• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 The queen of clamelot
 Falling with style
 Wood U
 She left her mark
 Rebound and recover
 Hitting the bricks
 Design for the ages
 Voyage to tomorrow
 UF's bighearted hero
 A beautiful career with "Ugly...
 High plains dentist
 My old school
 A government-issued education














Group Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Title: Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073685/00016
 Material Information
Title: Florida news for alumni and friends of the University of Florida
Uniform Title: Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida National Alumni Association
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Publisher: University of Florida National Alumni Association,
University of Florida National Alumni Association
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: Winter 2008
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 2000)-
General Note: Title from caption.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073685
Volume ID: VID00016
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Focus (University of Florida)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    The queen of clamelot
        Page 4
    Falling with style
        Page 5
    Wood U
        Page 6
    She left her mark
        Page 7
    Rebound and recover
        Page 8
    Hitting the bricks
        Page 9
    Design for the ages
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Voyage to tomorrow
        Page 14
        Page 15
    UF's bighearted hero
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    A beautiful career with "Ugly Betty"
        Page 20
        Page 21
    High plains dentist
        Page 22
        Page 23
    My old school
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    A government-issued education
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text











for alumni and friends of the university of florida


news

















swamnta~dk


Senior Editor
Liesl O'Dell (BS '92)

Editor
Cinnamon Bair

Assistant Editor
Meredith Cochie (BSJ '06)

Contributing Editors
Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)
Shannon McAleenan (7JM)

Managing Editor
David Finnerty

Contributing Writers
April Frawley Birdwell (BSJ '02)
Pat Dooley (BS'76)
Ted Geltner (MAMC '06)
Denise Trunk Krigbaum (MAMC '97)
Jamison Webb (BSJ'07)
Wendell Kilpatrick (BSE '48, MS '49)

Design
University of Florida
Office of University Relations
Publications Group

UNIVERSITY of
UFIFLORIDA

Florida is published three times a year and
sent free to all alumni, parents and
friends of the University of Florida.
Opinions expressed in Florida do not
necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or
official policies of the University of Florida, the
University of Florida Foundation
or the UF Alumni Association.


Editorial Staff
352-846-2818
Fax: 352-392-7676

UF Alumni Association
352-392-1905
888-352-5866

E-mail
Florida@uff.ufl.edu

UF Alumni Association Web address
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu

Copyright 2007

Florida is printed on recycled paper
and is recyclable.


Not a Hero
Of all the possible profile sto-
ries you could have published
in Gator Tales (fall 2007), you
chose one from PR-huckster
Ron Sachs (BSJ '72) on his
"courageous" attempt as editor
of the Alligator to publish in-
formation on abortion provid-
ers in 1971, which was against
the law then. Mr. Sachs gets
to shill his "bravery" in stand-
ing up to the "bad" President
Stephen O'Connell (BSBA
'40, LLB '40). How noble. No
mention of the 40 million-plus
babies killed by abortion in
the U.S. since those days.
Maybe it's just a sign of
how UF is trying to become a
premier liberal (in the negative
political sense) university. Ron
can spread his garbage about
abortion rights and denigrate
President O'Connell, and UF
[ACCENT, a student-run
speaker's bureau] invites con-
victed murderer Kevorkian to
be paid to speak. The least able
(the unborn, the sick and the
old) to protect themselves from


enablers such as Ron and kill-
ers such as Kevorkian don't get
a voice, but the cult of death is
able to spread freely.
MichaelJ. Delate
,'BsEEV 9, lE '93i



Mr. Orange and Blue
It was incredibly fun to read
the alumni profile (fall 2007)
of Florida's "Mr. Orange and
Blue," Richard Johnston
(BSBA '79, JD '81). It's won-
derful to know that a college
friend has never lost his desire
to show everyone why it's great
to be a Florida Gator.
I first met Richard in the sum-
mer of 1976 when we were
both working on Homecom-
ing. Richard worked directly
with another friend, Karen
Stone. He always insisted that
they be referred to as "The
Carpenters" in tribute to
Karen and Richard Carpenter.
If someone drew a blank on
the reference, Richard was
happy to sing a few bars of
"Close to You."


Richard and I attended
law school together. One day
Richard announced that since
he was not having enough fun
in law school, he was trying
out for the cheerleading squad.
He made the squad perhaps
the only graduate student in
the history ofUF to include
that activity in a busy academic
schedule.
Richard was scheduled to
graduate from law school one
term after many of his close
friends. However, Richard
promised to be at our gradu-
ation and he was dressed
as Albert the Alligator. Most
graduates have to settle for a
picture with the dean; we were
lucky enough to pose with
Albert.
Richard's love for UF may
not seem that important to
some. However, without peo-
ple like him, Florida football
would not continue to be the
most fun you can have on a
Saturday. Thanks for the up-
date on Mr. Orange and Blue.
LisaA. Miller (BA 79, JD '81)
Minneapolis


2 FLORIDA




volume 9


number 1 winter 2008


ON THE COVER
Heisman Trophy
winning quarterback
Tim Tebow grew
up helping kids
like Joel Ramos in
the Philippines as
part of his family's
missionary work.
Page 16
COURTESY OF THE TEBOW FAMILY


.iSw'u


FEATURES
10 ........................................... ..................................... Design for the Ages
Universal design keeps home comfortable
no matter your age or ability.
14 ............................................................................... Voyage to Tom orrow
UF launches its push for a brighter future.
16.......................................................................... UF's Bighearted Hero
Winning the Heisman Trophy hasn't changed Tim Tebow's desire to
help people it's just changed how many people desire his help.

IN EVERY ISSUE

ON CAMPUS NEWS ABOUT CAMPUS, FACULTY AND STUDENTS

4 ........................................................................ The Queen of Clamelot
Faculty Profile: How Leslie Sturmer brought clams -
and prosperity to Cedar Key.
5 ......................................................................................... Fa ling W ith Style
Student profile: Four UF students make a splash at
an annual "flying" competition.
6 .......................................................................... . ............ ............. W ood U .
In the Classroom: From chewing gum to the magazine you're reading,
forestry impacts your life every day.
7 ........................................................................................She Left Her M ark
UF Flashback: Sixty-four years after she died, Georgia Seagle's name lives on.
................................................................................... Rebound and Recover
Sports Profile: Lonnika Thompson's basketball dreams seemed lost to
Hurricane Katrina. At UF, she's gotten them back.
9 ...................................................................................... Hitting the Bricks
How well do you know campus?

ALUMNI PROFILES
20 ................................................... A Beautiful Career with "Ugly Betty"
Jim Wallis (BFA '82) gives a hit TV show its distinctive look.
2 2 ............................................................. ................ High Plains Dentist
Dian Olah (DMD '85) plans to trade her Beverly Hills clientele
for those who need her talents more a Navajo tribe.

ALUMNI ALUMNI MEMORIES AND HAPPENINGS
2 4 .......................................................................................... M y Old School
UF alumni share their memories.

GATOR TALES
27 ........................................................A Government-Issued Education
A grateful Wendell Kilpatrick (BSE '48, MS '49) hasn't forgotten how much the
GI Bill helped him and his family.


news for alumni and friends of
the university of florida


winter 2008


CONQ


ENTS


UF
Flashback





















The Queen of Clamelot


HOW LESUE STURMER
BROUGHT CLAMS AND
PROSPERITY TO
CEDAR KEY.
Cedar Key owes a lot to the clam.
The tiny town tucked in Flori-
da's Big Bend is one of the country's
biggest producers of farm-raised
clams. The hardy mollusk thrives in
the waters off the town. But no one
knew that until the early 1990s.
That's when Leslie Sturmer began
a retraining program to teach clam
farming to local oyster harvesters,
who were nearly out of work be-
cause of increasing regulations and
polluted waters.
"This was an opportunity to use
their water-related skills and grow
a crop on the water instead ofhar-


vesting one, but there was a lot of
uncertainty," remembers Sturmer, a
UF extension agent specializing in
shellfish aquaculture.
Then an aquaculture specialist
for the Harbor Branch Oceano-
graphic Institute, Sturmer had.
already conducted one retraining
program in Apalachicola to teach
out-of-work seafood workers to
farm oysters. But that program
failed. Things went differently in
Cedar Key. The water had just the
right salinity for clams. Commu-
nity leaders helped secure funding
for the program. Locals helped run
it. And the clams were hardier than
oysters.
By 1993 her Cedar Key students
each had plots of submerged land
to farm and they were making


The clam-farming industry Leslie Sturmer helped found in Cedar Key has grown
to include seed producers, wholesalers, distributors and equipment manufac-
turers. "I have never seen aquaculture come and be applied on a community
level as it has here in Cedar Key," she says.


