Title: Pinellas news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073688/00135
 Material Information
Title: Pinellas news
Uniform Title: Pinellas news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Publisher: Potter Media
Publication Date: August 10, 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg
Coordinates: 27.782254 x -82.667619 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073688
Volume ID: VID00135
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28918446

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861 12-31-10 6P 2S (2)
MR. WILL CONOVA CURATOR **B010
SMATHERS DIGITAL LIBRARY CTR
PO BOX 117007 #
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


250


August 10, 2007


Vol. 25, No. 32; 1 Section, 8 pages


fff Bronson Warns Low

Endeavour Lifts Off Okeechobee Water May


- m mIM-mm 1" w- -. -Il... -


FSU Researchers Developing

Diagnostic 'Lab on a Chip'
By Barry Ray, FSU
If you have ever marveled over the orderly process by which
cars, buses and other modes of transportation are directed toward ,"
their destinations in a big city, you'll really appreciate the work of
one Florida State University chemist.
Thomas Fischer, an associate professor of chemistry and bio-
chemistry at FSU, is designing a "smart" traffic system similar to
those in major metropolises. A major difference, though, is its size:
Fischer's traffic grid is small enough to fit on a tiny microchip.
Working with an FSU postdoctoral associate, Pietro Tiero, and
another colleague, Professor Tom H. Johansen of the University of
Oslo. in Norway, Fischer has designed a "lab on a chip"-a small
device that, when exposed to very low magnetic fields, might one day
be used as a portable tool for quickly diagnosing a variety of human
illnesses.
"Currently, a doctor seeking to help a sick patient may take a
blood sample and send it out to a laboratory," Fischer said. "In three
or four days, the lab results will come back and the doctor will have
a better idea of what ails the patient.
"With the 'lab on a chip,' however, it might be possible to take a
single drop of the patient's blood, place it on a small chip, and then
be able to provide a very quick, inexpensive and-most important-
accurate diagnosis."
Fischer explained that the device would work by exposing the
blood sample to very low magnetic field oscillations. In so doing, cer-
tain microscopic particles within the sample would be manipulated
into "commuting" through an array of magnetic bubbles on the sur-
face of the chip. Observing where various particles align themselves
then would enable medical professionals to determine the nature of
the patient's illness.
"Single molecules marking the presence or absence of a disease
will be attached to magnetic particles a billion times smaller than a
marble," Fischer said. "The magnetic traffic system then will guide
these particles to different positions on the chip depending on their
molecular marking."
A paper describing the research of Fischer, Tierno and Johansen
was recently published in the prestigious scientific journal Physical
Review Letters. That paper, titled "Localized and Delocalized Motion
of Colloidal Particles on a Magnetic Bubble Lattice," can be accessed
at this website.
In addition, Fischer, Tierno and another colleague, Lars Helseth,'
an assistant professor at Nanyang Technological University in
Singapore, have submitted a patent application related to their 'lab on
a chip.' The application, titled "Digital Transport of Paramagnetic
Beads on Magnetic Garnet Films," states that their goal is to "control
the location and movement of molecular objects on a microchip by
modulating magnetic domains on the surface of the microchip."
A company, Siemens Medical Solutions, also has expressed
interest in Fischer's technique. Plans to develop the magnetic chip
further in a joint effort are under way.
Much more basic research must be done before such a diagnos-
tic tool is ready for the marketplace. Fischer stressed that science
"often is a long, laborious process that can take years to generate
results. However, this sort of research is essential if breakthroughs in
medicine and the sciences are to occur."


Cheers and shouts could be heard throughout the Space Center
at 6:36 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, August 8th as Endeavour, carrying
the STS-118 crew, roared off the launch pad into the late afternoon
sky to begin the 22nd mission to the International Space Station.
Like all shuttle missions, STS-118 is about the future: putting
the International Space Station a step closer to completion and gath-
ering experience that will help people return to the moon and go on
to Mars. But this mission also will see a two decade-old dream real-
ized and a vision of inspiration completed. Twenty-two years after
first being selected as Christa McAuliffe's backup in the Teacher in
Space Project, Barbara Morgan strapped into space shuttle
Endeavour as a fully-trained astronaut. She is one of five mission
specialists in the seven-member crew.


Cause Economic Loss

TALLHASSEE Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson says consumers will see food
prices increase and that Florida faces serious economic consequences
if the prolonged drought in southeast Florida continues. Total
statewide economic losses have already topped an estimated $100
million this year, and are expected to surpass $1 billion over the next
two years if the current situation is not altered.
"Some agricultural industries like cattle, citrus and sugar won't
feel the worst of their financial pains until 2008 and 2009," Bronson
said.
While the normal summer rains have eased the severity of urban.
water shortages throughout the state, many Floridians are unaware
that agricultural producers around Lake Okeechobee are facing ongo-
ing water shortages and storage dilemmas that will continue well into
next year and beyond.
In addition to providing a backup drinking water supply for the
densely populated communities of South Florida and a critical sup-
plemental water supply for the Everglades, Lake Okeechobee stores
irrigation water for some 700,000 acres of agriculture considered by
some as the most productive farm land in the world.
"Agriculture around the lake is facing a dire situation," Bronson
said. "If there's any hope of avoiding a financial meltdown, it's
absolutely essential that the state, the South Florida Water
Management District and the Army Corps of Engineers do everything
possible to increase water levels in Lake Okeechobee."
Even with the increasing rainfall in recent weeks, Bronson
believes that state agencies must find a way to put more storage water
back into the lake. Florida's "dry season" starts in November, and
most agricultural producers do not feel that there is sufficient water
to get them through the critical period until next spring.
And without ample water, the state's valuable winter vegetable;
production, citrus crop and sugar production are in peril, Bronson
said. Many South Florida farmers have been under water restrictions
since November of 2006 and some are now questioning the viability
-of even planting a fall crop.
"This is a tough situation," Bronson said. "Think about it; would
you invest hundreds-of-thousands of dollars planting crops with the
prospects of having an insufficient water supply to keep them alive?"
Bronson stressed that agriculture losses will no doubt also show
up in lost tax revenues, unemployment and higher food prices.
"It's not.just about farm profitability; it affects everyone who
eats and relies on the economy," he said.


NOAA Fisheries Service issued a rule
under the Endangered Species Act this week
to require fishing vessels in designated fish-
eries to take observers on board to help col-
lect information on bycatch of sea turtles.
Collected information from the observers
helps better protect sea turtles from being
injured or killed in fishing nets. All sea tur-
tles in the United States are listed as endan-
gered or threatened. Thousands die each year
as a result of getting entangled in fishing
gear.
"We're issuing this rule to increase our
ability to protect sea turtles, and to restore
their populations," said Bill Hogarth, NOAA
Fisheries Service director. "Observers col-
lect key scientific information that we need
to minimize bycatch in our fisheries. This
information also helps us carry out our obli-
gations under the ESA."


NOAA Fisheries
Service will be better
positioned to address
the sea turtle bycatch
problem in the future
as a result of the
observer rule.
Observers will help
determine whether
existing measures to
reduce sea turtle
St po bycatch are working,
a le te a c or whether new or
ST. ., additional, measures
."'i. ., are needed. The rule
Phol:c Courtes ef r OAA will apply to designat-
"ed fishing vessels
operating in both state and federal waters,
and to designated U.S. fishing vessels on the
high seas.
Current regula-
tions under the
Endangered Species
Act allow NOAA
Fisheries Service to
place observers on
vessels on a short-
term basis in response
to an emergency
event, such as a mass
sea turtle stranding.
However, these limit-
ed, temporary observ-
er requirements do not
enable the agency to .
collect comprehensive
information on all sea --


turtle-fishery interactions of concern. The
new rule allows NOAA Fisheries Service to
identify potential sea turtle bycatch problems
before they reach crisis levels, which could
ultimately result in stricter management
measures.
Under this rule, each year NOAA
Fisheries Service will publish in the Federal
Register a draft and final determination of
fisheries it intends to monitor for sea turtle
interactions. The determination will be based
on the best available information regarding
sea turtle-fishery interactions, sea turtle dis-
tribution or fishing gear characteristics. The
final rule can be found online at:
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/species/tur-
ties/regulations.htm.


W HATS Events Calendar Page 2
HAT'S Recipe Page3


INSIDE? Legal Notices Pages 4-5


Q


NOAA INCREASES SEA TURTLE



BYCATCH MONITORING







Page 2 Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007



St. Pete Events


-.7~- '


dog/m r


Aug 10 ST. PETE SHUFFLE. St. Petersburg Shuffleboard
Courts, 559 Mirror Lake Dr. N. 7 to 11 p.m. A hip twist on an old
game with music, art and fun for all ages. Free.
http://www.stpeteshuffle.com/ or 727-822-2083.
Aug 11 THE FOURTH ANNUAL HEARTSBREATH
FLUTE CIRCLE EXTRAVAGANZA. Weedon Island Preserve.
1800 Weedon Drive NE. St. Petersburg. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Enjoy the art
and music of the Native American culture at this extravaganza. Listen
to the Native American Flute Performers. Learn the basics of making
a flute as Flute Builder Master Craftsmen present a workshop. Join in
a silent auction of Native American themed items or shop for other
Native American items. Free. For information, call (727) 453-6500.
Aug. 11 "LOCKS OF LOVE" DAY PEP RALLY. 14823
North Florida Ave. Tampa. 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Bucs fans and other
attendees can donate their ponytails to Locks of Love, an organiza-
tion that provides children with custom hairpieces. There will also be
food, drinks, and activities as well as an opportunity to give blood.
For more information, contact Jeff at (813) 908-BUCS (2827).
Aug. 13 ARCHAEOLOGY PRESENTATION. Sawgrass
Lake. 7400 25th St. N., St. Petersburg, FL. 1:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. For
more information, call (727) 217-7256.
Aug. 15-19 OLD SALT LOOP TOURNAMENT. Spa Beach,
615 2nd Ave. N.E. St. Petersburg. This prestigious tournament returns
to St. Petersburgfor its 32nd annual competition. www.oldsaltfish-
ing.org or (727)-497-1060.
Aug. 17 FLASH! BANG! BOOM! DISCOVER OUR AMAZ-
ING WEATHER! Brooker Creek Preserve. 3940 Keystone Rd.
Tarpon Springs. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Lightning, thunder, hail and won-
der! Get blown away by whirlwinds, tornadoes, hurricanes and
cyclones. Get swept up by these interesting weather phenomena at
this fun and engaging program. Free. To register, call (727) 453-6800.
Aug. 17-19 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. CLEVELAND
INDIANS. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
www.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Aug 17 DECOMPOSITION: LIFE'S PROCESS OF
RENEWAL. Weedon Island Preserve. 1800 Weedon Drive NE. St.
Petersburg. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Think composting is a mystery? Been
confused about what can or cannot be added to the compost bin?
Solve those mysteries at this free workshop led by a Pinellas County
Extension educator at beautiful Weedon Island Preserve. Discover
how easy it is to create compost to use in the garden and landscape.
Pinellas County residents will receive a free 17.6 cubic feet plastic
compost bin, while they last! Free. To register, call. (727) 453-6500.
Aug. 18 GUIDED NATURE WALK. Chestnut Park. 2200
East Lake Rd. Palm Harbor. 9:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Aug. 18 SPCA'S NATIONAL HOMELESS PETS ADOP-
TION DAY. SPCA Tampa Bay 9099 130th Ave. N. Largo. 11:00
a.m.-5:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.spcafl.org or call
S(727) 586-3591.
Aug. 18 PROM. Countryside Recreation Center. 2640 Sabal
Springs Dr. Clearwater. If you didn't get to enjoy Prom the first time
around, here is your chance.This event is geared toward individuals
with developmental disabilities. Tickets are on sale now at the Long
Center: $20 per participant/$5 per chaperone. Includes dinner, danc-
Sing, flower, and photo. For more information, call the Clearwater's
Therapeutic Recreation department at (727)793-2320 x. 227.
Aug. 18 COMPOST HAPPENS. Weedon Island Preserve. 1800
Weedon Drive NE. St. Petersburg. 10-11:30 a.m. Think composting
is a mystery? Call (727) 582-2673 to pre-register.
Aug. 20-22 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. BOSTON RED
SOX. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg. www.dev-
ilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Aug. 23-26 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. OAKLAND
ATHLETICS. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
www.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Aug. 25 FIRE STATION OPEN HOUSE. Lake Maggiore #8,
4701 Martin Luther King Jr. St. S. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Meet your local
firefighters, check out their trucks, join in e celebration of their 100th
anniversary and ring the 100 year old bell. For more information, call
(727) 893-7480.
Aug. 25 BILLY B. AND FAMILY FUN. Brooker Creek
Preserve. 3940 Keystone Rd. Tarpon Springs. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Enjoy a
fun-filled performance by internationally renowned children's enter-
tainer Billy B. Sing and dance to a better understanding of the natu-
ral world. This family event features indoor and outdoor nature
games between shows and a children's book sale. Free tickets are
Required for admission. For more information, call (727) 453-6800.
Aug. 26 JOE WALSH IN CONCERT. Mahaffey Theater, 400
1st St. S. St. Petersburg. 8 p.m. Enjoy a evening with a rock and roll
legend, Joe Walsh. Special guest performance by JD and The Straight
Shot. $65 and $100. www.mahaffeytheater.com or 727-892-5767.
Aug. 29 LIVING WITH OUR WILDLIFE NEIGHBORS
PROGRAM. Brooker Creek Preserve. 3940 Keystone Rd. Tarpon
Springs. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Have you ever wondered what kind of ani-
mal you are seeing or if it should even be in your yard? Join Jeanne
Murphy, from Pinellas County Extension, to learn how to identify
common backyard visitors, how to encourage or discourage their vis-
its and much more. Free. To register, call (727) 453-6800.
Sep. 1 ALBERT WHITTED AIRPORT PRESERVATION
SOCIETY PANCAKE BREAKFAST. Albert Whitted Airport, 451
8th Ave. S.E. St. Petersburg. 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. All you can eat pan-

