have a comparative advantage
n growing," said Roy Beckford, a Lee County extension agent who
specializess in sustainable farm development.
Beckford, who works for the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, has been pushing Jatropha as an alternate crop to South
Florida farmers the past couple years through IFAS newsletters.
Biodiesel is a fuel made from natural sources, such as new and
ised vegetable oils and animal fats, for use in diesel engines. It is
;afe, biodegradable and contains fewer pollutants than gasoline.
Jatropha, also called Barbados nut or physic nut-as well as sev-
eral other names, including black vomit nut for its use as a purga-
.ive-also contains glycerine that must be extracted from the fuel.
Early Central American settlers lit the long-burning seeds in a bowl,
is makeshift candles, Beckford said.
Last week, a company called Dream Fuels donated some 1,500
latropha curcas seedlings worth about $6,000 to Lee County.
Following the ceremonial planting of about 100 seedlings attended by
Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottcamp and other officials, the rest of the seedlings
were planted on a 1-acre demonstration farm at Orange River Park in
:he Buckingham area of Lee County.




Humpback Whales now


"MEGAPCLICKS"

SCIENTISTS RECORD FIRST "MEGAPCLICKS" FROM
FEEDING HUMPBACK WHALES IN NOAA'S STELLWA-
GEN BANK NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY

For the first time, researchers have recorded "megapclicks" a
.series of clicks and buzzes from humpback whales apparently asso-
Sciated with nighttime feeding behaviors in and around NOAA's
.Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. As-detailed in the most
.recent issue of the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, this study
offers the first documentation that baleen whales produce this type of
sound, normally associated with toothed whales and echolocation.
"We've known that humpback whales exhibit a variety of forag-
ing behaviors and vocalizations, but these animals as well as other
baleen whales were not known to produce broadband clicks in asso-
ciation with feeding," said David Wiley, sanctuary research coordina-
tor and leader of the research team. "However, recent work with spe-
cial acoustic tags has made us reexamine our previous assumptions,
with this expansion of the acoustic repertoire of humpback whales."
The research team from the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology,
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, University of New
Hampshire, and NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program used
multi-sensor acoustic tags attached with suction cups to study whale
behavior. The data provided a record of the whales' underwater
movements, including heading, pitch, roll, and sounds made and
heard. During the tagging studies, broadband clicks were recorded
exclusively during nighttime hours. Sharp body rolls also occurred at
the end of click bouts containing buzzes, suggesting feeding
episodes.
Alison Stimpert of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, the
lead author on the paper, labeled the sounds "megapclicks" based on
their form and the scientific name for humpback whales (Megaptera
novaeangliae). This acoustically active species has been known to
produce complex "songs" on their breeding grounds, but knowledge
of sound production on northern feeding grounds has been limited.
The researchers report that the similarity of the megapclicks to
sounds made by toothed whales suggests echolocation-assisted feed-
ing behaviors, especially where buzzes at the end of a series of clicks
appear to be associated with attempts to capture prey. The sounds
may also be used to detect the sea floor or other large targets. Another
possibility for the megapclicks could be to attract prey, such as herd-
ing schools of fish or chasing animals out of the sediments. But the
research team notes that a lack of knowledge about baleen whale
hearing and sound production prevents any definitive answers at this
time about the function of the megapclicks.
Additional humpback whale tagging studies completed earlier
this summer in the Stellwagen Bank sanctuary may provide further
insights into sound production in northern feeding grounds.
The report appeared in the Aug. 8, 2007 on-line issue of Biology
Letters. Funding for the project was provided by NOAA's National
Marine Sanctuary Program and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant
College Program. Research was conducted under National Marine
Fisheries Service permit no. 981-1707-00.
Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary encompasses 842
square miles of ocean, stretching between Cape Ann and Cape Cod
offshore of Massachusetts. Renowned for its scenic beauty and
remarkable productivity, the sanctuary is renowned as a whale watch-
ing destination and supports a rich assortment of marine life, includ-
ing marine mammals, seabirds, fishes, and marine invertebrates. The
sanctuary's position astride the historic shipping routes and fishing
grounds for Massachusetts' oldest ports also make it a repository for
shipwrecks representing several hundred years of maritime trans-
portation.
NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program seeks to increase
the public awareness of America's marine resources and maritime
heritage by conducting scientific research, monitoring, exploration
and educational programs. Today, the sanctuary program manages 13
national marine sanctuaries and one marine national monument that
together encompass more than 150,000 square miles of America's
ocean and Great Lakes natural and cultural resources.
NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and nation-
al safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-


related events and information service delivery for transportation, and
by providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and
marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation
System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal part-
ners, more than 70 countries and the European Commission to devel-
op a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it
observes, predicts and protects.