NEWS


ABOUT CAMPUS,


FACULTY AND


STUDENTS


4 FLORIDA


money. New businesses cropped up
to support the fledgling industry.
Now, 15 years after Sturmer's pupils
first planted their own clam "seed,"
Cedar Key is the center of the
clam-farming map. The business
has become a $10 million industry
- $24 million if you count the
support businesses, Sturmer says.
"I like to call it Clamelot," says
Sturmer, who lives in Cedar Key
with her husband, a clam farmer.
"Cedar Key has become a clam
town. Nobody knew these condi-
tions existed here. We didn't know
the biological conditions would be
so conducive to mollusk and shell-
fish species."
Sturmer no longer teaches cam
farming she became a UF ex-
tension agent in 1995 but still
advises clam farmers across the state
and works with UF researchers to
sort out problems in the growing
industry.
"She's helped us when we needed
(equipment). She gives advice.
She knows plumbing. She knows
pumps. She knows how much the
salinity should be," says Sue Colson,
a clam farmer with Sturmer since
1991. "She's a fountain of informa-
tion right here in the community."
Sturmer's role as an extension
agent has been crucial to nursing
the fledgling industry, says Chuck
Adams, a UF marine economist.
She works on solving problems that
plague the industry, such as keeping
clams alive during the summer and
extending their shelf life.
"(The clam farmers) don't have
the ability to do all this," Adams
says. "They need somebody to
bridge the gap. She wants to make
sure people get the information
they need."
- April Frawley Birdwell (BSJ '02)


oTIn Ca TII s








I ON CAMPUS


Museum


Stroll


MODERN MASTERY
"Paradigms and the Unexpect-
ed: Modern and Contemporary
Art from the Shey Collection"
features mostly American
artists from the 20t and 21"
centuries. The exhibit is di-
vided into two parts, modern
and contemporary with works


I1

if 2

r
*3


American


from important movements such as Cubism, Geomet-
ric Abstraction, Precisionism, Realism, Regionalism,
Pop, Minimalism and
Neo-Expressionism. The
exhibit runs through May
18 at the Samuel P. Harn
Museum of Art.
www.harn.ufl.edu
The Gigant


AFRICAN ODESSEY
The Florida Museum of Natural History will explore
the many facets of Africa its people, lands and rich


cultural history when
it hosts "Inside Africa."
The exhibit includes a
model slave ship, African
language recordings, a


INSIDE

AFRICA
BASED ON AFRICA," A PERMANENT
EXHIBITION ATTHE FIELD MUSEUM
^"a OumiM Epr


binocular viewing video of a mountain gorilla family
and a section on the Underground Railroad. The ex-
hibit will run March 15 to Sept. 7.


Falling With Style


FOUR UF STUDENTS MAKE A SPLASH AT ANNUAL "FLYING" COMPETITION.
They aren't engineering students. They didn't have to be to know a 30-foot skillet would
never ly.
But that didn't stop law student Evan Ferl and seniors Cale Flage, Nathan Reid and Jona-
than Jasinski from dressing up as breakfast foods and careening off a 30-foot ramp with the
skillet anyway.
The foursome unofficially represented UF last fall as team "Breakfast Club" at the Red Bull
Flugtag in Austin, Texas. Flugtag (pronounced FLOOG-tog), which means "flying day" in
German, is a homemade flying-machine competition sponsored by Red Bull a caffeinated
energy drink that claims to "give you wings."
More than 85,000 people gathered at Lady Bird Lake to watch 28 teams of mostly college
students perform a skit before launching homemade fliers out over the water. The teams and
their crafts, which were judged on flight distance, skit creativity and showmanship, included a
large replica of an Apache helicopter, a box of wine and Andre the Giant.
It's the competition's ab-
surdiry that draws participants
and spectators alike, the UF
students sa.
'Everybody knows they
aren't going to fly," says Flage,
who dressed as a slice of bacon. A
"It's 28 train wrecks in a row."
It took about 50 hours to
construct the skillet, which was
made of PVC pipe, tarp, rope
and wood. It measured 20 feet
in diameter 30 feet with
handle and I 1 feet high.
The skeleton %was constructed
at Flage's Gainesville home
where a skillet-shaped patch
of dead grass remained for a
month. (From left) Evan Ferl (7JD), Cale Flage (4BS), Nathan Reid
To match their oversized (4BS) and Jonathan Jasinski (4AG) represented UF by flying a
cookware, their costumes in- giant frying pan at the Red Bull Flugtag in Texas last fall.
cluded an 8-feet-long spatula, a
5-by-6 feet piece of toast (played by Reid) and a giant salt shaker spewing silver confetti.
The team transported the unfinished skillet on a flatbed trailer and paid for the trip by
agreeing to transport items along the way. Once in Austin, they spent a day-and-a-half franti-
cally piecing together the skillet's components.
"It was the quintessential college trip," says Jasinski, who dressed as a chef for a culinary-
themed skit just before the launch.
The students agree the skit was their favorite part because it showed their personalities.
Launching the skillet, however, proved a challenge. Beams collapsed, the sides hung off the
ramp and the team faced a strong crosswind. Ferl, the pilot, hit his arm and head as the skillet
went down, but he wasn't injured. The skillet splashed down as a twisted heap.
Jasinski says he knows not many people can say they've had an experience like theirs.
"W'e tr to live it up," he says.
Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)
winter 2008 5









ON CAMPUS


Gator Bytes

www.flmnh.ufl.edu/wildflower/
Want to know what type of
wildflower is in your backyard or
what type of butterfly is resting on
it? Check out the Florida Museum
of Natural History's new search
engine for a quick identification
by color, location, habitat or other
options.

www.distancelearning.ufl.edu
Miss being at UF? Check out
the opportunities to continue your
education through UF's distance
learning programs, including ad-
ditional degrees, certifications or
classes.

www.dcp.ufl.edu/arch/resources/
gallery/html/index.htm- Check
out this site for a virtual tour of the
School of Architecture's student
exhibit gallery.

www.bkstr.com Click on
Florida and then the University of
Florida under the "Everything Col-
lege" box at this Web site to find
all the latest Gator gear for the
law school, the veterinary medi-
cine program, the health sciences
branch and campus as a whole.

www.floridatomorrow.ufl.edu
See the potential for UF's fu-
ture and learn how you can play a
role while visiting the site for UF's
capital campaign.

To find any UF Web site, visit
www.ufl.edu.





6 FLORIDA
. . ..i


In the

Classroom


Wood U.


In Forests for the Future, it's about
seeing the forest for the trees.
Offered through the School of
Forest Resources and Conservation,
this big-picture course dabbles in
everything from how trees are used
to make toothpaste to the fact that
longleaf pines have bark so thick
fires don't harm them. Ultimately,
the course shows how forestry is
applicable to everyone.
"Forestry is a profession that
is part of students' lives that they
didn't even realize," says Taylor
Stein, the course's lead instructor.
Approximately 80 percent of
the classes are non-majors fulfilling


A team of instructors including Alan Long,
forest operations, fire and extension in the Sc
Resources and Conservation gives student
canopy overview of forestry and its relevance


general education requireme
While Stein doesn't view the
a recruiting mechanism, he s
has led to changed majors.
After her first class, Krist
Summers says she knew "thi
where I need to be."
A former political science
jor, Summers will travel to C
Rica during spring break for
ecotourism class. Eventually,
wants to pursue a degree in
ronmental law.
"It's because of this class
I am where I am now on
path," she says.
Unlike other survey court
Forests for
Future is a
for-one dea
professors t
up each se
to give stud
a look into
specific are
study. Asid
Stein's lesso
fall's lineup
included th
implication
forestry, get
forest mana
ment and b
fuels.
With ea
professor te
a topic for
two weeks,
students gei
how interdi
plinary fore
professor of Alan Lo
hool of Forest instance, sh
a roots-to- students a r
to everyday life. aged forest


FROM CHEWING GUM TO THE
MAGAZINE YOU'RE READING, FORESTRY
IMPACTS YOUR LIFE EVERY DAY.

nts. close and personal bugs includ-
class as ed during a Saturday morning
says it field trip to UF's 2,000-acre Austin
Cary Memorial Forest.
en "I was amazed at how complex
s is forest management was," says Kris-
ten Erickson, a junior studying hos-
ma- pitality management with a minor
:osta in environmental studies. "There's
Stein's more to it than growing trees and
she cutting them down."
envi- This focus on the "cooler" as-
pects of forestry does not take away
that from the critical and practical is-
this sues the professors tackle in class,
Stein says. These issues include
ses, communities built on the edge of
the fire-prone forests and coping with
five- global warming.
l. Five Rather than coming at issues
.eam from a particular platform, the
nester professors attempt to give students
lents information to discern scientific
their fact from fiction, Stein says. To that
a of end, one of the assignments in-
e from dudes analyzing Web sites that deal
ns, last with forestry issues for accuracy
also and bias.
ie social "We tackle issues with no right
Is of and wrong answers," Stein says.
netics, "Hopefully we get them to form
Lge- an educated opinion at the end
iomass of class."
For Stein, the best moments
ch in the class occur when students
aching get excited about their newfound
about knowledge. He recently received an
the e-mail from a student who realized
t to see that Kleenex tissue, something she
sci- had always taken for granted, came
stry is. from trees in Canada.
ng, for "It's becoming a big issue
owed how we use resources," Erickson
nan- says.
up Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)