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
9025 49th St. N., Pinellas Park 546-5741


Sunday School
9:00 am
Summer Reunion Worship
10:15 am


Transportation and Nursery Available
Frank K. Reynolds, Pastor


cakes, eggs, bacon, hashbrowns, grits, coffee and juice. $10 adults, $2
children under 12. www.awaps.org or 727-822-1532.
Sep. 1 SUNCOAST ANNUAL CORVETTE SHOW. The Pier,
800 2nd Ave. N.E. St. Petersburg. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Labor Day week-
end corvette show featuring entertainment, door prizes, awards and
more. Pre-register your 'vette by Aug. 5, plus receive a t-shirt, dash
plaque and goodies. $20 registration, www.stpetepier.com or 727-
821-6443.
Sep. 3 to 5 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. BALTIMORE
ORIOLES. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
www.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Sep. 7 GET DOWNTOWN. Central Ave. from 2nd to 3rd St. St.
Petersburg. 5:30 to 10 p.m. Live music and festive street party. Free.
727-393-3597.
Sep. 7 to 9 TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS VS. TORONTO
BLUE JAYS. Tropicana Field, One Tropicana Dr. St. Petersburg.
www.devilrays.com or 888-FAN-RAYS.
Sep. 7 to 9 WEEKEND ART SALE. The Arts Center, 719
Central Ave. St. Petersburg.Fri. and Sat., 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sun. noon
to 4 p.m. Purchase works of art from over 25 juried artists. Free.
www.theartscenter.org or (727) 822-7872.
Sep. 15 AIDS WALK ST. PETERSBURG. North Shore Park,
901 North Shore Dr. N.E. St. Petersburg. 9 a.m. to noon. Fundraiser
benefiting clients of For AIDS Care Today. (727) 328-3268.
Sep. 15 CRIME PREVENTION RUN & FESTIVAL.
Campbell Park, 601 14th Street S, St. Petersburg. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Promotes positive interaction between community residents and law
enforcement. Free. For more information, call (727) 327-2081.
Sep. 15 PRESCHOOL VILLAGE RAMBLERS. Heritage
Village. 11909 125th Street N, Largo, FL. 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Preschoolers and their parents or grandparents can play at history!
Call (727) 582-2123 for more information.
Sep. 15 GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. Brooker Creek
Preserve. 3940 Keystone Rd. Tarpon Springs. 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Choosing plants that create habitat for variouswildlife can be a
rewarding and educational experience for the entire family. An
instructor from Pinellas County Extension will be on hand to teach
this free workshop at Brooker Creek Preserve Environmental
Education Center in Tarpon Springs. Call (727)453-6800 for info and
pre-registration.
Sep. 16 SICKLE CELL DINNER & JAZZ. Hilton St.
Petersburg, 333 1st St. S. St. Petersburg. 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Jazz extrava-
ganza featuring dinner, dancing, and entertainment by local musi-
cians and vocalists. Call (727) 896-2355.
Sep. 16 FAMILY DAY. The Arts Center, 719 Central Ave. St.
Petersburg. 1 to 4 p.m. Family friendly day with hands-on art projects
and other fun activities. Free. www.theartscenter.org or 727-822-
7872.
Sep. 17 GOP REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY
DEBATE. Mahaffey Theater, 400 1st St. S. St. Petersburg. 7 to 9 p.m.
Live broadcast on CNN moderated by Anderson Cooper.
wwyw.mahaffeytheater.com or 727-892-5767.
Sep. 22 DOG SWIM DAY. Fossil Park Pool, 6739 Martin
Luther King Jr. St. N. St. Petersburg. Swim sessions: 10 a.m. to noon
and 1 to 3 p.m. Friendly canines get to splash and paddle in the pool.
Register at either start time with proof of vaccination. $5 per dog,
humans free. 727-893-7732.
Sep. 22 CLASSIC AUTO SHOW. The Pier, 800 2nd Ave. N.E.
St. Petersburg. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check out classic beauties from
1976 and earlier. Call for car registration. Free. www.stpetepier.com
or 727-418-0628. ..
Sep. 25 TAMNPA BAi JOB FAIR. The Coliseum. 535 4th Ave.
N. St. Petersburg. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Over 80 local employers on site per-
forming testing, interviews, and more. Free. Call (727) 898-5202 for
more information.

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HERITAGE


NEWS


FORUM

dwin J. Feulner, Ph.D
http://www.heritage.org
214 Massachusetts Ave. N.E. Washington, D.C. 20002 *
(202) 546-4400



Fencing Class
By: Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D
Smugglers Canyon, California. This is the southwestern-most
point of the continental United States. Several Mexican families
swim in the Pacific Ocean on one side of the border fence, while a
group of Americans walk the beach on the other side. I've come to see
what our border agents face every day.
A 30-year old fence runs east through the populated area and
over several hills and valleys in the distance. The border road on the
American side is basically a dirt path. On the Mexican side, though,
there's a four-lane highway. The northern path is crossed by trails
where dozens have come across illegally in recent months.
During my visit, a unit of the California National Guard was
working with bulldozers and heavy equipment, clearing a path for a
new fence to be built on the American side. Most of the action here
happens after dark. Mid-day, however, we heard the car radio blast
"ladder up" with a specific location. "Ladder up" means aliens are
crossing.
A two-man Border Patrol unit waited at the end of a culvert. One
agent was looking in. Then, 20 yards away, five unhappy aliens
emerged with another Border Patrol agent following them. His usu-
ally impeccable uniform bore the marks of his crawl through the large
culvert. I thanked him for his efforts. His immediate reply, which I
would hear throughout the day: "Just doing my job, sir!"
These detainees will now be fingerprinted (as all illegal crossers
are) with those prints run through a master list. First- or second-time
offenders are simply sent back. Those caught multiple times face
more elaborate procedures. They may be transported to a distant
crossing point or even flown to an interior airport such as Mexico
City.
Ironically, recent improvements in border security have made it
possible for an upscale shopping center to be built virtually against
the border fence on the American side. That's a sign of progress, as is
the fact that agents are catching fewer illegals.
At one time, a Border Patrol officer says, 20 percent of all illegal
crossings happened in the San Diego Sector. Yet the number of appre-'
hensions is down significantly because fewer people try to come in
here. Once the fence is erected, it should enhance border security.
Meanwhile, the number of agents is increasing. And the mission
is a good training ground. Giving practical experience to National
Guard units as backup while more agents are trained and deployed is
having a positive impact at the border -- and in the Guard.
'Of course, not every tool is high-tech. At least two agents patrol
the border on horseback here. N6 doubt Ronald'Reagan, who loved
the cavalry, would be proud that a part of the U.S. Government still
relies in part on horses. When the fog rolls in from the Pacific,-the
cameras, the lights and the SUVs take second place to the horses,
whose acute senses bring agents to critical points more quickly.
There are far more legal crossings than illegal ones, of course.
Some 150,000 people go daily through the San Ysidro crossing point,
riding in more than 40,000 cars. We watched as one car was sent for
a secondary check. Sure enough, in a false panel ih the back, officers
found more than 30 pounds of marijuana. At this border point last
year, 140,000 pounds of cocaine, marihuana, heroin and metham-
phetamines were confiscated.
Again, I shook hands with the agent and congratulated him. The
reply, of course: "Just doing my job, sir."
That's an understatement. Along the border, dehydration is a
problem in summer and sudden freak snowfalls pose challenges in
winter. And weather is but one component of what the men and
women along the border endure. I'm not high on many government
workers, but Border Patrol officers certainly earn their pay.
Congress made a sensible decision not to go for a comprehensive
immigration reform bill this year. But lawmakers should proceed,
step by step, to get the job done. In the meantime, every American
should take great pride in the work of the U.S. Customs and Border
Protection agency.
Ed Feulner is president of the Heritage Foundation







Florida Press Association
Award Winning Newspaper


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K 2










How to Avoid



Foreclosure
By Jerry Cobbe, Vice President and Branch Manager,
Largo, Fla., Market Street Mortgage
Sometimes, despite the best planning, homeowners find them-
selves unable to make their mortgage payment, perhaps due to a
change in circumstances- employment, marital status, illness or other
factors. It could happen to anyone. But if you miss mortgage pay-
ments, you may risk foreclosure.
The trick is to handle the situation so that foreclosure isn't nec-
essary. Here are some ideas for avoiding foreclosure.
1. If you have enough lead time and equity in your home, put
your home on the market. To avoid missing payments, you may con-
sider a home equity line of credit to help you until you can sell. In
this current buyer's market, a homeowner may find it takes longer to
sell a home or that prices may not be as high as you'd hoped. To
increase your chances of selling early and at a good price, differenti-
ate it from others on the market by making it more appealing. You
mustt also be realistic about listing and selling prices in your neigh-
Sborhood. Your real estate agent can provide advice on both counts.
2. But if it looks like you may miss a payment, your first step
..should be to have an honest conversation with the lender to explain
.your current financial situation. If you're proactive, this should hap-
-pen before you miss a payment. But if you find a letter about missed
payments in your mailbox or get a call, don't ignore it. Honesty is key
no surprises. You may be surprised to know that your loan counselor
will want to help you avoid foreclosure and will discuss with you all
S,of your available options.
3. Since your loan counselor will need to review your full finan-
Scial picture, collect any documentation referring to your monthly
Income, expenses and any income loss. This information is particu-
larly helpful for temporary situations. A temporary reversal may
qualify you to receive payment help for a maximum of six months.
After this period, you would continue with regular payments, includ-
ing the repayment of what you've missed, for the next 12 months. But
Syou won't know if this is possible if you do not discuss your situation
openly with your lender.
4. Forbearance is another temporary remedy you may be able to
negotiate. By proving to your lender that your finances will soon
Improve, the lender may grant a forbearance, where payments would
be halted for a specified time frame. A payment plan would then go
Into effect after your forbearance period.
5. If your situation is not temporary, ask the loan counselor if you
can reduce payments indefinitely. This may help you keep from los-
ing your home.
6. Your lender may be willing to accept what's called a "short-
sale." You would sell the house and pay the lender the profits. A "deed
in lieu of foreclosure" is another option, in which the lender takes title
to the house. In both scenarios your debt is paid in full. This situation
.,will appear on your credit report, but has less of an impact on your
;, credit rating than a foreclosure.
7. No matter what you choose to do, stay in your home while the
p, process plays out. If you abandon the home, you may not qualify for
assistance.
Although some people are uncomfortable talking about a finan-
cial reversal, it pays to be open and honest with your loan counselor,
-,ii ohe or she can provide you with options to avoid losing your home
pr damaging your credit it's.part of their serviceto you.,

'Sting Busts Unlicensed Moving

Company In Hillsborough County

TALLHASSEE -Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
-,, Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced last week that Cary
. .Lee White, 41, of Odessa was charged with operating a moving com-
Spany without a license.
Under Florida law, intrastate moving companies those moving
goods from one location in Florida to another are required to be reg-
istered with Bronson's department to assure that a series of consumer
protection provisions in the law are being followed.
Bronson's Division of Consumer Services had identified White's
company as an unlicensed mover operating in the Tampa area. The
.Division made repeated efforts to register White's company Onyx
Movers. When White refused to register, the Division of Consumer
Services issued a final order to "cease and desist" operations. White
ignored the order and continued to operate his home based business.
S The case was turned over to the Bronson's Office of Agricultural
., aw Enforcement for investigation. Last Wednesday, a sting opera-
tion was conducted in which undercover agents brokered a deal with
White to move furniture from one location to another within the
Tampa area.
Once the deal was completed, officers moved in and halted any
'further activity. White was issued a Notice to Appear, and charged
with a First Degree Misdemeanor Violation for operating without
being licensed. The violation carries a maximum penalty of up to 1
year in jail and up to a $1,000.00 fine. White will be required to
appear in Hillsborough County Court to answer to the charge.
Investigators with the Division of Consumer Services were pres-o,
ent during the sting operation, and issued White another order to
Cease and Desist Operations for operating the unlicensed business.
"It is important that consumers make sure that a mover that
they're dealing with is registered for their own protection," Bronson
said.
Consumers can call the department's toll-free hotline 1 800
HELP FLA (435-7352) to check on the registration status of mov-
ing companies in Florida, check the complaint history of such com-
panies or file a complaint against a moving company.


Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007 Page
---------------------------------

NASA's Spitzer Spies Eggplant Parmesan


Monster Galaxy Pileup 1. St n control to
broil. Generously
NOWMEW,- MRS nrats hth aira5m nfI


Four galaxies are slamming into each other and kicking up bil-
lions of stars in one of the largest cosmic smash-ups ever observed.
The clashing galaxies, spotted by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope,
will eventually merge into a single, behemoth galaxy up to 10 times -
as massive as our own Milky Way. This rare sighting provides an
unprecedented look at how the most massive galaxies in the universe -'
form. ,
"Most of the galaxy mergers we already knew about are like compact 1 mediur
cars crashing together," said Kenneth Rines of the Harvard- I peeled
Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. "What we 1/42 -p
have here is like four sand trucks smashing together, flinging sand Cookin
everywhere." Rines is lead author of a new paper accepted for publi- I 1/3 cup fin
cation in Astrophysical Journal Letters. Parmes
Collisions, or mergers, between galaxies are common in the universe. 1/4 cup Pro
Gravity causes some galaxies that are close together to tangle and I bread
ultimately unite over a period of millions of years. Though stars in 2 teaspo
merging galaxies are tossed around like sand, they have a lot of space vegeta
between them and survive the ride. Our Milky Way galaxy will team I 1 cup sp
up with the Andromeda galaxy in five billion years. 1 1/2 cups s
Mergers between one big galaxy and several small ones, called minor reduce
mergers, are well documented. For example, one of the most elabo- zarella
rate known minor mergers is taking place in the Spiderweb galaxy I
a massive galaxy that is catching dozens of small ones in its "web" of
gravity. Astronomers have also witnessed "major" mergers among PrepTime:5 m
pairs of galaxies that are similar in size. But no major mergers Start to Finish
between multiple hefty galaxies the big rigs of the galaxy world Vakes:6 serving
have been seen until now.
The new quadruple merger was discovered serendipitously during a
Spitzer survey of a distant cluster of galaxies, called CL0958+4702, I
located nearly five billion light-years away. The infrared telescope nutrition Infon
first spotted an unusually large fan-shaped plume of light coming out 1 Serving:
I Fat lOg (Sa
of a gathering of four blob-shaped, or elliptical, galaxies. Three of the I 480 mg; Ti
galaxies are about the size of the Milky Way, while the fourth is three Protein 11
times as big. Vitamin C
Further analysis of the plume revealed it is made up of billions of Starch; 1
Percent Dal
older stars flung out and abandoned in an ongoing clash. About half
of the stars in the plume will later fall back into the galaxies. "When _
this merger is complete, this will be one of the biggest galaxies in the
universe," said Rines. the best evidence
The Spitzer observations also show that the new merger lacks gas. ly recent
Theorists predict that massive galaxies grow in a variety of ways, Some of the stars
including gas-rich and gas-poor mergers. In gas-rich mergers, the lated areas outside
galaxies are soaked with gas that ignites to form new stars. Gas-poor could theoretical
mergers lack gas, so no new stars are formed. Spitzer found pnly old be quite different
stars in the quadruple encounter. galaxies.
"The Spitzer data show that these major mergers are gas-poor, unlike In addition to Sp
most mergers we know about," said Rines. "The data also represent known as the Mi




Fat is the New


n eggplant,
and cut into
h slices (1
inds)
ig spray
ely shredded
san cheese
ogresso dry
crumbs (any
ons olive or
ble oil
aghetti sauce
hredded
d-fat moz-
cheese (6
s)

in
:15 min
inncl


WKJUII wyUtIUI VWIL
with cooking spray.
Place on rack in broil-
er pan. Broil with tops
4 to 5 inches from.
heat about 10 min-
utes, turning once,
until tender.
2. While eggplant is
broiling, mix
Parmesan cheese and
bread crumbs; toss'
with oil.
3. Heat spaghetti sauce
in 1-quart saucepan
over medium heat
about 2 minutes, stir-
ring occasionally,
until heated through.
Remove from heat;
cover to keep warm.
4. Sprinkle 1 cup of the
mozzarella cheese
over eggplant slices.
Spoon bread crumb
mixture over cheese.
Broil about 1 minute
or until cheese is
melted and crumbs
ar h kml.n T n s_


gya are uuvvwn. iup eay -
plant with spaghetti
sauce and remaining I
1/2 cup mozzarella
cheese. i
nation: cheese.
Calories 195 (Calories from Fat 95 ); Tota
saturated Fat 4 g); Cholesterol 20 mg; Sodium
otal Carbohydrate 18 g (Dietary Fiber 3 g)
g Percent Daily Value*: Vitamin A 12 %9
6 %; Calcium 28 %; Iron 4 % Exchanges:
Vegetable; 1 1/2 High-Fat Meat; 1 Fat I
lily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet'
Recipe Courtesy of Betty Crocker

that the biggest galaxies in the universe formed fair-
ly through major mergers."
s tossed out in the monstrous merger will live in iso-
le the borders of any galaxies. Such abandoned stars
ly have planets. If so, the planets' night skies would
t from our own, with fewer stars and more visible

*itzer, Rines and his team used a telescope formerly
multiple Mirror Telescope and now called MMT near
See Galaxy Pileup, Page 6



Normal.


FSU Researcher Says


By Jill Elish, FSU
American women have gotten fatter as it
has become more socially acceptable to
carry a few extra pounds, according to a new
study.
Florida State University Assistant
Professor of Economics Frank Heiland and
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston Economist
Mary Burke are the co-authors of a paper
published in the academic journal
"Economic Inquiry" that argues that the bal-
looning weight of the population has fed
even more collective weight gain as our per-
ception of what is considered a normal body
size has changed.
"This is a social force that we are trying
to document because the rise in obesity has
occurred so rapidly over the past 30 years,"
said Heiland, who also is affiliated with
FSU's Center for Demography and
Population Health. "Medically speaking,
most agree that this trend is a dangerous one
because of its connection to diabetes, cancer
and other diseases. But psychologically, it
may provide relief to know that you are not
the only one packing on the pounds."
The paper, "Social Dynamics of
Obesity," is the first to provide a mathemati-
cal model of the impact of economic, biolog-
ical and social factors on aggregate body
weight distribution. It also is one of the first
studies to suggest that weight norms may
change and are not set standards based on
beauty or medical ideals.
Many economists believe that people eat
more-and thus gain weight-when food
prices drop, but that's just part of the story


behind the nation's dramatic weight gain
since the late 1970s, according to the
researchers. The full price of a calorie has
dropped by about 36 percent relative to the
price of consumer goods since 1977, but
prices leveled off in the mid-1990s. And yet
American women continued to get bigger.
Heiland and Burke's "social multiplier"
theory offers a potential reason why: As
Americans continue to super-size their value
meals, the average weight of the population
increases and people slowly adjust their per-
ceptions of appropriate body weight. Given
that these changes in perception may come
about gradually, Heiland and Burke suggest
the nation's battle of the bulge may extend
into the future.
Heiland and Burke studied body
weights among American women in the 30-
to 60-year-old age bracket from 1976 to
2000. Using data from the National Health
and Nutrition Examination Survey, they
found that the weight of the average woman
increased by 20 pounds, or 13.5 percent, dur-
ing that period. There was disproportionate
growth among the most obese women as the
99th percentile weight increased a hefty 18.2
percent, from 258 to 305 pounds.
The researchers also looked at self-
reports of women's real weights and desired
weights. In 1994, the average woman said
she weighed 147 pounds but wanted to
weigh 132 pounds. By 2002, the average
woman weighed 153 pounds but wanted the
scales to register 135 pounds, according to
data from the Centers for Disease Control


and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System.
The fact that even the desired weight of
women has increased suggests there is less
social pressure to lose weight, Heiland said,
citing a previous study that 87 percent of
Americans, including 48 percent of obese
Americans, believe that their' body weight
falls in the "socially acceptable" range.
While it seems thinness is increasingly
idealized in popular culture-images of
waif-like models and stick-thin celebrities
are everywhere-there is a gap between the
cultural imagery and the weights that most
people consider acceptable for themselves
and others, according to Heiland.
Biological forces also play a role in the
rise of obesity. An additional pound of body
weight is more likely to be fat, which does
not metabolize calories nearly as well as
muscle tissue, Heiland explained. Therefore,
any increase in calorie consumption-say,
one more cookie each day-leads to greater
weight gain among an initially heavier per-
son.
The researchers focused this study on
women partly because their weight gains
have been so dramatic, Heiland said, citing a
whopper of a statistic: 33.2 percent of
American women over age 20 are classified
as obese, according to 2001-2004 National
Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
data. However, men also have become heav-
ier, and the researchers believe the same eco-
nomic, social and biological forces are to
blame.


McCollum Announces Florida's Participation in Multistate Tire Inquiry


TALLAHASSEE, FL Attorney General Bill McCollum today
Joined several state Attorneys General in issuing a consumer adviso-
ry about potentially dangerous tires that were imported from China
Sand sold from 2002 to 2006 for'light trucks, SUVs and vans. More
than 450,000 tires may not meet the minimum specifications provid-
ed to the tire manufacturer and therefore may be unsafe. The tires
were distributed in the United States under the names Westlake,
Compass and YKS.
"It is important to make the public aware of the potential danger
to consumers due .to the safety hazards created by inadequate tires,"
Attorney General McCollum said. "We want to ensure that proper
safety standards are in place when Floridians are on the road."
The tires were made by Hangzhou Zhongce Rubber Co. Ltd.
(HZ) and distributed by Foreign Tire Sales, Inc., a small tire distrib-
utor in New Jersey. Foreign Tires Sales recently filed a non-compli-
ance report on certain tires with the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA). Affected tires may lack a sufficient layer


of rubber between their steel belts which could cause tire treads to
separate, creating potential safety hazards on the road.
The Attorneys General have asked tire dealers not to charge for
the safety inspections for these tire brands. Consumers of these par-
ticular tires should not drive their vehicles for long distances on hot
roads until the vehicles have been checked. If an inspection indicates
that a vehicle has unsafe tires, the consumer should immediately
contact Foreign Tire Sales, Inc., and report the problem. Because of
the safety concerns, a multistate working group of Attorneys General
has been created to investigate the issue. Further information can be
obtained from FTS's web site at http://www.foreigntire.com.As part
of general tire safety, Attorney General McCollum reminded Florida
consumers to keep the following tips in mind:
At least once a month and before every long trip, inspect tires for
patterns of uneven wear that could damage tires. Check tire inflation
pressure in accordance with manufacturer recommendations. Do not
overload your vehicle. Excess weight can place extra stress on your


tires. Check your tire placard or vehicle owner's manual for the max-
imum amount of weight your vehicle can safely carry.
Develop safe driving habits. Observe speed limits and avoid fast
stops, starts and turns. Avoid contact with potholes, objects and curbs
when driving or parking your vehicle. Keep your vehicle properly
maintained. Rotate tires regularly, get wheels balanced and get a
front-end alignment as necessary.
Use the proper tires for your vehicle. Check the vehicle manu-
facturer's recommendations before replacing a tire with a different
size and/or construction. Be aware of how the outside temperature
affects your tires. Hot weather can be. especially hard on tires, caus-
ing them to expand. As the outside temperature drops 10 degrees, tire
pressure drops about one or two pounds per square inch. Have any
tire problems checked out by professionals. If you find that one of
your tires is losing pressure, take it to a tire expert for a complete
internal inspection. Be careful of buying used tires. Check used tire
numbers and do not buy any that are specified in this inquiry.


spray oom sioes ur i
Lanch Lanoolant slice










Page 4 Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007
NOTICE OF AC"
Legal BEFORE THE BO
CLINICAL LABOR

Notices PERSONNEL
BEFORE THE BOAR
NOTICE OF ACTION Clinical Laboratory Pi
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE IN RE: The license ti
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT laboratory pe
OF THE SIXTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Eleanor Tiemey
2004 67th Avenue No
IN AND FOR St. Petersburg, Florida
PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2006-259
CASE NO.: 07-8093-FD-23 LICENSENO.: 2101

Judy Ann Robbins, The Department
Petitioner has filed an Admi
and Complaint against yo
Gary Lynn Wetter, of which may be ob
Respondent contacting, Ellen M
Assistant General
To: Gary Lynn Wetter 6500 Prosecution Servic,
Bear Creek Rd. Garden Valley, 4052 Bald Cypress
CA #C65, Tallahassee
32399-3265, (850) 24
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that If no contact
an action has been filed against made by you conce
you and that you are required to above by JUNE 22,
serve a copy of your written matter of the Admi
defenses, if any, to it on Judy Complaint will be pr
Ann Robbins, whose address is an ensuing meeting
2363 Mary LN, Clearwater. FL Board of Clinical L
33763 on or before August 17, Personnel in an info
2007 and file the original with cceding.
the Clerk of this Court at 315 ,n accordance
Court Street, Clearwater, FL Americans with Di
33756 before service on the Act, persons needing
Petitioner or shortly thereafter, accommodation to i
If you fail to do so, default may in this proceeding sh
be entered against you for the tact the individual c
relief demanded in the petition, sending this notice
Copies of all court docu- than seven days pri,
ments in this case, including proceeding at the add
orders, are available at the Clerk on the notice. Telephi
of the Circuit Court's office. 245-4640, 1-
You may review these docu- 8771(TDD) or 1-
ments upon request. 8770(V), via Florii
You must keep the Clerk of Service.
the Circuit Court's office noti- 16788 An, 310 17 24
fled of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme NOTICETO CREE
Court Approved Family Law IN THE CRCUIT
Form 12.915.) Future papers in FOR PINELLAS C
this lawsuit will be mailed to the FLORIDA;
address on record at the clerk's PROBATE DIVIS
office. UCN:
WARNING: Rule 12.285, 522007CP002875X
Florida Family Law Rules of FieNo 07-287
Procedure, requires certain Division 004
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure IN RE; ESTATE OF
to comply can result in sanc- WALTERCHARLES
tions, including dismissal or RAGSDALE,
striking of pleadings. Deceased.
Dated: This 17th Day of
July, 2007. The administration of
Ken Burke of Walter Charles Rag
Clerk of the Circuit Court deceased, whose date
By: /s/ KIM FREIJIA was April 11, 2007, am
xxxxnl 2 2 2.27.AGl3 10i rri7203 Social Security Numb
34-3153; Reference N
NOTICE OF ACTION 07-2875-ES-004 is p
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT the Circuit Court for I
OF THE SIXTH County, Florida, Prob;
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, Division, the address
IN AND FOR is 315 Court Street, C
PINELLAS COUNTY, Florida 33756. The na
FLORIDA addresses of the person
CASE NO.: 07-8879FD-23 sentative and the pers
resentative's attorney
CRISTINA COX, forth below.
Petitioner, All creditors of the de
and other persons hav
and claims or demands ag
decedent's estate on w
JOHN DUVAL COX, copy of this notice is
Respondent, to be served must file
claims with this court
TO: John Duval Cox THE LATER OF THI
Unknown address MONTHS AFTER TI
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an OF THE FIRST PUBL
action for Dissolution of 'TION OF THIS NOT
Marriage, including claims for THIRTY (30) DAYS
dissolution of marriage, pay- THE DATE OF SERV
ment of debts, division of real A COPY OF THIS Ni
and personal property, and for ON THEM.
payments of support, has been All other creditors of
filed t you. You are required to dent and other person
serve a copy of your written claims or demands ag
defenses, if any, to this action o decedent's estate musl
Anett Lopez, Esq., Petitioner's claims with this court
attorney, whose address is 4620 THREE (3) MONTHS
Professional Loop, New Port THE DATE OF THE
Richey, FL 34652, on or before PUBLICATION OF T
August 31, 2003 and file the NOTICE.
original with the clerk of this ALL CLAIMS NOT
court at PINELLAS County FILED WILL BE FOR
Courthouse, 315 Court Street, BARRED.
Clearwater, Florida 33756, NOTWITHSTANDIN
either before service on TIME PERIOD SET i
Petitioner's attorney or imme- ABOVE, ANY CLAI
diately thereafter; otherwise a TWO (2) YEARS OR
default will be entered against AFTER THE DECED
you for the relief demanded in DATE OF DEATH IS
the petition, BARRED.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, The date of the first p
Florida Family Law Rules of of this Notice is
Procedure, requires certain August 3, 2007
automatic disclosure of docu- Personal Representat
ments and information. Failure Charles
to comply can result in sanec- 215 20
tions, including dismissal or Indian Rocks Beach,
striking of pleadings. Attorney for Personal
DATED this 31 st day of July Representative:'
2007. t.lmpe I .hn,.n II