The planting is part of a much larger effort by county officials to
reduce reliance on petroleum-derived fuels. They plan to build a
biodiesel plant at the site of a closed landfill and to use Jatropha and
restaurant grease to fuel at least part of the county's fleet, said Lee
County Commissioner Ray Judah.
"We think it's doable," he said.
The trees can grow to 20 feet tall, can thrive up to 50 years and
can be harvested twice a year-as quickly as 18 months after plant-
ing, under ideal conditions. It does well in both good and poor soil
and doesn't require heavy cultivation, fertilization or irrigation.
One acre of Jatropha can yield between 600 to 1.000 gallons of
oil per year, although at-least two companies marketing the plant say
they have varieties that yield much more.
Beckford said he believes farmers trying to recover from citrus
canker or greening might want to give Jatropha a look. Because it
fares well in bad soil, he also says the crop might be helpful for
landowners whose property is unsuitable for traditional agriculture.
He also suggests that Jatropha be used as a replacement in cases
where invasive plants such as Brazilian pepper and Melaleuca are
removed from the landscape.
Besides the donated seedlings that are now being planted,
Beckford said a handful of Lee County growers are on the verge of
planting as well. Also in Lee County, a nonprofit Christian group
called Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization, or ECHO, has
been growing a half-acre of the trees for more than five years.
ECHO specializes in finding alternative crops for underdevel-
oped countries and is currently using the trees as a "living fence."
Some underdeveloped countries plant a line of trees as a fence to
keep animals from grazing on their farms.
Martin Price, one of ECHO's co-founders, said although the
trees appear to be doing well there, his group is hesitant to lead the
cheers without more feasibility studies in place.
"We are not promoters at this point," he said. "But we're a big
believer of the potential in underutilized crops."
But with other countries, such as China, India and Brazil, invest-
ing heavily in Jatropha, Beckford says time is of the essence, espe-
cially with federal goals for renewable fuels.
"I'll keep plugging it, because I want to make sure that some-
thing comes from it," he said. "If we don't do it, someone else will."



Florida Fish and Wildlife

Conservation Commission

to meet in St. Petersburgt

St. Petersburg-The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) will meet Sept. 12-14 at the St. Petersburg
Hilton. The Hilton is at 333 First St. South, and the meeting will con-
vene at 8:30 a.m. all three days. .
During the Sept. 12 (Wednesday) session, the agenda includes an
overview of the FWC's imperiled species listing process, manage-
ment plans and a process for modifying management plans after
Commissioners approve them. Then Commissioners will consider
final approval of management plans and rules that would change the
listing category of two imperiled species.
Proposals would reclassify the Florida manatee from endangered
to threatened and the gopher tortoise from species of special concern
to threatened.
The FWC also will review a draft management plan and rule pro-
posals to remove bald eagles from the imperiled species list entirely.
Final action on that issue probably will take place during the FWC's
December meeting at Key Largo.
Also on Wednesday's agenda are four rule proposals concerning
permit requirements for activities involving marine turtles.
In addition, Commissioners will hear staff reports about the
agency's deer management program, proposed rule changes to
wildlife and freshwater fisheries regulations for 2008-09 and recom-
mendations for the future of freshwater fishing in Florida.
On Thursday, Commissioners will hold a final public hearing on
proposed rules that would let licensed trap fishers designate people to
recover and possess their traps when the governor and FWC declare
an emergency following a storm. The rules would also exempt local,
state or federal officials from having to get FWC approval before
removing traps, derelict traps and trap debris from areas where trap-
ping is prohibited and modify the definition of a derelict trap under a
requirement that blue crab traps must be marked with FWC trap tags.
A final hearing will also be held on proposed rules that would
allow recreational fishers to use fold-up blue crab traps up to 1 cubic
foot in volume and not necessarily pyramid-shaped and delete a pro-
vision limiting the base panel of fold-up traps to 1 square foot.
The Commission also will consider draft rules for red snapper
harvested in Gulf of Mexico state waters. These draft rules are con-
sistent with pending permanent rules for red snapper in federal waters
that will replace interim federal rules.
These measures could reduce the daily recreational bag limit of
Gulf red snapper from four fish to two fish per person, establish a
zero daily bag limit for captains and crew of Gulf for-hire vessels,
and change the recreational fishing season for Gulf red snapper from
April 15 through Oct. 31 to June 1 through Sept. 15.
In addition, these possible rule changes could reduce the mini-
mum size of commercially harvested red snapper in the Gulf and the
minimum size of imported red snapper from 15 to 13 inches total
length, and reduce the daily commercial bag and trip limit of Gulf red
snapper from four fish to two fish per day.
Proposals also could allow only non-stainless steel circle hooks
to be used to harvest any reef fish when natural baits are used and
require a venting tool and a de-hooking device to be present onbdard
vessels harvesting any reef fish.
In other marine fisheries action, Commissioners will consider
various federal marine fisheries management issues and receive the
final vision document for the future of saltwater fishing in Florida.
Other matters on the Thursday agenda include boating regula-
tions on or adjacent to the Withlacoochee River in Citrus, Hernando,
Marion and Sumter counties during flooding; requirements for pos-
session and exhibition of dangerous animals and regulation changes
that make FWC's due process provisions more accessible to the pub-
lic.


