Group Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Title: Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073685/00021
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Title: Florida news for alumni and friends of the University of Florida
Uniform Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida National Alumni Association
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Publisher: University of Florida National Alumni Association,
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: Summer 2008
Frequency: semiannual
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
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Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 2000)-
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Volume ID: VID00021
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news for alumni and


friends of


the university
the university


THE FRESHMAN

EXPERIENCE
Do you have the mettle to survive the first
year at UF? Test yourself on our board
game inside.
















UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA


I


S



F

e
Si


of florida
Summer 2008



















,wanmntalk


Senior Editor
LiesI O'Dell (BS '92)

Editor
Cinnamon Bair

Assistant Editor
Meredith Cochie (BSJ '06, MAMC '08)

Contributing Editors
Elizabeth Hillaker (BSJ '08, BA '08)
Shannon McAleenan (MAMC '08)

Managing Editor
David Finnerty

Contributing Writers
Ron Coleman ('68-'73)
Dave Dorsey
Kathy Fleming
Stephanie Fraiman
Ted Geltner (MAMC '06)
Maureen Harmon
Nick McGregor

Design
University of Florida
Office of University Relations
Publications Group

UF | UNIVERSITY of
UF I FLORIDA
Florida is published three times a year and
sent free to all alumni, parents and
friends of the University of Florida
Opinions expressed in Florida do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or
official policies of the University of Florida, the
University of Florida Foundation
or the UF Alumni Association


Editorial Staff
352-846-2818
Fax: 352-392-7676

UF Alumni Association
P.O. Box 14425
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425
352-392-1905
888-352-5866

E-mail
Florida@uff.ufl.edu

UF Alumni Association Web address
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu

Copyright 2008

Florida is printed on recycled paper
and is recyclable


Ignore Attack Mail
I was dismayed that you pub-
lished the letter from Michael
Delate (BSEEN '89, ME '93)
in the winter edition of the
Florida alumni magazine. Ad
homonym attacks and inflam-
matory rhetoric are inappropri-
ate for our alumni magazine.
I knew Ron Sachs (BSJ '72)
at UF and remember when he
investigated a mysterious death
at the Alachua County Jail. I
remember him as a very coura-
geous investigative journalist.
He put his career on the line
to publish that information on
abortion services. It was impor-
tant information and helped
women who had nowhere to
turn at a time of great need.
Several years earlier, a friend
of mine almost died when she
underwent termination of an
unwanted pregnancy at a trailer
located down a dirt road out-
side of Gainesville.
Whatever your opinion on
a woman's right to choose (and
we have no doubt about Mr.
Delate's opinion), using words
like "killer" and "cult of death"
serves only to fan emotions and
to prevent rational discussion
about this difficult issue. In
addition, printing this type of
rhetoric could incite violence


against physicians, health care
workers and patients.
Please use better judgment
when publishing letters in our
alumni magazine and keep the
discussion at least civil if not
intelligent.
-Joan Spiegel (BA '71, MD '80)
Sharon, Mass.

I am glad to see the university
is upholding the traditions of
free speech, free thought and
a free press, and more impor-
tantly, airing the opinions of
those who may be opposed to
all three. The letter from one
Michael Delate illustrates the
commitment to these prin-
ciples by allowing him to air
his decidedly minority opinion
in the magazine. As an A//.gmr,
alumnus also, I think it took a
lot of courage for undergradu-
ate employees of the university,
as they were at that time, to
buck the establishment and
follow the law of the land, as
decided in court. Mr. Delate is
welcome to rage against those
freedoms though he does his
alma mater a disservice if he
doesn't understand the values
of a free society.
Thanks for keeping us
informed.
Paul Beard (BA '87)
Seattle


Sparking Memories
I enjoyed the "My Old School"
letter from Joseph Smith (BSBA
'62). He mentioned a "barbecue
joint several blocks from
campus." I wanted him and
your readers to know that the
name of this barbecue joint was
YT's, owned by Y.T. Parker.
In 1962-63 Y.T. was a black
middle-aged gentleman who
enjoyed having students crowd
into his small "shack" of a res-
taurant and serving them ribs
and chicken, soft drinks and
white bread.
I once helped him repair
part of the roof on his restau-
rant, and he once cooked (for
many hours) a wild boar that
we shot while hunting near
Micanopy where I lived during
my junior and senior years on
the "Tumbleweed Ranch."
The sauces he made avail-
able were mild, hot, red hot,
super red hot and super saber
jet. His ribs were the best, but
you were "warned" that very
few students or residents of
Gainesville could eat ribs with
the SSJ sauce on them. There
were many who tried but very
few who succeeded, including
me. You didn't try that stunt a
second time.
Gerry Katz (BSBR '63)
Weston


Flori-DUH
Editors, despite our protestations to the contrary, are not perfect. We make dumb mistakes, including in our
winter issue when we spelled "aisle" as "isle" throughout the "Gator Tales" story.
In the past we have received your occasional letters pointing out our flaws and have taken our licks in private.
Without a good public flogging, however, how do you know we're listening?
Therefore we hereby introduce "Flori-DUH," a place where we smack ourselves on the head and declare
mea culpa. We'll try to expose our foibles in a way that's fun and entertaining, not because we don't take your
complaints seriously we most definitely do but because it's time we take ourselves a little less seriously. We
are just editors, after all.
Take this example: In the winter issue, we shifted the time-space continuum when we said Kathryn Chicone
Ustler Hall was "originally the Women's Gym" in "Top 10 Campus Halls You May Not Know." As Jerry Chicone
(BSBA '56) of Windermere points out, the gym was built in 1919 a good 28 years before women were allowed
to study at UF (At the time, calling it the Men's Gym might have seemed redundant.) Although the building did
eventually become the Women's Gym, "it was the original UF gym and still is," Chicone says.
So if you see us get something wrong, let us know. Send your corrections to florida@uff.ufl.edu or in care of
the editor at P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425.


_2 FLORIDA






volume 9


number 2 summer 2008


ON THE COVER
Illustrator Ethan Long
depicted many of the
experiences encoun-
tered by UF freshmen
in this board game.
See more on
Page 10
ILLUSTRATION BY ETHAN LONG


>Cj


Yr
C) 4
8 ,,// ,


FEATURES
II ....................................................................... The Freshm an Experience
Do you have the mettle to survive a freshman year at UF?
I ...........................................................................................U neq ual J justice
One journey begins, and one ends, when a brand new lawyer gets mad.
................................................................................................... H o w R u d e !
A pushy boss or obnoxious co-worker can affect your performance
more than you think.


IN EVERY ISSUE Museum
Stroll
ON CAMPUS NEWS ABOUT CAMPUS, FACULTY AND STUDENTS


r ................................................................................... .............. K rista's K id s
Krista Vandenborne studies therapies for muscular dystrophy.
5................................................... ... ............ Tour de Force
Student profile: Ray Holzworth Jr.'s bike ride through France
celebrated a different kind of endurance.
.............................................................................................. In n H o sp ita b le
In the Classroom: For the disabled traveler, comfort is
about more than "handicapped facilities."
7 ............................................................................................... A Tim e to Talk
UF Flashback: Robert Frost's springtime stops were always a friendly visit.
.............................................................................................. A ce in the H o le
Sports Profile: Billy Horschel never thought he was good enough
until he got to UF.
9 .................................................... ................ .............. H hitting the Bricks
How well do you know campus?

ALUMNI PROFILES
2 0 ......................................................................................... T he S irens' C all
A new image of the sea, sky and waves beckons
from Wolfgang Bloch's paintings.

2 ........................................................... Western Thought, Eastern World
It's not common to buck the system in Japan.
Sachio Semmoto thinks it should be.

ALUMNI ALUMNI MEMORIES AND HAPPENINGS
2 4 ..........................................................................................M y O ld S school
UF alumni share their memories.

GATOR TALES
2 7 .................................................................. Black and W hite M em ories
The road to UF wasn't easy.
Neither was the racism Ron Coleman faced after he arrived.


news for alumni and friends
of the university of florida


summer 2008


CON


ENTS


w


7
UF
Flashback


20










UFALUMNI


on CamiMID1 s ,


NEWS


ABOUT CAMPUS,


FACULTY AND


STUDENTS


Krista's Kids


UF RESEARCHER STUDIES
THERAPIES FOR MUSCULAR
DYSTROPHY.
It started with a game of handball
and a torn ligament. Krista
Vandenborne, ended up in a leg
cast. Months later when the cast
was removed, she couldn't believe
how her leg looked without it.
Deteriorated. Weak.
"I wanted to learn more about
how and why that happened," says
Vandenborne, chair of the Depart-
ment of Physical Therapy in the
College of Public Health and Health
Professions. "I think it's pretty typi-
cal. People don't really think about a
profession until they need it."
Now an internationally known
leader in human muscle physiology
and rehabilitation, Vandenborne
focuses on helping children with a


far more serious form of muscular
degeneration muscular dystrophy.
There are nine types of the neuro-
muscular disease that affects about
250,000 Americans, according to
the Muscular Dystrophy Associa-
tion. The most common in children
- Duchenne muscular dystrophy
- affects only boys, and by age 12
many need a wheelchair. Vanden-


"MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY IS A
DISEASE THAT HAS A HUGE
IMPACT ON PATIENTS AND
CURRENTLY THERE IS NO
CURE. IT'S A DEVASTATING
DISEASE THAT DESERVES A
LOT OF ATTENTION."