ON CAMPUS


UFFlashback

She Left Her Mark


SIXTY-FOUR YEARS AFTER
SHE DIED, GEORGIA SEAGLE'S
NAME UVES ON.
Georgia Seagle left little of her
personal history behind when she
died in 1943.
Name variations hint at marriag-
es. Sources disagree about whether
she lived in Jacksonville or St. Peters-
burg. The Gainesville native faded
into little more than footnotes.
Amid her mystery, one thing is
clear: Seagle loved the University of
Florida, serving as a quiet, philan-
thropic force.
A stocky woman with curly hair
and an impish grin, Seagle made
her first impact in 1935 when she
marched a $20,000 grant to help
the city of Gainesville complete the
Dixie Hotel, which had been left
unfinished 10 years earlier due to
the Great Depression.
She provided the money in ex-
change for naming the building after


Georgia Seagle originally offered
housing to UF football players
in her Gator Club on University
Avenue. The building later became
Seagle Hall, which offered hous-
ing to upstanding young men of
limited means.


her deceased brother, John Seagle.
Renewed construction began
in spring 1936, with the College
of Architecture designing the 11th
floor of the Art Deco structure. As
construction progressed, the Works
Progress Administration employed
several football players at the re-
quest of Coach Josh Cody, accord-
ing to the book "Gator History."
Instead of pouring concrete or
lifting heavy objects, the men spent
most afternoons passing the pigskin
on Florida Field. After the scan-
dal broke in the Orlando Sentinel
congressional hearings were held,
the FBI conducted an investigation
and some sportswriters dubbed
the Florida Garors "the New Deal
Team."
Seagle's affection for Florida
football was clear as she gave the
stadium its first electric lights and
press box in 1938 and allowed the
team to stay in her swanky board-
ing house, called the Gator Club,
free of charge.
She helped to give the universi-
ty's Bedgling museum a nice spot,
as well, in the bottom two floors of
the John F. Seagle Building. Within
a year after construction was com-
pleted, the Florida State Museum
set up exhibits formerly housed in
Thomas and Flint halls. They in-
cluded a dugout canoe, an extensive
shell collection and information
about Florida's early inhabitants.
Seagle died in her Gainesville
home seven years after the museum
opened.
But the Seagle Building, now on
the National Register of Historic
Places as a business complex, contin-
ued her legacy, going through several
UF incarnations, including housing
the university's center for correspon-
dence courses and the WRUF radio
station in addition to the museum,


Gainesville's John F. Seagle
Building, circa 1930s.
which was the predecessor for both
the Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory in Gainesville and the Museum
of Florida History in Tallahassee.
Joel Buchanan was one of the
first black students to attend a
white school in Alachua County
and, in a recording from the
Samuel A. Proctor Oral History
Program, recalled how few oppor-
tunities existed for black students.
"The only place I recall going
that was white where blacks and
whites were allowed was the
Florida State Museum when it was
downtown in the Seagle Building."
The museum's open-door policy
fit perfectly with Seagle's philoso-
phy, as evidenced by her sparse
obituary: "She was greatly inter-
ested in the education of worthy
young men without means.
To this end, Seagle turned the
Gator Club, located at 1002 W.
University Ave., into a cooperative
living organization called Seagle
Hall. In her will, Seagle established
a scholarship program for men of
limited means who do household
chores and keep their noses dean
there was a no drinking policy
in exchange for $40 per month
rent. Eventually, the structure was
sold to Paradigm Properties and
currently serves as temporary hous-
ing for fraternities and sororities.
Elizabeth Hillaker (4JM)


Kudos
Steve Dorman, dean of the
College of Health and Human
Performance, received the 2007


William A. Howe Award from
the American School Health
Association.* Pharmacy Practice
Department Chairman Julie
Johnson, director of the UF
Center for Pharmacogenomics,
received the Paul R. Dawson
Biotechnology Award from the
American Association of Colleges
of Pharmacy. Grant McFadden,
program director for the Emerging
Pathogens Institute, was elected a
Fellow of the American Academy
of Microbiology. Law professor
Christopher Peterson was named
the 2007 Consumer Advocate
of the Year by the National
Association of Consumer Agency
Administrators. John Sawyer
(BSBA '00) and Jordan Wiens (BS
'02), senior security engineers
on UF's Information Technology
Security Team, won the electronic
Capture the Flag competition at
DefCon 15, the world's largest
annual computer hacker
conference. It's the second year
in a row the team has won.








winter 2008 7









ON CAMPUS


Florida Facts

* LOCAL GATOR CONNECTION:
When you join the UF Alumni
Association, you automatically
become a member of your local
Gator Club. Find which of the
98 Gator Clubs is closest to you,
or start your own, by visiting
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/
GatorClubs.


/


* TIMES HAVE CHANGED: It was
on Sept. 15, 1958, that UF admit-
ted its first black student to the
College of Law. The event was
nine years in the making Vir-
gil Hawkins had tried since
April 1949 to gain admission to
the college. Hawkins' journey
ended with the state's Jim Crow
laws overturned, the desegre-
gation of all public schools and
with Hawkins withdrawing his
law school application in ex-
change for a court order deseg-
regating UF's graduate schools.
Learn about UF's events to
celebrate the 50th anniversary
at www.urel.ufl.edu/50.
* DOCTOR DOCTOR: Last fall
Hyun Jung Yun (MA '03, PhD
'07, PhD '07) became the first UF
student to earn two doctorates
at the same time. The South
Korean completed doctorates
in political science and political
communications.


Go,


Gators




Rebound and Recover


LONNIKA THOMPSON'S
BASKETBALL DREAMS
SEEMED LOST TO HURRICANE
KATRINA. AT UF, SHE'S
GOTTEN THEM BACK.
Lonnika Thompson is known to her
coaches for being mentally tough
and nearly impossible to rattle.
For the 18-year-old freshman
point guard, those characteristics
have been earned through life
experiences.
Two years ago, she was starting
her senior year at New Orleans'
McDonogh 35 High School.
Coming off a year in which she
had earned all-state first team
honors, she looked to be a highly
touted recruit.
Then Katrina struck.
As it did for millions, the
hurricane changed the course
of Thompson's life in ways she
couldn't have imagined.
The disaster scattered her fami-
ly, sending her to Georgia with her
dad and brother while her mom
and grandmother were stranded
in Mississippi. She wept as she
watched TV news reports and saw
the tragedy and turmoil unfold in
her ravaged hometown.
Thompson spent the next seven
months in Georgia, enrolling in a
high school where she knew nobody
and playing with new teammates
and coaches. It wasn't until Febru-
ary 2006 that she and her family
returned to New Orleans, only to
see the flooded out remains of her
family home. (Last fall, repairs were
finally completed, and the family


moved out of temporary housing.)
She rejoined her old team in
time for the final seven games of
the season (the squad made the
state finals), but her circumstances
made recruiting difficult, and she
ended up at Trinity Valley Commu-
nity College in Athens, Texas.
Then the Gators came calling.
New head coach Amanda But-
ler (BSESS '95, MESS '97) took
over in April, late in the recruiting
process, and the team desperately
needed a point guard. A colleague
pointed her toward Thompson.
Thompson's campus visit sealed
the deal.
"They showed me that we have
our own practice gym and a game
gym and told me I could come here
any time of night or morning and


shoot around," she remembers.
Assistant coach Brenda Mock
Kirkpatrick says the decision to
bring Thompson aboard has already
proven wise.
"I think she's done extremely
well under the circumstances," she
says. "She's really independent and
has the capabilities to lead a team.
With [Thompson], you're only go-
ing to see her improve."
Today, Thompson is happy to
have some stability in her life. After
tutoring, she makes her way to the
practice court and shoots around by
herself or with her new friends, just
like she imagined.
"It's beautiful out here," she says.
"Everyone is cool, and I love my
teammates. I'm really having fun."
-Jamison Webb (BSJ '07)


-Lonnika is compact and very explosive. wnat she laCKS in size, sne maKes up
for in pure speed," says women's basketball coach Amanda Butler (BSESS '95,
MESS '97). "1 think she has the ability to become a phenomenal defender and
was exactly the type of player I hated to have guarding me when I played."


SFLORIDA








Rooms With a View
These geometric windows provide a structured
glimpse of UF vistas. Can you identify which
campus buildings house these shapely panes?
Check your answers on page 24.


Bricks


SON CAMPUS


Campus

notes
OFF THE AIR: After eight years,
UF's award-winning public radio
program, "Recess," is taking a
break from the airwaves. Pro-
ducer and host John Cech says
the program is not completely
gone, however it is expected
to take new form on its Web site,
http://recess.ufl.edu.

MARK OF DISTINCTION: A series
of historical markers is being
developed by the university's
History Advisory Council and
the UF Alumni Association to
commemorate milestones,
people and sites that have been
noteworthy in the university's
development. The first marker,
which highlights the invention of
Gatorade sports drink, was placed
near the Stephen C. O'Connell
Center last fall. Inventor Robert
Cade was in attendance. He died
just two weeks later at age 80.