The Friday session will focus on the FWC's financial and leg-
islative matters and issues to discuss with stakeholders for the 2009
legislative session..
The complete agenda and background materials are available at
MyFWC.com/commission.
For more information (850) 488-6411


proTessor

wins 'Grace

Paley Prize

for Short

Fiction'


By Libby Fairhurst
The Florida State University graduate program in creative writ-
ing recently made The Atlantic's "Best of the Best" list, and remark-
able faculty writers such as FSU Assistant Professor David Vann are
a big reason why.
Vann, an author of growing distinction-and a skilled sailor who
has logged more than 40,000 miles offshore and barely lived to write
about it-has won the esteemed 2007 Grace Paley Prize in Shot
Fiction for his deeply personal "Legend of a Suicide." The collection
of five short stories and one novella drew inspiration from the com-
plex issues surrounding his father's suicide when Vann was 13.
The Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction, named for one of
America's most celebrated short story writers and administered by
the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, includes a publish-
ing deal with the University of Massachusetts Press. "Legend of .a
Suicide" is expected to land on bookstore shelves next year.
"David Vann's impressive and charmed year-in which he has
work forthcoming in Esquire, Men's Journal and Outside, much of
which entails Vann's tempting the bejesus out of death and then writ-
ing about it, which so far he's survived-just got more impressive
yet," said author Mark Winegardner, the director of FSU's top-ranked
Creative Writing Program.
Born on Alaska's Adak Island and part Cherokee Indian (he's
related to Cherokee Chief David Vann), Vann holds a U.S. Coast
Guard 200-ton Master's License and has so far sailed a cumulative
total of more than 40,000 miles on the open seas. Those adventures
inspired his acclaimed 2005 memoir "A Mile Down: The True Story
of a Disastrous Career at Sea," which soared-make that sailed-to
No. 4 and No. 7, respectively, on the Washington Post and L.A. Times
bestseller lists.
Armed with a Master of Fine Arts degree from Cornell
University, Vann was awarded the prestigious Wallace Stegner
Fellowship and the John L'Heureux Fellowship, both from Stanford
University, where he served as Jones Lecturer and taught creative
writing. A member of the FSU Creative Writing Program faculty
since August 2006, Vann teaches courses in creative nonfiction and
fiction.
"I was Grace Paley's student, so it's especially wonderful to win
a prize in her name," Vann said. "For 12 years I worked on this book
about my father's suicide when I was 13, and the result is a reflection
of all the writers 1 admire most. One story borrows its structure from
Chaucer, another borrows language from Elizabeth Bishop, and the
longer novella draws from six novels by Faulkner and Cormac
McCarthy."
Despite the success of his memoir "A Mile Down," Vann
declared "Legend of a Suicide" the work by which he wants to be
judged as a writer. "And although the stories have been published
inThe Atlantic Monthly and other magazines, they only really make
sense read together. At this point, I just feel enormously grateful and
relieved," he said.
In addition to past appearances in the Atlantic Monthly, Writer's
Digest and other literary publications, Vann's work has been featured
in, or is slated for, Esquire (January 2008 and June 2008), Men's
Journal (October 2007), Outside Magazine (July 2007 and February
2008), and Outside GO (Summer 2007 and Spring 2008). Twice a
nominee for the Pushcart Prize, Vann now has written a second mem-
oir ("Crocodile: Memoirs from a Mexican Drug-Running Port") and
a novel ("Cut Adrift")-both expected to be published soon.
"Congratulations to David, not only for cheating disaster at sea
time and again, but especially for the Grace Paley Prize," said FSU
College of Arts and Sciences Dean Joseph Travis. "This truly is a ter-
rific honor."