KRISTA VANDENBORNE


Vandenborne (right) is known for her devotion. Once, she spent week-
end hours helping a 15-year-old patient with his science project on
muscular dystrophy research.


borne is developing imaging strate-
gies to determine the effectiveness of
different therapies in children using
the McKnight Brain Institute's pow-
erful 3-Tesla whole-body scanner.
"Muscular dystrophy is a disease
that has a huge impact on patients
and currently there is no cure,"
Vandenborne says. "It's a devastat-
ing disease that deserves a lot of
attention."
A mother of two, Vandenborne's
work is a family affair. Her children
run lemonade stands and donate
the money to research. Her hus-
band, Glenn Walter, an assistant
professor of physiology and func-
tional genomics in the College of
Medicine, also studies muscular
dystrophy. The couple met in a lab
during graduate school at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, and some-
times collaborate on projects.
Vandenborne and the research-
ers in her lab also study muscle
adaptation after spinal cord injuries
and during cast immobilization
- the problem that got her inter-
ested in muscle degeneration.
Vandenborne has led her depart-
ment to new heights with increased
research funding, the development
of a Doctor of Physical Therapy
degree, clinical fellowships, NIH-
funded predoctoral training pro-
grams and a research and clinical
seminar series.
"She has a vision and it's easy to
get motivated by her because she's
so motivated by what she sees for
the future," says Claudia Senesac,
a UF clinical assistant professor of
physical therapy.
Stephanie Fraiman
pt.phhp.ufl.edu/vandenborne.html


4 FLORIDA








ON CAMPUS


Muse 111


Stroll


Metamorphic Metaphor
"Butterflies and Moths
in Contemporary Zuni
Art" highlights the but-
terfly's role as a symbol
of fertility, beauty, re-
birth and transformation
in the belief system and
art of contemporary Zunis, a Southwestern Native
American tribe located primarily in Arizona and New
Mexico. The exhibit will be on display at the Florida
Museum of Natural History until Dec. 31.
www.1lmnh.ui fl.ecld


Fluid Thought
"Cross-Currents in
Recent Video Installation:
Water as Metaphor for
Identity" explores the
amorphous quality of
water as a metaphor
for shifting notions of
identity, migration and
memory. The exhibit, organized by Tufts University
Art Gallery and sponsored locally by The Talking
Phone Book, features the works of four international
artists with ties to Africa: Zwelethu Mthethwa,
IngridMwangiRobertHutter, Moataz Nasr and Berni
Searle. The exhibit will remain open through Sept. 7 at
the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art.
www.harni.ufl.edu


Tour de Force


FORGET PELOTONS AND PODIUMS. RAY HOLZWORTH JR.'S SUMMER RIDE
THROUGH FRANCE CELEBRATED A DIFFERENT KIND OF ENDURANCE HIS OWN.
It's been nearly a year since Ray
Holzworth Jr. went on his sight-
seeing trip through France.
He witnessed beautiful
mountainsides with soaring
peaks as he traveled between
Paris, Brest and back- all 760
miles.
The trip took him 85-and-a-
half hours.
On a bicycle.
"I wasn't tired mentally, but
I was tired physically," he says.
"I've fallen asleep riding down-
hill and woken up at the bot-
tom. It can be a little scary."
The doctoral student was
the youngest American finisher
in the 2007 Paris-Brest-Paris
endurance ride, the oldest open-
road bicycling event in the
world. The ride, which runs
every four years, challenges Holzworth says he was so fatigued on his 760-mile endurance
bicyclists to push themselves for bike ride that at one point he fell asleep while going downhill.
their own sake rather than to
win a race or climb a podium
such as in the Tour de France. And they have 90 hours to do it.
Holzworth himself became aware of the ride only six years ago. An avid cyclist with his dad
since age 15, Holzworth tried out for the 2003 ride but missed the cut-off time after a five
hour nap in the woods.
This time, Holzworth managed his time and his rare sleep opportunities better, easily
meeting the qualifying time. So in 2007 he joined more than 4,000 riders who set off from
Paris amid fireworks and throngs of cheering spectators.
The ride was a struggle. Holzworth rode the first 24 hours without sleep, then tried to grab
an hour or two here and there. His dad followed in a car with food and water.
He kept himself going by concentrating on the picturesque French countryside and historic
stone architecture that line the course. The view of the mountains overlooking the bay as the
riders entered Brest was phenomenal, he says.
After 85 hours and 35 minutes, he crossed the finish line as the sun finally broke through
the Parisian sky.
Although Holzworth's primary focus is studying electronic materials science in hopes of
making it his career, he hasn't left bicycling behind. In fact, when the gun goes off to start the
2011 PBP, he just might be in the pack. "I could definitely see myself doing it again," he says.
Ted Geltner (MAMC '06)


summer 2008 5










ON CAMPUS


Gator Bytes

www.ufalumni.ufl.edu -UF
Alumni Association members are
eligible for priority seating at this
year's 85th Annual Gator Growl.
Slated for Oct. 24, the eve of the
Gators' Homecoming football
game against Kentucky, this pep
rally is $15 for students and $20 for
others. Members will be mailed
a ticket form. Non-members can
print a ticket form from this site.

www.sustainable.ufl.edu/videos.
html Learn what UF is doing to
become a sustainable campus,
straight from the people who are
making it happen.

http://gogatornation.com Trade
photos and videos with fellow Ga-
tors or just catch up on the latest
news at this home page for The
Gator Nation.

www.sg.ufl.edu/accent/tran-
scripts.htm -Wondering what
the rich and famous have said on
campus? Read transcripts from
the speakers whom UF's Accent
Speaker Bureau has brought to
campus, including John Kerry, Elie
Wiesel and Spike Lee.

www.arts.ufl.edu/theatreand-
dance/pages/takealook/video
gallery.asp Sample snippets of
past performances by UF's School
of Theatre and Dance, including
"Cabaret" and "A Midsummer
Night's Dream."

To find any UF Web site, visit
www.ufl.edu.


In the

Classroom


Inn Hospitable


FOR THE DISABLED TRAVELER,
COMFORT IS ABOUT MORE
THAN "HANDICAPPED
FACILITIES."
There was a time when student Di-
ana Saiz (4HHP), a front desk clerk
at the Cabot Lodge in Gainesville,
would simply send a disabled guest
to one of the motel's special "handi-
cap rooms," thinking the wider
doors, handrails and a lower peep
hole would be enough to make the
stay comfortable.


Since taking UF's
es for Persons with
Disabilities class,
however, Saiz
knows better. She
now asks whether
there is anything
else she can do be-
cause she's learned
every disability is
distinct.
"You have to
be able to offer
something that
fills everyone's
needs, whether


"(Students) need to have an
understanding of how to work with
people with disabilities because they
exist in our communities as clients,"
associate professor Robert Beland
says, noting that tourism is the No.
1 industry in Florida. "They are part
of the everyday fabric of our lives."
The class pivots around Beland's
energy and knowledge as well
as his efforts to give every disabled
person a face.
"They're not in hospitals," he
says. "They're all ages, all types; they
work, live and play everywhere."
The class meets in
a lecture hall in the
Florida Gym, but stu-
ABLE dents quickly apply their
NG knowledge in the real
world.
NE'S Trisha Laissle, who
plans to work in family
WEN law, teaches a court-or-
ING dered parenting class at
ItT the Alachua County Jail

A --


to many parents who have children
with disabilities.
"I don't know everything, and
I find that the strategies that I'm
learning in the class are helping,"
says Laissle (4CLAS). "I pass re-
sources along to make them more
aware as parents."
Saiz says the course has applica-
tions for anyone who works with
people. She wants to work at a
diverse resort that will serve a whole
spectrum of people of different ages.
"So I need to be prepared for any-
one who comes my way," Saiz says.
Elizabeth Hillaker
(BSJ '08, BA '08)

The Leisure Services for Persons
with Disabilities class is offered
by the Department of Tourism,
Recreation and Sport Management
within the College of Health and
Human Performance. To learn
more about the department and its
offerings, visit
www.hhp.ufl.edu/trsm.php.


they're businessmen or someone
coming to a beach resort just to
relax," says Saiz.
Leisure Services for Persons
with Disabilities is required for all
recreation management majors at
UE It focuses on disabilities and
aging, including how to respond
to individual needs, how to enable
people to enjoy themselves and how
to do it all within the confines of
the Americans with Disabilities Act.


6 FLORIDA


Leisure Servic-



"YOU HAVE TO BE
TO OFFER SOMETHI
THAT FILLS EVERY
NEEDS, WHETHER
THEY'RE BUSINESS
OR SOMEONE COM
TO A BEACH RESORT
JUST TO RELAX."
DIANA










ON CAMPUS


Kudos


UFFlasliI ckA



A Time to Talk


ROBERT FROST'S SPRINGTIME
STOPS AT UF WERE ALWAYS A
FRIENDLY VISIT.

His voice was soft and mellifluous,
rising and falling with emotion
as he read before the crowded
auditorium.
"The Gift Outright." Possibly
"Stopping By Woods on a Snowy
Evening" or "The Road Not
Taken." The poetry flowed from
its creator, leaving the listening UF
students captivated.
Such readings in University
Auditorium were the highlight of
Robert Frost's annual Gainesville
visits. For the better part of two
decades, America's poet laureate
made UF a regular stop as he trav-
eled home to Amherst, Mass., from
his winter home in Miami.


"Invariably (the auditorium)
was absolutely full," Stanley West,
director of UF Libraries, recalled
years later for the Samuel Proctor
Oral History Program. "The stu-
dents really did adore him. He was
such a handsome, rugged sort of a
guy, and he read so beautifully."
Frost's visits were the result of
a social call UF English professor
Archie Robertson made while in
Boston for a 1940 conference.
Frost was familiar with Gaines-
ville, and although he liked the
town as a whole, it didn't hold the
happiest memories for him. He
and his wife, Elinor, moved into
an apartment in the Duck Pond
area's Thomas Hotel in 1937 with
hopes that Florida's climate would
improve Elinor's failing health, Jay
Parini wrote in "Robert Frost: A
Life." Ultimately, the move didn't
help. She died in March
1938 after suffering a
massive heart attack.
Frost returned
north, settling into an
apartment in Boston's
Beacon Hill area while
his daughter, Lesley,
t T.i remained in Gainesville
with her children (both
,. she and her brother,
Carol, had moved south
with their parents). It
was Lesley who encour-
aged Robertson to visit
Frost in Boston, noting
that her father was lonely
and would appreciate the
attention.
A few days later,
Robertson found himself
sitting in Frost's dark,