KEN BURKE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
315 CourtStreet
Clearwater, FL 33756 -5165
By: /s/ LINDA PREIATO
Deputy Clerk


Florida Bar No. 0061(
Brian E. Johnson. P.A
7190 Seminole Boule
Seminole, Florida 331
Telephone; (727) 39
1(1570 A' 3 102107


,10705Ani'3 10 17242007080310
NOTICE OF ACTION AND OF
PETITION AND HEARING
TO TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS
PENDING ADOPTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR ORANGE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: DR07-8779


TION
ARD OF
ATORY
L
RD OF
personnel

o clinical
rsonnel


rth
i 33702

'35


of Health
nistrative
lu. a copy
gained by
. Simon,
Counsel.
es Unit,
Way. Bin
Florida
5-4640.
has been
mring the
2007, the
inistrative
resented at
g of the
laboratoryy
rmal pro-

with the
disabilities
a special
participate
would con-
or agency
not later
or to the
ress given
ne: (850)
.800-955-
-800-955-
da Relay

I1M7 083'4c

1ITORS
COURT
COUNTY,

SION

XESXX
5-ES







the estate
gsdale,
of death
nd whose
ler is 026-
lumber
lending in
Pinellas
ate
of which
learwater,
ames and
final repre-
onal rep-
are set

cedent
ing
ainst
homr a
required
their
WITHIN
REE (3)
HE TIME
LICA-
ICE OR
AFTER
'ICE OF
NOTICE

the dece-
s having
ainst the
t file their
WITHIN
S AFTER
FIRST
'HIS

SO
REVER

G THE
FORTH
M FILED
MORE
tENT'S


publication


ive:Arthur
s Ragsdale
th Avenue
FL 33785



521
k.
vard.
'72
1-9756
080311


IN THE MATTER OF THE
TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS FOR THE
PROPOSED ADOPTION OF A
MINOR CHILD.

TO: Tammie L. Adams a/k/a
Tammie L. Barber
ADDRESS UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to terminate your
parental rights has been filed against you in the above-captioned
matter, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on Petitioners' Attorney, Patricia L. Strowbridge,
whose address is 1516 E. Colonial Dr., Suite 202, Orlando, FL
32803, on or before Thursday, August 23, 2007, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this court at 425 N. Orange Ave., Rm. 320,
Orlando, FL 32801, either before service on the Petitioners'
Attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
There will be a hearing on the petition to terminate parental
rights pending adoption on Thursday, August 23, 2007 at 9:00 a.m.
before Hon. Thomas B. Smith at Orange County Courthouse. 425
N. Orange Ave., Court Room 16G, Orlando, FL.
UNDER SECTION 63.089, FLORIDA STATUTES, FAIL-
URE TO FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THIS NOTICE
WITH THE COURT OR TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING
CONSTITUTES GROUNDS UPON WHICH THE COURT
SHALL END OR TERMINATE ANY PARENTAL RIGHTS
YOU MAY HAVE REGARDING THE MINOR.
In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT. if you are a person with a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please
contact the COURT ADMINISTRATION, at 42S North Orange
Avenue. Room 2130, Orlando, Florida 32801, telephone (407)
836.2303, within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice; if
you are hearing impaired, call (TDD) 1-800-955-8771; if you are
.voice impaired, cell VOICE (v) 1-800-955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and seal this 18th day of July, 2007.
By: Deputy Clerk
LYDIA GARDNER
ORANGE COUNTY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
XXXXX Jul 20, 27, Aug 3.10. 2007 072001c


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
REF: 07-4210-ES4

IN RE: JUDITH A. REED,
Deceased.
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
The administration of the
Estate of LYNDA CAVE,
deceased, whose date of death
was February 18, 2007, File
Number 07-001410, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is Pinellas County Courthouse,
315 Court Street, Clearwater,
FL. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and that of the the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
ESTATE IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is August 10th,
2007.
Personal Representative:
Julian A. Cave
15815 Guk Boulevard
Redington Beach, FL 33708
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John L. Green, Jr. of
THE LAW OFFICE
OF JOHN L. GREEN, JR.
3637 Fourth Steet North,
Suite 410
St. Petersburg, FL 33704
Telephone: (727) 821-6550
Florida Bar No. 0031195
SPN 00041568
xxxxx A- 1017 W 081001


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 07-0851
Division No.: ES-3
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ARTHUR WINSTON,
Deceased.
The administration of the
estate of ARTHUR WINSTON,
deceased, whose date of death
was January 22, 2007, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
Pinellas County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 315 Court Street,
Clearwater, FL 33756. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and the
personal representatives' attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required
to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is Friday
August 3, 2007.

Personal Representatives:
Andrew E. Winston
56 Castle Harbor Isle
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33308-6012

Gail N. Weinsheimer
7506 Linda Lane
Panama City, Florida 32404-
8555
Attorney for
Personal Representatives:
Linda S. Griffin, Esquire
Attorney for
Andrew E. Winston
Florida Bar No. 0371971
Linda Suzzanne Griffin, P.A.
1455 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756
Telephone: (727) 449-9800
13115 Aug.3,10.2007 080316


NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL TOBACCO,
FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES
CASE NO. 8:03-cr-489-T-17MSS

UNITED STATES
V.
AKBAR NOORANI


Notice is hereby given that on November 24, 2004, in the case
of United States v. Akhar Noorani. Case No. 8:03-cr-489-T-
17MSS, the United States District Court for the Middle District of
Florida entered an order condemning and forfeiting to the United
States of America the interest of Akbar Noorani in the following:

a. The real property located at 506 Canal Street
W., Mulberry. Florida 33860, for which the
United States has received S202,978.77, which
is legally described as:

SUBDIVISION: CRIGLER L N ADD, PB 1,
PG 43; SEC/TWN/RNG/MERIDIAN: SEC
11, TWN 30S, RNG 23E; CRIGLER L N ADD
PB 1. PG 43, BLK A LOT IN 100 FT. & LOT
2 LESS HWY R/W & LOT 3 NI/2.

Parcel Identification
Number: 233011156000007010;

b. $217,289.72 USD seized from Akbar Noorani;

Pursuant to the foregoing Preliminary Order of Forfeiture hav-
ing been entered on November 24, 2004, the United States hereby
gives notice of its intention to dispose of the forfeited property in
such manner as the United States Attorney General may direct.
Any person having or claiming a legal interest in the said proper-
ty must file a petition within thirty (30) days of the final publica-
tion of this notice pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 853(n). The petition shall
be signed by the petitioner under penalty of perjury and shall set
forth the nature and extent of the petitioner's right, title or interest
in the forfeited property, the time and circumstances of the peti-
tioner's acquisition of the right, title or interest in each, and addi-
tional facts supporting the petitioner's claim, and the relief sought.
A copy of any such petition should be served on JAMES R.
KLINDT, Acting United States Attorney for the Middle District of
Florida, 400 N. Tampa Street, Suite 3200, Tampa, Florida 33602,
Attn; Adelaide G. Few, Assistant United States Attorney.


DEPARTMENT OF J
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL TO
FIREARMS AND EXPL

AIG 3 10n 17. 2007


1100nn


NOTICE OFA
NOTICE TO CREDITORS FOR DISSOF
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY, IN THE RC
FLORIDA OF THE S
PROBATE DIVISION JUDICIAL C
FILE NO.: 07-5002-ES4 IN AND I
IN RE: ESTATE OFINELLAS C
ELAINE N. SOUTHARD, FLORII
Deceased.
Deceased. CASE NO.: 0700
The administration of the
estate of Elaine N. Southard, lida Marie Duch
deceased, whose date of death
was July 10, 2007, and whose Peoner
Social Sdcurity Number is 287- and
14-9205 is pending in the GavinredBosse,
Circuit Court for Pinellas in ed osse
County, Florida, Probate Respondent
Division, the address of which To: Gavin Fred B
is 315 Court Street, Address Unkn
Address Unko
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165.
The names and addresses of the YOU AR N
personal representative and the an action has been
personal representative's attor- an
ney are set forth below. you and at you a
All creditors of the dece- defenses, if any,
dent and other persons having Marie Duchene ,
claims or demands against address is 4232 Bu
decedent's estate on whom a N, St Petersburg,
copy of this notice is required or st
to be served must file their file the original
claims with this court WITHIN of this Court a
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS Street, Cewate
AFTER THE TIME OF THE bere service on
FIRST PUBLICATION OF borrtly there
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS to do so, default m
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV- to do st default
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS against you tfo
NOTICE ONTHEM. demanded in the p
NOTICE ON' THEM. Copies of all
All other creditors of the Copies of a
ments in this ca
decedent and other persons orders, are available
having claims or demands of the Circuit C
against decedent's estate on You may review
whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file m ets uon reue
their claims with this court th C uit urt'
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER he Crcut ourt
fled of your cur
THE DATE OF THE FIRST ed yourcur
PUBLICATION OF THIS (You may file Not
LICA O T Address, Florid
NOTICE. Court Approved
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO 12.915.) Fut
Form 12.915.) Fut
FILED WILL BE FOREVER this lawsuit will be
NBARRED.address on record
NOTWITHSTANDING office
THE TIME PERIODS SET
WARNING:
FORTH ABOVE, ANY Florida Family L
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Procedure, requ
YEARS OR MORE AFTER automatic dilosu
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF automatic disclose
DEATH IS BARRED. ments and inform
DEATH IS BARRED.
to comply can re
The date of first publica-tions including
tion of this notice is Friday striking ofpleadin
striking of pleadin
August 3. 2007. Date: July 27,

Personal Representatives:
Thomas N. Southard Clerk of the
P e r s C le r k o f th e
423 Fox Chapel Road 31.
Pittsburgh, PA 15238 Clearwater, FL
By: /s/ LINI
Attorney for As
Personal Representative: xxxxx AI G3 1017s
John E.M. Ellis
Florida Bar No. 0022486
Ellis & Bradley
P.O. Box 356
St. Petersburg, FL 33731-0356
Telephone: (727) 822-3929
xxxxx Aug.3.10.2007 080.321


JUSTICE
BACCO,
.OSIVES

080306


ACTION
ITION OF
AGE
IT COURT
IXTH
IRCUIT
FOR
COUNTY,
DA
8677FD-009


ene Bosse,






osse
known

NOTIFIED that
Sailed against
re required to
your written
o it on Alida
Bosse, whose
irlington Ave.
FL 33713 on
31, 2007 and
'ith the Clerk
t 315 Court
r, FL 33756
the Petitioner
er. If you fail
lay be entered
Sthe relief
petition.
court docu-
se, including
le at the Clerk
court's office.
these docu-
it.
p the Clerk of
s office noti-
rent address.
ice of Current
la Supreme
Family Law
ture papers in
Smiled to the
at the clerk's

Rule 12.285,
aw Rules of
ires certain
ure of docu-
ation. Failure
result in sanc-
dismissal or
gs.
2007

Ken Burke
Circuit Court
5 Court Street
L33756-5165
DA PREIATO
Deputy Clerk
42(4.7 0 0302


NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That Pursuant to an Execution
issued in the Circuit Court of Pinellas County, Florida, on the 1st
day of June 2007, in the cause wherein Grace Malouf and Sihani
Malouf (by Assignment of Judgment to Lloyd Demers ind. and
dba L R Demers and Associates, recorded in O.R. Book 15596,
Page 174, Public Records of Pinellas County, Florida) was plain-
tiff and Zauher Karim aka Zauher Karim-Mahalati and Amin
Laiji were defendants, being Case No. 01-005970-CI-008 in the
said Court, I, Jim Coats, as Sheriff of Pinellas County, Florida,
have levied upon all right, title and interest of the above named
defendant, Zauher Karim aka Zauher Karim-Mahalati, in and to
the following described real property located and situate In
Pinellas County, Florida, to-wit:

1625 Golfview Drive, Belleair, Florida aka A Tract of
Land included in the Plat of the Pelican Golf Course, as
recorded in Plat Book 53, page(s) 45 and 46 of the public
records of Pinellas County, Florida (and Lying in the
Southwest 1/4 of Section 28, Township 29 South, Range
15 East) Described as follows: Begin at the Northeast
intersection of Althea Road and Golf View Drive as shown
on said Plat of the Pelican Golf Course and run thence
Southerly along the easterly boundary of said golf View
Drive a distance of 530.00 feet for a Point of Beginning;
and from the Point of beginning thus established, continue
Southerly along the Easterly boundary of said Golf View
Drive a distance of 120.00 feet; run thence South 64 42'
17' East a distance of 125.00 feet; run thence North 04 44'
21" East a distance of 128.16 feet; run thence 64 42' 17'
West a distance of 80.00 feet to the established Point of
Beginning. Property Appraiser's Parcel Number:
28/29/15/68274/000/0005