FSU Launches New Initiative

to Promote Student Research
By Jill Elish, FSU
Florida State University students will soon have more opportunities to
conduct research and pursue creative projects with the establishment of a
new office to promote such activities at the undergraduate level.
The Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors
(URACE) will coordinate the university's efforts to strengthen and develop
research opportunities for students pursuing bachelor's degrees. Michelle
Bourgeois, a professor of communication disorders who has earned nation-
al recognition for her research on memory aids to help people with
Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia, has been named director of
URACE. A faculty advisory committee also will provide direction for the
office.
"In addition to being a distinguished researcher in her own right, Dr.
Bourgeois has been an inspiring mentor for many undergraduate students,"
said Undergraduate Studies Dean Karen Laughlin. "Her creativity, energy
and enthusiasm for the task should ensure that this new program gets off to
an excellent start."
The new office is one way to see that undergraduate students both con-
tribute to and benefit from FSU's Pathways of Excellence initiative, an
effort launched by President T.K. Wetherell in 2005 to enhance the univer-
sity's standing as one of the top research and graduate education institu-
tions in the United States, Laughlin said.
While almost all graduate students must conduct research to earn an
advanced degree, many students pursuing bachelor's degrees do not.
Involving undergraduates in research, however, can result in a win-win sit-
uation for both students and universities, Laughlin said, pointing to evi-
dence that suggests students can improve their critical thinking and com-
munication skills while universities see increased graduation and retention
rates.
"In addition to helping to keep current students engaged in the univer-
sity's research mission, heightened awareness of the availability of research
opportunities can help the university recruit academically motivated and
talented students and make the public aware of excellent work undergradu-
ate students are doing in partnership with their faculty mentors," she said.
From research on the dynamics of calcium in the pancreas' beta cells
to women's rights in Uganda, FSU students already are engaging in
research and creative activities in a range of disciplines and have the oppor-
tunity to obtain at least some financial support for doing so, Laughlin said.
The rates of participation vary significantly from academic discipline to
discipline, however, and students .from disadvantaged backgrounds are
involved in research at a lower rate. The new office will help expand these
opportunities across disciplines and make them available to a broader range
of students.










More evidence of Global Warming


Northwest Passage Nearly Open


AUgUST 22, ZUU2/


Aqua Satellite image courtesy of NASA
NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data obtained courtesy of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Thanks to Walt Meier, NSIDC;
U.S. National Ice Center; and John Falkingham, Environment Canada Canadian Ice Service for image interpretation.