KOnert i-rost


gloomy apartment overlooking the
Charles River. And the two men
were having a blast.
"We talked and talked and
talked," Robertson said in a 1967
interview preserved by UF's Oral
History Program. "My train had
gone, and I stayed on for two or
three hours more ... talking."
A friendship was born, leading
to Frost's relationship with UE He
made his first trip in 1941, return-
ing regularly until 1960. Between
1946 and 1960, in fact, he never
missed a spring.
Most visits included a stay at
Robertson's house where Frost was
provided not only his own room and
bathroom, but also his own study in
case the urge to write struck. Frost
would go on long walks around the
campus and in the woods along
Hogtown Creek, often for three and
four hours at a time.
The climax of each trip, how-
ever, was his poetry talks and reci-
tations. Students flocked to Frost
anytime he was around, asking him
to read or speak.
"Everybody around here pre-
ferred his way of reciting," Robert-
son said. "The quality of his voice,
that gravelly sort of voice, had its
own music, and nobody could re-
produce that voice. The intonation,
the rhythm, the timing, the frosty
sense of drama of the particular
poem."
To show its gratitude for Frost's
kindness, UF awarded him an
honorary degree, Doctor of Letters,
in January 1960. It was Frost's last
appearance on campus. He died
just three years later from a pulmo-
nary embolism. He was 88.
Cinnamon Bair


Kathleen Deagan (BA '70, PhD
'74), distinguished research
curator of archaeology at the
Florida Museum of Natural
History, received the Order of La
Florida award for outstanding
community service. Jonathan
Earle (ME '83, PhD '85), associate
dean emeritus of student affairs
in the College of Engineering,
received a Presidential Award
for Excellence in Science,
Mathematics and Engineering
Mentoring from the National
Science Foundation. Dr.
Wayne Goodman, chairman of
the Department of Psychiatry
in the College of Medicine, was
appointed to the state's Suicide
Prevention Coordinating Council
by Gov. Charlie Crist. John
Harvey, chair of the College of
Veterinary Medicine's Department
of Physiological Sciences,
received a lifetime achievement
award from the American Society
for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.
* Arthur Hebard, together with
professors from Aoyama-Gakuin
University and the University of
California-Riverside, is the 2008
recipient of the American Physical
Society's James C. McGroddy
Prize for New Materials. So
Hirata, assistant professor in the
chemistry department, received
the HP Outstanding Junior Faculty
Award by Hewlett-Packard
and the American Chemical
Society's Division of Computers
in Chemistry. Steve Pearton, a
professor of materials science
and engineering, received
the Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers Electron
Devices Society's J.J. Ebers
Award the third UF professor
to receive the accolade. Clint
Slatton, an assistant engineering
professor, received the
Presidential Early Career Award
for Scientists and Engineers.


summer 2008 7










ON CAMPUS


Florida Facts


* VISUAL WONDERLAND:
Winged clothing, blindfolded
spirits and a girl in a bee dress
are among the surreal images
that greet viewers during the
opening credits of CBS's "The
Ghost Whisperer" each week.
The digital images were created
by photographic artist Maggie
Taylor (MFA'87) based on some
of her earlier works, including
"Optimist's Dress," "One and
a Half Sisters" and "Southern
Gothic." Taylor's latest work,
"Almost Alice," will be at the
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art
July October. For details, visit
www.harn.ufl.edu.
* OFF AND RUNNING: The Uni-
versity of Florida Proton Thera-
py Institute in Jacksonville is off
to a fast start. It treated more
than 200 patients and delivered
more than 10,000 treatments in
its first year of operation, which
it reports is a faster ramp up
than any other proton therapy
facility in the country.
* HOW GREEN IS MY GARDEN:
The College of Design, Con-
struction and Planning is pio-
neering sustainability practices
not only in the design and con-
struction industries, but atop
its own halls. A "green roof"
garden filled with native Florida
plants has been installed atop
the Charles R. Perry Construc-
tion Yard building, providing
added insulation, reducing
storm water runoff and offering
new research opportunities to
students.


Go,


Gators




Ace


A GOLFER SINCE AGE 2, BILLY
HORSCHEL NEVER THOUGHT
HE WAS GOOD ENOUGH
- UNTIL HE GOT TO UF.
In 2005 UF men's golf coach
Buddy Alexander went to Palm
Beach to scout the Florida high
school finals and fill his last roster
spot. There were two candidates
- a highly sought superstar with
a magnificent swing and Billy
Horschel, a little-known senior
from the Melbourne area with zero
scholarship offers.
"The other player looked like
the better of the two," says Alexan-
der, "but there was just something
about Billy, about the way he
competed."
Alexander went with his gut
and offered the spot to Horschel,
who snapped it up. It might be
the best decision of the coach's
distinguished 30-year career.
Today, Horschel is the
reigning Southeastern
Conference player of the
year, has twice been chosen
a first-team All-American and
is on his way to one of the finest
careers in Gator golf history.
Though he didn't fully blossom
until he donned the orange and
blue, Horschel has had a club in
his hand since the age of 2 when
his father, a competitive club
player with a 3 handicap, set up
a tee in the backyard and let the
toddler whale away. The Horschels'
backyard was 100-yards deep, and
father and son had a standing bet:
When Billy could drive a ball over
the stream at the edge of the prop-


n the Hole


erty, he would be allowed to tee it
up on a real course. Billy sailed one
over the stream as a kindergartener
and was waiting in the driveway to
announce it when his dad got home
from work. The two were on the
course the next day.
Horschel went on to an impres-
sive high school golf career but
wrestled with a mental block when
competing against elite competition
in junior tournaments.
"I always felt like I wasn't one of
the best," he says. "It was a psycho-
logical thing. When I came to col-
lege, I got into the mindset that I


was just as good as everybody else."
His new perspective paid divi-
dends from the outset. He placed
in the top 10 in his first two tour-
naments as a Gator and quickly
established himself as the team's
breakout star. The trend continued
as a sophomore, and this past fall,
Horschel made the U.S. Walker
Cup team, a group of top American
amateurs who traveled to New-
castle, Ireland, to compete against
the best British and Irish players.
Horschel went undefeated in the
event and led the U.S. to victory.
"That's one of the greatest expe-
riences of my life," he says.
Horschel, who will be a senior
for the 2008-09 season, hopes the
pro golf tour is in his future, but
he also has a passionate interest
in sports management (his major
at UF). He would love to own his
own company some day, possibly a
golf center for kids.
His coach sees more college
accolades in Horschel's future and
thinks the pro tour is a possibility.
"He's got a chance," says Alex-
ander. "There are no guarantees in
this day and age, but if you could
buy stock in Billy Horschel, I'd
be at the front of the line."
Ted Geltner (MAMC '06)






Billy Horschel first set foot on a
golf course as a kindergartener a
reward for proving he could drive a
golf ball more than 100 yards.


8 FLORIDA


1W


I /
' .














Gators
Gators of every shape, size and style lurk on UF's
campus. Can you pick out which alligator skulks where?
Bonus points if you can identify which one is real. Check
your answers on page 24.


Bricks


ON CAMPUS


Campus

notes
SPENDING CUTS: Due to shrink-
ing state funding caused in
large part by falling home prices
and a faltering economy UF is
facing lean times for 2008-09. As a
result, President Bernie Machen
announced $47 million in spending
cuts as of July 1.
The reductions -which equal
6 percent across nearly all col-
leges and administrative units
- include limiting enrollment by
1,000 students for each of the next
four years, ending some degree
programs, cutting research fund-
ing, restructuring several depart-
ments and eliminating 430 posi-
tions, many of which were already
vacant. Nonetheless, the cuts
resulted in layoffs for 14 faculty
and 118 staff members.
Some reductions were made
before the last fiscal year ended.
For instance, 1,000 fewer transfer
students were admitted for the
upcoming school year. Additional
cuts may become necessary later
in the year if state revenues con-
tinue to fall, Machen says.
To see a comprehensive list
of the reductions as proposed by
Machen, visit www.president.ufl.
edu. Also, watch for the fall issue
of Florida for further coverage of
UF's budget situation.

For the latest UF news, visit
http://news.ufl.edu.


summer 2008


Hitting


the










The Freshman Experience

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU'VE BEEN ACCEPTED TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA. YOUR GRADES MAY BE HIGH ENOUGH, BUT DO YOU HAVE THE METTLE TO SURVIVE
YOUR FRESHMAN YEAR AMONG 50,000 OTHER STUDENTS? USING A SINGLE DIE AND COINS
AS GAME PIECES, SEE HOW WELL YOU FARE IN YOUR FIRST YEAR AS A GATOR.


%f',


Rules:
To play, roll a die
to determine how
many spaces yoL
may move in one
turn. Follow any
directions printed
within a space yo
land on. The first
player to reach th
end of the game
path wins.


p11tv f,


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10 FLORIDA


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'Yo take yourJ
fisttadton



4~rs 0on Move -0
hea 0npae

0o 0c r 0ikt
to.6 a prtn eet








Moefowr
one -pace

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You win!
Advance to
sophomore
status.


Illustration by Ethan Long


summer 2008 11


'I^


I U


I /





































A BRN IEWLWE



/GETS MAD.


r w HITE, BLACK. RICH, POOR. November 3, 2006: of privilege," he is called. After having sex with a
FREE, NOT FREE. JUST Charlie Douglas (BABA '03, JD '06) got home prostitute at his home, Wood argued about the
earlier than usual that Friday night. He always $30 payment and shot the prostitute in the back.
UNJUST. IT'S A PLOT THAT eats out at the end of the long work week, and He obtained the finest legal representation,
COULD HAVE COME RIGHT OUT this Friday was no exception. He dropped down pleaded guilty, had a one-day trial at which one of
on the couch just in time to catch the tail end of the most powerful pastors in Texas spoke on his
OF A JOHN GRISHAM BESTSELLER. ABC's "20/20" television show. It wasn't a show behalf and received 10 years probation.
INSTEAD IT CAME FROM ABC'S "20/20" he would normally watch, but one segment shook While on probation, Wood was caught repeat-
the tiredness right out of his bones. edly with cocaine and other serious offenses.
TELEVISION SHOW. LUCKILY FOR Judge Dean gave him a "post card probation"
THE PROTAGONIST, A RECENTLY The story: requiring him to confirm his address once a year.
GRADUATED UF LAWYER WAS Two young men go through the same Dallas He served his 10 years probation and his record
courtroom of Judge Keith Dean at about the was expunged.
WATCHING. same time. Then there is the case of Tyrone Brown, then a
John Wood, a Caucasian, is the son of one of poor black 16-year-old who, with a friend, waited
the most prominent pastors in Texas. A "paragon outside a Bennigan's restaurant one night and


BY KATHY FLEMING
121 FLORIDA











robbed a man at gunpoint. Brown gave the victim
his wallet back after removing the $2 it contained.
It was a first offense. Brown pled guilty and,
like Wood, received 10 years probation.
However, when Brown tested positive for
marijuana during a probation check, he didn't get
the usual treatment of having the minor offense
noted in his records. Judge Dean sentenced him
to life in prison.
"Good luck, Mr. Brown," Dean told him.
Brown spent the next [almost] 17 years in a
Texas prison.
From his Jacksonville townhome, 24-year-old
Douglas watched the broadcast in disbelief.
"Although robbery is a serious crime and
I certainly don't condone that behavior, I was
shocked at the disparity in the two sentences," he
says. "I immediately went to the computer, found
the ABC message board and met others who were
as equally outraged as I was over Brown's unjust
sentence."