ITS SHOWTIME: Resident hall
dwellers with a hankering for a
late-night movie needn't look far
- UF's Resident TV has mov-
ies showing day and night. The
Inter-Residence Hall Association
arranges for closed-circuit chan-
nel 68 to show student-requested
movies in the dorms on a monthly
schedule.

For the latest UF news, visit http://
news.ufl.edu.
winter 2008 9


Hitting


the














































































CAN YOU SPOT AT LEAST FIVE DESIGN-RELATED DIFFERENCES THAT MAKE IT EASIER FOR YOUR HOME TO ADAPT TO CHANGING NEEDS? CHECK YOUR
ANSWERS ON PAGE 12. -:, :
:. :,,V. -,; .....; o.. .;.


10 FLORIDA


.".""'" .. ',.


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:

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.-
























for the


si


Universal design keeps home comfortable
no matter your age or ability.


HEN MASTER'S STUDENT
ANNE BAUMSTARCK
m (BSBA '03) AND HER
INTERIOR DESIGN CLASSMATES
DESIGNED A RENOVATION PROJECT
FOR A VIRGINIA RETIREMENT CENTER,
THEY FOCUSED ON MERGING STYLE
WITH FUNCTION.
The wainscoting, for instance, also acted as
a handrail an idea they borrowed from Oak
Hammock, a retirement community at UE Stu-
dents designed a storage space for walkers because
residents didn't like seeing them lined up near the
cafeteria. The students also planned adjustable
countertops high enough for a visitor to sign pa-
pers and low enough for a person in a wheelchair.
"A space isn't merely there to look beautiful,"
Baumstarck says. "It has to function and look
beautiful. Universal design is simply good design
practice using what is best for everyone."


Universal design has grown to become the
heart of many courses within the College of De-
sign, Construction and Planning. The idea is to
create buildings whether homes, businesses or
public facilities with the needs of all ages and
abilities in mind without sacrificing style.
UF housing specialist Hyun-Jeong Lee calls
this concept one of the most important issues in
housing today.
"Universal design is a really fast growing con-
cept in housing," says Lee, a UF assistant profes-
sor of family, youth and community sciences.
"It's not just about growing older. Anybody has a
possibility to have a disability or that people close
to you will have a disability or difficulty living in
regular housing situations."
Although the idea has been around for years,
many people outside the construction or design
industries haven't heard the term.
That will probably change, says home econom-
ics professor emeritus Marie Hammer. With the
first wave of the baby boom generation prepar-
ing for retirement and planning for later years,


demand for homes built with universal design
features likely will increase.
"This is a generation of people who don't
want to age and who are working toward stay-
ing independent," says Maruja Torres-Antonini
(PhD '01), an associate professor of interior de-
sign. "In the next few decades as baby boomers
put more pressure on the construction industry
to create spaces that address needs, I think it will
become more prevalent."
But it's more than just aging. Thanks to ad-
vances in medical care, people live longer with
disabilities after debilitating illnesses or injuries,
requiring that homes be built to meet varying
stages of abilities.
Because it doesn't require later changes or
retrofitting to make a home accessible, universal
design is the best way to accommodate every-
one, Lee says. The idea is gaining popularity at
home shows, and some cities are already working
to ensure that new homes are built with basic
universal design features to make them equally
"visitable" to all.


BY APRIL FRAWLEY BIRDWELL (BSJ '02)
winter 2008 11














Chair rails or
wainscoting
doubles as a
handrail.


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Doorknobs are 7

replaced with
lever handles Adjustable height
to help those counters can
with arthritis or be lowered for
artificial limbs. I wheelchair users,
,, I' or raised for tall
S '. , people.


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Traditional light
switches are
replaced with
rocker switches
or touch-sensitive
plates, which
don't require the
grasping of a small
lever or knob.


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OTHER CHANGES INCLUDE A WIDER DOOR TO IMPROVE WHEELCHAIR ACCESS, HIGHER PLACEMENT OF ELECTRICAL OUTLETS TO MAKE STOOPING
UNNECESSARY AND A SMOKE DETECTOR WITH A STROBE LIGHT THAT CAN BE SEEN AS WELL AS HEARD.

Ld o A ;....A . .. . .. .. .
LAM..... DA%.


Steps are avoided
by landscaping a
natural ramp.


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ene: F










Just good design
The idea of building accessible spaces hasn't always been a popular one for
the average homeowner. Most people don't want to think of themselves as old
or needing special accommodations, Hammer says.
"It was a mindset that slowed the whole process down," she says.
It didn't help that style wasn't originally part of most "barrier-free" designs.
With a growing number of disabled veterans after World War II, the ideas of
accessibility grew, but improvements were generally institutional-looking, ac-
cording to the Center for Universal Design at North Carolina State University.
Over time, style has been incorporated into accessibility, Torres-Antonini
says. "Universal design goes a step farther than barrier-free," she says. "It in-
cludes flexibility so furniture and spaces can be easily adapted."
And universal design isn't just about what goes into a building. Products
such as side-by-side refrigerators, adjustable closet shelves, elevated washers
and dryers and easy-to-clean paints and finishes make home life easier, too,
Hammer says.

Coming to a city near you
Universal design has become widely considered for public housing projects,
as well. One such project in Sarasota enlisted the advice of Lee, who spoke to
planners and the Sarasota County Senior Advisory Committee last fall.
Committee member Van Deist says he and his colleagues have been push-
ing for a county policy that requires new homes be built with basic "visitability
features," namely an entrance that is at least 29 inches wide, a bathroom on the
first floor and a level, step-free entryway, among other things.
"We'd like Sarasota to be a county for all generations," says Deist, who also
incorporated universal design elements in a private home built for his aunt,
who is in her mid-80s.
Cities in 28 states have visitabiliry laws already, including Florida, says Lee.
St. Petersburg has a policy on the books, although it only applies to city-owned
housing.
Although public buildings are already subject to the accessibility standards
set forth in the Americans with Disabilites Act, Lee says, some experts feel
enforcement of these policies is not stringent enough.
"Public housing is easier to regulate than private homes," she says. "We ex-
pect there is going to be a ripple effect, starting from the public housing. It will
encourage people to include these features in private homes, too."
But the first step is making sure the public knows about universal design
and what kinds of features they can ask builders to include, such as replacing
doorknobs and twist faucets with levers or using landscaping to create natural
ramps.
"If you don't know about it, you don't expect anything," says Lee.
Hopeful homeowners should take heed that they may have to fight for
universal design when they're negotiating with builders. Some design elements
take more time to incorporate and not all builders are on board, says Hammer,
who had to lobby for key features when her new home was built.
"It was so good to be able to build a new house and include these ele-
ments I had taught," Hammer says. "It really works. I think I can live here
for a long time." -r.1







































Everlea Bryant (4FA) of Altamonte Springs, was one of the many School of Theater and Dance students who performed at the
Florida Tomorrow campial campaign kickoff.



Voyage to Tomorrow
UF LAUNCHES ITS PUSH FOR A BRIGHTER FUTURE


FUTURISTIC THEMES AND
COLORFUL HOPES FOR A
BRIGHT TOMORROW WERE
AMONG THE HIGHUGHTS LAST FALL
WHEN THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
KICKED OFF ITS $1.5 BILLION CAPITAL
CAMPAIGN, FLORIDA TOMORROW.
More than 1,000 alumni and friends attended
the elegant soiree, "Voyage to Tomorrow," at
the Stephen C. O'Connell Center on Sept. 28.
President Bernie Machen was joined by students,
faculty and donors to explain the campaign's
importance to not only the university, but also
everyone it touches.
"We can believe that here at the University
of Florida many of the world's great questions


are going to be answered," Machen said. "We
can charter a bright Florida tomorrow for people
everywhere."
Many of the kickoff's invited guests represent-
ed the dedicated donors who had already given
more than $502 million toward UF's fundraising
goal in the two years leading up to the public
kickoff. Machen said the university hopes to raise
the remaining $1 billion by 2012.
"We have a very busy five years ahead of us
to meet the challenge of the Florida Tomorrow
vision," Machen said. "Together we can make
Florida Tomorrow a reality."
The evening event capped a daylong exposi-
tion, "Showcasing the Possibilities," which high-
lighted each UF college and unit. The public was
treated to an array of events, including faculty
talks, tours and symposia, all which displayed the
impact UF has and will have on the world.


That night, the floor of many UF sporting
events was transformed into a color-splashed
theater-in-the-round surrounded by 100 under-
lit tables. Throughout the evening scholarship
recipients, notable faculty and university support-
ers took the stage to tell how the university has
impacted their lives for the better.
In the end, the campaign is about helping
students, faculty and researchers, campaign lead-
ers said. Especially students.
"Everything we do here is for the students,"
said Earl Powell, the campaign's co-chair. "Ev-
erything we dream of for our future depends on
them. We want all of them to have the advantage
of attending a world-class university."