Arsenic imports for


lumber plunge; UF


Center sets sights on


disposal
By: John Schert
GAINESVILLE, Fla. It's a success story so far but the end
has yet to be written.
Research supported by the University of Florida helped prompt
the treated wood industry to abandon a once common but potentially
harmful wood preservative from lumber in residential construction.
New statistics show that since this change in 2004, imports of arsenic,
a toxic metal used in the wood-treating chemical chromated copper
arsenate, have plunged.
Now, the challenge is to figure out what to do with millions of
board feet of CCA lumber still in service nationwide. Some structures
pose a potential hazard now, while others will face demolition as they
age, with all CCA-treated wood waste requiring special care, said
John Schert, director of the Bill Hinkley Center for Solid and
Hazardous Waste Management at the UF College of Engineering.
"Over 35,000 metric tons of arsenic hMs been imported into
Florida from places like China, Chile and Mexico to be'used as an
ingredient in pressure treating CCA-treated wood since it first
became available in the 1970s," Schert said. "Our focus now is figur-
ing out how to deal with all that wood as it comes out of service in
the form of old decks, docks, fences and homes."
Statistics appearing next year in a book by a University of British
Columbia scholar show U.S. imports of arsenic used in treated lum-
ber have dropped from 19,200 metric tons in 2003 to 4,450 in 2004
and 5,760 in 2005. The statistics were obtained from the U.S.
Geological Survey, said Bill Cullen, a UBC professor emeritus of
chemistry and the book's author.
The decline coincides with the wood industry's decision to swap
the CCA preservative with a "greener," arsenic-free preservative in
2004 for all residential construction. That decision occurred after
nearly a decade of research supported by the Hinkley Center that
showed the propensity for CCA-treated lumber to shed its arsenic
into underlying soils where the arsenic could accumulate in con-
centrations that might be hazardous to people.
Much of that research was funded with about $600,000 obtained
through a National Science Foundation Partnerships For Innovation
grant. Among other efforts, the NSF grants helped fund several CCA-
related projects by UF and University of Miami environmental engi-
neering researchers Tim Townsend and Helena Solo-Gabriel.
Townsend and Solo-Gabriele discovered that aging decks made
of CCA-treated wood are capable of shedding enough arsenic into
surrounding soil for it to be classified as a contaminated, among other
findings. Subsequent investigations by Hinkley Center researchers
and news organizations linked CCA wood in playgrounds to arsenic
contamination in soils, a particular concern because of children unin-
tentionally ingesting the dirt.
While the amount of arsenic flowing into the U.S. has slowed
since the change, the disposal of CCA-treated lumber remains a
tough problem to solve, Schert said. There are about 35,000 acres of
decks in Florida alone, most built with CCA-treated lumber, and
more than 1,000 playgrounds nationwide built with CCA, he said.
Solo-Gabriele said some CCA wood can be coated or painted to
prevent it from shedding its .arsenic, particularly when touched. But
that is only a short-term solution because the paint will eventually
wear away. With public structures, officials need to prioritize which
ones should be replaced and which can be coated or left in place, she
said.
"Playgrounds and picnic tables these are the ones we really
need to be concerned with," she said. "Decks, I would place next on
the priority list."
Also needed, she said, are better methods for identifying CCA-
treated lumber, which is often indistinguishable from regular lumber
when aged. Today, CCA-treated wood often winds up in landfills.
Concerned about contaminating the water supply, the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection is considering a ban on
CCA-treated wood in unlined landfills.
CCA-treated lumber also may go to plants that burn discarded
vegetation and wood to generate electricity. Because burning CCA-
treated lumber can release arsenic into the air or create arsenic-taint-
ed ash, Solo-Gabriele and Townsend have developed new ways to
identify and remove CCA-treated wood from the waste stream. It also
may be possible to install scrubbers that cleanse the air emissions of
arsenic. "If we can burn both the treated and the untreated wood that
comes from the demolition industry here in Florida without having to
separate the two, it could be a big green energy source," Schert said.