November 4, 2006:
Douglas drove to Orlando early the next
morning to attend the wedding of two UF Law
classmates, but spent the rest of the day holed up
in his hotel room, e-mailing back and forth with
angry viewers on the message board.
Before the day was over, Douglas found
himself at the forefront of a grassroots advocacy
group resolved to accomplish just one goal: bring
Brown home.

November 5, 2006:
The grassroots campaign officially commenced.
"A medical student in California took care of
the technical issues of formatting our Web site
named SaveMrBrown.com, and I started research-
ing Texas law to see what legal avenues were avail-
able to free Mr. Brown," Douglas says.
A commutation of sentence was the only op-
tion, but in Texas, that's not an overnight project.
"We couldn't simply walk into the governor's
office and politely ask that he review the
documents and sign the necessary paperwork,"
Douglas says.
The Texas Constitution and Administrative
Code require a three-step process.
The first is to secure the signatures of local
officials the sentencing judge, district attorney
and sheriff. If two of those recommend a com-
mutation, the second step is to secure the votes
of a majority of the members of the Texas Board
of Pardons and Paroles. The third and final step is
the governor.
After learning what was ahead and loosely
formulating a plan, Douglas called Nora Brown,
Brown's mother. He told her the process would be


(Opposite page) Now a free man, Tyrone Brown shares a tearful reunion with his family after his life
sentence was commuted. (Above) Charlie Douglas (BABA '03, JD '06) fought for Brown's release after
learning about his legal troubles on a network TV program.


long, but promised he would not abandon her or
her son.
"I was in it for the long haul, whether it
took four months or four years. I wasn't going
anywhere until Tyrone was home," he told her
that day.
"I later learned that several people had made
similar promises throughout the [almost] 17 years
her son was in prison, so now looking back I'm a
bit surprised she didn't hang up the phone imme-
diately," he says.
Douglas knew exactly what to do and had,
in fact, been leading groups with passionate
causes since high school. In 2000 he was named
Florida's Youth Advocate of the Year for his work
combating tobacco company tactics as part of
the "Truth" campaign run by Florida teenagers.
As a result of that success, the American Legacy
Foundation invited him to serve as a national
spokesperson, enabling him to continue his quest
against "big tobacco." He formed a company
called Revolution Consulting with three other
advocates while in college that took him all over
the country to teach young people how to be
advocates for change.
The son of retired Putnam County Sheriff
Taylor Douglas realized trial law was his calling
when he attended a personal injury trial as part of
a business law class he took as an undergraduate
business major at UF. From there it was a short
trip over to the law school, where he was elected
editor-in-chief of the Florida Law Review and
graduated second in his class of 211.


This time the stakes were higher. He knew the
next step in this fight was to get the attention of
the decision makers in Texas, so he and dozens of
campaign members began sending letters hun-
dreds of them to officials in Texas.
He called Brown's mother at least three times a
week to keep her updated. She began to think of
Douglas, a man she had never met eye-to-eye, as
another son.










"I WAS IN IT FOR THE LONG

HAUL, WHETHER IT TOOK FOUR

MONTHS OR FOUR YEARS. I

WASN'T GOING ANYWHERE

UNTIL TYRONE WAS HOME."

CHARLIE DOUGLAS


PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELANIE BURFORD/DALLAS NEWS

summer 2008 1_















"I LEARNED THAT ADVOCACY WORKS. IF PEOPLE ARE

WILLING TO RISE UP, PASSIONATELY FIGHT FOR A CAUSE

AND REFUSE TO BE DISCOURAGED BY BUREAUCRACIES,

CHANGE WILL HAPPEN."

TYRONE BROWN


November 30, 2006:
District Attorney Bill Hill seemed like the logical place to start. The team,
which had swelled to the hundreds, pleaded for him to recommend to Gov.
Rick Perry that Brown be released.
"I called the president of the Dallas NAACP, Bob Lydia, and asked if
he could help us find people in Dallas who knew Bill Hill and who would
be willing to talk to him on Tyrone's behalf," Douglas says. "Within days
of our initial battle, Mr. Hill wrote a letter to Gov. Perry recommending
Tyrone's release."
In those early days, Lydia and Douglas developed a close working relation-
ship, strategizing about the campaign nearly every other day.
So they waited some more.
Like those in Texas, Douglas found that many people he knew in his own
state weren't taking his efforts seriously.
"People were skeptical," he says. "I'm a brand new attorney and some
thought I was being idealistic ... that I was chasing windmills."
Careful to work on the crusade during his own time while balancing a
heavy case load at work, Douglas was relieved when the people whose opinions
count most in the life of a young lawyer his employers at Harrell & Harrell,
Renee (BA '91, JD '94) and Bill (BSBA '71, JD '74) Harrell became believ-
ers early on. They picked up all his costs and encouraged him to keep going.
"The firm first became involved when Charlie needed help to get out to
Texas and back Christmas Eve. At that time it appeared he could get the gover-
nor's signature and Mr. Brown would be able to go home Christmas day. Until
that time, Charlie worked on his own and sought no recognition for his time
and sacrifice," says Bill Harrell. "We hired Charlie for the type of person we
thought he was, and this confirmed that we were right."

December 11, 2006:
The campaign turned to Judge Dean, who had sentenced Tyrone Brown [al-
most] 17 years earlier. For several weeks the group sent letters and faxes asking
him to join the district attorney in recommending that Brown be released. Two
weeks before Christmas, Dean wrote Gov. Perry and asked for Brown's release.
"That day represented a monumental triumph because without his signa-
ture we could not have progressed to the second step, which was the Parole
Board," Douglas says.
To ensure Brown knew everything that was happening outside his prison
walls, Douglas sent him several letters each week. Brown responded with heart-
felt letters of appreciation.


"When it became apparent that the governor's office was not taking
our campaign seriously, we decided to recruit the help of State Rep. Helen
Giddings, who represents Dallas, Tyrone's hometown. Rep. Giddings
agreed to meet with the governor on Tyrone's behalf, but still nothing
happened," he said.
"I began calling and e-mailing the governor's press secretary and deputy
general counsel every other day it seemed, but both sealed their lips and
wouldn't talk," Douglas says.
Letters continued to flood the governor's office; Douglas continued to call;
and Giddings continued to push the governor.

January 19,2007:
The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles was the next stop on the road to
freedom. It received Brown's commutation-of-sentence application Dec. 29,
2006, and the Save Mr. Brown team reinvigorated the campaign by sending
e-mail, faxes and letters to each of the seven board members. The board evalu-
ated Brown's application and voted 5-2 to recommend a commutation-of-
sentence.

January 22,2007:
Texas Gov. Perry received Brown's commutation application. The cam-
paign group, which had grown to more than 1,000, waited for days. Then
weeks and months.
"Every single day our team was steadily flooding the governor's office with
e-mail, faxes, letters and phone calls," Douglas says. "Still, nothing happened."
Meanwhile, Douglas established the Tyrone Brown Freedom Fund to raise
money for Brown while he was in prison and after his release.

March 9, 2007:
Perry signed an executive proclamation to release Brown. Instead of a full
commutation, he received a conditional pardon, but it was great news.

March 15, 2007:
Early Thursday morning a group of about 20 family members, reporters
and Douglas boarded a bus in Dallas to make the three-hour drive south to


141 FLORIDA











Huntsville. They arrived at the prison at 9:45 a.m. Brown's mother was on the
verge of collapsing. Other family members were sobbing and shaking.
"At exactly 10 a.m., through the glass doors I could see walking down the
hallway a tall black man with a big smile. As he walked through those doors,
I recognized his face, and I knew it was him," Douglas says.
After living in a prison cell for 16 years and 10 months, inmate number
554317 walked out of those penitentiary doors and became citizen Tyrone
Dwayne Brown.
"The whole experience was surreal," Douglas remembers. "I couldn't help
but recognize that I was standing in front of the building where Texas houses
its execution chamber, and I thought that of all of the lives taken inside those
walls, Tyrone's life would not be among them."
As the celebration continued and the group returned home to Dallas,
Brown gave numerous media interviews and caught up with family, neighbors
and friends who stopped by to offer congratulatory hugs. Finally, he made his
way to the dining room table where his mom served a Southern-style feast. An
impromptu neighborhood block party went on late into the night.
While his release marked the end of one phase of the campaign, it also
ushered in the beginning of another.
"When Tyrone was in prison, I promised him we would not abandon him
after his release. We would meet his needs and help ensure that his re-entry was
a success," Douglas says.
Douglas remained in Dallas a few extra days to help Brown enroll in parole
classes, reconcile outstanding court costs from 16 years earlier and shop for
new clothes. It took many calls to department store headquarters before Doug-
las found a store willing to help.
Stein Mart's Julia Taylor whose husband, John Taylor, is a 1970 UF law
school alumnus agreed and made the necessary arrangements with one of
its Dallas stores.
The Save Mr. Brown campaign assisted in finding Brown a job in mainte-
nance at a Dallas church and arranged for him and his family to see his favorite
sports teams: the Mavericks, Cowboys and Rangers. One couple in California
donated $5,000 for a used vehicle.
Now, many months later, Brown, 35, has earned his GED and visits juve-
nile detention facilities to counsel and motivate kids at risk. He plans to write
a book about his experiences and is the focus of a documentary.
"Tyrone is a good-hearted man who holds no bitterness for the judge who
sentenced him or the government that incarcerated him," Douglas says. "He is
looking forward to making the best out of the years he has ahead."
Douglas continues to be part of Brown's daily life and plans to bring him
to Jacksonville soon so he can see the ocean and go out in a boat for the
first time.
"I think of Charlie like a little brother," Brown says. "He is kind and has
a big heart. He was willing to jump on my case and once we started, he was
there non-stop to the very end. Still is. I was just lucky he was there."
For Douglas, those four and a half months of daily battles just confirmed
his belief that equal justice under the law is an ideal, not a truth, that can be
achieved with persistence.
"I learned that advocacy works," he says. "If people are willing to rise up,
passionately fight for a cause and refuse to be discouraged by bureaucracies,
change will happen." -ir

This story previously appeared in UF Law magazine, published by the Fredric G.
Levin College of Law. Reprinted with permission.