SOR FLORIDA
THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


141 FLORIDA
-j,






























SI










































































Whether it's in person at the Gator Walk, above, or through calls and letters, Gator fans can't get enough of quarterback Tim Tebow.


BY PAT DOOLEY (BSJ '76)


16 FLORIDA


~-_111~






















UF's




Bighearted Hero


Winning the Heisman Trophy hasn't changed Tim Tebow's desire to help
people it's just changed how many people desire his help.


HHE LETTERS AND E-MAILS
POUR IN. SOME TO THE
UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION WHERE UAA OFFI-
CIALS SIFT THROUGH THEM. SOME
TO OTIS ROAD WHERE PAM AND
BOB TEBOW LIVE.
They all want the same thing.
Timmy.
"My daughter has a terrible disease and ..."
"Our 12-and-under soccer team is heading to
regionals and ..."
"I have a friend who could use some cheering
up and he is a big fan ..."
He'd love to do them all, every speech or
appearance or simply a phone call. He tries to do
most of them.
"Some of them are a little bizarre," Tim
Tebow (2Ag) says. "There are so many crazy ones.
But you also get some that are really touching."
The requests were many before he ever took a
snap as a quarterback at the University of Florida.
Once he fell into the rock star category by doing
the dirty work for the Gator national champions
of 2006, Tebow became the best known player in
college football to never have started a game. Even


before he became the starter, UF coach Urban
Meyer was worried about what 2007 would bring.
"Because he doesn't know how to say no,"
Meyer says, "we've got to monitor him. It's (offen-
sive coordinator) Dan Mullen's job. Pam Tebow
(BSJ '71) may be Tim's mom, but Dan's his mom
when he's in Gainesville."
Of course, all Tebow did in his first year as
a starter was make history. He became the first
sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy.
He also became so popular that the UAA had
to shut him down in late December. No more
autographs.
But the requests for speaking engagements
kept coming. The pleas for a visit to help a sick
child didn't slow down. UF officials estimate that
approximately 200 requests have come their way
since Tebow stepped on campus.
There are several reasons why he is in such
demand. There is the smile plastered on a face
that features sharp, good looks. There is the foot-
ball legend that grows every day. But mostly, it is
because this is what Tim Tebow has been raised
to do.
Not throw passes or run over tacklers. His mis-
sion is to make a difference off the field.
And the role models have been everywhere he
has looked.
"Definitely, my parents have always encour-
aged us to help other people," Tebow says. "And


my siblings, being the youngest, what great role
models. Just following their example has made a
difference for me. And even my coaches. I have
had the opportunity to learn from a lot of wise
people."
One of those role models was Danny Wuerffel
(BSPR '96), who won a Heisman at Florida and
was the first to give Tebow a hug on the stage of
the 2007 Heisman presentation. Tebow used to
have a Wuerffel poster in his bedroom, but it was
more about how Wuerffel carried himself off the
field than the touchdowns he threw on it.
Since his football career ended, Wuerffel has
kept his good works going as the director of De-
sire Street Ministries in New Orleans.
"We've talked a lot about how to handle
things," Wuerffel says. "I just tell him to be the
person you've always been."
That person is a giver, a young man who
knows what a phone call or a visit or a talk can
mean. He has dealt with it since he became a high
school phenomenon, a physical freak with seem-
ingly no flaws.
"Someone gave me a paper the other day
where they were talking about how they couldn't
find anything wrong with Timmy," says Bob
Tebow (BSPE '71), the quarterback's father. "They
haven't tried to get him to clean his room."
For a guy who already carries the burden of
being the starting quarterback at the school with


winter 2008










Born in the Philip-
pines, Tebow grew
up in Florida where
he was able to par-
ticipate in school
sports despite be-
ing home schooled
(top right). He
regularly returns
to the Philippines,
however, as part
of his family's
missionary work
(bottom left and
right).


A More than half the
Tebow family are
Gators. From upper
left are Robby, Tim
(2Ag), Peter (4Eng),
dad Bob (BSPE '71),
(front row from left)
Gannon Shepherd,
Katie (Tebow)
Shephard (BSPR'01),
their baby Abigail,
mom Pam (BSJ '71),
Christy (Tebow)
Allen, her husband
Joey Allen and their
daughter Claire.


On your marks, get set ... Orphans at Uncle Dick's
Home in the Philippines give Tim a chance to play.


the biggest fan base in the state and has to deal
with the normal class load of a student, just get-
ting away from it all would be the direction for
most players.
But Tebow wasn't brought up that way, not in
the Philippines where he was born and has re-
turned on missionary work, and not in the house
on Otis Road in Jacksonville where he was home-
schooled.
With people tugging at each sleeve, he has
simply rolled his up and gone to work.
"I think if you did it just to do it," he says of
his charitable work, "it would get old. But when
you see the joy it brings people, the way it chang-
es lives just because you took the time to talk to
them. I mean, it can be kind of draining. You can
get worn out with some of it. But you see the joy."
It's not the time he spends that sometimes
drains Tebow. Instead, it is getting close to people
and seeing them suffer.
In the summer, for example, he was contacted
by the parents of an 18-year-old woman who was
dealing with cancer. It had already cost her a leg,
and she needed an emotional lift.


Tebow provided it, spending time at Shands
with her and bringing her books to read. During
the football season, he talked to her parents, try-
ing to keep their spirits up.
'And then they called me and asked me to talk
to her again," he says. "She wasn't going to make
it. I talked to her 30 minutes before she died.
"I've seen a lot in the Philippines. I've seen
some bad things. But that was hard."
While the UAA tries to protect Tebow, he's
still not going to say no. During practices for the
Capital One Bowl, he joked about "needing mean
people around me."
But more than anything else, Tim Tebow
wants to help. He wants to be the role model that
Wuerffel is, that his brothers and sisters and par-
ents are, that his coaches are.
If he can touch lives, well, the juggling of his
is worth it.
"Positive results," Tebow says. "That's what it's
all about." -r

Pat Dooley (BSJ '76) is a sports columnist for
The Gainesville Sun. He has covered Gator sports
for 30 years.


18 FLORIDA


"WHEN YOU SEE THE JOY IT

BRINGS PEOPLE, THE WAY

IT CHANGES UVES JUST BE-

CAUSE YOU TOOK THE TIME

TO TALK TO THEM. I MEAN,

IT CAN BE KIND OF DRAIN-

ING. YOU CAN GET WORN

OUT WITH SOME OF IT. BUT

YOU SEE THE JOY."









TEBOW'S
Heisman by
the Numbers

S Number of players to win two
Heismans (Ohio State's Archie
Griffin in 1974 and '75).

3 Number of Heisman winners
at Florida (Steve Spurrier [BSPE '81],
1966; Danny Wuerffel [BSPR '96],
1996; Tim Tebow, 2007), which places
UF in a tie for 5th all-time
behind Ohio State, Southern Cal and
Notre Dame (seven each) and
Nebraska (five).

11 Years since the last SEC player won
a Heisman (Wuerffel in 1996).

58 Number of Heisman voters out of 862
who did not have Tebow on their
ballots.

254 Margin of victory over Darren
McFadden of Arkansas, who was
runner-up for the second straight year.

462 First-place votes for Tebow.


What does it mean to
win a Heisman?

He's not just a Heisman Trophy winner. He's
the only person to ever do it as a sophomore,
which means he has the chance to be the first
to win three.
But Tim Tebow (2Ag) says all of the Heis-
man hoopla won't change him.
"People say the Heisman is going to
change you fdr the rest of your life," Tebow
says. "Actually, it's going to change peopi's
perspective of you for the rest of your lifeplt
doesn't change you and who you are and how
you act. That's; how you have to go about it."
i:t dos change the perception of a player
1hen ihe wins the Heisman. For some, it's not
,: ,


good. Heisman winners who have flopped in
the pros are looked at with disdain, as if NFL
performance has anything to do with college
football.
But forever, a Heisman winner is invited
back for the annual dinner. And he gets a
Heisman vote. e '
;"Even as I've gotten further away from my
college career, they.still remember what you
have done," says Danny Wuerffel (BSPR'96),
who won the award in 1996 while at Florida.
"It gives me an ability to help Desire Street
Ministries (in New Orleans) even more.l
"It's really.a neat group of.guys, especially
some of the older guys who served in the mili-:
tary," he says of other Heisrian winners. "It
has been neat to get to know them. It's spe-
cial to be part of an elite and small fraternity."


Steve Spurrier (BSPE '81), who won the
award in 1966, has missed only one Heisman
dinner since 1977.
"I like to go back and see the guys, al-
though some of them have passed away,"
Spurrier says. "It's one of those annual things,
and then you move back into your own world.
"I was fortunate enough to play for 10
years in the NFL and go into coaching. I was
one of the few winners who did that. I guess
Pat Sullivan was the other. So I've been fortu-
nate to do other things in life. I don't get intro-
duced as a Heisman Trophy winner as much
anymore."
-PatDooley(BSJ 76)


winter 2008 1.