UF scientists reveal


how dietary restriction


cleans cells



GAINESVILLE, Fla. Reduce, recycle and rebuild is as
important to the most basic component of the human body, the cell,
as it is to the environment. And a University of Florida study shows
just how much the body benefits when it "goes green," at least if
you're a rat: Cutting calories helps rodents live longer by boosting
cells' ability to recycle damaged parts so they can maintain efficient
energy production.
"Caloric restriction is a way to extend life in animals. If you give
them less food, the stress of this healthy habit actually makes them
live longer," said Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, chief of the division of
biology of aging in UF's Institute on Aging. Understanding how the
process works at the cellular level in rodents could help scientists
develop drugs that mimic the process in humans, Leeuwenburgh
added.
How'does it work? During the aging process, free radicals -
highly reactive byproducts of our cells' respiration wreak havoc on
our cellular machinery. Mitochondria, the tiny power plants that keep
a cell functioning, are especially vulnerable to this type of damage.
The effects can be disastrous if malfunctioning mitochondria aren't
removed, they begin to spew out suicidal proteins that prompt the
entire cell to die. Cell death, on a whole-body scale, is what aging is
all about.
Fortunately, younger cells are adept at reducing, recycling and
rebuilding. In this process, damaged mitochondria are quickly swal-
lowed up and degraded. The broken down pieces are then recycled
and used to build new mitochondria. However, older cells are less
adept at this process, so damaged mitochondria tend to accumulate
and contribute to aging.
"Cell survival is dependent upon the ability of the cell to reduce
and recycle by a mechanism called autophagy," said William Dunn
Jr., a professor of anatomy and cell biology in UF's College of
Medicine and senior author of the study, which was published online
this month in the journal Rejuvenation Research. "When a cell is
under stress, autophagy is turned on to clean up the cell by removing
damaged cellular components, while recycling building blocks nec-
essary to rebuild the cell. It's there to protect the cell. But in aged
cells, they're basically not able to adjust to stress as well."
UF scientists studied 22 young and old rats, comparing those
allowed to eat freely with those fed a low-calorie, nutritious diet. The
stress of a low-calorie diet was enough to boost cellular cleaning in
the hearts of older rats by 120 percent over levels seen in rats that
were allowed to eat what they wanted. The diet had little or no effect
on younger rats.
"Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism that keeps cells free
of damaged and thereby detrimental mitochondria and other toxic
materials while recycling their building blocks nutrients needed by
the cell," said Stephanie Wohlgemuth, a lecturer in UF's department
of aging and geriatrics and the study's lead author. "So if that process
is maintained with age or even increased that can only be ben-
eficial."
To determine how dietary restriction boosted cells' ability to
reduce the toxic trash, the scientists studied how the amount of cer-
tain proteins changed with the rats' age and diet. They found that
some proteins responsible for degrading the damaged parts of the cell
by autophagy were more abundant in older, calorie-restricted rats.
Boosting autophagy is especially important in the heart, a vital
organ packed with mitochondria, Wohlgemuth said. Swift disposal of
damaged cellular components is essential to maintaining an abun-
dance of healthy heart cells as we age.
"Cardiac cells have lost the capability to divide readily to replace
dying cells. So the maintenance of the cells' survival mechanisms is
crucial for the heart," Wohlgemuth said.
Now that some of these proteins have been identified, UF
researchers say the next step is to figure out how the proteins can be
activated without inflicting dietary stress.
"What if we bypass the caloric restriction and find a way of
increasing autophagy?" asked Dunn. "That is, instead of starving
yourself you can find another way of enhancing autophagy that will
allow the enhanced removal of various damaged organelles that accu-
mulate in aged cells."
Dr. Ulf Brunk, a professor emeritus of experimental pathology at
Link6ping University in Sweden, said the study builds on past
research showing that removal of toxic mitochondria may extend life
in a variety of mammals.
"The paper is a further step in the direction of showing that the
stimulation of autophagy may be beneficial," Brunk said.


Sea Ice Concentration (%)
II l : : .. 1~~


In 1497, English King Henry VII sent Italian explorer John
Cabot to look for a northwest route from Europe to the Orient that
would keep ships from having to sail all the way around Africa. That
expedition launched roughly five centuries of steady disappointment
and tragedy as generations of explorers-Sir Francis Drake and
Captain James Cook among them-met with failure as they searched
for the fabled Northwest Passage. Even in modern times, navigating
from the Atlantic to the Pacific through Canada's Arctic Islands has
been difficult. The summer of 2007, however, saw sufficient sea ice
retreat to change the character of the fabled sea route.
This image shows sea ice around the Northwest. Passage as
observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS
(AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on August 22, 2007. In this
image, dark gray indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice
concentration, and the lighter gray indicates loosely packed sea ice.
Theblack circle at the North Pole indicates no data as the satellite
does not make observations that far north. McClure Strait, Parry
Channel, Victoria Strait, and McClintock Channel (north of Victoria
Strait), all appear nearly ice-free. North of McClure Strait, an area of
sea ice remains, but it is fragmented.
Multi-year ice (ice that survives more than one melt season)
tends to be thicker and more resistant to melt than first-year ice
(formed over just one winter). According to John Falkingham of the
Canadian Ice Service, most of the multi-year ice melted from Victoria
Strait and McClintock Channel in the summer of 2006, leaving these
traditionally difficult areas more open. In mid-August 2007, only
patchy 'areas of ice filled Victoria Strait and Larsen Sound, immedi-
ately to the north. Falkingham described the Northwest Passage as
"nearly open." Changes in the Northwest Passage were part of a larg-
er pattern of melt in 2007 that also affected the East Siberian Sea.
Although nearly open, the Northv. es' PajSage \'. as iot ihe sai-
ily easy to navigate in August 2007. Located 800 kilorieters (500
miles) north of the Arctic Circle and less than 1,930 kilometers
(1,200 miles) from the North Pole, this sea route remains a significant
challenge, best met with a strong icebreaker ship backed by a good
insurance policy. Despite the challenges, long-term opening of the
passage would have global impacts on trade and natural resource use.