And on the 5th day of September, 2007, directly in front of the
door with the number 140, at the Sheriffs Administration
Building, 10750 Ulmerton Road in the City of Largo, Pinellas
County, Florida, at the hour of 11.00 a.m., or as soon thereafter
as possible, I will offer for sale all of the said defendant's,
Zauher Karim aka Zauher Karim-Mahalati, right, title and inter-
est in the aforesaid real property at public outcry and will sell the
same, subject to all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if
any as provided by law, to the highest and best bidder or bidders
for CASH, the proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the
payment of costs and the satisfaction of the described Execution.
JIM COATS, Sheriff
Pinellas County, Florida

By: K. W. Somers, Sergeant
Civil Section


C F Arnold
1701 Dr MLK St No
St Petersburg FL 33704
15017


Au. 3 10 1724


080308


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
UCN:
522007CP001410XXESXX004
REF: 07-001410-ES04

IN RE: ESTATE OF
LYNDA CAVE, also known as
LYNDA B. CAVE,
Deceased.
The administration of the
Estate of LYNDA CAVE,
deceased, whose date of death
was February 18, 2007. File
Number 07-001410, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is Pinellas County Courthouse,
315 Court Street. Clearwater.
FL. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and that of the the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent, or
unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
ESTATE IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is August 10th,
2007.
Personal Representative:
Julian A. Cave
15815 Guld Boulevard
Redington Beach, FL 33708
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John L. Green, Jr. of
THE LAW OFFICE
OF JOHN L. GREEN, JR.
3637 Fourth Steet North,
Suite 410
St. Petersburg, FL 33704
Telephone: (727) 821-6550
Florida Bar No. 0031195
SPN 00041568
xxxx All 1017W07 9810(17


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 07-4232 ES4

IN RE: ESTATE OF
DENNIS B. DORSEY A/K/A
DENNIS BASIL DORSEY
Deceased.
The administration of the
estate of Dennis B Dorsey
a/k/a Dennis Basil Dorsey,
deceased, whose date of death
was June 12th, 2007 and whose
social security number is ***-
**-****, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 315 Court Street, Clearwater.
Florida 33756. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
'decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is August 03,
2007.
Personal Representative:
Whitney National Bank
(fonnerly known as
The Trust Company of Florida)
c/o 240 Nokomis Ave. S.,
Ste. 200
VENICE, FL 34285
Attorneys for
Personal Representative
R. O. Isphording
BECHTOLD & CORBRIDGE,
PA.
240 NOKOMIS AVE S.
Suite 200
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone:(941) 488-7751
Florida Bar No. 0038740
17778 Aug 3,10,2007 080314


NOTICE OF SALE OF ABANDONED PROPERTY
Four Seasons Estates Resident Owned Community, Inc.
13225 101st Street
Largo, FL 33773

Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Florida Statute 715.109 a
public sale shall be held on August 20, 2007 at 11:00 AM at
13225 101st Street, Largo, Florida 33773 to sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the following described property:

Double wide mobile home 1978 (year) RAMA (make), VIN#
20620485AL, Title # 15938239 and VIN# 20620485BL, Title #
15938240; refrigerator, stove, china cabinet with miscellaneous
glassware, mini fridge, tv trays, desk, painting, micro wave stand,
couch, end tables, table/floor lamps, head boards, dresser/mirror,
VCR, suitcase, crucifix, exercise bike, misc. pans, garden tools,
ironing board, garbage can

The names of the former tenants are Alexander Yarin and Alla
AYarin.
xxxxx Aug. 3.10,2007 080315


NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL TOBACCO,
FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES
CASE NO. 8:03-cr-490-T-27TGW

UNITED STATES
v.

GABRIEL ASLAN and
KARAM ASLAN

Notice is hereby given that on March 17, 2006, in the case of
United States v. Gabriel Asian and Karam Asla,. Case No. 8:03-
cr-490-T-27TGW,'the United States District Court for the Middle
District of Florida entered an order condemning arid forfeiting to
the United States of America the interest of Gabriel Asian and
Karam Asian in the following:

a. The real property located at 5475 Karlsburg
Place, Palm Harbor, Florida, for which the
United States has received $65,000.00, which
is legally described as:

Lot 96, LYNNWOOD PHASE 2, according to
the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
116, Pages 23 through 26 inclusive, of the
Public Records of Pinellas County, Florida;

b. Funds in the amount of $380,350.00 seized
from the Asians; -

c. The real property located at 2351 Cobbs Way.
Palm Harbor, Florida 34684, for which the
United States has accepted $100,000.00 in lieu
of forfeiture, which is legally described as:

Lot 6 and the South 5 feet of Lot 5, THE
PINNACLE AT COBB'S LANDING,
according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 99, Pages 25 through 30, Public
Records of Pinellas County, Florida.

Parcel Identification
Number: 32-27-16-71809-000-0060;

d. The contents of Wachovia (f/k/a First Union)
bank account # 1010040261940 in the name of
Karam Asian; and

e. The contents of Wachovia Bank (f/k/a First
Union) bank account # 2000004466499 in the
name of Karam Asian D/B/A Tobacco
Discount.

Pursuant to the foregoing Preliminary Order of Forfeiture hav-
ing been entered on March 17, 2006, the United States hereby
gives notice of its intention to dispose of the forfeited property in
such manner as the United States Attorney General may direct.
Any person having or claiming a legal interest in the said proper-
ty must file a petition within thirty (30) days of the final publica-
tion of this notice pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 853 (n). The petition
shall be signed by the petitioner under penalty of perjury and shall
set forth the nature and extent of the petitioner's right, title or inter-
est in the forfeited property, the time and circumstances of the peti-
tioner's acquisition of the right, title or interest in each, and addi-
tional facts supporting the petitioner's claim, and the relief sought.
A copy of any such petition should be served on JAMES R.
KLINDT, Acting United States Attorney for the Middle District of
Florida, 400 N. Tampa Street, Suite 3200, Tampa, Florida 33602,
Attn: Adelaide G. Few, Assistant United States Attorney.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL TOBACCO,
FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES

11500 AUG 03, 10, 17, 2007 080305


NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SIXTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 07-6322-FD-17

Cheryl Lynn Hart,
Petitioner
and
Daniel Jay Hart,
Respondent

To: Daniel Jay Hart
Address Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Cheryl
Lynn Hart, whose address is
7230 4th Street N., #218, St.
Petersburg, FL 33702 on or
before August 17, 2007 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court at 315 Court Street,
Clearwater, FL 33756 before
service on the Petitioner or
shortly thereafter. If you fail to
do so, default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office.
You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings.
Dated: This 12th Day of
July, 2007

Ken Burke
Clerk of the Circuit Court
315 Court Street
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165
By: /s/ LINDA PREIATO
As Deputy Clerk
XXXXXIn 71127 AUi G31020~lt72


Legals!

Call

(727) 894-

2411


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PINELLAS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 07-2844
Division: ES4
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLARE LOUISE WEHRLE,,
Deceased.
The administration of the.
estate of Clare Louise Wehrle,
deceased, whose date of death
was January 6, 2006, File
Number 07-2844 is pending'in
the Circuit Court for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 315 Court Street,
Clearwater, FL 33756-5165.
The names and addresses of ehe
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the deee-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is requited
to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on.
whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file,
their claims with this court,
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER,
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS,
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE,
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE'
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is Friday
August 3, 2007.
Personal Representatives:
PATRICIA GRIEF
3000 Lowell Avenue
Wantagh, NY 11793.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Derek B, Alvarez, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0114278
01891073
GENDERS-ALVAREZ
A Professional Association. /
2307 West Cleveland Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Telephone: (813) 254-4744
Facsimile: (813) 254-5222
xxxxx Aug.3,10.2007 080322


CITY OF PINELLAS PARK, FLORIDA
QUASI-JUDICIAL
PUBLIC HEARING

The Board of Adjustment of the City of Pinellas Park will hold a
Quasi-Judicial Public Hearing in City Council Chambers, City
Hall, and 5141 78th Avenue North at 7:30 p.m. on August 28,
2007. The Board of Adjustment will entertain all public com-''
inent regarding any item on their agenda at this meeting. All case
tiles are available for review at the Technical Services Buildin,
6051 78th Avenue North, in the Zoning Division'

1. CASE NO.: BOA 2007-56 (QUASI-JUDICIAL) .

REQUEST: Consideration of a request for a''
vari- ance to
reduce rear yard setback for
the construction of a room addition. ,

LOCATION: 12402 68th Street

2. CASE NO.: BOA 2007-57 (QUASI-JUDICIAL)

REQUEST: Consideration of a request for a-'
vari- ance to
reduce rear yard setback for :
the construction of a screen room.

LOCATION: 5711 92nd Avenue

NOTICE .
You are invited to register your opinions either at the public
hearing or by a letter stating the reasons for your opinions.
Letters should be addressed to the Zoning Division, Post Office,
Box 1100, Pinellas Park, Florida, 33781. For more information,
please contact the Zoning Division.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the City,
Council, City Board or City Commission, with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and for such purpose, may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is made, whichrecord includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The applicant, proponents, and public should not communicate
either verbally or in writing with the members of the Board of
Adjustment regarding the matter under consideration except at,
the quasi-judicial hearing, in that this could invalidate any action
taken at the quasi-judicial hearing. Please e notethat at the quasi;
judicial hearing anyone who has standing may address the issues
at the hearing. All parties will have an opportunity to question
other speakers and be questioned by any one who is affected by
the case. Should anyone wish to question City, who reviewed the
proposed request for compliance with City Code for building,
engineering, drainage, police or fire issues, please call the Zoning
Division, at least five days prior to the hearing, so that arrange-
ments can be made to have said staff attend the meeting.
Any written communication should be received 8 days prior to
the public hearing date in order to be made a part of the record
and letters should be addressed to the Zoning Division, Post
Office Box 1100, Pinellas Park, Florida, 33780. All oral commu-
nication concerning this case is prohibited by Florida State law
unless made at the public hearing. For more information, please
contact the Zoning Division.
The City maintains a tape recording of all public hearings.
In the event that you wish to appeal a decision, the tape may or
may not adequately ensure a verbatim record.
FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED An interpreter for indi-
viduals with hearing impairment will be made available upon
requests made at least 72 hours in advance. Also, an Assistive
Hearing Device (magnifier) is available from the City Clerk for
use in Council Chambers and all meeting rooms throughout the
City. This document is available in the following accessible for-
mats: Braille, Large Print, Audio Tape, and Electronic File on
Computer Disks.
10005-2 Aug 10, 2007 081006
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that on the 21st day of August, 2007,
beginning at 6:30 P.M., a public hearing will be held by the
Board of County Commissioners in the County Commission
Assembly Room, Fifth Floor, Pinellas County Courthouse, 315
Court Street, Clearwater, Florida to consider the petition of Jane
Anderson Carr to vacate the following:

A portion of an easement on Lo( 20, Block A, Homestead
Woods Subdivision, as recorded in Plat Book 80, Pages 39
and 40, of the Public Records of Pinellas County, Florida.

Persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision,
made at this mieeting/hearing, they will need to ensure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS
ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF,
THIS NOTICE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF
HUMAN RIGHTS, 400 SOUTH FORT HARRISON AVENUE,
SUITE 500, CLEARWATER, FLORIDA 33756, (727) 464-4062
(V/TDD).

KEN BURKE, CLERK TO
THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
By: Cynthia N. Haumann, Deputy Clerk
xxxxx Aug. 10,17 20' 081003


I I


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Missing
or
Unavailable







- Page 6 Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007


Crime down at



USF Tampa

TAMPA, Fla. (Aug. 3, 2007) The number of reported crimes on
the Tampa campus of the University of South Florida dropped nearly
11% between 2005 and 2006, according to the Division of Safety
Yearly Activity Report. In 2006, there were a total of 961 crimes
reported, compared with 1077 the year before. Some of the largest
declines were in burglary reports (down from 204 reports in 2005 to
112 in 2006) and aggravated assault (down from 15 reports in 2005
to 4 in 2006).
"This is an indication of the great work by the USF Police
Department, and a trend we like to see," said Vice President of
Student Affairs Dr. Jennifer Meningall. "The safety of our students,
faculty, and staff is one of our top priorities, and we take it very seri-
ously."
USF's Tampa Campus has grown rapidly, with around
37,000 students on campus last year, and more than 10,000 faculty
and staff. The rapid growth sometimes puts a strain on the police
department, which is funded for nearly 50 officers. The USF Police
Department is a fully accredited law enforcement agency, meeting or
exceeding over 200 standards of excellence set by the Commission
for Law Enforcement Accreditation. USF is one of over 100 law
enforcement agencies in the state to meet these strict standards.
"The need for greater security was driven home to colleges and
universities across the nation on April 16, in the tragedy at Virginia
Tech," said Dr. Meningall. "We're working to fill some of the vacan-
cies on the force, and we're discussing other proposals to beef up
security on campus."