_laluimni profiles




A Beautiful Career with



"Ugly Betty"


JIM WALIS GIVES A HIT TV SHOW ITS DISTINCTIVE LOOK.


"EVERYTHING I DID

IN THE UF THEATRE

DEPARTMENT WAS

ABOUT LEARNING

TEAMWORK AND

BEING PART OF A

MUCH LARGER

PROCESS."
Jim Wallis
(BFA'82)


The longhaired, bespeckled girl
is as bumbling as she is well-mean-
ing. She works in a glamorous in-
dustry, but she is completely with-
out fashion sense. She is dubbed
"Ugly Betty," but everything about
this fictional young woman in-
cluding her lack of style and the
glitzy offices and Manhattan streets
she inhabits is beyond her con-
trol. In fact, costume designers
produce her wardrobe down to her
black tights and red-framed glasses,
and her world is created by a team
of artists and craftspeople who
are all supervised by one man: art
director Jim Wallis (BFA '82).
Just how Wallis, who gradu-
ated from the College of Fine Arts'
School of Theatre and Dance with
a bachelor's degree in tech and
design, landed the position of art
director for the hit ABC television
show is an example of the "right
place right time" phenomenon,
which actually means "through
years of dedicated effort."
After working on motion cap-
ture films including "The Polar
Express" and "Beowulf" for four
years, Wallis ended up taking a
temporary position as set designer
for "Ugly Betty." As that stint was
ending, the production designer,
Mark Worthington, asked him to
step into art direction.
That led him a first time art
director on a television series to
the podium to accept an Art Direc-
tors Guild Award for art direction


Astute viewers of ABC's "Ugly Betty" sitcom may notice the Mode magazine
office set designed by Jim Wallis takes on distinctive orange and blue hues.


last February. Last September, he
received a Primetime Emmy Award
nomination for art direction, one
of 11 nominations "Ugly Betty"
received in 2007.
"It was a truly moving experi-
ence to be chosen for these awards
by my peers. These are the people
who understand what it takes to
accomplish this work," says Wallis,
who lives in Burbank, Calif., with
his wife and two children. "To be
selected from all of the amazing
designs being done on television
in a given year and to have them
say, 'You are one of the top five,' is
quite an honor."


Despite success in television and
previous work that ranged from
being a scenic artist for the San
Francisco Opera to creating scenery
for rock 'n' roll tours, Wallis always
planned to work in theater. Televi-
sion was never on his radar, but he
credits his experiences at UF for
giving him the skill set to succeed.
"Unlike film school where the
budgets limit student designers to
mostly dressing locations, theater
programs like UF allow students
to be involved in staging full-scale
productions," Wallis says.
The learn-by-doing method has
suited him.


20 FLORIDA









Between his high school drama
class in West Palm Beach and col-
lege, Wallis took a few years to
figure out what aspect of the theater
he wanted to pursue. That is when
he landed in Gainesville where he
volunteered as a stagehand at the
Gainesville Little Theatre and the
Hippodrome State Theatre.
While volunteering, he met UF
theater professor emeritus C. "Doc"
Wehlberg, who taught him that a
university education in theater was
about more than polishing acting
skills; it included learning tech jobs
such as set design, costuming, art
direction, lighting and directing.
Wallis applied to the program.
"I never wanted to be an actor
- I only wanted to be a techni-
cal director or designer. The great
thing about the program at UF was
that in addition to all of my courses
in scenery and lighting, I had to
take classes in acting, directing,
costume, architecture, Shakespeare,
art," Wallis says. "This helped me
to have a much greater understand-


ing of all of the aspects of perfor-
mance art and in the end made me
a much better collaborator."
He finished his UF degree and
worked in theater for four years
before he applied to both the New
York City opera and an internship
on "Cheers." He landed the televi-
sion job.
In his position on "Ugly Betty,"
Wallis is part of the art depart-
ment team and works with the
set decorator, the set designer, the
construction coordinator and the
prop master in preparing the show's
numerous soundstages, green screen
and on-location shots. The produc-
tion designer conceptualizes the
look of the "Ugly Betty" set, the set
designer draws it, and as art direc-
tor, Wallis is responsible for bring-
ing their ideas to life and nailing
down every aspect of the look. Wal-
lis oversees his crew of designers,
graphic artists, carpenters, painters
and propmakers as they transform
the production designer's vision
into a physical reality hard enough


THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE


*1 ill


PROFILES
for Betty to slam into during one of P R F I ES
her more klutzy moments.
"In television there is a lot of
what we call 'arm waving,'" Wallis
says, "because plans may say one
thing, but production is moving
so fast, and we are trying to do so
much in such a short period that all
the answers don't get worked out
on paper beforehand. So a major
portion of my day is spent either on
the soundstage or in the shop wav-
ing my arms and saying do this or
do that."
Wallis says UF, particularly the
Summer Repertory Program, pre-
pared him for the arm waving and
collaboration his job requires.
"Everything I did in the UF the-
atre department was about learning
teamwork and being part of a much
larger process," Wallis says. "You
need to be the kind of person who
wants to work in a group and not
be the sole creator. ... because ev-
erything you do is going to be part
of a team process."
Denise Trunk Krigbaum
(MAMC '97)





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High Plains Dentist


DIAN OLAH PLANS TO TRADE HER BEVERLY HILLS CUENTELE FOR
THOSE WHO NEED HER TALENTS MORE A NAVAJO TRIBE.


Before settling down on the Navajo Reservation in Crown Point, N.M., Dian
Olah provided her dentistry services to Sioux Indians in South Dakota and
several tribes in New Mexico.


On a typical day, Dr. Dian Olah
might run into Paris Hilton, Cour-
teney Cox or Larry King in the
lobby of her building. Or Ashlee
Simpson might duck into her office
in a hasty attempt to avoid swarm-
ing paparazzi. Or she may take off
after a grueling shift of cavities and
root canals, and head to the studio
and join the audience for a live
broadcast of "American Idol."
Such is the life of a Beverly Hills
dentist.
Olah (DMD '85) has been
working on teeth in the heart of
show biz for about two years now.
But despite the glamour, she's
found that she is far more interest-
ed in seeing a different type of star
- the kind you can gaze at under
the expansive New Mexico sky,
miles removed from the hassles and
annoyances of civilization.
After operating a successful
practice in Beverly Hills, Olah has
decided that she finds more satis-
faction in the work she's done in
the past performing desperately
needed dental services for Native
American patients in rural outposts
scattered across the American West.
"I long to go back to the reserva-
tion where I feel like I was really
helping, and the people were just so
appreciative," she says.
Olah, 59, has had a long and
interesting path to discovering


her true calling, but dentistry was
in her plans from early on. She
remembers fondly her childhood
visits to Dr. Tyke, who practiced
"old fashioned dentistry." From age
11, she began to dream about the
profession for herself.
After years as a dental hygienist
and instructor, Olah set her sights
on a degree in dentistry. On her
fourth try, she was finally accepted
into the program at UF
Then a divorced, single mother
of 10-year-old Stephanie, Olah
headed back to school at age 34,
sitting in classes where most of the
students were 10 years her junior.
"Everyone was very supportive,
and they took my daughter under
their wing," she says. "It was a
great experience for me. I made
great friends at the University of
Florida."
Dr. Sue Carey (DMD '85) was
a fellow classmate and had a new
baby at the time. The two bonded
and developed a lifelong friendship.
"Dian was one of the hard-
est working students in the class,"
Carey says. "It wasn't easy. We basi-
cally didn't sleep for four years.
Olah graduated and moved into
private practice in St. Petersburg
where she remained for 18 years,
enjoying a successful and satisfying
career. In 2001, with Stephanie (BA
'93) getting married and moving


22 FLORIDA
~----!









PROFILES


to the West Coast, Olah felt she
was ready to try something new.
She sold her practice, and to pay
the bills decided to go to work as
a contract dentist for the
federal government.
Over the next six years, :
she practiced her trade !'
across the U.S. and around
the world, from Mexico to
the Marshall Islands. She "-
did stints on nine differ- .
ent reservations. It was on
the reservations that Olah
found she could best utilize
her skills to help others.
Dental conditions there
are horrible, she says. Most
residents have drifted away
from their native diet, often drinking
soda and eating candy bars. There is
an overwhelming need for what she
calls "crisis dentistry." She worked
with many patients who had never
seen a dentist, and recalls one little


girl who had "never even seen a
white person."
One assignment that made a
lasting impact on her was on the


Navajo reservation near Shiprock,
N.M. There, she dealt with patient
after patient who spoke no English,
only the Navajo language. Still, she
was able to find a way to commu-
nicate, provide care and develop a


deeper relationship with many of
the people on the reservation. She
fondly recalls being invited to wit-
ness a Kinaalda ceremony, a sacred
Navajo ritual that marks the pas-
sage to adulthood.
In 2006 Olah moved to Beverly
Hills to be near her new grand-
daughter, Amelia Dell. That experi-
ence has been rewarding, as well,
but she's decided the reservation
is where she will finish her career.
She has a job waiting for her, on
the Zuni Reservation west of Albu-
querque, N.M. She plans to work
on the reservation during the week,
flying home on weekends to see her
family and continue her Beverly
Hills practice, too.
Carey, for one, isn't surprised.
"She's just the type of person
who is always thinking of others,"
she says. "I'm very proud to be able
to call her my friend."
Ted Geltner (MAMC '06)


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winter 2008 23


r















11falimnn i


HITrING THE BRICKS
ANSWERS FROM PAGE 9:

1) North side of Library
West
2) Weimer Hall atrium
includes "Art in the
Atrium" by UF professor
Richard Heipp
3) Turlington Hall
4) Welcome Center




24 FLORIDA


My Old School
Please join us in a walk down memory lane. We welcome your letters and photographs at Florida@uff.ufl.edu or at Florida
magazine, PO. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604-2425. Photos can be scanned and returned upon request.