NOAA DEACTIVATES

POLAR ORBITING

SATELLITE

NOAA-12 was Nation's

Longest Serving Polar

Orbiting Satellite

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration official-
ly shut down the nation's longest serving polar-orbiting satellite,
NOAA-12 on Aug. 10. While in operation, NOAA-12 logged 16
years of service and 84,402 Earth orbits, capturing critical environ-
mental data from space. The spacecraft was deactivated following a
series of power system problems.
NOAA operates two polar-orbiting environmental satellites, or
POES. These spacecraft are critical for monitoring changes in the
atmosphere and ocean temperatures and observing climate phenome-
na such as El Niio and La Nifia. NOAA-12 was launched on May 14,
1991, and became the operational replacement for NOAA-10 four
months later on Sept. 19.
"NOAA-12's performance over its lifetime is a credit to the engi-
neers who built and operated it as well as the technology that sus-
tained it," said Mary E. Kicza, assistant administrator for NOAA's
Satellite and Information Service.
When it was launched, NOAA-12 was a third-generation, opera-
tional meteorological satellite and considered an upgrade from earli-
er spacecraft because it featured higher resolution global data and
images. "The technology of NOAA-12 gave scientists more day- and
night-time data on local and global scales than earlier satellites were
able to provide," Kicza added.
NOAA-12 was replaced operationally by a newer satellite,
NOAA-15, in December 1998, but was configured to send real-time
data directly to users on the ground as it passed over their receiving
stations, extending the usefulness of the spacecraft.
NOAA is celebrating 200 years of science and service to the
nation in 2007. From the establishment of the Survey of the Coast ih
1807 by Thomas Jefferson to the formation of the Weather Bureau
and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries in the 1870s. much of
America's scientific heritage is rooted in NOAA.
NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and nation-
al safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-
related events and information service delivery for transportation, and
by providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and
marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation
System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal part-
ners, more than 70 countries and the European Commission to devel-
op a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it
observes, predicts and protects.