NASA Conducting


Undersea Mission;


Underwater


"Moonwalks"
Three astronauts and a Constellation Program aerospace engineer
Began a 10-day NASA mission in the ocean depths off the Florida
Coast Aug. 6. They will test lunar exploration concepts and a suite of
long-duration spaceflight medical objectives.
Veteran space flyer and aquanaut Nicholas Patrick is leading the
undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory. NASA
Astronaut Richard Arnold, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
(JAXA) Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa and systems integration engi-
neer Christopher Gerty complete the crew.
During the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations 13
(NEEMO 13), the crew are conducting a variety of undersea "moon
,walks" to test concepts for future lunar exploration using advanced
navigation and communication equipment:
"This crew will work much more independently from the mission
. control team than on previous, missions," said NEEMO Project
Manager Bill 'Todd of the United Space Alliance at NASA's Johnson
SSpace Center in Houston. "This autonomous mode of operation will
encourage the crew to make real-time decisions about daily opera-
tions similar to what we think will be necessary for lunar and Mars
missions. The idea is to show how procedures and training for future
missions can be adapted, considering the reduced direct communica-
,tion with Mission Control those crews will encounter."

-;u .
".* ,
..; .,~ ~_ .7.:- ..,.,, . .r ,,: 1


By: April Frawley Birdwell, UF
GAINESVILLE -A parent's struggle with stress or depression
can lower a child's quality of life and it could hinder an over-
weight youngster's attempts to lose weight, too, University of Florida
researchers say.
Parent distress, peer bullying and childhood depression can pro-
pel a cycle that makes it more difficult for children to adopt healthi-
er lifestyles, UF researchers report in the current issue of the journal
Obesity.
Understanding more about factors that affect an overweight
child's well-being could help health-care professionals better treat
these kids, said David Janicke, a UF assistant professor of clinical
and health psychology in the College of Public Health and Health
Professions and the lead author of the study.
Tending to the needs of distressed parents could be one of the
best ways to help children, Janicke said. Having supportive parents is
vital for children to be able to make the lifestyle changes needed to
lose weight. Often, children only have access to food at home, so
what a parent puts on the table usually determines what the child
eats, Janicke said. Also, the behaviors a parent models affect the
lifestyle choices a child makes, too.
When parents are struggling, they may have less energy and not
be able to provide the emotional support an overweight child needs
or help organize play dates and exercise activities, Janicke said.
"Looking at how parents are doing themselves, how they are
doing socially and emotionally and how they are coping with the
stresses in their lives, is really important too," Janicke said. "It's
important for them to take time out to take care of themselves."
More than 33 percent of children and adolescents in the United
States are overweight or obese, according to the National Center for
Health Statistics. Prior studies conducted elsewhere have shown that
overweight children have a poorer quality of life than normal-weight
peers. UF's study is one of the first to examine how factors such as
parent distress, depression and bullying affect a child's well-being,
giving researchers a better understanding of how to help overweight
children.


Above: NEEMO 12 crewmembers pose for a group photo at
their undersea habitat as they begin the 12th NASA Extreme
Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission. From the
left are astronaut/aquanaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper
(commander), astronaut/aquanaut Jose M. Hernandez, NASA
flight surgeon Josef F. Schmid and Dr. Timothy J. Broderick of
the University of Cincinnati. Habitat technicians James Talacek
and Dominic Landucci can be seen through the port in the
background. The crew is spending 12 days, May 7-18, on an
undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater
Laboratory, which is operated by the University of North
Carolina at Wilmington and located off the coast of Key Largo,
Florida. Photo Courtesy of NASA.


Left: Astronaut/aquanaut Jose M. Hernandez (right) and
NEEMO instructor Mark "Otter" Hulsbeck shake hands during
an undersea training session for the NASA Extreme
Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. NASA
flight surgeon/aquanaut Josef F. Schmid looks on. The NEEMC
12 crew is spending 12 days, May 7-18, on an. undersea
mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration's (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory.
Photo Courtesy of NASA.


. .


UF, French Scientists Seek Test to Detect Ge


GAINESVILLE Gene doping has the potential to spawn ath-
letes capable of out-running, out-jumping and out-cycling the
strongest of champions. But research under way at the University of
Florida could help level the playing field by detecting the first cases
of gene doping in professional athletes before the practice enters the
mainstream.
In the wake of recent Tour de France drug'violations and with
the 2008 Olympics looming the need to stay ahead of the game has
never been more evident. That's why the Montreal-based World
Anti-Doping Agency, or WADA, charged with monitoring the con-
duct of athletes, is working with investigators around the globe to
develop a test that would bust competitors for injecting themselves
with genetic material capable of enhancing muscle mass or height-
ening endurance.
"If an athlete injects himself in the muscle with DNA, would we
Sbe able to detect that?" asked one of France's leading gene therapy
researchers, Dr. Philippe Moullier, an adjunct professor of microbi-
ology and molecular genetics at UF and director of the Gene Therapy
Laboratory at the Universite de Nantes in France.
Right now the answer is no, he said. But the UF scientists are
among several groups collaborating with national and global anti-
doping organizations to develop a test that could detect evidence of
"doped" DNA.
"WADA has had a research program in place for some years
now, to try to develop tests for gene-based doping," said Dr.
Theodore Friedmann, head of the agency's panel on genetic doping
and director of the gene therapy program at the University of
California, San Diego.


It sounds futuristic, but experts say it's only a matter of time.
Unscrupulous athletes began showing an interest in gene doping in
2004, when the first reports of muscle-boosting therapies in mice
were published by University of Pennsylvania researchers.
Since then, several potential targets of gene doping have
emerged, including the gene for erythropoietin, or EPO. A bioengi-
neered version of the hormone, currently on the market, increases red
blood cell production in patients with anemia and boosts oxygen
delivery to the body, In athletes, this translates to enhanced stamina
and a competitive edge. But because synthetic hormones such as
EPO are prohibited by WADA and readily detected through drug
tests, performance-driven athletes have begun searching for stealthi-
er and more powerful alternatives.
"The next variation of boosting red blood cell production is to
actually inject the EPO gene itself, which would cause increases in
red blood cells," said Richard Snyder, an assistant professor of
microbiology and molecular genetics at UF and director of UF's
Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology. "So
the idea is to develop a test that could detect the gene that's admin-
istered."
The task isn't easy the researchers are faced with a myriad of
uncertainties, such as which tissues in the body to sample and how
to distinguish a "doped" gene from a naturally occurring form of the
gene. Ultimately, the test will compare how many copies of the EPO
gene are found in an athlete's body to levels found in the average per-
son who has not been doping.
"Our research aims to develop the ability to detect gene doping,
primarily in athletes. But it has a wider purpose, and that's to under-
stand how gene therapies are disseminated throughout the body,"


UF researchers surveyed 96 overweight or obese children and
their parents, comparing how bullying, depression and parents' well-
being related to each child's quality of life. The researchers looked at
a combination of factors, namely health, emotional well-being, aca-
demic performance and social status.
Children whose parents were struggling or who reported more
problems with peers tended to have a lower overall score for quality
of life. Both bullying and parent distress were linked to more depres-
sive symptoms in children, and these symptoms seemed to be related
to poorer quality of life.
"One of the pathways to poor quality of life seems to be child-
hood depression," Janicke said. "If a parent is distressed, that seems
to impact a child's symptoms of depression, which then impacts
quality of life. It's the same with peer victimization. It impacts
depression, which then impacts quality of life. And it seems to affect
not just the emotional aspect of quality of life, but also their health
status."
Talking about quality of life and problems such as bullying also
helps clinicians encourage children to confront their weight problem,
said Meg Zeller, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University
of Cincinnati and a psychologist with the Cincinnati Children's
Hospital Medical Center. Often, fears of developing type 2 diabetes
or cardiovascular disease don't motivate children, but factors such as
bullying do, she said.
"It gives a kid language to be able to talk about what it would
mean to them to be able to make lifestyle changes," she said, adding
that Janicke's research helps advance researchers' understanding" of
factors that affect a child's quality of life.
Addressing emotional and psychological issues is a key part of
helping kids manage their weight, Janicke said. Aside from helping
kids open up about making healthier lifestyle choices, psychologists
also can help children deal with depression and teach coping strate-
gies for peer bullying.
"Sometimes it's hard to change peer interactions, but just giving
the child an ear can be very powerful,': Janicke said. "Helping parents
take care of themselves and be effective listeners is a starting point."

Galaxy, Continued from Page 3
[TusoIn, A-711.. to co1nt11m i tht ihe four g.ala\ie, J re inltelt\\ ined. arid
NASA'., Chandra X-ra\, Obse,.jt'ir\ i.:, \\eigh the mais -Io the giant
cluster of giala.ies in which the mirerigel \V., Jisdco\ered Bolh Spifzer
and tecle.cope kno\i n a \\ IYN at Kitt Peak. also neil TuL son. Xnz
\v.eie uJed to stld\ the plume \\IYN i., named matter the Lini'.erity of
\\'i onsin. India.iI Liiti ,ni'tl \ Y.,le iniu crmi \ a.nd the National
Optical A.-liitnlnm Ob()heitatr,. which h ,ci'.mi nd opeIate the iele-
cope


One of the biggest galaxy collisions ever observed is taking place at
the center of this image. The four blobs in the middle are large galaxies
that have begun to tangle and ultimately merge into a single gargantuan
galaxy.
The cloud around the colliding galaxies contains billions of stars
tossed out during the messy encounter. Other galaxies and stars appear
in yellow and orange hues.
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted the four-way collision, or
merger, in a giant cluster of galaxies, called CL0958+4702, located
nearly five billion light-years away. The dots in the picture are a
combination of galaxies in the cluster; background galaxies located
behind the cluster; and foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

ne Doping in Athletes

added Snyder, whose research stemmed from a cooperative agree-
ment between the UF Genetics Institute and two biomedical research
organizations in France: INSERM, the French version of the
National Institutes of Health, and the French national blood bank,
Etablissement Francais du Sang Pays de Loire. The agreement
allows Snyder and Moullier to pool their expertise and resources.
A major objective of the UF-French collaboration is to decipher
the structure of AAV, a virus commonly used to deliver genes into the
body for therapeutic purposes. Gene "doping" would enter the body
through a similar route, but scientists say the two procedures are as
different as night and day from a therapeutic standpoint.
"When you use the phrase 'gene therapy' it should be very clear
that you're talking about therapy," Friedmann emphasized. "But the
same process of transferring genes would also be relevant in sport
doping settings. And there you cannot talk about gene 'therapy' -
you can simply refer to the same technology as gene 'transfer."'
Gene therapy has progressed in leaps and bounds over the years,
but the field has proved anything but predictable. Scientists say gene
doping will be no different. Current technologies could prove inef-
fective or even lethal in humans. When the EPO gene was first
introduced into macaques, for example, the animals produced so
many red blood cells that their veins clogged, and many eventually
died after developing massive allergic responses to the therapy.
"I think many athletes know of the technology. They're aware
and they're concerned. WADA's aware and concerned." Friedmann
said. "One can overestimate the urgency, or one can be sort of blind
to it. But the technology is relatively straightforward and people
involved in gene therapy studies could very well see how it could be
applied to sport doping."


A Parent's Depression can Weigh



Heavily on Children














By Susan Ray
A collaboration between the National Higi
Laboratory at Florida State University and
SuperPower Inc. has led to a new world record fc
created by a superconducting magnet.
The new record-26.8 tesla-was reached i
magnet lab's High Field Test Facility and brings
engineers closer to realizing the National
Research Council goal of creating a 30-tesla
superconducting magnet. The development of
such a magnet could lead to great advances in
physics, biology and chemistry research, as well
as significant reductions in the operating costs of
many high-field magnets.
The world-record magnet's test coil was
wound by Schenectady, N.Y.-based SuperPower
(www.superpower-inc.com) with a well-known,
high-temperature superconductor called yttrium
barium copper oxide, or YBCO. SuperPower
develops superconductors such as YBCO and
related technologies for the electric power indus-
try. The magnet lab's Applied Superconductivity
Center has worked with the company to deter-
mine the superconducting and mechanical proper
other materials.
"This test demonstrates what we had long hi
high-temperature superconductors being made nov
ty applications also have great potential for high-m
nology," said David Larbalestier, director
Superconductivity Center and chief materials scier
lab.


Phoenix Heads for


Spacecraft Hea


h Magnetic Field
industry partner
)r a magnetic field

n late July at the



WI


"It seems likely that this conductor technology can be used to
make all-superconducting magnets with fields that will soon exceed
30 tesla. This far exceeds the 22- to 23-tesla limit of all previous nio-
bium-based superconducting magnets." (Niobium is the material
used to build most superconducting magnets.)
Venkat Selvamanickam, vice president and chief technology
officer at SuperPower, said the YBCO wire's
Potential for application outside the electric
power industry has long been in the company's
sights.


"We are encouraged by the results of these
tests at the magnet lab and look forward to con-
tinuing our collaboration to more completely
explore the additional
possibilities in high field applications,"
Selvamanickam said.
Scientists have been aware of the amazing
properties of YBCO and its potential for magnet
technology for 20 years, but only in the past two
y\ ears has the material become commercially
available in the long lengths needed for magnets.
Scientists at the magnet lab are interested in the
David Larbalestier Photo Courtesy of FSU material because at very low temperatures, the
ties of YBCO and conductor is capable of generating very high magnetic fields.
"In principle, YBCO is capable of producing the highest-field
oped-that YBCO superconducting magnets ever possible," said W. Denis Markiewicz,
w for electric Vtili- a scientist in the lab's Magnet Science & Technology division. Based
iagnetic-field tech- on the potential of the material, he said, it's even possible that it could
of the Applied one day produce magnetic fields as high as 50 tesla.
ntist at the magnet "What we learned from this test really opens the door to imagin-
ing that one day we could use superconducting magnets in place of
our resistive magnets," he.said.
M ars Resistive magnets, primarily used for physics research, are more
ars, costly to operate because they are powered by tremendous amounts
of electricity, while superconducting magnets require little or no elec-
1h trical power to run once they are brought up to full field. The magnet
1 lab's annual utility costs to run the magnets are close to $4 million,
and the lab consumes 10 percent of the city of Tallahassee's generat-
ing capacity.