Wearing T-shirts that proclaim "In God We Trust, Welcome
Home Tyrone Brown," Brown's family celebrates upon his
release from the Huntsville Unit at Huntsville, Texas, on
March 15, 2007.
























..0P


Pushy boss? Obnoxious co-worker?
They can affect your performance more than you think.


MAU REEN


HARMON


16 FLORIDA


BY















T WAS A TOUGH DAY TO

BE A PART OF AMIR EREZ

AND CHRISTINE PORATH'S

STUDY ON HOW PERSONALITY

AFFECTS BEHAVIOR. WHEN STUDENTS

ARRIVED AT THE CLASSROOM IN

WHICH THE EXPERIMENT WAS TO

TAKE PLACE, THEY WERE MET BY ONE

CRABBY PROFESSOR WITH A HELL OF

A CHIP ON HER SHOULDER.

It turned out the experiment had been moved
down the hall, and the professor was quick to
chastise the students who missed the sign alerting
them to the change. "Can't you read," she barked.
"There is a sign on the door that tells you the
experiment will be in [another room]. But you
didn't even bother to look at the door, did you?"
The student subjects sauntered off to the correct
room, while the professor awaited her next victim.
What the student volunteers didn't realize was
that the study had already begun.


It was all for show. The professor? She had
been recruited from the law school to play the
part. The hard-to-find sign on the door? It's loca-
tion had been plotted. The very idea that this was
a study about how personality affects behavior?
Not true.
This was all a clever ruse to get to the bottom
of something else: How rude behavior affects
productivity and creativity. And this study, de-
veloped by Erez, a UF management professor,
and Porath, a management professor at the Uni-
versity of Southern California, was the first of its
kind. Sure, plenty of researchers had studied this
kind of concept before, but those studies were
based on secondhand stories told by the subjects.
There weren't any quantifiable, objective results.
Until now.
The series of studies, published in the Octo-
ber issue of the Academy *r _/ . -Journal,
documents data from 275 student subjects, each
of whom participated in one of three scenarios.
The study that involved the crabby professor was
designed to expose subjects to rude behavior di-
rectly. In another, subjects were exposed indirectly
to rude behavior when a student arrived late to
the experiment, was dismissed and then was bad-
mouthed along with the whole student body
- as the proctor wondered aloud: "What is it
with you students here ... You always arrive late.
You're not professional." The third study simply


asked subjects to recall a scenario in which they
were treated rudely.
What Erez and Porath found was that rudeness
muddles the brain. After being exposed to rude
behavior either directly, indirectly or through
memory, the subjects were asked to perform a
series of tasks to test cognitive function and cre-
ativity. When asked to recall a series of 15 words,
subjects who experienced rude behavior recalled
20 percent less than their control counterparts.
When asked to solve verbal anagrams, those who
observed rude behavior indirectly in the form of
a frustrated proctor did 33 percent worse than
those who solved anagrams in a more civil envi-
ronment. Subjects who were directly chewed out
by the professor did 61 percent worse.
Students who had been subjected to rude be-
havior rated low on the creativity scale, too. The
experimenters handed a brick to each subject and
asked for creative ways in which they could put
that brick to use. The brick, some offered, could
be used to build homes. No stroke of creative
genius there.
The ideas from the control group, however,
went beyond the obvious. How about using the
brick as a paperweight, one subject suggested.
A design element for the home? A weapon? Or,
another subject offered, the brick could be used to
break a window and retrieve keys.
While the students brainstormed, the experi-


summer 2008 17














Your colleague hands you a project that

is poorly clone and full of holes. Relax. Firing off a few
choice words isn't likely to better your colleague's perfor-
mance in the future; in fact, it may lead to more problems.
According to a new study by UF management professor Amir
Erez, and his colleague Christine Porath of the University of
Southern California, kindness is key. Here are a few tips for
keeping the workplace civil.



Start at the beginning ... :
Want to weed out incivility? Hire civil people, says Porath. The
only way to do that well is to take reference checks very seri-
ously. And instigate a zero-tolerance policy. That way, if a bad
apple makes its way into your bunch, you can put an end to
rude behavior before it gets out of hand.



... And at the end:
If an employee is leaving an organization, he or she is much
more inclined to offer honest feedback. Use departure inter-
views to your advantage and get the low-down on employee
behavior and work environment.


Punish the perpetrator:
Employees are less inclined to report incidents if they don't
think anything will be done to stop it. Solicit anonymous feed-
back from employees on work environment, and when an em-
ployee or colleague brings an incident to your attention, act.


Positivity is contagious:
In another study by Erez and Porath, the pair found that rude
behavior creates an increase in negative mood and that leads to
a state of high arousal. "High arousal can be easily transferred
from emotion to emotion and usually people are not aware of
it," says Erez. "So in principle, the high negative arousal caused
by rude behavior can be transformed to positive arousal and
counter the effect."



"I'm so sorry:"
If you're the one whose emotions have gotten the better of you,
apologize. Part of the reason rude behavior is so distracting is
that the recipient of your rant doesn't understand why she's been
targeted. "Because it is not clear," says Erez, "people ruminate
about it and this [distracts] them from concentrating."


IT WASN'T THAT SUBJECTS

WEREN'T WILLING TO

PERFORM BECAUSE

THEY SOUGHT REVENGE

OR FELT ANGRY OR

HURT. IT WAS SIMPLY

BECAUSE THEIR BRAIN

WAS OCCUPIED -

THE EXPERTS CALL IT

COGNITIVE DISRUPTION.



center went on to test how helpful
the subjects might be under the
circumstances. She knocked over a
jar of pencils to see who might help
pick them up. Only 35 percent of
the students who experienced inci-
vility offered to help. Ninety per-
cent of those who worked in a less
hostile environment helped.
What the researchers found
- that those subjects who were
subject to incivility didn't perform
as well as others wasn't all that
new. What was surprising to Erez
and Porath was the reason behind
the poor performance. It wasn't
that subjects weren't willing to per-
form because they sought revenge
or felt angry or hurt. It was simply
because their brain was occupied
- the experts call it cognitive
disruption. "[The subjects] are
thinking about what happened,"
says Porath. "Playing it over and
over." And when your brain is pre-
occupied when you're robbed


of cognitive resources it's pretty
tough to solve anagrams or think
about the most creative way to use
a brick.
All of this research suggests
that bossy bosses aren't necessar-
ily helping their cause. Modern
organizations, Erez argues, thrive
on flexibility, creativity and a clear
head. The more hostile a work
environment is, the less productive
it becomes. And Erez doesn't limit
his push for kindness to bosses.
Colleagues and peers who exhibit
rude behavior have just as much
impact on their co-workers. And
the customer? They can cause their
fair share of problems, too. The
customer is not always right, argues
Erez. The idea that the customer
can be rude to the employee won't
help that employee solve the prob-
lem at hand.
"This well-crafted research
shows that when organizations
allow rude employees to run rough-
shod over others, it not only creates
uncivilized workplaces. It is just
plain bad business." says Robert
Sutton, Stanford professor and
author of "The No-Asshole Rule."
Throughout the years it took
to design and implement the
study, collect the data, write the
paper and submit it to journal
editors, Porath and Erez got along
swimmingly. Practicing what they
preach, the two remained civil
throughout the stresses of the job
at hand. Their own work behavior
just proves their point. -i


r
I ^


18 FLORIDA




















"Florida Tomorrow is a belief
that excellence in dental care
demands excellence in scientific
discovery, dental care delivery
and education."
Micaela Gibbs,
clinical assistant professor
in the College of Dentistry


Harry Posin of Boca Raton holds
Olive, his 4-year-old Maltese
whose kidney cancer was success-
fully treated by the UF Veterinary
Medical Center's oncology service.
In March, Posin, his wife, Lisa,
and other community members
helped raise $320,000 for the
center's cancer research and care
services. The center diagnoses
and treats both small and large
animals affected by the disease.
To help the college or its oncol-
ogy services, contact Zoe Seale at
352-392-2213, ext. 5200 or e-mail
sealez@vetmed.ufl.edu.


"Florida Tomorrow is a place where
our forests, wildlife, our natural
resources are abundant, healthy,
profitable and enjoyed by all of us."
Tim White, professor and
director of the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation


As the University of Florida copes with increasingly difficult eco-
nomic times, the spotlight is shining even brighter on the largest
capital campaign in UF history, Florida Tomorrow.
"This capital campaign will help define the university's next generation of
students, faculty and researchers," says UF President Bernie Machen. "The
resources it brings to bear will be the difference in UF's margin of excellence."
By June, eight months after the campaign's public phase kickoff, Gator
alumni and other philanthropists had given $654 million toward the cam-
paign's $1.5 billion goal.
Each gift is earmarked to fulfill a UF need. Research and program support,
for example, received the most support so far with $427 million in pledges and
donations.
One such donation came from Robert and Debbie Forbis of Naples, found-
ers and owners of Premier Electric, one of Florida's largest electrical contractors.
Their $1 million gift for the College of Medicine's Department of Ophthal-
mology will enable UF scientists to study the safety and effectiveness of experi-
mental therapies being used to treat children with hypoplasia, a sight-robbing
disease.
Other UF needs include building projects ($254 million), faculty support
($433 million), graduate support ($197 million) and undergraduate support
($67 million).
One proposed building project which has gained momentum is Hough
Hall. Following Bill and Hazel Hough's $30 million gift to the Warrington
College of Business Administration last year, several alumni and friends of UF
have contributed to maximize the project. The building will bring the college's
graduate program offices and classrooms together under one roof and fulfill
the college's needs for corporate interview rooms and other facilities unique to
business students.
The campaign, slated to conclude in 2012, is crucial to the university's
three-pronged mission: teaching, research and service.