Page 8 Pinellas News Friday, August 31, 2007

Parent's Depression


Can Weigh On Children

By: April Frawley Birdwell

GAINESVILLE, Fla. A parent's struggle with stress or
Depression can lower a child's quality of life and it could hinder
in overweight youngster's attempts to lose weight, too. University of
Florida researchers say.
Parent distress, peer bullying and childhood depression can pro-
3el a cycle that makes it more difficult for children to adopt healthi-
er lifestyles, UF researchers report in the current issue of the journal
Dbesity.
Understanding more about factors that affect an overweight
:hild's well-being could help health-care professionals better treat
:hese kids, said David Janicke, a UF assistant professor of clinical
md health psychology in the College of Public Health and Health
Professions and the lead author of the study.
Tending to the needs of distressed parents could be one of the
)est ways to help children, Janicke said. Having supportive parents is
vital for children to be able to make the lifestyle changes needed to
ose weight. Often, children only have access to food at home, so
vhat a parent puts on the table usually determines what the child eats,
lanicke said. Also, the behaviors a parent models affect the lifestyle
choicess a child makes, too.
When parents are struggling, they may have less energy and not
)e able to provide the emotional support an overweight child needs
)r help organize play dates and exercise activities, Janicke said.
"Looking at how parents are doing themselves, how they are
Joing socially and emotionally and how they are coping with the
;tresses in their lives, is really important too," Janicke said. "It's
important for them to take time out to take care of themselves."
More than 33 percent of children and adolescents in the United
States are overweight or obese, according to the National Center for
Health Statistics. Prior studies conducted elsewhere have shown that
overweight children have a poorer quality of life than normal-weight
peers. UF's study is one of the first to examine how factors such as
parent distress, depression and bullying affect a child's well-being,
giving researchers a better understanding of how to help overweight
children.
UF researchers surveyed 96 overweight or obese children and
their parents, comparing how bullying, depression and parents' well-
being related to each child's quality of life. The researchers looked at
a combination of factors, namely health, emotional well-being, aca-
demic performance and social status.
S Children whose parents were struggling or who reported more
problems with peers tended to have a lower overall score for quality
of life.'Both bullying and parent distress were linked to more depres-
sive symptoms in children, and these symptoms seemed to be related
to poorer quality of life.
"One of the pathways to poor quality of life seems to be child-
hood depression," Janicke said. "If a parent is distressed, that seems
to impact a child's symptoms of depression, which then impacts qual-
ity of life. It's the same with peer victimization. It impacts depres-
sion, which then impacts quality of life. And it seems to affect not just
the emotional aspect of quality of life, but also their health status."
Talking about quality of life and problems such as bullying also
helps clinicians encourage children to confront their weight problem,
said Meg Zeller, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Cincinnati and a psychologist with the Cincinnati Children's
Hospital Medical Center. Often, fears of developing type 2 diabetes
or cardiovascular disease don't motivate children, but factors such as
bullying do, she said.
"It gives a kid language to be able to talk about what it would
mean to them to be able to make lifestyle changes," she said, adding
that Janicke's research helps advance researchers' understanding of
factors that affect a child's quality of life.,
Addressing emotional and psychological issues is a key part of
helping kids manage their weight, Janicke said. Aside from helping
kids opefi up about making healthier lifestyle choices, psychologists
also can help children deal with depression and teach coping strate-
gies for peer bullying.
"Sometimes it's hard to change peer interactions, but just giving
the child an ear can be very powerful," Janicke said. "Helping parents
take care of themselves and be effective listeners is a starting point.


Florida lawmakers


unanimous in vow to


support voters' rights


WASHINGTON,- Members
of Florida's Democratic congres-
sional delegation unanimously
declared Tuesday they'll support
voters' rights to have their ballots
count in a Jan. 29 statewide pres-
idential primary, in lieu of a later
caucus of candidates' supporters
as just ordered by the
Democratic National Committee
(DNC).
"We cannot go along with
anything but the state-run pri-
mary set for next January," the
10 Democratic lawmakers led by
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson said in a
joint statement issued today. "We
strongly encourage all
Democrats to vote for their pre-
ferred nominee in that primary,
regardless of whatever penalties
the DNC might enact."
"The vote is going to matter
- period," the lawmakers said.
Florida's Democratic con-
gressional delegation is com-
prised of Nelson and U.S. Reps.
Allen Boyd Jr. of Monticello,
Corrine Brown of Jacksonville,
Kathy Castor of Tampa, Alcee
Hastings of Miramar, Ron Klein
of Boca Raton, Tim Mahoney of
Palm Beach Gardens, Kendrick
Meek of Miami, Debbie
Wasserman Schultz of Weston
and Robert Wexler of Boca
Raton.
Their statement comes after


holding a conference call yester-
day, and three days after the
DNC under Chairman Howard
Dean voted to strip the state of its
delegates to the national conven-
tion if the Florida Democratic
Party refuses to hold a caucus on
Feb. 5 or later, instead of a bind-
ing primary on Jan. 29. The pri-
mary date is set by a new law
passed recently by the Florida
Legislature and signed by Gov.
Charlie Crist.
The congressional delega-
tion members also said they
intend to mount a legal challenge
,aimed at blocking the DNC from
banning Florida delegates if it
comes to that. Nelson; who has
spoken with DNC leadership
about the Saturday decision, said
today, "I hope we're going to be
able to work this out. The easy
solution is for a few other states
to move their primaries up before
Florida's."
The DNC still has four
weeks in which it can change its
directive regarding Florida's del-
egates, but has yet to signal any
intention of doing so. "We hope
that over the next few weeks, the
DNC and its chairman will show
a willingness to work with us to
find an equitable solution that is
acceptable to all," the lawmakers
said.


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