It was September 1965 when
UF came into my life. From the mo-
ment I stepped into my room on the
fourth floor of Mallory Hall, a new
door and world opened for me.
Each year was unique, whether
it was eating at the College Inn,
going for your first drinks on Uni-
versity Avenue the night before you
turned 21 (you were legal then),
curfew, no curfew, juggling classes
or studying for exams.
When I started at UF, physical
education was required. My sec-
ond trimester, I signed up for golf,
which I thought would be fun as
my parents were both golfers. I had
to arrange rides to the University
Golf Course twice each week. My
dad bought me a used set of clubs
and new shoes. I was set for a new
adventure. I loved the game and
picked it up rather easily. The class
was fun with some instruction, but
many days we were just trying to
see how many holes we could walk
and play in the class period.
I was especially excited when the
coach asked me to represent UF in
the Senior College Divisions Fourth
Annual Florida Intercollegiate Golf
Tournament. Seven universities
and 28 women were competing.
UF didn't have a women's golf team
then. I was thrilled to be asked to
participate. There were only three
of us from UF who would be play-
ing. We jumped into the tourna-
ment with basically no training on
how a tournament works.
The day of the tournament,
I arrived anxious and nervous. I


changed clothes and prepared for
the game. Our competitors were
an experienced team. One girl even
had her own caddy. Imagine my
surprise as I walked out to the No.
1 tee and saw players teeing off
from the men's tees the white
tees. We had always played from
the women's tees red tees. (Golf-
ers will know there is a big differ-
ence in how the course plays. It
adds a lot of length and makes the
course significantly more difficult.)
All I was thinking was, "I've never
played from the white tees. No one
told me this!"
I was next on the tee. I nervously
walked up to the tee box and the
announcer called, "Charlene Stew-
art from the University of Florida."
I teed up my ball and took a prac-
tice swing. I took my trusty driver,
looked down the fairway and hit
the ball. I nailed it! The ball sailed
perfectly down the middle. All I was
thinking was, "Hurrah! I did it!"
I had made a wonderful 222-yard
drive. Later this won me third place
in the driving contest. While the
rest of the two-day tournament had
its ups and downs, that first drive al-
ways stands out as a special feeling.
In the years since graduating.
I have continued to be connected
to UE I worked for UF for many
years, had season football tickets
for years and even had my first date
with my husband. Richard, at the
Auburn game in 1992. Yes, we do
bleed orange and blue. Go, Gators!
Charlene Stewart Mixa (BSBA '69)
Oldsmar


My roommate at the university,
Tom Spencer, is still a best friend,
and we often meet and have lunch
in Alachua or Gainesville. He's a
great guy and has a wonderful fam-
ily who all live near Alachua.
George Ronald Wilcox (BSP '50)
Dunnellon

I was thrilled to find in your
summer 2007 Florida magazine the
photo that accompanied the article
by Harold Beard, "Don't Look
Down." This may be one of the
scarce visual records of how Grove
Hall appeared during my residence
there while I was a student at U of
E I am reasonably sure that Grove
Hall is the long two-storied build-
ing in the upper right edge of the
picture, since I distinctly remember
its relative location to Century
Tower and University Auditorium,
and also to Broward Hall, which I
assume is the building in the right
foreground.
I started at the university
in September 1956 and well
remember the first trek from
Grove Hall down to Broward Hall,
where we had to get our clean
sheers and towels every week.
Three oF the four years I lived in
25 Grove Hall and the last year
in 36 Grove Hall. I graduated
in January 1960 with a BA in
math and subsequently worked at
North American Aviation for a few
years. I then spent over 30 years
as an instrumentation engineer at
NASA's Flight Research Center
on Edwards AFB in the Mojave









Desert of California. I think I
heard somewhere that Grove Hall
was torn down the year after I
graduated ... the rumor was that
Grove Hall had been built during
World War II or even before.
PaulHarney (BA '60)
Lancaster, Calif

Reading the summer issue of
"My Old School," my student
number "75937," issued to me in
June '58 popped into my head.
That started me remembering the
$60 registration fees per semester
(no tuition) that included the year-
book and admission to all campus
events, such as the Kingston Trio
and Saturday football games. Dis-
creet brown bags carried into the
stadium helped us cheer the Gators
on to victory; FSU was always an
easy romp in those days. Alachua
County was dry except for 3.5 per-
cent beer so my '55 Chevy Bel-Air
hardtop made frequent trips across
the county line to buy adult bever-
ages for my fraternity brothers. And
also many short drives to Sam's
Tavern on 13th Street for a cold Bud
and the Kit Kat Club for dancing.
My first semester was spent
in Thomas Hall, the next in the
single-story wooden building
known as Grove Hall. It took me
seven semesters to go from 2UC
to 4BA, along the way I made the
dean's list. The 50-cent burgers at
Whatta Burger were huge, bigger
than the bun. Therewas a barbecue
joint several blocks from campus
that served pork ribs and goat meat;
three sauces were available: Hot,
Red Hot and Super Duper Saber
Jet. Albert lived in a chain-link pen
and occasionally moved; what year
was it that a visiting redneck foot-
ball player jumped into the pen and
killed Al by axing off his tail?
Can't forget Mrs. Manokian's
seamstress service on University
Avenue where a guy could get his
Madras shirt tailored into a form-
fitting shirt or have frayed col-
lars flipped over for three dollars;
Madras shirt, chinos with hinie-
binders, and penny loafers were
de rigueur (only basketball players
wore Converse sneaks).
Total student enrollment was
14,000 and the university officially


ended its segregation policy by ad-
mitting one male black student to
grad school. I had plenty of money
in those days as the government
paid me $110 tax-free monthly to
attend college under the Korean
GI Bill. New and used books were
cheap; a couple of bucks would buy
a good used one. It cost me three
bucks to fill-up my Chevy and
drive to pre-Disney Orlando to visit
my folks.
My sister and husband and five
kids lived in the old on-campus
wooden apartments called Flavet
Village for practically nothing. My
first job after graduation was at
Honeywell in Clearwater for $425
a month. I resigned from the job
and re-joined the Navy for pilot
training in Pensacola at $800 a
month. Important events include
meeting my wife, Jean Makemson
from Fort Lauderdale, in Decem-
ber 1977 and talking to the great
J. Wayne Reitz in Cedar Key one
hot Saturday afternoon. And those
great spring weekends at the Flagler
Beach Hotel. Those were the days,
my friend. We thought they'd never
end. Thanks, UF Thanks for the
great education and memories.
Joseph Smith (BSBA '62)
Newport, R.I.

The fear and trepidation as I
settled into my basement room
in Rawling Hall was almost over-
whelming. My parents could not
afford to take off work to deliver
me to Gainesville, so I hitched a
ride with a high school friend who
was beginning his sophomore year
at UE Feeling very much alone and
dejected, I began to stow away my
meager belongings one medium
sized suitcase! It seemed like every-
one else had steamer trunks and
family helping them to decorate
their rooms.
Upon opening the closet door,
I discovered a pea-green quilted
car-coat hanging inside and imme-
diately took it upstairs to an older
lady (her name escapes me) who
was working at the switchboard.
She thanked me for turning in the
coat and said she could place it in
lost and found.
I forgot all about the coat until
a cold snap hit a few months later. I


inquired about whether anyone had
ever claimed the coat. With a big
smile, this wonderful lady handed
me the coat and told me that it was
mine to keep! That coat got me
through four winters in Gainesville,
and to this day, I am convinced that
the switchboard operator somehow
knew I didn't own a winter coat
and probably never would while a
student. Rather than placing it in
the lost and found, she saved it for
when I would need it.
This was just the beginning of
many kind acts that were bestowed
on me during my years at the Uni-
versity of Florida. How lucky I was
to be a Florida Gator!
GailDuganne Gregg (BA '64)
Miami


U FAL U MNI


UF students in 1961 picket the College Inn, a once-popular hangout
across from campus that refused service to blacks.