Fish and Wildlife Seeks

Comments, Announces Public

Workshop for Bald Eagle Plan

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
Monday requested public comment about a revised draft bald eagle
management plan and announced a public workshop later this month
to review and discuss issues related to the plan.
The public workshop will be from 5:30-7 p.m. on Aug. 22 at the
FWC Northeast Regional Office, 1239 S.W. 10th St., Ocala. For a
copy of the agenda, contact Robin Boughton, FWC, 1239 S.W. 10th
St., Ocala, FL 34471-0323 or call (352) 732-1225.
The public may participate in the workshop from Tallahassee via
,video conference at the Farris Bryant Building, 620 S. Meridian St.,
Room 272.
Anyone requiring special accommodations to participate should
advise the FWC at least five days before the workshop by contacting
Cindy Hoffman at (850) 488-6411. If you are hearing- or speech-
impaired, contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service: 1-800-
955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (voice).
This second comment period ends Sept. 14 when the
Commission meets in St. Petersburg. Commissioners will hear pub-
lic comment at the September meeting and again at the December
meeting, but no formal action will take place before the December
meeting.
The revised draft management plan is available online at
MyFWC.com in the "Quick Clicks" area.


New World Record for Superconducting


Magnet Set at FSU


Phoenix Heads for Mars, Spacecraft Healthy
*, -A Delta II rocket lit up the early morning sky over Cape Canaveral
A" Air Force Station in Florida as it carried the Phoenix spacecraft on the
first leg of its journey to Mars. The powerful three-stage rocket with
-nine solid rocket motors lifted off on Friday, August 3rd at 5:26 a.m.
E..DT.
The Phoenix spacecraft has separated from the Delta II rocket
and ground controllers at NASA's Deep Space Network have
acquired its signal and begun assessing its health. The solar panels
that will power the mission's cruise phase will be deployed and
Phoenix will be pointed to best receive solar power and communicate
With Earth
The spacecraft has oriented itself to the sun as it was pro-
grammed to do. It will use solar panels to generate electricity during
,- the nine-month coast to Mars. A separate set of solar arrays is
.attached to the lander itself.
The Phoenix Mars lander's assignment is to dig through the
-Martian soil and ice in the arctic region and use its onboard scientif-
ic instruments to analyze the samples it retrieves.
Photo Courtesy of NASA

NASA Announces Web


Coverage of Next Space


Shuttle Mission

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. A prelaunch webcast, live blogs,
podcasts, pictures and videos highlight NASA's Web coverage of
space shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission to the International
Space Station. NASA will provide ongoing updates online at:
A live webcast featuring astronaut Joan Higginbotham, who flew
aboard space shuttle Discovery in December 2006, started the in-
depth coverage of the mission at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Aug. 7.
A blog will update the countdown continuously, beginning about
six hours before Endeavour is scheduled to lift off on Aug. 8 at 6:36
p.m. Originating from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the
blog is the definitive Internet source for information leading up to
Launch.
During the 11-day mission, Endeavour's crew of seven astronauts
will conduct at least three spacewalks. They will install new station
components, replace one of the outpost's attitude control gyroscopes,
deliver 5,000 pounds of supplies and add a segment to the right side
of the station's backbone, or truss. Visitors to NASA's shuttle Web
site can read about the crew's progress and watch the spacewalks,
which will be broadcast live from the space station. The NASA blog
also will detail Endeavour's landing at the conclusion of the mission.


GAINESVILLE The age-old debate
of nature versus nurture has a new twist:
Scientists say the two N's may be so
entwined that their influence on our genes
combines to shape our health and develop-
ment in ways we never imagined.
Now a new epigenetics research consor-
tium at the University of Florida is seeking to
understand how our environment tips the
genetic balance toward cancer and a host of
other all-too-familiar diseases.
We're born with a certain set of genes,
but UF scientists say our surroundings -
even the level of nurturing from our mothers
- can modify how those genes act through-
out our adult life. Nurturing can alter the way
we're programmed to behave and even our
susceptibility to disease, all without, chang-
ing a single letter in our genetic alphabet.
This phenomenon is called "epigenetics" -
literally, "above genetics."
Scientists are finding increasing evi-
dence of a second code of instructions, clev-
erly disguised as a protein coat superim-
posed over our genes, said Thomas Yang,
director of UF's Center for Mammalian
Genetics and a professor of biochemistry and
molecular biology in the College of
Medicine. Yang helped launch the program,
which has recruited five top-ranked scientists
from the National Cancer Institute, Harvard
Medical School, Texas A&M University,
Louisiana State University and the National
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases. The researchers are cur-
rently applying for federal funds to support
graduate student and postdoctoral training
programs.
"The genetic code basically tells the cell
what proteins to make, but it doesn't tell the
cell when to make them," Yang said. "There


is an emerging concept that there is a second
code of instructions that tells the genetic
code when and where to do its thing."
Yang explains that the genetic code isn't
enough to distinguish between a caterpillar
and a butterfly, two creatures that share the
same genes. The impetus that prompts a
caterpillar to morph into a butterfly stems
from none other than the mysterious epige-
netic code.
How does it work? Certain traits are
hardwired into our systems, such as brown
eyes or height, but other things may depend
on how our bodies respond to the environ-
ment. Hormones, toxins and even the foods
your mother ate while you were in the womb
can tweak the protein coat that surrounds
your DNA. Scientists suspect the slightest
alteration in this coat can turn a gene on or
off, shaping things such as personality, sexu-
al preferences and even your risk for cancer.
"The person on the street has been told
about sequencing the human genome and
how.important that is to the identification of
disease and development of new drugs," said
Michael Kilberg, a professor of biochemistry
and molecular biology in the College of
Medicine who helped establish the program.
"But epigenetics is another layer of regula-
tion. In many ways more important than
DNA sequence, this layer of regulation is
changing during our life. It's dynamic."
Much like brown eyes, epigenetic
changes can be passed down from generation
to generation. But the changes can also be
sporadic, shifting like the colors of a kalei-
doscope over the course of a person's life-
time. Changes that occur in the womb might
not appear until old age, when they manifest
as atherosclerosis. Or they might appear
right away, as with certain congenital disor-


ders such as Prader-Willi and Angelman syn-
dromes.
Epigenetic malfunctions can afflict the
mind as well as the body, spawning condi-
tions as disparate as schizophrenia and sick-
le-cell anemia but the hottest area of inter-
est right now is cancer. Research into the epi-
genetic nature of disease has been under way
for almost a decade at UF, but plans for a for-
mal research consortium weren't outlined
until 2004, when the department combined
forces with the UF Shands Cancer Center.
"The role of epigenetics in cancer is
huge. The research on this topic is exploding
right now," Kilberg said. "It was natural the
Cancer Center would have this interest. So
biochemistry and the Cancer Center together
went out and recruited a series of the best-
trained individuals in the country."
New recruits Keith Robertson, Jianrong
Lu, Michael Kladde, Kevin Brown and
Suming Huang, all join a network of faculty
researchers affiliated with the UF Genetics
Institute, the UF Shands Cancer Center and
the department of biochemistry and molecu-
lar biology in the UF College of Medicine.
The UF researchers say epigenetics is
changing the way people think about nature
versus nurture: It's quickly becoming clear
that nature isn't everything nurture plays
an important role, too.
"There's more to understanding the
expression of disease-related proteins in our
body than just the DNA sequence," Kilberg
said. "Epigenetics research opens up the pos-
sibility that we can ease the symptoms or
reverse some of these diseases, and it opens
up tremendous new avenues for drug thera-
pies."


Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007 Page 7


USF: Parenting



Mixed-Messages



Affect Toddler



Development


ST. PETERSBURG Soon-to-be parents should sit down and
discuss their approaches to parenthood prior to their baby's arrival,
according to a new research study by Psychologist James McHale,
associate professor and director of the USF St. Petersburg Family
Study Center. His research found that children as young as two can
show a wide variety of social, emotional and behavioral adjustment
difficulties when their parents fail to establish a supportive parenting
relationship.
Findings, published by Zero to Three Press in Charting the
Bumpy Road of Coparenting, indicate that difficulties in establishing
supportive parenting relationships could be seen as early as three
months after the baby's birth and were unlikely to resolve themselves
with time. Additionally, co-parenting problems faced at 12 moths
were strong indicators of problems faced at 30 months and intricate-
ly tied to the social and behavioral problems seen in toddlers.
"It is hard enough for young children to learn to follow the rules
and regulate their own behaviors when their parents are being rea-
sonably consistent and working together," McHale said. "When par-
ents can't get on the same page, toddlers really struggle. Our findings
confirm that professionals need to be paying particularly close atten-
tion to this vitally important dynamic in families".
"Families Through Time"followed 120 northeastern couples get-
ting ready to become first-time parents from prior to their child's
birth to 30 months. The study examined consistency and change in
co-parenting relationships between the infant and toddler years.
Couples were interviewed and observed together completing routine
and slightly stressful tasks with their baby. Distinctive co-parenting
patterns were characterized by cooperation, support and validation in
some families and detachment, disagreement and/or poor coordina-
tion in others.
Though a number of studies had previously examined early par-
enting adjustments by mothers or fathers, this investigation broke
new ground through its in-depth look at coordination and support
between parents. It was conceived to address gaps in the understand-
ing of early co-parenting dynamics.
Major findings of the study:
Mothers and fathers who harbored concerns before the baby's
arrival about their capacity to work collaboratively as parents fre-
quently went on to exhibit low co-parenting cohesion at three moths
post-partum, especially when their baby had a difficult early tem-
perament.
Co-parenting problems at three months foreshadowed co-parent-
ing at 12 months, when conflict began to play a more prominent role
in defining the co-parental relationship.
Co-parenting difficulties at one year strongly predicted co-par-
entlnKgdjustment 18 months later, whei children where 30 months
old.
At 30 months, children in low co-parenting solidarity families
had more problem behavior at home and poorer pre-academic skills
at nursery school. They also had a less mature awareness of emotions
and showed more reliance than other children on adults when trying
to regulate their emotions.
Editors Note: "Families Through Time" was supported by two
grants from the National Institute of Child and Health Development.
A Podcast interview with Dr. McHale regarding his findings and their
implications is available at
http://www.usfsp.org/iNews/view.asp?ID=222.


New Center Explores Influence of



Nature Versus Nurture on Genes








Page 8 Pinellas News Friday, August 10, 2007

Bronson Urges Consumers PinellasAnimalDo

SPrtet A ainstServices Offers "Dogption
Tn Prnterct Anain t All Days" Adoption


Types Of Termites


TALLAHASSEE -Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson is urging homeowners to take
steps to prevent a termite infestation and check on pest control com-
panies prior to signing a contract. The reminder comes as drywood
termite swarming season gets underway. Signs of a drywood infes-
tation and control measures are very different from those associated
with subterranean termites.
Unlike subterranean termites, drywood termites do not require
contact with the soil, so treatment of the soil under and around a
structure is not an effective protection against these destructive pests.
Baiting systems are also not an effective prevention against drywood
termites. Drywood termites remain hidden within the wood or other
material on which they feed, so they are seldom seen. They occur in
small colonies in isolated wood pieces but multiple colonies can
infest a structure at the same time.
Signs of a drywood termite infestation inlcude winged insects
coming out at night attracted; discarded wings around window sills;
wooden pellets smaller than rice grains accumulating on floors or
under furniture (the pellets are cream to reddish brown or black and
are not related to the color of the wood); surface blisters on wood (the
termites sometimes tunnel close to the surface giving wood a blis-
tered appearance)
Infestations can often be detected by tapping on wood every few
inches because damaged wood sounds hollow.
Dry-wood termites don't cause damage as quickly as other types
but because they fly into structures are more difficult to keep out of a
home and to identify. Bronson urges homeowners to have uninter-
rupted termite protection service from a licensed pest control compa-
ny. He says consumers need to be sure a termite contract covers all
types of termites. A new rule put into place last year requires that
pest control companies must clearly tell consumers if the contract
covers both types of termites.
"We took steps to ensure the contracts tell consumers specifical-
ly what is covered," Bronson said. "But consumers with existing
contacts need to check to see exactly what is covered and make
adjustments if necessary. Consumers also need to know that the
Florida Building Code does not require a preventive treatment for
drywood termites but does require treatment for subterraneans for
new construction."
Bronson also urges consumers to check out a pest control com-
pany before signing a contract. The Department's Bureau of
Entomology and Pest Control maintains records of consumer com-
plaints and can verify whether a business is properly licensed. The
Department recommends obtaining at least three opinions, written
cost estimates for treatment, and a copy of the contract being offered
by licensed pest control companies. Consumers who have technical
questions or require information on a pest control company may con-
tact the Department's Bureau of Entomology and Pest Control at 850-
921-4177 or visit the website www.floridatermitehelp.org.

Pinellas County Attorney Put


On Paid Administrative Leave

County Attorney Susan ChurutiThe Pinellas County Board of
County Commissioners put. Pinellas County Attorney Susan Churuti
on paid administrative leave, pending the outcome of a Grand Jury
investigation.
The commission voted 7-0 to approve the motion made by
Commissioner Calvin Harris and seconded by Commissioner John
Morroni. The vote followed a discussion during a special meeting of
the board today. The commission met to discuss hiring legal counsel
for the commission and staff who may appear before the Grand Jury.
The Grand Jury is looking into the county's purchase of land owned
by Pinellas County Property Appraiser Jim Smith.
The commission did vote to hire outside legal counsel to provide
a written guideline for staff and commissioners to familiarize them
,with Grand Jury proceedings and answer common questions.
Jim Bennett will be the acting county attorney until the matter is
resolved.

Tired of battling the sweltering summer
heat as you make your way to the
newsstand each week in search of quality
local news?
Why not let it come to you?
Call (727) 894-2411
and subscribe to Pinellas News today!