Learn more about UF' needs and the goals set by each college and unit by visiting


"Florida Tomorrow is a
place where a large group of
committed faculty and students
in the Florida Museum of Natural
History and the McGuire Center
are already taking a worldwide
leadership role in addressing
environmental issues, bio-
diversity and bioinformatics."
-Tom Emmel, director
of the McGuire Center for
Lepidoptera Research at the
Florida Museum of Natural History











$1.5 BILLION












LU


$ 5654,016,309


01











FLORIDA
TOMORROW


Florl"da Tomorrow 14's 0 0 0


11(m NNHI Notl cllillll_,(- (4)IIIIII-1-oNN?
















nlumni nrofiles


"I WAS ENJOYING

[ILLUSTRATING],

AND THAT WAS

PAYING MY BILLS,

BUT AT THE SAME

TIME SOMETHING

WAS MISSING."


WOLFGANG
BLOCH


The Sirens


' Call


A NEW IMAGE OF THE SEA, SKY AND WAVES BECKONS
FROM WOLFGANG BLOCH'S PAINTINGS.


Growing up, Wolfgang Bloch loved
to surf. Living in Ecuador, he spent
weekends on pristine beaches. He
loved everything about the ocean,
the waves, the beach and the life-
style of local fishermen.
"The idea of fisherman going
out in their little pangas (small
boats) and bringing home food for
their families was so romantic to
me," Bloch says. "They were happy.
I thought, 'I could do that' and live
happily there forever."
But Bloch's life was on a differ-
ent course. Despite choosing a path
that would lead him to a science
major at UF, the inexorable pull
of the ocean drew him back. He
found his calling while taking an
elective fine arts course.
Now an internationally acclaimed
artist, Bloch (BDESF '87) uses hori-
zontal lines to define sand, ocean and
sky as thick color blocks in gun-
metal, cobalt, rust and cigar browns.
The painted ocean landscapes are
complemented by found objects
such as wood and rusted metal.
His work is sought after by
ocean lovers worldwide, including
musicians Jack Johnson and Nancy
Sinatra, Billabong President Paul
Naude, and 1960s surfing icons
Mike Doyle and Randy Rarick.
Bloch's artistic success can be
traced to the early 2000s, when he


was a freelance illustrator creating
what he calls "pretty surf pictures":
palm trees swaying in the wind,
beautiful waves breaking in the
background and sunshine accentu-
ating the tropical perfection.
One day, Bloch decided to try
a few different colors. He applied
darker shades of gray and blue to
his canvas, creating a more morose
feeling than typically found in an
idyllic surf scene.
"I just kind of stumbled across
this thing," he says. "And where the
two colors collided, I saw this wave
in the middle. I started to develop
it further and further, and that's
basically what I'm still doing."
The ocean has long been part
of Bloch's life. Growing up in Ec-
uador, where his father's German
family found refuge at the onset of
World War II, Bloch spent almost
every weekend at the beach. With
his parents and siblings, he learned
to appreciate nature and developed
an affinity for surfing. His father,
however, dissuaded his early fishing
dreams, so Bloch chose to pursue
marine biology at UE He found
himself stymied by prerequisites.
"I couldn't do well with my
math and chemistry," Bloch re-
members. "So I took an art class
as an elective. I figured, 'Hey, I'm
kind of good at this, and I need


some credits.' I truly enjoyed it,
and that's what motivated me."
Having graduating from UF in
1987 with a fine arts/graphic design
degree, he switched coasts to attend
the Art Center College of Design in
Pasadena. From there, he reconnect-
ed with his nautical roots by creating
commercial designs for surf-industry
giant Gotcha Sportswear.
"After Art Center in Pasadena, I
walked away from fine arts," Bloch
says. "I was under the impression
that I had to make a career as a
designer."
Bloch started out with logo
and color work but was quickly
promoted to Gotcha's marketing
department, where he handled
advertising and the overall direction
of the brand. He still longed for
hands-on interaction.
"Working at Gotcha never felt
right," he remembers. "I enjoyed it,


20 FLORIDA


















but I didn't have the passion for it.
I just didn't feel like I was doing the
right thing."
So Bloch quit and returned to
basics by getting what he calls a
"non-thinking" job.
"I started working for a carpenter
who was building furniture, and all I
did was finish work: applying paint,
applying stains, sanding," he says.
"But it was hands-on, and it was
great therapy for me at the time."
Even in his new line of work,
Bloch maintained the industry
contacts he built up during his four
years at Gotcha. When surf com-
panies began calling for organic,
hand-drawn designs, Bloch's fine-
arts training resurfaced.
"A niche was created for me,"
he says.
Bloch started off with surf big-
wigs such as Quiksilver, Billabong,
O'Neill, Rip Curl and Vans. Soon
he branched out to mainstream
projects with Tower Records and
Indian Motorcycles, the latter hir-
ing Bloch in 2002 to re-design their
corporate identity. But drawing
paradisiacal palm tree scenes be-
came stale.
"I was enjoying [illustrating],
and that was paying my bills, but at
the same time something was miss-
ing," he says. "These little illustra-
tions that were really pretty never
looked quite as good after being
transferred onto T-shirts. And to
me they lacked soul."
Bloch discovered soul in his
new aesthetic approach: moody
renderings of abstract lineups. He
soon experienced success in the
notoriously fickle surf art world.
Industry fountainhead Surfer
Magazine profiled Bloch in its
December 2004 issue, dedicating
six full pages to his geometric
explorations of the ocean's horizons,
planes and swathes of color. But
even the new paintings proved to
not be enough.
"After painting this hint of
a wave between these two color
fields, all of a sudden I started see-


ing waves all over the place: in the
cracks of concrete, on the wood in
fences. Then I said, 'Wait a minute,
maybe I can include these materials
in my work."'
Bloch began scouring swap
meets, garage sales and construc-
tion sites for "found" materials: bits
of wood, chunks of concrete, scraps
of metal. Harkening back to his
wood-working days, the "found"
objects began to direct his projects
instead of the other way around.
"I really enjoy the process of
finding something that inspires
me," Bloch says. "I grab something
and see a beautiful texture or color
in it, and then the material basically
dictates where I go."
These days, Bloch has gone
global. His work has been on
display in California, New York,


Brazil, Japan, England and Austra-
lia. A 176-page book detailing his
career is due September 2008 from
Chronicle Books, and Bloch recent-
ly teamed up with shoe company
DVS to produce an Eco-Sandal
from recycled materials.
Through these variations on a
theme, Bloch has come to recognize
the unpredictability that dominates
his life and work.
"I've learned now that these
little happy accidents happen for
a reason," he says. "I've learned to
trust them and see them not as a
mistake but more like, 'OK, this is
the way I'm supposed to go with
my work.' The accidents that hap-
pen now, I don't try and fix them."
-Nick McGregor and Elizabeth
Hillaker (BA '08, BSJ '08)


summer 2008 21


PROFILES


. ............ _.










PROFILES


Western Thou


Eastern World


IT'S NOT COMMON TO BUCK
THE SYSTEM IN JAPAN.
SACHIO SEMMOTO THINKS iiii
IT SHOULD BE.


Sachio Semmoto is up before
dawn in Tokyo, watching golf on
his treadmill at 5 a.m. He can't help
but point out that Japan isn't rep-
resented by any players at this PGA
tournament. It saddens him.
"Japan isn't hungry enough," he
says over a clear long-distance con-
nection and a 12-hour time differ-
ence. "The young people of Japan
lack hunger and risk-taking. They
are satisfied with the situation here.
If you look at the Roman Empire,
when they became rich and satis-
fied, things began to degrade."
This small, haiku-worthy mo-
ment of wistful discontent for
Semmoto (PhD '71) explains both
his character and his enormous
success as the founder of Japan's
second-largest telecom. When he
was young, his hunger for change
brought him to UF, and then
- with some important lessons
learned lured him home again to
Japan where he eventually revolu-
tionized telecommunications.
He has taken risks at every turn.
After a brief period of employment
in the mid-'60s, he left Nippon
Telephone and Telegraph, the most
prestigious telecom in Japan, sec-
ond in size only to AT&T. On a
Fulbright Scholarship, he came to
Gainesville turning down of-
fers from Harvard and Princeton
(again the contrarian) because of
his esteem for UF's faculty, espe-
cially Dr. Rudolf Kalman to
get a doctorate in electrical engi-


neering. Most Japanese students
chose the Ivy League or UCLA or
Stanford and then formed cliques
on campus with other Japanese
expatriates. Yet Semmoto chose the
South. As a Christian, he already
was an outsider in Japanese society
where only half a percentile belong
to the Christian faith, and he liked
the idea of mingling with unpre-


tentious, church-going American
students. Everything he did was
against the grain of his upbringing:
even his religion.
Yet going to church in America
isn't what changed his life.
"It was liberating in the U.S. My
study at the University of Florida
enabled me to accomplish what I've
done in Japan," he says. "But being


22 FLORIDA











in the middle of student life was
crucial, too. I had a friend, a bright
law student, well-behaved, prayed
before going to bed. When I told
him I was from a huge, prestigious
Japanese monopoly, he called me a
two-word name. I was shocked. He
never cursed."
The first word was "dumb." The
second also had four letters.
At the time, Semmoto was
blindsided by that friendly insult.
Yet over the next six months, those
words opened his eyes. He began to
reflect on how American's strength
and growth grew from everything
opposed to monopoly: variety,
competition, risk and individual-
ism. Qualities Japan, it seemed,
would never have. These values
got into his bones. He decided to
stay in America: he'd even bought a
used VW Beetle, like so many other
students in that era, because he de-
spised Japanese engineering. Japan's
cars broke down at high speeds.
Yet once he got his degree, he
returned to work at NTT in Japan


- thinking maybe
he was living up
to that epithet
from his dorm
room friend all
because of advice
from UF professor
Donald Childress.
Semmoto could
have worked at
Bell Labs or IBM's
Yorktown Research
Center. Instead, he
surrendered again
to a state-run
monopoly. But
in the long run,
as it turned out,
his professor was


"THE YOUNG PEOPLE OF
JAPAN LACK HUNGER
AND RISK-TAKING. THEY
ARE SATISFIED WITH
THE SITUATION HERE.
IF YOU LOOK AT THE
ROMAN EMPIRE, WHEN
THEY BECAME RICH
AND SATISFIED, THINGS
BEGAN TO DEGRADE."