This year marks the 50th anniversary of UF's integration.
Celebrate this historical milestone by sending in your
memories and photos.
E-mail submissions may be sent to Florida@uff.ufl.edu.
Photos mailed to Florida editors, P.O. Box 14425,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425 can be returned upon request.


winter 2008

___wint







Top .6|s



TEST YOUR CAMPUS KNOWLEDGE. GIVE YOURSELF TWO POINTS FOR EACH CORRECT MATCH. TALLY YOUR POINTS AND
CHECK YOUR CAMPUS CONNOISSEUR STATUS. DON'T PEEK THE ANSWERS ARE BELOW.


O Rolfs


0 Rhines


0 Ustler


0 Yon


o Benton


0 Carr


Q Williamson


* Walker


0 Rinker


,Farrior


From top left
are Rolfs,
Rhines, Ustler,
Williamson and
Rinker halls.


A. Originally the Women's Gym, it is now the Wom-
en's Studies building. The building is just south of
Murphree Hall.
B. The former athlete dormitory now houses various
administrative and graduate student offices. It is part
of Ben Hill Griffin Stadium.
C. This six-year-old building houses the building
construction program. It is located on Newell Drive
about a block south of Century Tower.
D. The Materials Science and Engineering Hall. It was
built in 1948 and remodeled in 1999. It is located
along Gale Lemerand Drive south of Ben Hill Grif-
fin Stadium.
E. Built in 1995, this building houses academic advising
and the University Athletic Association. It is tucked
between Dauer and Sledd halls along Fletcher Drive.
E This 1967 building houses the Electrical and Com-
puter Engineering program. It is located west of
Center Drive, which runs between Museum Road
and the J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center.
G. This 50-year-old building is located off the J.
Wayne Reitz Union lawn and serves the geology and
physics programs.
H. Named for UF's acclaimed turtle researcher, this
1974 building serves the botany and zoology pro-
grams. It can be found southeast of Dickinson Hall,
which was once the main Florida Museum of Natu-
ral History on Museum Road.
I. Originally the Horticulture Building, this 1927
building near Turlington Hall houses the Center
for Written and Oral Communication and is on the
National Register of Historic Places.
J. This 82-year-old building across the parking lot from
Tigert Hall houses the criminology, Jewish Studies
and anthropology programs.


20-17 Graduate Certified campus expert.
16-13 Senior Navi-Gator.
12-9 -Junior Doing swimmingly.
8-5 Sophomore -Just getting your feet wet.
4 or fewer Freshman Come back and visit UF to get reacquainted with campus.


How did
you do


3-01 '3-6 0 '-8 '9-L 'H-9 'F-S '"-V 'V- '"- 'I-1.
26 FLORIDA









GATORTALES


A Government-Issued Education


A GRATEFUL WENDELL KILPATRICK HASN'T FORGOTTEN HOW
MUCH THE GI BILL HELPED HIM AND HIS FAMILY.

By Wendell Kilpatrick (BSE '48, MS '49)


I joined the Army Air Corps after
high school in 1943 and married
Frances (BAE '70) in December of
that year. Upon enlistment I hoped
to become a pilot, but failed an eye
test along the way and was sent to
airplane mechanic's school. After
completion, my group and I were
sent to CBI (China, Burma and
India) to join the 98th Airdrome
Squadron. I served 18 months
overseas and almost equally in the
three countries. I was in Kunming,
China, when the two bombs were
dropped, thus ending the war with
Japan.
I arrived home on Dec. 19,
1945, to my family's welcome,
including my 11-month-old daugh-
ter, Linda, whom I was seeing for
the first time. Frances was teaching
elementary school then. So, we
decided to wait until June 1946 to
enter UF In the interim we lived in
a one-bedroom mobile home. The
bedroom had two single beds, each
adjacent to the side wall with an isle
in the middle. I rigged Linda's baby
bed mattress and springs with side
hangers to hang in the isle between
the bed rails. Of course, this rigging
was removed in daytime.
I towed the mobile home to
Gainesville and placed it in Mrs.
Home's trailer park on Masonic
Avenue within a short walking
distance to the UF campus. I had


"I THINK HISTORY WILL and bottling plant were on campus.
The cows were pastured in a large
RECORD THE GI BILL open acreage west of P.K. Yonge
AMONG THE BEST AND Laboratory School. We continued
to live in the mobile home until the
MOST FAR-REACHING BILLS initial opening of Flavet III. Our
family was the first to occupy our
EVER ENACTED BY THE U.S. assigned six-unit Flavet III build-
CONGRESS." ing. We selected a two-bedroom
unit on the ground floor. The rent
was $29, per month and I think the
driven to Gainesville earlier for electric bill was initially covered in
pre-enrollment, thus I began my the rent payment. The GI Bill paid
classes during the first of two sum- married veterans $90 per month
mer sessions in 1946. My thoughts and singles recei ed $60, plus tu-
were, "My future and that of my ition, books, etc. Later, these pay-
family depends on my making pass- ments were increased to $120 and
ing grades on the two courses I'm $90, respectively.
taking. Failure is unthinkable." I graduated with a bachelor's
Grades were posted on bulletin degree in education in June 1948,
boards near the UF post office by but I had one year of eligible GI
each student's ID number. I still schooling left. I immediately began
vividly remember the pressure I felt a master's program for a degree
as I looked on the board for my in school administration. My
number. My two grades were a B in bachelor's minor was in agricultural
each course. I was exhilarated, hap- science education. I arranged all my
pier with these two grades than any graduate school classes on Monday,
later, better ones. Wednesday and Friday and was
Soon, my student comfort level fortunate tpgeta job in Reddick,
s' Jipgrved enough that I felt com- near Ocaa, teaching a class of 12
fortable with a part-time job at ;S farming veteranson Tuesday and
the university milk bottling plant.., j j: Thursday-nighats; met the required
The pay was minimal but helpful home-site visitation requirements
in supplementing my GI pay. The byv isi ng six.vecerans on Tuesday
fringe benefit was great: free milk and six on Thrsday. I'm sure their
and ice cream to take hoqe after i motivation for class attendance was
work. At the time, the diary cows their GI pay. However, they were


very cooperative and helpful to me
in choosing subjects for two classes
per week. I became well acquainted
with the Alachua County Farm
Agent's office in researching class
subjects for discussion. I resigned
this position in June 1949 after I
graduated with a master's degree.
I close with my sincere thanks
to the federal government for
making my college education
possible. I think history will record
the GI Bill among the best and
most far-reaching bills ever enacted
by the U.S. Congress. My and my
family's quality of life was certainly
enriched by my college education,
as were all other veterans who
took advantage of this educational
opportunity. The U.S. government
has benefited greatly by the taxes
we veterans (collectively) have paid
to the treasury over many years.
The government made an excellent
investment in me with the GI
Bill. I've paid back its investment
many times over. I'm still paying
with absolutely no complaint. My
appreciation for the GI Bill remains
steadfast.
Wendell Kilpatrick spent 35years as
a school administrator, including 14
as director ofthe Florida Department
of Educations area office for federal
programs in Gainesville. He is retired
and lives in Huntsville, Ala., with his
wife of 64 years, Frances.


winter 2008 27







Stay

Connected

February
20 Florida Alumni Networking Seminar with students
in Gainesville
21-23 Back to College Weekend in Gainesville
23 Association of Black Alumni's Pre-Florida Invitational
Step Show Social in Gainesville
29-March 2 Sixth Annual SanDiego Gator Club ski trip


March
7-9

April
11
11-12





21

May
10
17

June
15-24
20-22


New England Gator Club Ski Expedition in Stowe, Vt.



Official Class Ring Ceremony in Gainesville
Spring Weekend in Gainesville
Young Alumni Awards
Silver Society induction of the 1983 class
UF Alumni Association's Orange and Blue Barbecue
Orange and Blue football scrimmage
Grad Bash in Gainesville


Fifth Annual Gator Guayabera Guateque in Miami
International Gator Day


Young Alumni Greek Isles trip
Key West Gator Club Dolphin Derby


To learn more about these and other UF Alumni Association events,
It's been just more than 20 years since the Computer Science Engineering building and the Mar- visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu, call 888-352-5866,352-392-1905 or e-mail
ston Science Library resembling conjoined twins near Century Tower opened their doors to ufalum@uff.ufl.edu.
students and researchers. www.ufalumni.ufl.edu

------------------ ------------------------------------------------ -----------------------------------------------------------------
Want to join the UF Alumni Association? Visit www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/membership to become a member and receive a host of benefits, including UF Today magazine.
Or, mail this coupon to the address at left to request information.


T I UNIVERSITY of
UFI FLORIDA
FLORIDA
University of Florida Alumni Association
Emerson Alumni Hall
P.O. Box 14425
Gainesville, FL 32604-2425


NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
PERMIT NO. 682
SO.FL
FLORIDA


Sl*elta*eltSSECRLOTi*41B-010
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MR. JAMES R. CLIFTON '89
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