GRAND LAKE ESTATE
I A Roclime Estate onlootking Coalorodo's L rgest. I -

Convunient proximity to Denver .
three most beautiful lakes Snow 'I.c." .'
Mountain National Park [ August 23 at 11:00 AM (MT) 12







CERTIFIED QUALITY AT UNBEATABLE PRICES nE)t o


Rates
Dog Up For Adoption! The
Dog Days of August are here.
With so many kittens and puppies
clamoring for new homes,
Pinellas County Animal Services
is offering a very special adop-
tion fee of $9 during the month of
August.
All dogs, cats, kittens and
puppies have been vaccinated,
spayed or neutered, treated for
internal and external parasites,
and come with license and
microchips. Each beautiful pet is
compassionately cared for until
ready for adoption. Adding a pet
to the family enriches the lives of
each member in numerous ways
and also saves a life.
The Animal Services adop-
tion center is at 12450 Ulmerton
Road, Largo. Hours are Monday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Please arrive at least 45 min-
utes before the closing time as
the adoption area closes a half-
hour earlier than the Animal
Services facility.Pinellas County
Animal Services protects the
community and its animals by
providing shelter for lost and
abandoned pets, impounding
dangerous animals and investi-
gating reports of animal cruelty.
Its goal is to eliminate homeless
pets by finding every adoptable
animal a home and encouraging
pet owners to spay or neuter their
own animals. For information,
call Pinellas County Animal
Services at (727) 582-2600.


Calling All

Sweethearts
The American Diabetes
Association is seeking nomina-
tions for its ADA Sweetheart
Program. Nominees should be
young women who will be soph-
omores or juniors in highschool
during the 2007-2008 school
year. Sweethearts will volunteer
for the benefit of children and
adults with diabetes, participate
in social activities and work indi-
vidually and as a team to plan
events that raise money to sup-
port the ADA's mission. The pro-
gram will begin in September
and conclude in May 2008 with
a gala event. To make a nomina-
tion for a sweetheart, please con-
tact Glenda Berry at (813) 885-
5007 ext. 3066 by August 15th.


Apartment for Rent
S215/Mo! 4BR/2BA HUD Home! (5% down
20 years @ 81'1 apr) More Homes Available
from S199/Mo! For listings call (800)366-
9783 Ext 5669.
Auctions
Private Island Fox Island. NY 263+/- acre
island in Lake Ontario. 5.000+/- s.f. renovated
8 bedroom 5 bath lodge (c 1905), plus 1/2
acre mainland lot with boat dock and parking.
3,000 foot grass landing strip. Includes rare
ownership of 27+/- acres of duck marsh.
Incredible fishing and duck hunting retreat.
Minutes by boat from Cape Vincent, NY.
Selling at Absolute Auction on August 24.
Gustav Stickley Antiques sold separately.
Woltz & Associates, Inc. (800)551-3588,
Schrader Real Estate & Auction Co., Inc. NY
#32SC1115028. Visit schraderauction.com or
woliz.com.
Auction Friday. August 24, 4PM. Executive
home, remodeled 4bdr./4ba, office. 32+/-
acres. divided. Pool, pond, shop. 10%BP.
GAL AU-C002594, (800)323-8388,
www.rowellauctions.com.
Circa 1789 WF farm and antebellum home in
historic Grccnbrier/Lewisburg. 24901.
Antiques, more August 25. www.riverben-
dauction.com FREE BROCHURE (800)726-
2897 Randy Burdette #927 Broker.
Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn
$800/day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL
US: We will not be undersold!
Cars For Sale
Hondas From $500! Cars and Trucks
Available Now! Many Makes and Models!
For listings call (800)366-9813 Ext. 9275.
Employment Services_
Notice: Post Office Positions Now Available.
Avg. Pay $20/hour or $57K annually includ-
ing Federal Benefits and OT. Get your exam
guide materials now. (866)713-4492 USWA
Fee Req. .. .... ...
Equipment For Sale
GovDcals.com. Online Government Surplus
Sales. City, County and State Surplus, Seized
and Confiscated Property. Heavy Equipment,
Trucks, Vehicles, Computers.
www.GovDeals.com (800)613-0156 x2
info@govdeals.com.

Health
ONLINE PHARMACY Buy Soma, Ultram,
Fioricet, Prozac, Buspar, 90 Qty $51.99 180
Qty $84.99 PRICE INCLUDES PRESCRIP-
TION! We will match any competitor's price!
(866)465-0796_pharmakind.com.
Help Wanted
OWNER OPERATOR SOLOS-FLATBEDS.
$1,000 Sign-On Bonus, Industry leading pay,
$2500-$3000/Week! Southwest Regional
Runs, 2,500-3,000 Miles/Week, Home Every
Weekend! Top Industry CPMs! Excellent
Equipment, Top Benefits Package Available!
FUEL @ $1.25/Gallon! Call (888)714-0056.
www.newlinetransport.com.
International Cultural Exchange
Representative: Earn supplemental income
placing and supervising high school exchange
students. Volunteer host families also needed.
Promote world peace! (866)GO-AFICE or
www.afice.org.
OTR drivers deserve more pay and more
hometime! $.42/mile! Home weekends and
during the week. Run our Florida Region!
Heartland Express (800)441-4953 www.heart-
landlexpress.com.
Drivers Regional Auto Transport $1100+/wk
100% Co. Paid Benefits. Paid Training! 1 yr.
OTR req'd. Call John @ Waggoners
(912)571-9668.
"Can You Dig It?" Heavy Equipment School.
3wk training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers,
Trackhoes. Local job placement asst. Start
digging dirt Now. Call (866)362-6497 or
(888)707-6886.


STOP LEG CRAMPS

BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. Clc

Calcet's'triple calcium formula is designed to help "pleCtalium
stop low calcium leg cramps. Just ask your pharmacist.


Ti







For Lowest Drug Prices, Call


My Florida Pharmacy, Inc.,


A Licensed U.S. Pharmacy


1-888-469-3579

wwmfoiIdparay6o


A National Sport and Fashion Firm has imme-
diate openings for sharp energetic people!
Make great money and see the USA! Must be
18. Call (877)646-5050.
Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR
CAREER, START IT RIGHT! Company
Sponsored CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be
21. Have CDL? Tuition reimbursement!
CRST. (866)917-2778.
DRIVERS: CALL TODAY! Great Bonus
Opportunity! 36-43cpm/$1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3 mos OTR (800)635-
8669.
Sales
WANT NEW CAREER? Make money in a
1.3 trillion industry. Work from home.,
Commissions paid weekly. Income guarantee.
Benefits available.
www.ytbsalesopporunity.com (239)287-3707.
Home Improvement
WANTED: 10 HOMES To Show Off Our
New Lifetime Exterior Paint. Call Now to see
if your home qualifies. (800)961-8547.
(Lic.#CBCOIO111)
Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $19,000! Only
$199/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr. Buy,
5/BR $302/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.
1-4 Bedroom Homes from $10,000! Bank
Foreclosures, HUDs Repos and More! As low
as $199/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr.
For Listings (800)366-9783 Ext 5853.
Homes For Sale
PALM HARBOR HOMES Factory
Liquidation Sale. Modulars, Mobile, & Stilt
Homes. 0% DOWN when you own your land.
Call for FREE Color Brochures (800)622-
2832.
1-4 Bedroom Homes from $10,000! Bank
Foreclosures, HUDs Repos and More! As low
as $199/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr.
For Listings (800)366-9783 Ext 5760.
Instruction
AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADEMY!! Start
your driving career today! Offering courses in
CDL A! Low tuition fee! Many payment
options! No registration fee! (888)899-5910
info@americasdrivingacademy.com._
Lots & Acreage
So/ Central Florida. Lake Lots Reduced
$100,000 Owner says "SELL"! I to 3 acre
lakefront and lake access properties in a gated
community with city water and sewer, paved
roads and underground utilities. Priced from
$99,900 w/ excellent financing available. Call
(866)352-2249 ext 2051.
Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc.
Only one signature required! *Excludes govt.
fees! Call weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600.
(8am-6pm) Alta Divorce, LLC. Established
1977.
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home.
Medical, business, paralegal, computers, crim-
inal justice. Job placement assistance.
Financial aid and computer provided if quali-
fied. Call (866)858-2121,
www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Job placement assistance. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387.
Pet Supplies
Stamp Out ITCHAMACALLITS! Shampoo
with Happy Jack(R) Paracide II(TM) &
ItchNOMore(R). Apply Skin Balm(R). At
Tractor Supply. www.happyjackinc.com.
Real Estate
Move to the Smoky Mountains 3/4-3 acre
tracts starting at $79,900. 15 min from Pigeon
Forge Gatlinburg. Low taxes Low crime.
Majestic Mountain Views (888)215-5611
xl01 www.mountainhightn.com.'
North Carolina Cool Mountain Air, Views &
Streams, Homes, Cabins & Acreage. FREE
BROCHURE (800)642-5333. Realty Of
Murphy 317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C.
28906. www.realtyofmurphy.com.


Honeymoon or Babymoon Cottage
Rental property on Lake Lure, NC.
Full Kitchen, washer & dryer,
King size bed.
Maximum Occupancy three (3).
Convertable chair bed for child
(twin size).
One small pet, acceptable if sleeps in
his or her travel kennel.
Amenities include Pontoon Boat,
Kayak and Hot Tub.
Minimum stay 2 nights.For complete
details and availability go to listing #
45240 on http://www.vrbo.com/45240


Many other sizes available
36' x 36' x 12' Reg. $14,900 $7,995
Includes Two 12'x O1' openings
SEE OTHERS ON LINE
WWW.SCG-GRP. COM
ACT FAST! TEMPORARY DISCOUNTS
AD #COOL 888 898 3091


MARKET PLACE


-- - -


So. Colorado Ranch Sale 35 Acres- $36,900
Spectacular Rocky Mountain Views Year
round access, elec/ tele included. Come for
the weekend, stay for a lifetime. Excellent
financing available w/ low down payment.
Call Red Creek Land Co. today! (866)696-
5263 x 2682.
NORRIS LAKEFRONT, LAFOLLETTE,
TENNESSEE, New Gated Development,
Fantastic Views, Deep Water, Utilities, Boat
Launch, Near Golf Course, One Hour North
of Knoxville, www.hiddenspringsonnorris-
lake.com, (800)362-4225.
NC: Best buy in mountains! Two acres with
spectacular view, paved road, gated, housesite
in, owner financing. Bryson City. $65,000,
$13,000 down. Call owner! (800)810-1590.
www.wildcatknob.com.
Deep Water Mountain View Lake Lot on
Georgia's Largest Private Lake. Gated, Golf,
Tennis, Pool. Seller is Agent. 520,000. Clay
Dalton (770)815-5451 www.claydalton.com..
BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA. ESCAPE TO,
BEAUTIFUL WESTERN NORTH CAROLI-
NA MTS FREE Color Brochure &
Information MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES with-
Spectacular views, Homes, Cabins, Creeks, &,
Investment acreage. CHEROKEE MOUN-
TAIN GMAC REAL ESTATE... chero-
keemountainrealty.com Call for free brochure
(800)841-5868.
1ST TIME OFFERED Colorado Mountain
Ranch. 35 ACRES $39,900. Priced for
Quick Sale. Overlooking a majestic lake,
beautifully treed, 360 degree mountain views,
adjacent to national forest. EZ Terms. Offered
by Colorado Land & Ranches. (866)353-
4807.
TENNESSEE LAND, 328 acres, Utility
Water, Lays Level, Country Setting, 1 hour
north of Chattanooga, 5 miles off 1-75,
$4,750/acre, (866)745-8474.
ARIZONA LAND LIQUIDATION! Near
Tucson, Football Field Sized Lots. $0
Down/$0 Interest, $159/Month ($18,995
total). FREE INFORMATION. Money Back
Guarantee! (800)682-6103 Op#10.
Mid-Summer Sale! Dockable Lakefront NOW
$59,900. SAVE $20,000. Lake Access with
FREE Boat Slips NOW $19,900. SAVE
$10,000. 1 Day- Aug. 11th Only! Gorgeous
private lake. Wooded park-like setting. Easy
access 1-40. Gated lake community w/ paved
rds, utils, more. Excellent financing. Call now
(888)792-5253, x 1382.
ASHEVILLE NC AREA MOUNTAIN LAND
Pristine mountain property with over 4 miles
of river frontage. 1 to 8 acre homesites from
the $80's! Custom owner's lodge, river walk
& more. Adjacent to the Pisgah National
Forest. Call owner: (866)800-4561.
COASTAL GEORGIA PROPERTY Beautiful
marsh view and creekside homesites, minutes .
to the Golden Isles. Creekside homesite with.
woodstork rookery, 2.1 acres at $99,990. Long
range marshview homesite, 2.8 acres at
$149,990. Call owner: (866)799-5903.
NC MOUNTAINS 5 acres with pristine 20-,
foot high waterfall, home site with great view,
very private, large public lake nearby,
$199,500. This won't last long. Call now
(866)789-8535.
Coastal Georgia Land Liquidation! 20 to 40+
acres from $99,900 to $169,900. Beautiful'
timber, potential to subdivide. Pay no closing
costs for limited time. Excellent financing.
Call Now! (800)898-4409, x 1333.
Developer's Closeout Now-September 29th-
save on already low pre-construction pricing
starting at 70k. Lots & condos available w/
water, marsh, golf, nature views. lyr. no pay-
ment options. (877)266-7376 www.coopers-
point.com.
LIMITED TIME OFFER 100% FINANC-
ING- Gated Lakefront Community of the NC
Blue Ridge Mtns. 90 miles of Shoreline start
$99,000. Call Now (800)709-LAKE.
Roofing,
METAL ROOFING. SAVE $$$ buy direct
from manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all.
-accessories. Quick turn around! .Delivery
Available.. (352)498-0778 Toll free (888)393-
0335 code 24. www.GulfCoastSupply.com.




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