SACHIO SEMMOTO


right. At the time, Childress had
just bought a Toyota. He could
foresee the future. With new qual-
ity principles, Japan was preparing
to become a major competitor to
the U.S.
In the mid-'80s, finally, after
15 years with NTT, where he'd
become general manager of engi-


neering, everything
he'd absorbed in
the U.S. goaded
Semmoto into
leaving the compa-
ny. With one other
partner, he found-
ed Japan's first,
and at that time,
only competitive
telecom: DDI,
now KDDI. It was
an entrepreneurial
move unheard of
in Japan. Most
people thought
he'd lost his mind.
It was his cloned
American DNA, as


he puts it, finally emerging.
"I saw that if no one stood up,
Japan wouldn't change. So I stood
up. My underlying values, from
my education in Gainesville, trig-
gered the move. Without it, I'd
have never thought to start a new
company. I wanted it to be the next
MCI. Now it's the second largest


PROFILES


carrier, with revenues of $45 bil-
lion," he says.
Because of his move, Japan's IT
industry, with its heavy dependence
of network data traffic, was able to
grow in the '90s: KDDI brought
down the cost of long-distance
dramatically, enabling IT to flour-
ish. "I'd learned to take risks, rather
than work for a monopoly," Sem-
moto says.
In all, he has started four differ-
ent telecoms, each one successful.
The latest is eMobile, offering the
world's fastest wireless data service.
"Without Gainesville, my life
would not be what it is today. I'm
so fortunate. And to think, when
I first arrived, I could only under-
stand 20 percent of the lectures,"
he says, laughing. "It was that
Southern drawl."
Dave Dorsey


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summer 2008 23

















lifnaliimfi


HITTING THE BRICKS
ANSWERS FROM PAGE 9:

1. Albert and Alberta have made
the Emerson Alumni Hall
courtyard their home.
2. This grinning gator hangs out
just above the entrance in the
UF Welcome Center.
3. This alligator can regularly
be seen sunning himself in
Graham Pond. And yes, he's
real.
4. This photogenic gator hangs
out on the north side of Ben
Hill Griffin Stadium near the
Gator Booster entrance where
he's always happy to pose
with fans.
5. This alligator, a gift from the
class of 1997, hams it up on
the northeast side of Univer-
sity Auditorium.
6. This snappy gator lives in
the Department of Civil and
Coastal Engineering office in
Weil Hall.

See more photos of campus
Gators on our Web site, which
launches in September at
www.ufalumnimagazines.com


My Old School
Please join us in a walk down memory lane. We welcome your letters and photographs at .. r r or at Florida
magazine, P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425. Photos can be scanned and returned upon request.


I entered UF as a freshman in the
general college in September 1940.
At that time the student popula-
tion was about 4,500, and it was
an all-male campus. The girls at-
tended the Florida State College
for Women in Tallahasssee (now
Florida State University).
This being at the end of the
Great Depression, things were tight
and folks were thrifty. My room
assignment was in section 0 of
Fletcher Hall, which at that time
was a new building, constructed
during the Depression by the
Works Progress Administration,
one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's
Depression-curing activities. If
my memory is correct, my dorm
room and all university fees, which
included football games, campus
functions and your yearbook, was
$40 per semester. To make ends
meet, I worked as a waiter three
meals a day at the Varsity Grill,
which was located on the corner of
University Avenue and 13' Street.
It was owned and operated by the
Hammonds, who also owned the
College Inn across from the dorms
on University Avenue. I was paid
25 cents an hour not in cash but
in meal tickets and was glad to
have the job. Most of the customers
were students, of course, so there
were no tips either, but all enjoyed
the tunes on the juke box, which
played for 5 cents. However, there
were some saving graces, such as
a complete dinner that included
meat, two vegetables and hot bis-
cuits with butter for 25 cents.


Pearl Harbor occurred at the
close of the next year, and things
changed rapidly on the campus
thereafter as so many volunteered
for service and many were drafted.
I was one of the fortunate ones
- I was deferred since my course of
studies was pre-med. After receiving
my two-year associate of arts degree
from the general college, I was fortu-
nate to go forward to another uni-
versity with my dental education as
no medical or dental school existed
in the state of Florida at that time. I
subsequently served in the Navy.
Henry Giddens King (AA '44)
Treasure Island

My mother, Ruth Woods,
passed away July 2007 at a hospice
in Atlanta. She was 92. Her ties to
UF ran deep. From 1965 to 1980
"Mom Woods" was the spirited,
much loved and remembered
House Mother of the Year among
all the Sigma Chi fraternity on
campus. In fact, her Sigs nominated
her for House Mother of the Year
among //the Sigma Chi chapters
throughout the nation in 1989, and
she won the award.
During her tenure as house
mother, she played host to numer-
ous dignitaries and the rich and
famous who dined at the campus
fraternity, including John Wayne,
GOP Presidential candidate Barry
Goldwater, Florida lawmakers, Ga-
tor athletes, powerful attorneys, etc.
UF President Dr. J. Wayne Reitz,
(yep, an old Sigma Chi) was a
regular at mealtime, as were various


department heads on campus.
Her influence on the young men
of Sigma Chi runs deep. I received
a condolence letter from the presi-
dent of Randolph-Macon College
in Virginia, a Gator grad from '76.
"I loved her kind spirit, her sense
of humor, her unfailing kindness."
Another Sigma Chi wrote, "She
taught me how to treat others with
respect and how to act like a gentle-
man." I could go on.
I wanted to inform the hundreds
of alumni who had the opportunity
to know Mom Woods that she left
this world slightly better than when
she entered it in 1915, in the back
room of a tiny home in Gurley, Ala.
She always considered herself a
Gator. The tradition, I'm proud to
say, is genuine in the Woods family.
My son Michael graduated from
Florida, his son plans to attend
Florida in three years, and I gradu-
ated in '63.
Larry Woods (BSCOM '63)
Clayton, Ga.

I attended UF during the
turbulent years of the Vietnam War
protests. Entering school in 1969
after serving four years in the U.S.
Air Force and working at the Ken-
nedy Space Center, I had many
occasions to witness the anti-war
protesters. On one particular af-
ternoon, I was attending a calculus
class when it was disrupted by tear
gas. Seems the protesters some
students, some not were up on
the roof of the building across the
street from where my class was be-


24 FLORIDA











ing held. They were hurling what-
ever they could on the law enforce-
ment officers below. The police
were fighting back by lobbing tear
gas canisters up to the roof, and
the students were throwing them
back into the street. Some of that
gas came into the building where
we were having class, and we were
forced to make a hasty exit. Epi-
sodes like this were common even
when I graduated in '72.
Clyde Martin (BSBA 72)
Orlando

There was an article by April
Frawley Birdwell on Kingsley Plan-
tation on St. George Island [Flor-
ida, summer 2007] that brought
back a memory involving butter-
flies. We frequently went to King-
sley Plantation because my wife.
Billie (MED '52), was interested in
both architecture and archaeology.
In addition to that attraction, there
was a little white church on the
other side of the island that looked
out over the swamps, but also had
little benches around it. We used
to go there and have picnics. The
church was used every fourth Sun-
day when the circuit-riding minis-
ter would get there.
In 1969, the last trip that I
made to Florida, we went to King-
sley Plantation. After visiting, we
took the tabby road back toward
the main highway.
In less than one half miles,
we came to an open place in the
woods, and I stopped the car as that
open area was filled with butterflies.
Our three daughters, my sister-in-
law, Lois B. Green (MED '53), and
I, of course, were enthralled at the
sight. We sat there in the car for
close to 12 minutes while the but-
terflies flew by. Billie identified 20
different species. They weren't just
at eye level, but the migration went
from eye level to above the treetops,
one of the most enthralling sights I
ever saw in my life.
David Mayne Johnston
Dayton, Ohio


The fall 2007 issue of Florida
brought back many fond memories
of my years at UF Of particular in-
terest was the article "UF Flashback
- On Your Honor." I was among
that group of students whose educa-
tion was interrupted by the call to
serve our nation during World War
II. Prewar enrollment was about
2,500 close-knit students. "A Flori-
da man needs no introduction" and
the honor code were a part of our
heritage. The many times I wrote
the statement, "On my honor as a
Florida man, I have neither given
nor received aid on this exam," are
something I will never forget. Never
once did I see one of my classmates
cheat on an exam. I feel certain the
professors who graded my exam
paper knew immediately that had
I received aid, my grade would've
been much better, and, had I given
aid, it certainly would not have
benefited the recipient.
Another item relating to honor
during the prewar days was the
apple boxes scattered throughout the
campus. Beautiful red apples were
available on the honor system for 5
cents. Oftentimes, we didn't have a
nickel in our pockets, but the sight
of those apples and that tempting
aroma was too much to pass up.
But not to worry, when we did get
a nickel, we dropped it in the box. I
knew several classmates who usually
dropped a nickel in the box even
though they didn't take an apple.
Why? Just in case someone had for-
gotten to drop a nickel in the box.
Joseph Cocke (BSA '49)
Clemson, S.C.

What fun to read in recent
issues of Florida of Gator graduates
who can, like me, still see to read
through their bifocals and can recall
the wisdom and lively encourage-
ment of professors John Paul Jones
and Rae Weimer. Like many other
grizzly Gators of that long-ago era,
I sandwiched classes between re-
sponding to that deeply unsettling
period of the Korean conflict and
starting a family.
My personal recollections in-
clude pledging for a semi-sober
time and one singularly embar-
rassing run down the crowded
streets of Gainesville after losing


my pajamas in the midst of a frat
skirmish which developed along the
pajama parade route. I also recall
vividly the period when I lived with
my new wife down the street from
the frat house in a small duplex.
We shared this hole-in-the-wall
with another bootstrap couple, and
occasionally we studied in the yard
together as we loosely managed our
respective crumb grabbers.
After graduation I went on to
become the house magazine edi-
tor for a large flight training firm,
Graham's Aviation. After four years
of doing that weekly, I joined the
Space Task Group at Langley Field,
Va., as Project Mercury's first civilian
information officer. In 1962, just af-
ter John Glenn's epochal three-orbit
flight, I moved my family to Texas
and took on additional duties for
NASA as the first executive officer to
the original seven astronauts.
My wife and I have created four
sons. I am now happily retired, in
good health and live with my good
wife and five noisy cats on a small
island near the Johnson Space Cen-
ter, just outside Houston. Please
know, lots of us old farts thorough-
ly enjoy each issue.
Gene Horton (BSCOM '56)
Kemah, Texas


E-mail submissions may be sent
to Florida@uff.ufl.edu.
Photos mailed to Florida editors,
P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL
32604-2425 can be returned upon
request.


summer 2008 25


I U ALUMNI


with us.


The hottest place to be this fall (besides
the Swamp) is online with the UF alumni
magazines' brand spankin' new Web site.


www.ufalumnimagazines.com



L










U FALU M NI


Black and White



Memories
By Ron Coleman ('68-'73)

THE ROAD TO UF WASN'T EASY. NEITHER WAS THE RACISM HE
FACED AFTER HE ARRIVED. BUT PIONEER RON COLEMAN SAYS
THE EDUCATION HE EARNED AND THE FRIENDS HE MADE AT UF
WERE WORTH IT ALL.


UF IS CELEBRATING

ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY

OF INTEGRATION

THIS YEAR. VISIT

WWW.UREL.UFL.EDU/50

FOR INFORMATION.


This September marked 40 years
since I first set foot on the UF's
campus. I was part of the new and
increasing number of black students
enrolling at formerly all-white state
universities throughout the South.
American history will tell you
that our nation was experiencing
a tumultuous tidal wave of social
change that swept across America.
It was a period that is referred to as
the civil rights movement.
My story parallels the stories
of many others on campuses large
and small. I was born and raised in
Ocala, and I attended segregated
elementary and secondary schools
through ninth grade. I left the
comfortable confines and camara-
derie of Howard High in June 1965
to attend Ocala High, which would


become the first integrated high
school in Marion County. My older
brother was already attending Bet-
hune-Cookman College, and my
younger sister was also destined for
college. My widower father was just
not able to send me his middle
child off to college. It was not
financially feasible. It seemed my
college education would have to be
placed on hold.
In my case, along came UF
Coach Jimmy Carnes and Athletic
Director Ray Graves to save the
day. In June 1968, I not only ex-
celled in the classroom, which was
mandatory for admission to UF,
but I was also pretty good at run-
ning and jumping. This resulted
in a full, four-year track-and-field
scholarship. The greatest hoopla,
however, centered on the fact that
I was to become the first black
student athlete at UF. Like many
other black students of the time, it
didn't matter very much whether
they were the first, second, third
or 100th black student athlete to
receive a scholarship. What did
matter was that he or she would be
going to college.
The sad part is that it obviously
mattered very much to those who
spewed hatred and bigotry. One of
my letters of congratulations said:
"Dear Nigger, Prepare to die. You
will never make it to Gainesville."
That was one of the many hate-
filled diatribes suffered by a young
man who simply wanted to go to


to say, those .
days were
very challeng-
ing not as
much for me, the
invincible 18 year old, as it
was for my father. My mother,
who had been a schoolteacher,
died about three years earlier when
I was 15. My father, a barber, was
not comfortable sending me to
what would surely be my death.
Who can blame a father whose par-
ents were born into slavery? Thanks
to a close-knit circle of supportive
family and encouraging friends, he
eventually overcame his fears and
supported me wholeheartedly.
Fast forward to my first day on
campus. A little-known part of the
story is due to another student ath-
lete from West Palm Beach named
Johnnie Brown ('68-'69). Johnnie
was to be my roommate during the
first two years at UF. Although he
was not on scholarship, as a cross-
country runner, Johnnie was the
first black student athlete to ever
compete for UF, two months before
I hit the track.
Coach Carnes proved, in a very
unique way, that he, too, was a
pioneer in the civil rights move-
ment. He dared to defy the crit-
ics and naysayers, including the
Florida Legislature, by signing a
black athlete. He was courageous,
defiant, carefree and nurturing. For


26 FLORIDA











him, academics always came before
athletics. Although there were still
people among the various athletic
squads who would rather not see
blacks lined up beside them on the
same field of play, there were many
unlikely allies among the white stu-
dent athletes who held no prejudice
and who helped to smooth the way
for future athletes. Jack Youngblood
(BSBA '72) stands out among them
in my memory as one of those allies
because he saved me from a terrible
predicament simply by being him-
self. You see, there were times when
I would eat at the athletic training
table and be left to sit alone. Jack
changed that by simply inviting me
to his table or by sitting with me at
mine. Willie Jackson (BSJ '75) and
Leonard George (BSBR '74) were
the first black student athletes to
set foot on the gridiron. They, too,
were courageous, not only because
they were potential human tackling
dummies, but also because they
invaded the last vestige of "good
old boy" spirit in Gator football.
Nat Moore (BSPE '75) came along
shortly afterwards and was the first
true black gridiron superstar.
Black athletes encountered
prejudice while traveling with the
teams, and some suffered in the
academic arena, but practically all
excelled on the competitive field
of play. During those days in the
late '60s and early '70s, ALL black
students belonged to the Black


Student Union. Whether you were
a radical proponent of change (the
Black Panthers were very much in
vogue during those days) or one of
those "I'm not gonna jeopardize my
scholarship" student athletes, every-
one belonged to the family known
as the BSU.
Black students formed a close-
knit group, very similar to the way
of life in our various hometowns.
We had our own little village away
from the villages where each of
us grew up. Of course there was
prejudice, bigotry and blatant
discrimination during those days,
but cool heads and calmness gener-
ally prevailed. With one exception,
there were no large-scale, disrup-
tive incidents. That one excep-
tion involved a sit-in at the office
of university President Stephen
O'Connell (BSBA '40, LLB '40).
The entire group of protesters was
hauled off to jail (except those who
ate at the training table.) Everyone
who was arrested that day was even-
tually (supposedly) exonerated.
Black athletes during those days
helped black students form a bridge
between academics and social life
that was virtually unknown before
their arrival on campus. Athletes
represented another source of pride
and self respect among the minority
student body. The Black Student
Union now had its own cheering
section at Gator football games.
Pioneering is not all it's cracked


up to be, especially when you're
staring down the barrel of a rifle
in a small restaurant outside of
Tuscaloosa, Ala. The man told
me, "We don't serve nigras in this
here restaurant," and I said to him
- while walking backwards and
praying at the same time "That's


OK, I don't like nigras that much
anyway." My teammates and I
quickly left, fearing for our lives
- well, mine for sure. Of course, it
was not all bad. As a matter of fact,
the positives far outnumbered the
negatives. But in the long run, all of
those kinds of experiences posi-
tive and negative served to lay
the framework for what this campus
has come to represent: a proud
Association of Black Alumni and a
conglomerate of humanity repre-
senting unprecedented diversity and
accomplishments in the academic
and athletic arenas. It gives me great
joy to give back to the institution
that played such a pivotal role in my
life by serving on the UF Alumni
Association Board of Directors, the
Gator Boosters Board of Directors
and the F Club Committee. The
Gator Nation I am proud as ever
to be a part of the legacy.

Ron Coleman lives in Orange Park.
He is a member of the Gator (
ofj .. and the UF Alumni
Association Board ofDirectors.


Ron Coleman became the first black track and field athlete at UF in 1968. His
coach, Jimmy "the hawk" Carnes, is fourth from the left.


summer 2008 27


I GATORTALES
























This backhoe-mounted "gator"
helped prepare for the con-
struction of a new lobby the
Gateway of Champions on
the southwest corner of Ben Hill
Griffin Stadium. Construction of
the 28,000-square-foot addition
is slated for completion this sum-
mer. To test your knowledge of
other alligators on campus, see
"Hitting the Bricks" on page 9.


July
12 Gator Hometown Party in Fort Lauderdale
19 Gator Hometown Party in Orlando
19 10th annual Volusia County Gator Club
Scholarship Golf Tournament in Ormond
Beach
27 Gator Hometown Party in Atlanta


August
9 Gator Hometown Party in Tampa
25 Class of 2012 Welcome Reception in
Gainesville
29-31 Association of Black Alumni Weekend
in Gainesville
30 Gator Nation Tailgate (Gators vs. Hawaii)
in Gainesville


September
6 Gator Nation Tailgate (Gators vs. Miami)
in Gainesville
17 Phil Griffin Distinguished Lecture Series
presents former U.S. Sen. and Florida Gov.
Bob Graham in New York City
20 Gator Nation Tailgate in Knoxville, Tenn.
27 Gator Nation Tailgate (Gators vs.
Ole Miss) in Gainesville


Gator Growl is coming Oct. 24. UFAA members will receive a priority seating form by mail.
Non-members can visit www.ufalulmni.ufl.edu for a printable ticketform.
For more information about any of these events, call 888-352-5866, 352-392-1905 or e-mail ufalum@uff.ufl.edu.

Want to join the UF Alumni Association? Visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/membership to become a member and receive a host of benefits, including UF Today magazine.
Or, mail this coupon to the address at left to request information.


UNIVERSITY of
UFLORIDA
F L 0 R I D A
University of Florida Alumni Association
Emerson Alumni Hall
P.O. Box 14425
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425


U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
PERMIT No. 682
SO. FL.
FLORIDA


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